atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

Tu kaun si badli mein mere chaand hai aa jaa

Posted on: June 21, 2014


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

THE JOY OF NFS (Song No. 4)
——————————-

From my house towards Juhu, there is a building at the corner of Gulmohar Circle which has a board-” Karachi Residents’ Association”. On enquiry I discovered that this was a building owned by ( Sindhi speaking Hindu and Muslims) people who resided in Karachi before Partition. I was told that 5-6 such buildings exist all over Mumbai. On further enquiries, I was informed that there were a few buildings of ” Lahore Residents Association” also( Punjabi speaking Hindus and Muslims). When I met one of the residents of ” Lahore” wala building, that old gentleman was speaking so lovingly about old Lahore that I was surprised. Even after 65 years of Partition, these people had such fondness for Lahore…or Karachi, for that matter.

Lahore had played an important role in India’s film industry till Partition separated us. Lahore had a built in advantage that it was in the midst of Hindi/Urdu speaking population. Bombay was far off and Calcutta and Madras catered mainly to regional aspirations. In the 40s, some really good films like Khazanchi, Khandan, Daasi etc were made in Lahore. All the 3 leading actors, Dilip, Raj and Dev had roots across the border. Shyam, Omprakash, Karan Dewan, Pran, Surendra, Balraj Sahni, Khursheed, Mumtaz Shanti, Veena, Begum Para, Noorjehan, Meena Shorey, Suraiya, Manorama, Kamini Kaushal, Shyama…. a string of artistes from Lahore enriched Indian films. Pancholi, Kardar, Rafi, Shamshad Begum, Jhande Khan, Ghulam Haider, Pt. Amarnath and brothers, Hansraj Behl, Khayyam, Vinod also came from Lahore.

( A separate article can be written about Lahore’s contribution to Bombay’s film industry).

Lahore city in particular gave us many Gems in Music. They came from HIRA MANDI. (old name ‘ Tibbi’ ). Hira Mandi was an area which was for Tawayafs. For centuries, Hira mandi in Lahore nurtured some outstanding performing artistes. The famous Noorjehan, Khursheed, Shamshad begum, Mumtaz Shanti and many others came from Hira Mandi. Sardar Akhtar and Bahar Akhtar, wives of producer Mehboob khan and A.R.Kardar were also from Hira Mandi.

Most of the early film actresses for pre-partitionLahore cinema came from the Kothas of Hira Mandi. Cine people scouted Hira mandi for fresh new talents. The art of Music was confined to the streets of the courtesans, with Hira Mandi taking the lead as the largest settlement in the cultural capital of the statein the undivided Punjab.

Writer Nirupama Dutt said about Hira mandi…

Come evening and they would be out in their balconies in the finest of silks and jewels. Their eyes would be lined with kohl and their lips red with dandasa, bark of the walnut tree and the most fragrant of eastern perfumes or itars would fill the air. They were known as diamonds and such was their glitter that the whole street would seem studded with stars. These were the courtesans of Heera Mandi of Lahore in the years before Partition in 1947.

Heera Mandi was to Lahore what Chowk was to Lucknow, Sonagachi to Calcutta and Bhaindi Bazar to Bombay. These forbidden yet most sought-after bazaars where women sold their many talents were known as “kothas”. In these abodes lived women, many of them very talented artists, who were nevertheless social outcasts living on the fringes of the society. Interestingly, this place was first known as Tibbi Bazar. And this name is recorded in a Punjabi “tappa”:
Tibbi waliye la de paan ni teri
Tibbi de vich dukan ni”
,

Pran Nevile,a Die hard ” Lahorite” and a retired I.A.S Diplomat of International reputation, says about Lahore-

Why was Lahore called the gem of India?” I asked. “That it indeed was,” Pran replied, “It was totally different from the rest of India, in every way. It was the educational centre of North India. It had more colleges than any other city of India. The student population of Lahore was lively and wonderful. Co-education came late, but there it was. Lahore was always very prosperous; it was the hub of North India right up to Peshawar. Everything about Lahore was special. If you wanted to see the best-dressed young men in India, they were to be found in Lahore. The best food in India was to be found in Lahore. It was a city of gourmets and it had romance. A popular film song of those days went: Ik shehr ki laundia, nainoon ke teer chala gayee.And this doggerel that we all knew and I to this day remember: Tibbi mein phir ke jalwa-e-Parwardigar dekh: Hai dekhney ki cheez issay baar baar dekh.The great stars, the great movers and shakers of the Bombay movie world were all from Lahore.”

In this Lahore and this Hira Mandi, was a singer TAMANCHA JAAN. She was a famous and a much loved singer, who sang a few NFS which became rage throughout India in those times. Not many records of Tamancha are available in India. However I could trace One song of Tamancha, which had become quite popular. Today we will enjoy this here. Here is her short Biography-collected from a Pakistani Blog-

” Tamancha Jan was born in 1918 as ‘Gulzar’ to a family of hereditary courtesans. In Lahore, this floating island, stretching from Bazar Sheikhupuriyan to Barood Khana in the old city, is commonly called Heera Mandi. In a more polite Lakhnavi expression, it is the bazaar. She was born here.

