atul's bollywood song a day- with full lyrics

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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, the 27th of April, is the death anniversary of Feroz Khan.

It feels like only the other day that Feroz passed away – the memory (and shock) of that day is still fresh in my mind. But, when I checked the year just now, I see it was in 2009. So it’s already 6 years since Feroz left us. How time flies!

Today’s generation might know Feroz Khan more as the father of Fardeen Khan, but to people of my generation (who were in (high)school in the 70s), Feroz Khan was a dashing, stylish hero, whose films usually had a lot of action and stunts, a lot of them in outdoor locations.

In other words, for school-going children of the time (like me), with a somewhat less critical eye with regard to “acting ability”, fultoos entertainment.

An earlier generation to mine would probably remember not just Feroz’s entry into the industry in the late 50s but also how he evolved over a career that spanned almost 50 years. For Feroz Khan’s roles in his early years were quite different from the roles he played in the 70s/80s.

In the 60s, Feroz played a negative or grey role in a few films. Ones that comes readily to my mind are Bahurani (1963), Oonche Log (1965) and Aadmi Aur Insaan (1969) but I am sure there are more out there.

He was also the official “jilted lover” of the time. In film after film, whether it was Aarzoo (1965), Raat Aur Din (1967), Aadmi Aur Insaan (1969), Pyaasi Shaam (1969), Safar (1970) or Upaasna (1971), the heroine would invariably fall for another guy (the hero), and poor Feroz would end up losing out. In the bargain, he got the occasional good song to sing (like “jo tumko ho pasand” in Safar and “darpan ko dekha” in Upaasna) but maybe he would have preferred to be the leading man and not “the other guy”, constantly losing out. :-)

But there was another category of films in the 60s where Feroz DID get to play leading man. Never mind that they were invariably B-films (where, by his own admission, he often tried to channel Shammi Kapoor :-)), opposite then B-heroines like Mumtaz and Ameeta. But at least in these films, Feroz didn’t have to sacrifice his love. :-)

Some of these films had good songs too – a song I am particularly fond of is the sweet, Chitragupt composition, “ek baat hai kehne ki” from Samson (1964) picturised on Feroz and Ameeta.

Some of these films were thriller/suspense films too. Like Ek Paheli (1971) where Feroz stars opposite Tanuja.

But then came the 70s – and there was a pretty remarkable transformation in Feroz Khan and his position in the industry.

It all started with Apradh (1972). Not only did Feroz star in this film (opposite Mumtaz) but he also produced and directed this film. So he had plenty of control over it, to shape it the way he wanted.

And the world got to see a different side to Feroz Khan.

They saw a stylish director, a lavish producer – one who pushed the envelope in trying to entertain the audiences. Feroz didn’t cut corners as producer/director – he went ALL the way.

This aspect of Feroz’s character would be seen in every film that he produced/directed. Whether it was Apradh, Dharmatma, Qurbani, Jaanbaaz or Yalgaar, Feroz’s stamp could be seen in the film. Lavish sets, outdoor locales, larger-than-life characters, action-packed sequences, lots of catchy music – Feroz gave all of this to his audiences without holding back. No half-measures or compromises.

In Apradh, he showed car racing in Germany – something new for Indian audiences.

In Dharmatma, he shot breath-taking scenes of Afghanistan’s landscape – possibly the first time, outdoor shooting was done in Afghanistan for a Hindi film.

In Qurbani, he had a scene of a Mercedes car in a parking lot being completely demolished. I remember this scene created quite a sensation at the time.

This was typical Feroz Khan. :-)

Even as an actor, the Feroz Khan of the 70s was different. His films often involved gangsters, dacoits, smugglers – and he, as leading man, would be right at the centre of the action. There was often a Hollywood, “western” feel to his films – Khote Sikkay, Dharmatma and Kaala Sona come to mind.

And oh, gone was the “jilted lover” Feroz. In Qurbani, it is not Feroz who makes the sacrifice, it is Vinod Khanna. Feroz might have thought “my film, my rules”. :-)

Came the 80s – and a Feroz Khan film became a rarity. Maybe this is one reason there was a lot of buzz before the release of Jaanbaaz (1986). Apart from the fact that the film had an all-star cast, the audience was waiting to see another Feroz Khan-made film. They hadn’t seen once since Qurbani (1980).

Jaanbaaz did fairly well at the box-office and was followed by Dayavaan (1988). I think this did fairly well too. It was a remake of the superhit Tamil film, Nayakan, loosely based on the life of Bombay’s underworld don, Varadaraja Mudaliar.

Feroz Khan then made Yalgaar (1991). Another of his action-packed films with gang rivalry but with a strong family angle to it too, if I remember the story right. I don’t remember how it did at the box-office, maybe it didn’t do too well.

