atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

Ab to darshan do

Posted on: June 16, 2014


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The mention of the name, takes me back again and again to my first meeting with Vijaylaxmi ji Deseram, and her introduction of Dr. Ashraf Aziz. Regulars will be familiar with Vijaylaxmi ji. Most avid listeners of Radio Ceylon and then Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation will immediately recognize this name, and will recall the soft and relaxing voice that has been the anchor of many mainline radio programs on Hindi film music and its creators. I have not yet met Dr. Aziz (who stays in Washington DC, USA), or even talked with him on the phone. But I am so familiar with his childhood and adolescent years, as also part of his later life. All on account of a wonderfully written article that captures a few key episodes and passages in great detail. The subject matter dealt within this article is beautifully summarized in its title – “Sajjaad Hussain Ki Khoj Mein”.

Remembering Sajjaad Hussain, the genius of musical magic, on his anniversary of birth (15th June.)

(NOTE: I must acknowledge being fully indebted to Dr. Aziz, and this article, without which this write up would not have been possible.)

Quite truthfully, I have not yet come across a more moving and a more passionate description of the association the common people have with Hindi films and Hindi film songs, as has been narrated in this article about the personal experiences of Dr. Aziz and his elder brothers Masood Sb and Ayyub Sb. And where would you expect this life description was being played out? In a most unexpected place – a small port town called Tanga, in the far away Tangaynika (now called Tanzania) in East Africa, during the 1940s and 1950s. I am surprised myself with the revelations of the amount of popularity enjoyed by Hindi films and Hindi film music, in Africa of all the places, in the years when the best mode of international communication was still the sea voyages.

The manner in which this article came to me is also very interesting. The original article is written in Hindi. The size of the article and the details it carries within can be surmised from the fact that it is 28 print pages. The article got created through a set of conversations between Dr. Aziz and Vijaylaxmi ji, wherein Dr. Aziz narrated the details of his childhood and teen years, while Vijaylaxmi ji took notes. She then framed the article from these conversation notes, and got is typed and prepared in 1997. When she visited India in Dec 2012, and I got the opportunity to meet her, one of the things she shared with me was this article by Dr. Aziz. And then she also placed in front of me an express request from Dr. Aziz. He has been wanting for many years to get this article translated and typed in Urdu. She wanted to know if I could get it done. There was no way that I could say no to this request. I took the print article, and talked with my collector friend. His response was immediate. Yes, he knows someone who does typesetting in Urdu, and is also capable of doing the Hindi to Urdu translation. Using the software called InPage, he completed the work for us. It took some weeks to completely translate and type the entire article and by end Jan 2013, I emailed the Urdu article to Vijaylaxmi ji.

The article tells of the deep impact that Hindi films and film music has on the minds of discerning followers. The family of Dr. Aziz is originally from Sialkot (now in Pakistan). Around the turn of the previous century – the Mughal empire having whittled down to nothing, and the 1857 rebellion having being crushed, the British took a strong iron grip of the Indian subcontinent. One of the many atrocities that they foisted upon the people of this subcontinent was to coerce and ship people from here as slaves and cheap labor to the other British Colonies around the Indian Ocean – Maldives, Mauritius, states in East and South Africa, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and as far as Fiji. Basic intent was getting semi skilled cheap labor for their constructions projects for railways, ports etc. in these far away countries. The family of Dr. Aziz was one of such families that went to Tangaynika. His grandfather was part of the work force that laid the first railway line in Africa, from Mombasa to Voi, and his father worked for the Tangamoshi Railways.

The article however dwells very little on this family history. After a brief introduction, the article readily moves into the discussion on Hindi films and films music, a subject that was a passion with the elder brothers Masood and Ayyub. A passion that was infective enough to consume the interest of the young Aziz also. In the small town of Tanga, Dr. Aziz recalls, it was his brother Masood that bought the first gramophone player from the famous music store Shankar Das and Sons, which was on Salim Road in Mombasa city, about 120 miles away. The gramophone was inaugurated at their home, with two records that Masood Sb had brought from the music store. The first one he played was “Baithi Hoon Teri Yaad Ka Le Kar Ke Sahaara” from the film ‘Village Girl’ or ‘Gaaon Ki Gori’ (1945). This wonderful melody by Shyam Sunder in the voice of Noorjehaan was the first captivating introduction to Hindi film music for young Aziz. The second record that was played that evening was another peerless song in the same voice from the film ‘Dost’ (1944) –“Koi Prem Ka De Ke Sandesaa Haaye Loot Gayaa”. The music was by Sajjaad Hussain. Masood Sb announced that the young music director who has created this melody, will rise like a shining star in the coming years. Alas, a prophecy that was to be and yet not to be.

