atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

Chaahe koi khush ho chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

Posted on: December 5, 2011


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

“Aankhon Hi Aankhon Mein Ishaaraa Ho Gayaa”, this lovely melody remains etched in my heart, as my first introduction to a dashing young Dev Anand, as seen on a Doordarshan screening of the film CID (1956). Time would be sometimes early seventies, and as a pre teen kid I was in the home of a friend (we did not have a TV of our own), religiously attending the Sunday film session, that was the once a week diet of film viewing generally allowed to us kids.

Those were the days when the entire film was shown in two parts, spread over Saturday and Sunday. The magic of this man’s smile, with one tooth slightly crooked amplifying its enticement, and the shining bright eyes that backed up the emotion to the hilt. And suddenly, ‘. . . baitthe baitthe jeene ke sahaaraa ho gayaa’. Icon, idol, role model – I did not know these words at that time, and yet that is how this suave gentleman slipped into my life and became – my hero, the one word that I could surely relate with, at that age. After that anything Dev Anand, especially on TV, became an event. And the life was high if I could make that event, and the world was a bad and bitter place if I was made to miss that event.

A point in the mind’s sky that was unchanged for decades, the invincibility of the personality that bubbled with spontaneity and verve, giving a lie to what a normal life would term as age in years, and the world seemed a secure constant with just the knowledge that Dev Saab is there, and he continues to make films. I have seen many of his movies after Swami Dada, Return of Jewel Thief, and Awwal Number, but it was a gratification to continue reading about his new ventures, his tenacity to push the creative abilities to their limits, and then continue to hold out such a positive stance to life – it sure is an amazing accomplishment in itself. In an interview of recent times, he had said something to this effect, ‘I love my fans, and equally I love my critics – they talk and think about me’.

A career that has lasted 65 years – 65 years of productivity for which he once said himself, that he would hang up his boots and stop working the day he is not able to think of a tomorrow that is better than yesterday. Apparently, that day never arrived. Just weeks after the release of his latest production, ‘Chargesheet’, and with continued plans for newer projects on anvil, his tomorrows continued to better his yesterdays. And then suddenly a physical mechanism in the body gave in, making way for a speedy departure. He breathed his last (in London) on the night of 3rd December (UK time) which was very early morning of 4th December in India. (The first inkling I had was a message posted on this blog by Peevesie’s Mom, and then the news on internet). A fair part of today has been spent with the ‘Times Now’ channel on television. They have scrapped all their regular programming for today, and are telecasting a full day nonstop recap honoring this illustrious icon and a legend in his own lifetime. (On the other hand, a quick scan of the music and film related channels was most disappointing – no other channel was carrying anything more than a headline item.)

Many times over the past years, he has attributed his life’s philosophy to the famous song from Hum Dono (1961), “Mein Zindagi Ka Saath Nibhaataa Chalaa Gayaa” , especially highlighting the second line of this song, that says “Har Fikr Ko Dhu’en Mein Udaataa Chalaa Gayaa”. Or that all the life’s concerns and worries are blown away, like the smoke from a cigarette. But seven years earlier, he has already performed another song in the film ‘Taxi Driver’ (1954), that initiated and set this tone for his approach to life, namely

“Chaahe Koi Khush Ho, Chaahe Gaaliyaan Hazaar De
Mastram Ban Ke Zindagi Ke Din Guzaar De”

Let the naysayers be damned
Care not if someone is happy
Or they pile you with curses
Just be carefree, and live your life
The way you want it to be

