atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

Prem jogan ban ke

Posted on: April 2, 2014


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

A young sarangiya (sarangi player) from Lahore becomes the sarangi accompanist to some of the female singers such as Inayatbai, Hirabai, Akhtaribai (Begum Akhtar) etc in their concerts in the late 1920s for a living. In such concerts, he also sings thumris composed by his uncle as fillers during breaks.

Soon, he begins to feel restless as his wish is to become a classical vocalist just like his uncle who has taught him both sarangi and vocal music. He also dislikes playing second fiddle in concerts. In one of the concerts of Hirabai in early 30s, instead of fine tuning his sarangi before the start of the concert, he keeps his sarangi aside and starts singing a thumri. The audience is amused but appreciative of his singing. They want him to sing more thumris. He accedes to the audience’s wishes and sings more thumris. This enrages Hirabai as the young sarangiya had encroached upon her territory. Soon arguments ensue between the two and in the heat of the moment, the young sarangiya takes a vow that he would never touch sarangi in future. He rushes back to Lahore and becomes the disciple of Ustad Ashiq Ali Khan of Patiala Gharana to be trained as a vocalist. After a rigorous training of more than 5 years, he participates in a musical concert organised at the time of All India Music Conference at Calcutta (Kolkata) in 1938 where his singing is much appreciated. A new star vocalist in Hindustani classical music comes into the horizon.

The young sarangiya was none other than Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan.

Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan ( 02/04/1902 – 25/04/1968), who is often called ‘the Tansen of 20th century’, was born in Kasur town near Lahore. His father Ali Bux Khan was a singer. During his childhood, Bade Ghulam Ali Khan learnt sarangi and vocal from his uncle Ustad Kaley Khan. At the age of 21, he became the sarangi accompanist to female singers, travelling to Lucknow, Banaras, Calcutta, Bombay, Hyderabad etc. Sometime, he would sing in the concerts the compositions of his uncle Ustad Kaley Khan. In the early 1930s, realising the stature of vocalists and singers in the concerts as against the musicians accompanying them and also due to the incidence narrated above, he decided to give up sarangi and concentrate only to be a vocalist. He became the disciple of Ustad Ashiq Ali Khan in 1932 and later Ustad Akhtar Hussain Khan, both of Patiala Gharana. In the same year, he lost his wife Allah Jiwai. At that time, he composed an immortal Bhairavi thumri yaad piya ki aaye , turning his grief into a melody. This thumri made him very popular in the Indian sub-continent which later became one of his trade mark thumri. By early 1940s, he had already established himself as one of the finest vocalists of Hindustani classical music.

After partition, he decided to settle down in Lahore which was near his home town of Kasur. The restrictive atmosphere for music during those days in Pakistan and the popularity and adulations he received in India made him to visit India quite often for concerts. In fact, during 1951-1957, he spent a major part of his time in India. In 1957, he approached Morarji Desai, the then Chief Minister of Bombay (comprising the present day Gujarat and Maharashtra states) for getting a permanent immigration visa for India. Morarji Desai not only helped him in getting Indian citizenship in 1957, he also provided him a bungalow at Malabar Hill for his stay in Bombay (Mumbai). In 1963, he shifted his base to Kolkata as he was frequently invited to sing in the concerts there. Later, on an invitation from Nawab Zahir Yar Jung, he shifted to Hyderabad to stay in Nawab’s Bashirbaug Palace which he continued to stay until his death in April 1968. He always used to say that this country would never have been divided if Hindustani classical music was taught to one child in every home.

As it used to happen during the early phases of the singing careers of some of the classical singers like Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Amir Khan and even Begum Akhtar, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan was reluctant to record his singing for issue of discs. He would give excuses to postpone the recording schedules. The fact of the matter was that all these classical singers were under the mistaken notion that recording their singing through the microphone would weaken their lungs and thus shorten their singing careers. He was coaxed continuously and needed to be tackled in a sensitive manner to agree for recordings. Similarly, he was averse to singing in films presumably under the belief that singing for films would bring down his stature as a classical vocalist. During his entire singing career, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan sang only two songs- both for ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960).