Gulzar’s birth was celebrated with great fanfare as it brought assurance that the family would remain in the business at least for another generation. In the bazaar, where singing was a higher profession than dancing, Thanks to the appreciative and generous patronage of the landowning and mercantile elite of the city, the family owned some high-value property in the area. Gulzar’s mother Sardar Begum, a beauty icon and an accomplished performer of her own times, remained an object of envy in her youthful days. Even the men in this family held sway over the affairs of their community. Lahore’s chronicler Agha Ashraf remembers Haji Umar Hayat, brother of Gulzar, who remained a chaudhry of the Bazar, sharing this status with Chaudhry Mian Bugga, Chaudhry Mian Hajro and Chaudhry Mian Dehroo during the 1940s.

At the age of seven, Gulzar came under the tutelage of Ustad Fida Hussain, who put her through the rigors of intensive training first in the basics of music and later in the art of presentation. Once her orientation was complete, she had to practice the rendition of various genres of music. By the time she turned sixteen, she had completed her education in music and mannerism. It was 1934 when she, under the pseudonym of Tamancha Jan, gave her maiden performance at her mother’s salon.

It is understandable that an aspiring singer would not have thought it wise to launch herself as Gulzar in the presence of two other senior courtesans with the same name in Lahore: Gulzar Bibi, elder sister of Madam Noor Jehan; and Miss Gulzar, the first heroine of silent cinema of Lahore. But it is hard to understand why Gulzar acquired a strange name like ‘Tamancha Jan’, which literally means ‘Miss Pistol’. Here ‘Jan’ becomes an approximate of the English word ‘Miss’.

Impressing the connoisseurs of music in Lahore was not an easy task. For most of them, melody mattered more than beauty. They all came with a highly trained ear and were interested in diverse genres. The bazaar offered them many choices. There were several sur kokaliyas and sangeet devis, some of them trained by men like Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. Tamancha Jan had to rival Inayat Bai Dehroowali, Khursheed Pondaan Wali, Anwari Sialkotan, Inayati Suniyari and Shamshad Alipurwali. So she continued with her riaz to consistently improve her singing and expand her repertoire. With every evening, the number of patrons at her salon grew. Her refreshing, melodious voice and her stunning features made a niche within months of her launch. In a few years, rumor took hold that the money she received assalaami every evening was large enough to be tied up in a sheet of cloth.

In the early 1930s, while Tamancha Jaan was conquering the hearts of Lahoris, the music director Master Ghulam Haider (the man who introduced Noor Jehan and Lata Mangeshkar to playback singing) was looking for new voices.

Impressed by her fame, Ghulam Haider invited Tamancha Jan for an audition. He found her voice deep and resounding in melody, high and wide in range and suitable for Punjabi folk songs. The offer followed and she accepted it. After a brief orientation in singing for the microphone, her first record was cut and marketed as the voice of Miss Tamancha Jan.

After a successful stint with Jenophone Records, Tamancha Jan worked for a couple of other record companies including Columbia at Anarkali in Lahore. Her initial repertoire included Punjabi folk and devotional songs but her later recordings included ghazals. In a very short span of time, she became a household name in the Punjab.

Lahore went into the production of ‘talkies’ with the release of the Punjabi-language film Heer Ranjha (1932). Offers came in due course to Tamancha Jan but she declined for the fear, common among courtesans, that appearing on the silver screen would lessen her appeal before the clientele that frequented her salon.

On December 16th, 1937, Lahore Radio went on air with Tamancha Jan, Shamshad, Zeenat Begum, Umrao Zia Begum and Surinder Kaur. Dr Afzal Mirza remembers that Kartar Singh Duggal used to write song-and-text based Punjabi features for Radio Lahore. Tamancha Jan was one of the singers, and Amrita Pritam was a reader of dialogues.At Radio, Tamancha Jan considerably expanded her repertoire.

In 1939, Dil Sukh Pancholi released his first film ‘Gul Bakawli’. It was “picturized” at the Pancholi Art Studio on Lahore’s Upper Mall. Among several others, one song of the film Goohk mayri kismat sooun gayee, jago zaroor oye sung by Tamancha Jan was an instant hit.

Pancholi’s next film was an Urdu “Muslim Social” called Khandan (1942) which won accolades for its music and elevated the regional film industry of Lahore to the national mainstream.One of these compositions,Tu kaun si badli mein mere chand hai aaja in the voice of Noor Jehan, reflecting ragas Patdeep and Kirwani, was a great hit for its melancholic and emotive appeal. The gramophone record version of the song was marketed in the voice of Tamancha Jan, who reproduced it with such perfection that many connoisseurs found it difficult to distinguish between the two versions.