The article carries description of the love of Hindi films and music that his elder brother had – discussions talk about the films they had seen in Mombasa and elsewhere, discussion about Sohrab Modi, KL Saigal, Chandramohan, Motilal, Noorjehaan, Raj Kapoor, Dilip Kumar and many others. Especially his immediate elder, Ayyub Sb. His life seemed to be immersed in Hindi films. He had this philosophical connection wherein he would discuss films in terms of their impact on real life, in terms of their depiction of the mores and values of life, in terms of their connection to history and the past of mankind. For example the song “Dum Bhar Jo Udhar Moonh Phere, O Chanda. . .” is a dialogue between Radha and Balram (elder brother of Krsna). Radha is telling Balram, represented as the moon, to look away for sometime so she can have some moments with Krsna. And to give strength to this interpretation, he tells about the lines from the song

main chor hoon kaam hai chori
duniyaa mein hoon badnaam
dil ko churaataa aayaa hoon main
yehi meraa kaam

these linea are so apt as applied to the persona of Lord Krsna. As I read these passages, I was so moved by the knowledge, by the interpretations, and simply by the amount of focus that Ayyub Sb had of the history of the subcontinent, its legends and stories, and the contemporary songs that are also now part of the folklore.

The article speaks of so many such philosophical interpretations and correlations, that the reader wonders in amazement at the depth of experience applied by that mind, and the level of intimacy he must have had with this so called ‘filmy’ or unreal and ethereal domain of experience.

Quite early in the article, Dr. Aziz tells of an incident that a friend of Masood Sb borrowed the record of ‘Dost’, only never to be returned. As a matter of family tradition, it was not considered appropriate to go and ask for a thing to be returned. And so, for all practical purposes, the record was lost. And then, in the following many pages, there is a whole saga of a journey that was undertaken by young Aziz and his elder brother Ayyub, to travel a long distance of many days, just to go an listen to this song just once again. The description of this journey is very heartwarming, and I will dare to say that it compares with other renowned travelogues and philosophy of life. Especially comes to mind is ‘Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance’ (by Robert Pirsig, considered to be one of the most influential books of the past half century).

The journey starts with Ayyub Sb locating information about the record being in the possession of one Haaji Sb in the distant town of Morogoro. He comes home and asks young Aziz to make preparations for travel. Aziz is in the midst of preparing for his maths examination, but Ayyub simply tells him that he will give him an application for leave on account of some family function or marriage, but he must come. The journey starts with a train ride to Korogve. After the train journey, they have to take a bus. The roads are not good, and they have to stop at nights. Pangaani, one of the rivers on way is flooded and they have to wait for the waters to recede below the level of the bridge. The brick and mortar bridge has been washed away, and a makeshift bridge made of bamboo and rope is to be traversed. Most passengers back out, when the driver announces that the waters are receded and he is ready to continue the journey. A handful of passengers, which includes the two brothers, board the bus, and make the dangerous crossing across the makeshift bridge. Ayyub Sb used to work in a factory that made ropes from sisal fibres (a plant product similar to jute), and he had confidence that the ropes in the bridge will hold.

The description of discussions during this journey are awesome and hugely revealing. Dr. Aziz declares that his brother Ayyub Sb was literate but not a reader of books. And yet, he had such depth of knowledge and discussed life in such great detail that one is left wonderstruck at the innate wisdom he espoused. They discussed Existentialism, a philosophy of life that was propounded in the late 19th century by European thinkers and writers like Dostoevsky and Sartre. And the discussion came through the poetry of Zauq (Mohammed Ibrahim Zauq) and the ghazal “Laai Hayaat Aaye Qazaa Le Chali Chale” .

There is a discussion on the entity called the film song and powerful role it has in the films. The song has an effect that even the camera cannot emulate. Through the words and the emotions conveyed through voice, the song tells about those parts of the story that are simply impossible to capture in dialogues and visuals. Ayyub Sb talks about “Baalam Aaye Baso Morey Mann Mein” . He stated that this song lives not in the words and not in the music, but in the moments of silences. The momentary passages of black silence in between the notes of sarod, is the place where one can hear the soul of Devdas, or rather Saigal Sb himself, as it is preparing for its final journey.