There is a trivia as to how he was roped in to sing two songs in ‘Mughal-e-Azam. K Asif, the producer-director was keen that Bade Ghulam Ali Khan lends his voice to Surendra in the role of Tansen. Both K Asif and Naushad, the music director of the film approached Ustad for recording two songs for his film which he flatly refused. K Asif was not a person to accept a ‘no’ to his proposal. He relentlessly pursued and cajoled Ustad to agree to sing for his film. Tired of his constant persuasions, Ustad finally agreed to sing two songs provided he was paid Rs.25000/- per song. He quoted this excessive fees solely to discourage K Asif from engaging him for singing in his film since the top playback singers of that time like Lata Mangeshkar and Mohammed Rafi were being paid Rs.500/- per song those days. However, K Asif not only agreed at once to his terms, he also said that his singing was more precious than any amount of money. The two songs – ‘shub din aayo raj dulara’ and ‘prem jogan ban ke sundari’ were recorded in his voice and were retained in the film. Incidentally, Surendra who was one of the top singing actor of the 40s had the privilege of lip syncing in the voices of two of the top most vocalists of Hindustani classical music – Ustad Amir Khan in ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952) and Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan in ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960).

As a vocalist, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan excelled in all the genres of Hindustani classical music. But he became popular for his thumri renditions. He sang most of his thumris with shorter aalaps and vilambits (slow tempo) to make them interesting for audience at large. The purists of Hindustani classical music criticised him for diluting the chastity of classical compositions. But he was unfazed by the criticism by countering them that the days of leisurely rendering of classical music in royal courts was over and we are singing in public concerts where time at the disposal of the audience was limited. He was a firm believer that folk music was the origin of Hindustani classical music. Those who had attended his concerts recall how he would demonstrate his classical renditions comparing them with folk music. Under the pen name of ‘Sabrang’, he composed many songs and bandishes of his own. Hari om tatsat, a bhajan which he sang in raag pahadi in khayal style was one of his own compositions. When asked as to what made this bhajan so popular, he replied that he became one with the God whenever he rendered this bhajan. His other popular thumris are yaad piya ki aaye, kya karoon sajni aaye na baalam and naina more taras rahe aaja balam pardesi.

In recognition of his contribution to Hindustani classical music, Government of India honoured him with Padma Bhushan Award in 1962. In the same year, he also got Sangeet Natak Akadamy Award.

Sometime in early 1960s, he was afflicted by a paralysis attack restricting his movements and resulted in him performing in lesser number of concerts. During this period, his younger son Ustad Munawwar Ali Khan, himself a classical vocalist, accompanied him. On April 24, 1968, he breathed his last in Bashirbaug Palace, Hyderabad.

Malti Jilani, one of the senior disciples of Ustad Ghulam Ali Khan has brought out an extensive biography on the life and music of her Ustad, co-authored by Quratulain Hyder in 2003. Unfortunately I could not lay my hand on this book. But I understand from the review of the book that Hindustani classical music was his life and family and for this he had to be in India. His opting for Indian citizenship separated him from his family in Pakistan for the rest of his life. His penchant for musical metaphors using nature and Hindu mythological stories came to him instinctively. He would compare the long drawn Raag Multani to the lengthening afternoon shadow and Rishab (Ri or Re of sargam) in Raag Bhairavi to the third eye of Lord Shiva. The gamak ( a technique in classical singing creating oscillation between notes) was like a moving fish, quivering from side to side even though it was not moving anywhere.

[Note : The profile of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan in this write up is mainly based on some inputs from ‘ITC Sangeet Research Academy, articles of G N Vaidya of HMV, Suresh Chandvankar in SIRC Record News, ‘Frontline’ (August 2, 2002 issue) and ‘The Hindu’ (May 2, 2003 issue) and ‘Ae Mohabbat .... Reminiscing Begum Akhtar’ by Prof. Rita Ganguly which I gratefully acknowledge.]