An approach that underscores this philosophy of life even better than the song from ‘Hum Dono’. For in this life, there will always be those who would applaud you, and there will always be those who would denounce you; ignoring them both, just lead your life the way you want to. A philosophy that he abided by all his life. In 1965, when his magnum opus, ‘Guide’ was getting ready for release, a fairly large number of his friends and critics alike condemned this film as a failure in advance, and predicted that the release of that film would be a professional suicide for Dev Saab (and for Waheeda ji) – that at the peak of his career and popularity, he was daring a subject that was taboo, viz. the lead character having an amorous relationship with a married woman. But dare he did, and the film proved to be one of his greatest hits, and over the decades, is arguably labeled as the best movie ever to hit the Hindi silver screen. Or that after the unmitigated disaster that was Prem Pujari (1970), his maiden directorial venture, he followed it up with a cult classic that is “Hare Rama, Hare Krishna” (1971) that became a phenomenal success story, besides launching the career for Zeenat Aman. And continue he did, with film projects one after another, caring not that the commercial success of his creations continued to dwindle. Aside from the likes of “Des Pardes” (1978) and “Man Pasand” (1980), there is not a real commercial success he can claim, but he continued to tackle themes off the beaten track with films like “Anand Aur Anand” (1984), “Censor” (2001) and “Mr. Prime Minister” (2005), besides continuing to attempt romantic themes as in “Main Solah Baras Ki” (1998) and “Love At Times Square” (2003) and the stock crime thrillers as in “Swami Dada” (1982), “Sachhe Ka Bol Baalaa” (1989), “Lashkar” (1989), “Sau Crore” (1991), “Return of Jewel Thief” (1996), and his newest offering “Chargesheet” (2011), which was released in September earlier this year. The list is impressive, considering that a major part of the films mentioned above came to life when Dev Saab was already past the 60 milestone.

But commercial success notwithstanding, his image as the heart throb of 50s and 60s continues to remain alive in the minds and hearts of generations after generations of moviegoers. This has been helped in no small measure by his indefatigable zest for continuing to work with positive energy, and continuing to stay in the limelight by releasing yet one more film every time his friends and critics alike would assume that he would now hang up his boots, and always kept them wondering where in the heck he raises finances for his films, given that he is making no money on most of them. And the stature and credibility that he yet commanded in the industry is apparent from the star line ups for his films. Aamir Khan, whose career got a significant fillip through the film “Awwal Number” (1990), a film in the genre of sports-cum-crime-thriller relates the following. His film “Qayaamat Se Qayaamat Tak” (1988) was well on its way to success, when one day he got a call from his father. His father said that Dev Saab had called, and has offered to include him (Aamir Khan) in the star cast for “Awwal Number”, and that he had already said yes, on Aamir’s behalf. When Aamir objected that he had not even seen the script, his father said it is OK, when Dev Saab calls and makes an offer, other considerations are secondary.

A towering giant has walked past the horizon, and a dynamo is stilled. But that twinkling smile and the glint in the eyes is a vision forever. The image of Dev Saab and Shakila, cheeks pressed to a tree, faces a few inches apart, with Shakila saying “. . . achhaa toh ye dil hamaaraa ho gayaa” – that evening many decades ago, in that living room full of invited and un-invited guests watching this play on the TV screen, a small pre teen kid lost his heart, forever, to this gracious and debonair young man – young forever.

Coming to this song, the film “Taxi Driver” (1954) is a crime thriller from the banner of Navketan, produced by Dav Saab himself, and directed by his elder brother Chetan Anand. Impressive star cast includes Dev Anand, Kalpana Kartik, Sheila Ramani, Johnny Walker, Bhagwan Sinha, Rashid Khan, MA Latif, Krishna Dhawan, Brahm Bhardwaj, Hamid Sayani and many more. The credit for lyrics is Sahir Ludhianvi and the music composition is by SD Burman. I have written before about the magic of music that has been created together by SD Burman and Navketan, and this film is indeed an immaculate example – with as many as eight fantastic gems, each of them having an iconic status in music selections. Six of these songs are already present on this blog (i.e. counting as two, the song “Jaayen To Jaayen Kahaan” which is performed twice in the film). This seventh offering is a typical Dev Anand fun song, that is hallmark of many of his films from the 50s and early 60s. The singing voices are those of Kishore Kumar and Johnny Walker, supported by the chorus of the crew accompanying them on this binge.