The song from ‘Niraala’ (1950) – “Mehfil Mein Jal Uthi Shama” . Ayyub Sb describes the sounds of clarinet playing between the stanzas as the dying whispers of a flame that is in the last moments of its existence.

There are many other small but detailed episodes through the journey, that are simply a treat to read and then contemplate. The bus driver who takes them from Korogve to Morogoro – when he finds out they belong to the country called India, just immediately starts to whistle the song “Mere Dil Ki Ghadi Kare Tik Tik Tik, Jab Baje Raat Ke Baarah” (‘Albela’, 1951). Or the local singer Lalu Bhagat who sings songs of Surendera. Lalu Bhagat is not his name, but he is called so because he always wears a red shirt. He does not know a word of Hindi/Urdu, and does not understand what the lyrics are saying. But he simply sings it, imitating the voice of the original singer. The listeners do not just applaud, but they shower him with money. Or the discussion on the poetry and songs of Rabindranath Tagore and Nazrul Islam. Or the discussion on the music legends like Tansen, Amir Khusro and Swami Haridas, and the assessment of the music directors of Hindi films – RC Boral, Pankaj Mullick, Anil Biwas, Ghulam Haider, Naushad against the historical benchmark. Or the discussion on the folk music and song rooted in the essence of rural India.

In fact at one point, Ayyub Sb remarks to young Aziz to keep this journey a secret between them. Because if their family and friends find out that they are traveling from Tanga to Morogoro to simply listen to one song, they would certainly urge them to continue their journey and from Morogoro to proceed to Dodoma, which has a large mental hospital, and get admitted there for good. :)

Seriously saying, I would have been ready for many things as I started to read this article, but simply not for this profound insight and analysis, wherein Ayyub Sb’s being is searching for and finding the soul of the song in the moments of silences. I am simply bowled over by the reach of his emotional intellect and the intensity of his connect with the innate characteristics of the song. Amazing is too low a value to attach to this insight.

On reaching Morogoro, they go to the home of Balwant Singh, a friend of Ayyub Sb’s. The visit to Haaji Sb is still another episode ahead. The discussion at the home of Balwant Singh continues about films. Their host is a connoisseur of the visual and for him the camera work of stalwarts like Fali Mistry, Faridoon Irai, RD Mathur, and Jaal Mistry is a work of magic that goes far beyond anything that the sound or the song can create. He talks about the song “Hawaa Mein Udtaa Jaaye, Mora Laal Dupatta Malmal Ka”(‘Barsaat’, 1949), and describes how Fali Mistry has created a magic of light and shade and makes the viewer believe that the color of the dupatta is really red. And the ongoing standoff between the two friends on whether the film enters the viewer first through the eyes or first through the ears.

The visit to Haaji Sb’s residence is a dinner invite in the evening. That meeting is documented in a memorable way. Haaji Sb is an equally knowledgeable person on music in general, and music in films. Despite what the music of ‘Barsaat’ being, he was very upset with Raj Kapoor to have changed from Ram Ganguli (‘Aag’, 1948) to Shankar Jaikishan. A detailed discussion on the three and a half minutes of a song on the 78 rpm record – a three and half minutes in which to create a mood, present a prelude, present the entire emotion of the song, punctuate with interludes at appropriate places, and then close the music appropriately. Something that the classical musicians of India and the west may take one or more hours to accomplish, is completed by the film musicians in just three and a half minutes.

And then the discussion comes to Sajjaad Hussain. Haaji Sb describes the talent of this prodigious musician as the one person in whose hands an instrument can sing, and the singing voices become musical instruments. His creations will deceive you with this interplay between the spoken sound and the music. He had this ability to unify the voice and the music so seamlessly and flawlessly. No wonder that he could not be successful – most people in the society can simply not appreciate this unity and harmony. When great souls like Buddha could not be successful, what then to say about Sajjaad Sb. And then, some more to say of this exceptional artist. The Italian instrument mandolin does not and cannot support partial notes. But in the hands of Sajjaad Hussian – he would play Indian classical raags on this instrument, that cannot be played without partial notes, least of all on such an instrument.