On the occasion of the birth anniversary of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan on April 2nd 2014, I am presenting a thumri in Raag Sohoni ‘prem jogan ban ke piya or chale’ sung by him in the film ‘MUGHAL E AZAM (1960). I chose this thumri because there is a complete harmony between the thumri song and the romantic visuals aesthetically conceptualised and picturised by Director K Asif. There are no dialogues between Prince Salim (Dilip Kumar) and Anarkali (Madhubala) as Tansen (Surendra) sings this thumri as part of his riyaaz. But their love for each other is transmitted through eyes and expressions. It is worth noting that during the making of this film, both Madubala and Dilip Kumar were not on talking terms following their permanent estrangement from each other. But the projection of the intensity of their longing for each other in ‘reel’ life was not affected by the estrangement of their love in real life.

The lyrics and music composition of the thumri is credited to Shakeel Badayuni and Naushad respectively. However, going by the fact that Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan had earlier sung a thumri prem ki maari kataar in the same Raag (Sohoni) which was recorded sometime in the 40s, it is apparent that the thumri ‘prem jogan banke’ was composed by Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan and Naushad merely arranged music.

This thumri from ‘Mughal e Azam is an audio-visual treat. It has to be so because Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan insisted on watching the rush print of the picturisation of the thumri which was projected on the screen placed in front of him as he recorded the thumri.


Song-Prem jogan ban ke (Mughal e Azam)(1960) Singer-Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Lyrics-Shakeel Badayuni, MD-Naushad

Lyrics

aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aaaaaa

prem jogan banke
ae ae ae
jogan aa
jo…gan
piya o oar chaley
ae ae ae
prem jogan bank…e ae
sundar piya oar chaley
prem jogan bank….e ae ae
jo…o o gan
ae
jo ..gan bank….e
ae ae ae ae ae
prem jogan bank…e
ae ae
ae ae
aa aa aa
aa aa
jogan ban
aa
aaa aa aaa
aaaaaaaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aaa
aa aa
aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aa aa
prem jogan ban
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
ae ae ae
saa..jan son jo nain miley
ae nain
ae nain miley
ae nain miley ae
ae nain
sajan sajan son jo nain mil………………ey ae
aa aa aa
tumne bhi man ki py aaa aaa aas bujhe
prem jogan ban gay…..i
ae ae ae
jogan
aa
pi sang sagri
rain
rain aa
rain
pi sang sagri
rain gujaa aaa aaa…ri
rain gujaar
aa aa
ae ae ae
bai bai..ran
ae ae ae
bairan ?? ?? ??
aa aa
??
bai..
prem jogan banke
jogan
prem
??
ae ae ae
prem jogan bank…e
jogan ae
jogan ban
prem jogan ban ke ae

About these ads

4 Responses to "Prem jogan ban ke"

Whatever be the source from where the information have been culled, the presentation bears your signature and it is simply great.
After many many years got the opportunity to to witness/listen this song.
Thanks.

There is one song in Delhi 6 Khansab with Shreya Ghosal>>>>bhor bhayi tori baat takat piya>>>

I do not know how this is possible. But there it is. Could Shreya mixed her voice with some old record of Khansab????.

21st century is the age of remix. There is nothing surprise in it.

Audio link of the original Gurjari Todi rendered by Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan :

.

I’d rate this one of the most erotic scenes. I use the word “erotic” minus its sexual innuendo. I also wish you had used the B&W clip of this song. While colorization of the film had its merits, I am of the opinion that classics should be left untouched. What can I say about the thumri? Nonpareil!!! Same for the write-up, Sadanad-ji. Films like Mughal-e Azam were made by demons I think. They thought of nothing else but their ambitious projects and what classics they have left for us!! Salaam, Asif Saab.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2014) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than six years. This blog has over 10300 songs post by now.

Total number of songs discussed

10315

Number of movies (All songs covered)

537

Total visits so far

  • 5,955,217 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,469 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Archives

Current Visitors

visitors whereabouts

blogadda

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

Stumble

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,469 other followers

%d bloggers like this: