atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

Chali Radhe raani ankhiyon mein paani

Posted on: May 1, 2012


“Upar Gagan Vishaal, Neeche Gehraa Pataal” – the unforgettable sound from the film ‘Mashaal’ (1950). The words carry a thrill – they have been written by Kavi Pradeep. The music is an uplifting exuberant melody – composed by SD Burman. And voice, the sound of which will make one sit up or even stand up – such is the strong conviction and the deep exhortation that one feels on listening to it – the singing voice is the deep, strong and bass-ful voice of Manna Dey. The song that set this young singer on the path to popularity and success.

Today, Manna Da is 93. And today we have a very special celebration for this very special, and a very enduring singer in the industry – this is the 200th song for Manna Da, to be posted here on this blog. He completes his double century of songs on this blog. Hearty double congratulations to Manna Da and all his fans.

And before I proceed further with the rest of this piece on Manna Da and this wonderful song in Baul tradition, let me take a minute to celebrate another very significant milestone for this blog. Regulars would be very familiar with a small box in the right hand side of the blog page, which is titled “Total visits so far”. Well, the day we hit the 5900 song landmark, that day this visits counter hit the 3 million mark. An individual effort, and without any formal PR or hype about it, this number is a very major achievement for this blog and for Atul ji in particular. I simply cannot cease to marvel at his energy and dedication for this activity. And this landmark of 3 million visits is a grand vindication of his vision and his hard work. Congratulations, congratulations, congratulations – Atul ji. I am happy and proud to be associated with yourself and the entire team of contributors pushing forward this great project.

Born Prabodh Chandra Dey in 1919 to Puran Chandra Dey and Mahamaya Devi, the name Manna was given to him when he was a child, by his uncle, the great KC Dey. The name stuck to the mind of everyone in the family, and everyone started calling him Manna. Later, when he became active in music and films, once again his uncle advised him to continue to use Manna as his name. I wonder whether the name PC Dey appearing in the film or record credits as singer / musician would have had the same appeal. Don’t know. But it is really interesting to note that for a short time in the period 1945-47, there are some recordings he made, in which the original 78 rpm record carries the name Prabodh De. (When I read this, I was intrigued. I checked out the Geet Kosh for singer names in the films for this period, and sure enough, I was able to locate one entry at least. In the film ‘Dil’ (1946), there are two songs for which the singer name is listed as Prabodh Dey.)

The influence of his uncle KC Dey on his life, his education and his career cannot be emphasized enough. His uncle, being a luminary in the field of music in his time, and one of the pioneers of background singing in films, was visited by other great singers and musicians, almost on a daily basis. And also, accompanying him, the young Manna had the opportunity to visit New Theatres and was able to observe closely, the famous names in action – Siagal Saab, Pankaj Babu (Mullick), Jamuna Devi, Kanan Devi, Nitin Bose, Prithviraj Kapoor, Pahari Sanyal et al. This constant exposure did have an influence on the young mind of Manna, who was contemplating a career in law, but then decided to follow his uncle’s footsteps.

In 1940, when KC Dey decided to move to Bombay, Manna Da was the preferred choice to accompany him. Given the visual inability of his uncle, he was required to be with him all the time. And this turned out to be a great blessing, for he went everywhere with him, met everyone that his uncle met, and was a constant audience to his discussions, his rehearsals, and his performances. As per Manna Da himself, the years of companionship with his uncle were the best education and training he had. No doubt he went to learn music at the feet of many other renowned musicians – Ustad Dabeer Khan, Ghulam Mustafa Khan, Pt. Tulsi Das Sharma, Ustad Abdurrahim Khan, and more. Still the time of his companionship with his uncle was the best learning he had.

In 1942, KC Dey composed the music for film ‘Tamanna’. A beggar’s song was in preparation, “Jaago Usha Aayee. . .”. On screen, it was visualized as being sung by an old man and a child girl. KC Dey selected Manna Da’s voice to sing for the old man. For the child girl, KC Dey wanted to have a child singer. The search resulted in Suraiyyaa becoming the co-singer with Manna Da for this song. Manna Da still remembers with a smile on his face that the young Suraiyyaa was standing on a stool besides him, when the recording was done. Although this song was Manna Da’s first recorded song, the first song that appeared in a released film is from the 1943 production ‘Ram Rajya’. The song “Ajab Vidhi Ka Lekh Kisi Se Padhaa Nahin Jaaye” sung by Manna Da, is already represented on this blog.