Kalpana Kartik, a naïve village belle has entered into Dev’s life and has exited once. Things are not going well for him, and he is on the verge of losing his driving license, his only means of livelihood. And yet the response of this carefree and freewheeling taxi driver is ‘Gham ki aisi taisi’ (let the sorrows be damned). He embarks on to a day of fling and fun with his mates, to spend the last five rupees he possesses. This particular video clip includes a brief lead in portion that sets the tone for the song picturization.

A very interesting note regarding the song availability. I very clearly remember when I saw this film for the first time on Doordarshan, this song was presented complete in the film, with 3 antaraas. And that was the last time I saw, or even heard the complete song, ever. Later in the 80s, when I would initiate my collection, whichever source I turned to for acquiring this song, all had only two antaraas, with just one line from the missing first antaraa in the song. I tried VHS, I tried the original audio cassettes released by HMV, or the pirated versions from the gray market. I bought the disc as soon as it became available, and I even saw this film at every opportunity when I could, as it was screened as re-runs in the theatres. But all had the same parts missing. It seems that some original print was edited, for reasons of defective film portion or otherwise, and then that original print became the source for all subsequent VHS, VCD, DVD, and audio cassette releases. And the first antaraa is lost forever. It is only very recently, actually just some weeks back, that I was able to track down the original 78rpm record for this song, and heaved a sigh of relief as I am now in the possession of the complete audio of this song, at least. The video still remains elusive, and will have to wait to see if a different original film print emerges somewhere. I have published online, both the video clip (for including the interesting lead in portion) and the complete audio and these links are included below. I can daresay that the complete audio is a very rare find, and published first time online.

So tune in and enjoy this fun filled fallacy of a song, that derides the customary pursuits of life – phony happiness through material possessions, and challenges the sorrows, professing a life that is carefree and worry-less. Very much the life that Dev Saab led, in reality.

Dev Saab, in all the yesterdays, and in all the coming tomorrows, there never was and never will be another one like you.

Adieu and bon jour.

gham ki aisi taisi

Let the sorrows be damned

gham ek rog hai, insaan ke tan badan ke liye
jo chain chaahe, toh kaudi na rakh kafan ke liye

Sorrow is a malady for the man’s mind and body
If contentment is desired
Then don’t even retain a paisa
Not even for your own burial garment
(NOTE: ‘kaudi’ is a unit of money that was prevalent before 1947, in the northern states. It used to be the smallest unit in the order of rupiya, anna, pie, damdi, kaudi. Kaudi literally is also the name for shells that are white in color and small in size, no larger than a thumbnail. These shells are the dice used in the traditional game of chausar (or chaupar), and hence became a unit of exchange in terms of betting and bidding in the game.)

chaahe koi khush ho chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de
mast ram ban ke zindagi ke din guzaar de

Let the naysayers be damned
Care not if someone is happy
Or they pile you with curses
Just be carefree, and live your life
The way you want it to be

pee ke dhaandli karoon to mujh ko jail bejh do
soonghne me kyaa hai ye jawaab thhaanedaar de

O mister police officer
You can send me to jail
If am drunk and creating a ruckus
But just smelling it (the wine)
Is it a crime in law? Do answer me please.

bhaav agar badhaa bhi daale sethiaa to gham na kar
khaaye jaa mazey ke saath jab talak udhaar de

Well if the trader is raising the prices, don’t be distressed
So long as he sells on credit
Enjoy life; eat and be merry

baant kar jo khaaye us pe apne jaan-o-dil lutaa
jo bachaaye maal us ko jooti’on ka haar de

Let your heart and your life be beholden
For a buddy who shares his food with you
But for him, who scrimps and keeps safe his things
Be sure to present him with a garland of shoes

Video

Audio

Song-Chaahe koi khush ho chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de (Taxi Driver)(1954) Singers-Kishore Kumar, Johny Walker, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhianvi, MD-S D Burman
Chorus=Fuchsia

Lyrics

arre gham ki aisi taisi
harrep
gham ki aisi taisi
nahin nahin

hyun. . .un. . .un. . .un. . .un
gham
hee hee heee haaaaaa
gham ek rog hai
kyaa boltey ho
insaan ke tan badan ke liye
heyyy
sa re ga ma pa dha ni sa
kyaa fitkari maari hai
mast hai

hahahaha
haaan jo chain chaahe
heyyy. . .yyy. . .yyy. . .yyy. . .yyy. . .yyy. . .yyyyy
toh kaudi na rakh kafan ke liye
haaan
to ye panjaa idhar laa bhai
haa haaa haaa haaa haaaa

chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de
mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arre mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

[nonsense expressions in chorus that I am unable to decipher :) ]

chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arre mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

pee ke dhaandli karoon
to mujh ko jail bhej do
soonghne mein kyaa hai
ye jawaab thhaanedaar de

pee ke dhaandli karen
to hum ko jail bhej do
soonghne me kyaa hai
ye jawaab thhaanedaar de
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

yeyyy haaa haaa haaa haaa

bhaav agar badhaa bhi daale sethiaa to gham na kar
bhaav agar badhaa bhi daale sethiaa to gham na kar
arre khaaye jaa mazey ke saath
jab talak udhaar de
khaaye jaa mazey ke saath
jab talak udhaar de
bhaav agar badhaa bhi daale sethiaa to gham na kar
khaaye jaa mazey ke saath
jab talak udhaar de
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arrey mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

[sound of air escaping from the car tyre]
arre tere ki
hawaa nikal gayee

jack lagaao
click click click click
stepney
pahiyyaa
arrey pumping

heyyyyyy
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arre mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

baant kar jo khaaye
us pe apne jaan-o-dil lutaa
baant kar jo khaaye
us pe apne jaan-o-dil lutaa

arre jo bachaaye maal
us ko jooti’on ka haar de
jo bachaaye maal
us ko jooti’on ka haar de
baant kar jo khaaye
us pe apne jaan-o-dil lutaa
jo bachaaye maal
us ko jooti’on ka haar de
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arrey mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de
mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de
chaahe koi khush ho
chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de

arre mast ram ban ke
zindagi ke din guzaar de

mast raam
mast raam
arre mast raam
mast raam
arre mast mast mast mast mast mast mast raam
o mast raam
o mast raam
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam
haaye haaye
o mast raam

[again, the sound of air escaping from the car tyre]
arre tere ki
phir hawaa nikal gayee

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5 Responses to "Chaahe koi khush ho chaahe gaaliyaan hazaar de"

What an outstanding tribute to Dev saab, Sudhirji!
Absolutely LOVED reading this.
I can sense the love and respect for Dev saab coming through. What a fine character he was – entertaining us for so many decades. And importantly, setting an example to millions of how to live life.

I have been limited in my net access the last few days – therefore not been here much. But it was a real pleasure to read this today. Made my day. Thank you very much.

Very good choice of song too. I’ve seen Taxi Driver – liked it too. It is a Dev saab classic.

Raja ji,

Thanks for your kind appreciation. Dev Saab has been my idol and my favorite film personality almost all my life. As a person and as a film maker, there are very few parallels that one can find. No one is really immortal, but his life, his untiring pursuit as a film maker and the philosophy by which he lived, it always appeared as if he would be going on and on and on for many more years.

A great loss indeed.
RIP

Rgds
Sudhir

Taxi Driver is one of my favorite Dev Sahab films too, and that’s saying something because I love most of his films :) This is lovely, and thank you so much for sharing the full audio of the song. What a treat!

Would you kindly reply post here the link for the audio recording of the usually missing first antara for the song chaahe koi khush ho, already posted online by Sudhir ji as mentioned in this wonderful tribute to Dev Saheb and the music of Navketan films under the leadership of SD Burman Da? Many Thanks to Atul and Sudhir ji for the post and reply.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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