Haaji Sb went on to talk about Sajjaad Sb’s career. He was assistant to Hanuman Prasad in the film ‘Gaali’ (1944). And then he was the assistant to Ali Baksh (father of Meena Kumari) when he was working on the film ‘Dost’ (1944). A day came when Ali Baksh was sick and did not come to the studio. Sajjaad Sb was playing a tune on the harmonium when Noorjehaan walked in. She was so impressed with the music that Sajjaad Sb was given the music director’s responsibility and Ali Baksh was out of the film.

Of course, the haughtiness and a single minded focus on his work gained him a reputation as an unfriendly person – a reputation that would be a disaster in the industry. And so it happened.

He was working on the film ‘Hulchul’ (1951). One day, K Asif was present when he was preparing a tune on the harmonium. In between, Asif Sb suggested that a different note be used. Sajjaad Sb requested Asif Sb to step to the harmonium and point out which note he desired. When Asif Sb indicated the particular note on the keyboard, Sajjaad Sb said Ok, so this one, and then proceeded to physically remove the key from the keyboard. Turning to Asif Sb, he said, this is your note. I do not have this note in my harmonium. Sorry, I cannot use it in the song. Of course the expected happened. He was removed from the film and Mohammed Shafi was brought in.

Then there is another anecdote. At one particular recording, Sajjaad Sb was not satisfied how the music instrument players and the singers were performing. Take after take was happening, the day was wearing out, but the perfection that Sajjaad Sb was seeking was not being achieved. He took a break, and asked one of the office boys to get a large meat knife from the market. When it came, the recording session was started again. Sajjaad Sb threw his baton in the waste basket and held the large knife in his hand. Then he announced that creating a film song is a matter of life and death. It is not entertainment. After this, if this song is not correctly recorded, there is going to be bloodshed here. As the anecdote goes, the next take was the perfect and final recording.

The article goes on to talk about the partition of India, the decades thereafter when the countries in Africa began to attain independence, and how the things changed for the people of Indian origin. The undercurrent of the Hindi films and film songs continues through the narrative. There is reference to films ‘Junglee’ (1961) and ‘Mere Mehboob’ (1963). There is another interlude wherein Aziz Sb spends another evening with Ayyub Sb discussing films, songs, the partition of India, and the basic underlying unity of the humanity and the religions.

After creating the magic of “Ye Kaisi Ajab Dastaan Ho Gayi Hai” and “Mauzan-daraan” for ‘Rustam Sohrab’ in 1963, Sajjaad Sb took his pride and self-esteem and moved away from the film world. The bridges had been burnt and the industry gave up on him. In the process, it discarded the most valuable diamond that there ever was in the community of music directors. Anil Biswas once stated that Sajjaad Hussain is the only original composer in the industry. This statement is borne out by the faultless and ideal scores that he has created for the twenty odd films that he worked on during his career. One listen to his melodies and compositions and one is taken in by the uniqueness and the unusual imagery that is created by his tunes. After a gap of more than a decade, the film ‘Aakhri Sajdaa’ was released in 1977, with music by Sajjaad Sb. This film has a dance song performed by Helen. The song is “Nazar Milaao, Pataa Chalega” . Hearing this song brings to mind the unbelievable scenario – a dance song for Helen has never been created with such a unique vision and arrangement.

1992 saw his last interview with Voice of America. In 1994, the hands that used to speak more than his lips, became rested forever. The remembrances – a small obituary in ‘Screen’ magazine, lost between other bigger news and articles. And only two personalities from the industry attended his last journey – Khayyaam Sb and Pankaj Udhas. A very sad outcome and a very sad hindsight for a genius creator whose short list of less than a hundred songs can simply not be sampled, for one would be stumped as to which songs to list and which to leave out.