After these two notable films, he continued to get some singing assignments, but nothing remarkable was happening. He worked as an assistant to Hari Prasanna Das, and sang for some films. But he was getting typecast as a singer for mythological films. In the late 40s, he was already contemplating returning to Calcutta. And then 1950 came, and with it came the phenomenal success of “Upar Gagan Vishaal”

After this song, Manna Da came into limelight – more and better assignments started to come his way.

The Bombay Talkies film, ‘Tamaasha’ (1952) had been a long time in the making. The music composition was under the charge of Khemchand Prakash. The song “Khaali Peeli Kaahe Ko Akkhaa Din. . .” was assigned to Manna De. During one of the rehearsal sessions with Khemchand Prakash and Manna Da, the young and very energetic Kishore Kumar joined them. After the rehearsal, Kishore requested Manna Da to teach him the song, and he did. After his preparation, Manna Da was so impressed by Kishore’s rendition, that he convinced Khemchand Prakash to let Kishore do that song. And thus, young Kishore got this song and also an acting role in the film. In Manna Da’s own words, the times then were different. The competition was healthy and not cut throat, and professional jealousy was a rare vice. Each song was preceded with days of rehearsals. Since the final recording had to be in a single session, hence everything had to be perfect. This gave an opportunity for the artists to spend a lots of time with each other. It was commonplace to commend a good performance from another artist, and also to point out slip ups and errors. He remembers with awe, the amount of days taken to rehearse the qawwaali from film ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960) – “Naa To Kaarvan Ki Talaash Hai. . . Ye Ishq Ishq Hai” and then it’s phenomenal final recording for 13 minutes nonstop. A lesson for the later generations. With the coming of multi track technology, the artist performing together need not even record together at the same time. A hundred marks for technology, but what a downside for team work and companionship.

Sulochana De, wife of Manna De, belongs to a Kerala family, although she herself is born and brought up in Bombay. As a young child, Sulochana ji fell in love with Rabindra Sangeet, and with some training, was an aspiring singer herself in the early 50s. And it was Rabindra Sangeet that brought them together. They would meet each other in live programs in Bombay. What started as casual meetings, resulted in the two becoming life partners. Manna Da acknowledges the key role she has played in his life and career. One episode is really notable. The time when Manna Da was signed up for the film Basant Bahaar (1956), and his humble disinclination to sing with Pt. Bhimsen Joshi is well known. The song is “Ketaki Gulaab Juhi Champak Ban Phoole”. Sulochana ji narrates that Manna Da’s disinclination to sing opposite to Pt. Bhimsen Joshi was so acute that he actually planned to leave Bombay and just disappear for two three weeks. Then it was Sulochana ji who counseled him and convinced him to perform. After all, the two singers would be singing their own parts. She convinced him not to consider this as a competition with a respected senior, although that’s what the script intended this duet to be. She reasoned with him to take this as a ‘jugalbandi’ opportunity, and not be concerned about the script. Then Manna Da agreed to do this song.

In a career that starts seventy years ago in 1942, and still continues for Manna Da himself has never announced his retirement. His last recorded song is in the film ‘Prahaar’ (1991). He is still open to sing in the films (a statement made about a decade ago). During this period, he has recorded almost 2900 songs in 19 different languages. And in his career, he has composed music for 15 films. Three years ago, in 2009, he was honored with the prestigious Dada Saheb Phalke Award for lifetime contribution to the Indian Cinema.

Wishing Manna Da good health, and many more years of musical journey.

Coming to this song and the film ‘Parineeta’ (1953). The presence of contemporary and classical literature in Indian cinema is conspicuous by its absence. The percentage of films based in literary works is really few and far between. ‘Parineeta’ is a delightful exception in that sense. This novel by Sarat Chandra Chatterjee has been made into a film at least three times on the Hindi screen, and twice in Bangla. It is a very poignant tale of love that endures for decades, and yet it goes unrequited, unacknowledged for a long, long time. This 1953 version was produced by Ashok Kumar, under his own banner, Ashok Kumar Productions, and is directed by the redoubtable Bimal Roy. The star cast is impressive and includes Ashok Kumar, Meena Kumari, Asit Baran, Baby Sheela, Nazir Hussain, Om Prakash, Badri Prasad, Protima Devi, Rekha, Manju, Manorama, S Bannerji, Naina, Sarita, Bikram Kapoor, Sailen Bose, Samar Chatterjee, Colin Paul, Gunjan, Radheyshyam, Baby Rehana etc. The lyrics are penned by Bharat Vyas and music is composed by Arun Kumar Mukherkjee.

A song in “Baul” tradition of Bengal, is almost a necessary part of the films that based in that region. This wonderful, earthy and melodious music from the wandering minstrels in Bengal, has found a special place for itself in the annals of Indian Music and also in the Indian Cinema. This genre of music was created by nonconformists, who rejected the traditional norms, and upheld music as their religion. The origin of the word “Baul” is interesting. Etymologically, it links to “vyakul” (restless) in Sanskrit, and thence to “baawla” (madcap) in the more familiar Hindi / Bengali that is in daily usage.

The members of this unique group are completely devoted to music and music only in life. It is their only sustenance, and the singers lead the life of wandering ascetics, having denounced the society and its material trappings. Their words and music is the only emotion that they know, and their singing is their way to connect with the Supreme One, whether inside the heart, or in His universal manifestation. I am sure the readers of this blog will easily recall many songs from Hindi films, that are from the pure “Baul” tradition, from films like ‘Devdas’ (1955), ‘Pyaasa’ (1957), ‘Bandini’ (1963) etc.

The story is set at the turn of last century. The story is of an orphan girl, Lalita (Meena Kumari), who stays with her uncle Gurucharan Babu (Nasir Hussain). Her uncle has a small paying job as a clerk, and has 5 daughters of his own. He is physically and financially exhausted, in efforts to marry off his daughters, and arrange for the dowry for each one of them. Nabin Roy (Badri Prasad) is a rich neighbor, and Gurucharan borrows money from him also. Initially the relations between the families are very good. Shekhar (Ashok Kumar) is Nabin Roy’s son. Lalita and Shekhar are very close friends, from childhood itself. As they come of age, Lalitha becomes aware of her emotions and infatuation with Shekhar. However, the two families are socially far apart from each other, both in terms of caste as well as status. Enter another character, Girin (Asit Baran), who is another distant relative and belongs to Brahmo Samaj. Girin helps Gurucharan to pay off his loans and set his home in order. Unwittingly, Shekhar starts to feel a jealousy for Girin. Misunderstandings happen as the Nabin Roy household mistakenly starts to believe that Girin is helping Gurucharan for the sake of Lalita. A triangle develops between the three characters. Girin convinces Gurucharan to join the Brahmo Samaj, and get away from the evils of dowry. This move so enrages Nabin Roy that he builds a high wall between his house and his neighbor’s. Lalita loses access to Nabin Roy’s household, and characteristically, she is unable to express herself to Shekhar. Misunderstandings multiply leading to a tragic end.

This song is a quintessential Baul song in its most traditional form, being performed on screen by an old, bearded mendicant with just the one stringed instrument with him. In the film, there are two versions of the song, one happy version and one sad version. The happy version is in the times when things are going well between Lalita and Shekhar, and the occasion for the song is a lover’s tiff. The sad version of the song is performed later in the film when the misunderstandings have magnified between the lovers and the families.

The words by Bharat Vyas are simply sublime. Taking a leaf from the divine pastimes of Krishna and Radha, he has weaved a song so beautiful and so appropriate for the story line. Rendering by Manna Da is simply coming from the heart. In the sad version, when he starts with the call ‘Raadhe’, the sound just descends inside and brings a lump in the throat.

(NOTE: Acknowledgements are due specifically to the interview with Manna De and Sulochana De, published in Listener’s Bulletin 116, August 2001.)

(Happy version)

(Sad version)

Song-Chali Radhe rani ankhiyon mein paani (Parineeta) (1953) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Arun Kumar Mukherji

Lyrics
———————
Happy Version
———————
chali Raadhe raani,
ankhiyon mein paani
chali Raadhe raani,
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani,
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
maan bhari,
abhimaan bhari
maan bhari,
abhimaan bhari
nirmohi se,
nirmohi se naataa todke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani

o o,
Jamunaa ke tat pe,
bansi ke bat pe
natkhat ne usko gher liyaa
dekho natkhat ne usko gher liyaa
ghoonghat ke pat se jhaank ke jhatpat
Raadhaa ne bhi munh pher liyaa
ho dekho Raadhaa ne bhi munh pher liyaa
baaton hi baaton mein jhagdaa bhayaa aisaa
baaton hi baaton mein jhagdaa bhayaa aisaa
baanhon ke bandhan todke
ho chali baanhon ke bandhan todke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani,
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani

chhaliyaa Mohan,
Raadhe bholi
chhaliyaa Mohan,
Raadhe bholi
saanwariyaa ne ki jo thhitholi
saanwariyaa
saanwariyaa
saanwariyaa ne ki jo thhitholi
na kuchh doli,
na kuchh boli
Raadhe na kuchh doli,
na kuchh boli
na hi do ankhiyaan kholi
na hi do ankhiyaan kholi
laakh manaaye koi,
maane na maani,
laakh manaaye koi,
maane na maani,
madhuban ki galiyaan chhodke
ho, chali Madhuban ki galiyaan chhodke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani,
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa modke
chali Raadhe raani

———————-
Sad Version
———————-
Raadhe
Raadhe. . . . aay aay
aay. . .
chali Raadhe raani
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
chali raadhe raani

chhod ke bachpan wo rangraliyaan
chhod ke Gokul ki ye kunj galiyaan
aan aan aan
chhod ke bachpan wo rangraliyaan
chhod ke Gokul ki ye kunj galiyaan
chhod ke Mohan ki meethhi muraliyaa
aa aa aa
chhod ke Mohan ki meeththi muraliyaa
nain’an ka naata tod ke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
chali raadhe raani
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
chali Raadhe raani

din dhalaa hui sandhyaa ki belaa
din dhalaa hui sandhyaa ki belaa
band huaa dekho madhuban ka melaa
Raadhaa akeli
ee ee
Mohan akelaa
Raadhaa akeli Mohan akelaa
khel vidhaata ne kaisa khelaa
aa
birhaa ka ye deep chhod ke
chali Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
chali Raadhe raani
ankhiyon mein paani
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
apne Mohan se mukhdaa mod ke
chali Raadhe raani

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10 Responses to "Chali Radhe raani ankhiyon mein paani"

Sudhir ji,
Thank you for a very absorbing,interesting and informative post-as usal !
-AD

3 million hits! Congrats Atul, and on building such a wonderful and vibrant community here :) And nice post, Sudhirji!

Thanks a lot ! Each of your comments is worth a million hits to us.

There is another interseting thing here. MD Arun Kumar Mukherjee was a cousin of Ashok Kumar who was the producer of this film. Sadly, Arun died early otherwise we would have heard more gems from him. Another song in Boul tradition was from the film DEVDAS — Aan milo aan milo.

Select any song from this movie ! It is super excellent. All are literatured, as that of the novel is.

The actor who plays the old sage is Radheshyam in one of his earliest (if not the earliest) appearances.

Such a beautiful song. Manna Dey is my favorite singer.

Atul and other contributors of this blog (me too) Many Congratulations.

3 million hits!!! I missed that milestone. Congrats, Atul. Shows how popular this site is.

Audio clip of ‘chale radhe raani’ sung by Geeta Dutt: http://youtu.be/1b4wt-r_7tg

The uploader seems to have recorded the song from a radio programme and says that it is a version song not included in the film.

Yes, I dont think this song featured in the movie or on the soundtrack. Its interesting though to hear it in a female voice.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than six years. This blog has over 10200 songs post by now.

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