Pran Nevile, lifelong Lahori, writer and former Indian diplomat, writes in his memoirs that it was in the early 40s when he heard Tamancha Jan in a soiree at a palatial mansion on the Race Course Road of Lahore.

Nevile visited her salon in 1945. Nevile again saw her in 1946, when she visited Delhi on the invitation of All-India Radio to give a performance. Tamancha had also visited Shimla in 1947 to sing in Cecil Hotel. She had to rush back to Lahore in the wake of impending Partition.

In 1989, the late Mr. M.A. Sheikh, a dear friend and head of the classical music research center at Radio Pakistan Lahore, told that Tamancha Jaan was still alive. On insistence, he promised to track down her location. After asking various individuals, he could only learn that she lived somewhere in a squatter settlement in the neighbourhood of Model Town. But he couldn’t find her. Pran Nevile, however, was able to meet Tamancha Jaan about half a century after 1946, on his emotional trip to Lahore in the late 90s. He found her an ailing shrunken version of what she had been in her youth. In her conversation with Nevile, Tamancha Jaan mentioned that after the Partition, when all of her patrons left Lahore, she stopped singing and shut down her salon. We know nothing more about her days in post-1947 Lahore. “

I first read about her in one of the books of Saadat Hasan Manto. Recently again her name came in my reading when I got Pran Nevile’s ” Lahore-a sentimental journey”, in which he has written in details about his visits to her in Hira mandi etc.

Unfortunately no discography of Tamancha Jaan is available.

Those of our readers, who lived in Lahore in pre partition days may remember Tamancha jaan’s name. For all others, it is a rare song from a singer who was famous some time in the past.


Song-Tu kaun si badli mein (Tamancha Jaan NFS)(1942) Singer-Tamancha Jaan, MD-Ghulam Haider

Lyrics

Tu kaun si badli mein
mere chaand hai aaja
tu kaun si badli mein
mere chaand hai aaja
ghar hai tera
dil mein mere
aa ke samaa jaa
ghar hai tera
dil mein mere
aa ke samaa jaa
tu kaun si badli mein
mere chaand hai aaja

dil toot chuka hai
dil toot chuka hai
ye tere geet mein zaalim
dil toot chuka hai
dil toot chuka hai
ye tere geet mein zaalim
dard e gham e hijr
ko ik dard bana jaa
dard e gham e hijr
ko ik dard bana jaa
ghar hai tera
dil mein mere
aa ke samaa jaa
ghar hai tera
dil mein mere
aa ke samaa jaa
tu kaun si badli mein
mere chaand hai aaja

main hoon ke tere
haaye
main hoon ke tere
hijr mein bhi
jiyoon na marti
main hoon ke tere
haaye
main hoon ke tere
hijr mein bhi
jiyoon na marti
pyaar ka ye jaam mujhe
aa ke pilaa jaa
pyaar ka ye jaam mujhe
aa ke pilaa jaa
ghar hai tera
dil mein mere
aa ke samaa jaa
tu kaun si badli mein
mere chaand hai aaja

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7 Responses to "Tu kaun si badli mein mere chaand hai aa jaa"

This number by Tamancha Jaan reminds us of D N Madhok’s composition “Tu kaun si badli mein mere chaand hai aa jaa” rendered earlier by Malika-e-Tarannum Noorjahaan in Khandaan (1942) under the baton of the same music director (Master Ghulam Haider) – which is at this web-site at http://atulsongaday.me/2012/04/06/tu-kaun-si-badli-mein-mere-chaand-hai-aa-jaa.

Shekhar ji,
Thanks for your comments.
If you see the above write up,one full paragraph is given to describe that this is a song,recorded as a version song of the NJ’s song from “Khandan”,by Ghulam Haider. it also says that it is similar to each others.
-AD

Dear Arunji: I tried to merely add fuller details of the NJ number for ready reference of fellow Atulites. It would be interesting to know who wrote the TJ version. – Shekhar

Shekhar ji,
You are right that the two songs are similar.
In those days,it was a custom for some singers to sing the songs from films-with slight difference in lyrics,to avoid controversy- and take out a record.
Akbar Khan Durrani Peshavari was the pioneer in this system. In the 30 and even early 40s,songs of all films or all songs of some films,were not made into commercial records. he would identify such songs and sing them . Advantage was that the people would get a similar song to re enjoy.
you will find several of his songs on UT. Later on he too joined films and sang some songs himself on and off screen. While listening to his songs one has to be sure of its source.
Even in those days,the Tawayafs would get farmaish of popular film songs. Pran Nevile describes in his book” Lahore-a sentimental journey”,how even he requested Tamancha Jan to sing 2 film songs and that she obliged him” singing in a better way than film song”.
These days,I have learnt,that Tawayafs sing only film songs…
-AD

The two songs (apart from the mukhda) have different lyrics.

Arunji,

Simply outstanding. Both the post and the song. Thanks for transporting us to pre-partition days.

What a superb song & voice….thanks a lot Arun ji!

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