His creations are becoming rarer by the day. On this blog we have a fantastic collection of 81 songs composed by him. Not too many other songs are left out. And the ones that are remaining, are remaining because they are extremely hard to find. I bring to this blog, the 82nd offering by this prodigal artist. The film is ‘Mere Bhagwan’ from 1947. Produced under the banner of Murari Pictures, the film is directed by Mohan Sinha. The list of actors includes Madhubala, Surendra, Wasti, Shyam Sunder, Munshi Khanjar, Jugnu, YN Joshi, V Gopal, Shashibala etc. There are 8 songs listed for this film. As per available information, only one record, i.e. two songs, are traceable. One song is already posted – “Mujhe Baawri Baawri Log Kahen” (http://atulsongaday.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/mujhe-baawri-baawri-log-kahen/). Today, I post the second available song from this film. Lyrics are from the pen of Shewan Rizvi. Singing voice is that of Geeta Roy (later Geeta Dutt) and chorus. The strange and unique thing about this song is that the primary singer has just one line in the entire song, sung only by her. Through the remaining song, one can make out Geeta Roy’s voice as part of the chorus.

Listen to this rare recording, one of the very last few that still need to be traced.

Enjoy.


Song-Ab to darshan do (Mere Bhagwan)(1947) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Shewan Rizvi, MD-Sajjad Hussain
Geeta Dutt + Female Chorus,
Male Chorus,
Male + Female Chorus)

Lyrics

ab to darshan do

ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do
ab to darshan do girdhaari. . .
radha ke shyam
o shyam
meera ke girdhaari
ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do

tum saamne ho aur bhatke nainaa
tum saamne ho aur bhatke nainaa

asli roop ko tarse naina. . .
tum saamne ho aur bhatke nainaa
jaan ke hotey ho (??)
meera ke girdhaari
ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do

jhan jhan goonje dhan se mahal ameeron ke
aur bhookh se tadpen bachche gareebon ke
jhan jhan goonje dhan se mahal ameeron ke
ab ye insaaf
ab ye insaaf ho bhagwaan
o bhagwaan
ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do

aane ko kahaa thhaa aaye na ab tak
dukhiyon ke kasht mitaayoge kab tak
aane ko kahaa thhaa aaye na ab tak
dukhiyon ke kasht mitaayoge kab tak
kab tak dekhen baat tihaari shaam
o shaam
meera ke girdhaari
ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do

ab to darshan do girdhaari. . .
radha ke shyam
o shyam
meera ke girdhaari
ab to darshan do. . .
bhakton ke muraari
ab to darshan do

—————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
—————————————–

अब तो दर्शन दो

अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो
अब तो दर्शन दो गिरधारी ॰ ईss
राधा के श्याम
ओ श्याम
मीरा के गिरधारी
अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो

तुम सामने हो और भटके नैना
तुम सामने हो और भटके नैना

असली रूप को तरसे नैना ॰ आss
तुम सामने हो और भटके नैना
जान के होते हो (??)
मीरा के गिरधारी
अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो

झन झन गूँजे धन से महल अमीरों के
और भूख से तड़पें बच्चे गरीबों के
झन झन गूँजे धन से महल अमीरों के
अब ये इंसाफ
अब ये इंसाफ हो भगवान
ओ भगवान
अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो

आने को कहा था आये ना अब तक
दुखियों के कष्ट मिटाओगे कब तक
आने को कहा था आये ना अब तक
दुखियों के कष्ट मिटाओगे कब तक
कब तक देखें बाट तिहारी श्याम
ओ शाम
मीरा के गिरधारी
अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो

अब तो दर्शन दो गिरधारी ॰ ईss
राधा के श्याम
ओ श्याम
मीरा के गिरधारी
अब तो दर्शन दो ॰ ओss
भक्तों के मुरारी
अब तो दर्शन दो

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5 Responses to "Ab to darshan do"

Sudhirji,
Excellent and very heart-felt write up! Congratulations. Can you please give the link of the article ‘Sajjad Hussain ki khoj mein’?

A small aside. I remember Raju Bharatan writing somewhere that Sajjad was very particular that his name be written with one ‘s’, i.e. Husain, and used to fly into uncontrollable rage if he saw it written as ‘Hussain’. Is there any supporting evidence on this?

Sudhir ji,
Thanks for a very engrossing article with a rare song of Sajjad Husain saab.
Such articles can be written by only you !
-AD

Songs of yesteryear were strong & deep in emotional feelings and so were the fans ! I had always heard my father talk about the popularity of Hindi movies and songs in Africa – especially Kenya. Once again, a great article Sudhir Sir !
Regards,
Manju Das

Sudhirji,
Thanks for the enthralling article and the nice song.

A GREAT. GREAT posting in every respect. Much has been said about Sajjad Saheb and your posting adds to the existing knowledge on my favourite composer. Many thanks.

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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