Feroz then took a break from acting. Years later, in 1998, he tried to launch his son, Fardeen, with Prem Aggan. The film flopped badly – it must have come as a rude shock for Feroz. After that, though he did the odd film, Feroz faded away from the scene of action. Towards the end, his health also began failing, though news of his death did come as a shock to many, including me.

All in all, whether his films did well or not, Feroz Khan as producer/director will be remembered as somebody who made stylish films in which he pulled out all the stops to give his audience maximum entertainment. As one who enjoyed watching his films, I must thank him for that.

Let’s now move on to the song for this post.

It is from Jaanbaaz (1986). It also happens to be one of my favourite songs of the 80s. And I suspect, not just mine. Whenever I’ve discussed this song with anybody, I’ve found that person also nodding in agreement, in appreciating this song.

What’s not to like? The music is catchy (especially the guitar), there’s Sridevi looking pretty awesome, the lyrics are pretty good. And, very importantly, it seems to me at least to be a pretty romantic song (not that I am much of a judge of romance :-)). This song gets played several times in the movie, viz – a duet with Sridevi and Feroz Khan, and a background version where Feroz is reminiscing the good times. The unabridged audio of this song lasts over seven minutes. Parts of this full songhave been picturised and there are portions of audio that have not been picturised.

This is one of those songs that has a memory for me. I first heard it when I was on tour to Hyderabad in 1986 on a project. I was staying at Hotel Sarovar, opposite the Secretariat at the time. I remember being quite tired at the end of that day. As I lay down, I decided to just switch on the radio to listen to whatever was playing on it.

This song “har kisi ko nahin milta” began playing. I had never heard it before – and fell instantly in love with it. It had a sort of relaxing (if surreal) feel about it – exactly what I needed at the time.

I didn’t know which film it was from. I thought it was from an older film, especially because of the lyrics. By then, in the mid-80s, I had got used to lyrics like “ice cream khaogi…haan, haan”. When I heard this song with lyrics like “jeete jee humko pyaar mila, hum donon kismat waale hain”, and sung ever so softly by Manhar Udhas, it didn’t seem to fit in with the times. :-)

Only later, when I asked somebody, I was told it was from the then-new film, Jaanbaaz.

So that is my first memory of this song. :-)

Anyway, enough reading. Now, let’s all enjoy this song and think of Feroz Khan.

Video (part I)

Video (part II)

Video (part III)

Audio (Full)

Song-Har kisi ko nahin milta yahaan pyaar zindagi mein (Jaanbaaz)(1986) Singers-Sadhana Sargam, Manhar Udhas, Lyrics-Indeewar, MD-Kalyanji Anandji
Both

Lyrics (Audio version)
——————-

laa la
lalalalaala
laa laa
lalalaala

laa la
lalalalaala
laa laa laa
lalalaalala

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

chaahe chaandi chaman mein barasti rahe
khilta nahin phool bahaar bina
chaahe chaandi chaman mein barasti rahe
khilta nahin phool bahaar bina
hai satya bina jeena mumkin
naamumkin jeena pyaar bina
naamumkin jeena pyaar bina
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

honthon se honth miley na bhale
chaahe miley na baanhen baanhon se
honthon se honth miley na bhale
chaahe miley na baanhen baanhon se
do dil zinda reh sakte hain
chaahat ki bhari nigaahon se
chaahat ki bhari nigaahon se
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein

zulfon ke narm andhere hain
jismon ke garm ujaale hain
zulfon ke narm andhere hain
jismon ke garm ujaale hain
jeete jee hum ko pyaar mila
hum donon qismatwaale hain
hum donon qismatwaale hain

har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
khushnaseeb hain wo jinko hai mili
ye bahaar zindagi mein aen
har kisi ko nahin milta
yahaan pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein
pyaar zindagi mein


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Amitabh – The Later Decades – 4
—————————————————–

Almost ‘Lolita’, but not quite so.  In the book, the young nympho is only 12 years old, and the old man is actually a pedophile.  In this Hindi film take off, the young girl is 18, and the old man is not a pervert, but is actually in love. And for all that matters, for all the time it matters, it is a two way love between the girl and the old man.

Around the time this film was relased, a joke was doing the rounds. Q: What is the height of good luck?  A: Amitabh in ‘Nishabd’.

One critic has commented that India and Indian cinema is not yet ready, maybe will never be, for a true ‘Lolita’ story.  But when this variation, ‘inspired’ in parts from the original, is conceptualized, who else but it is Amitabh for this role.  I have not seen this film, yet.  But more I hear and become aware of such films, the more I marvel at the performer behind these performances.  Is it the popular following he has that feeds into the producers mind to create films for him in which he excels?  Or is it his performing capabilities that sustain his popular standing that feeds into the producer’s minds?  Whichever way it works, we are witnessing the rising trajectory of a phenomena; not a super star, not a jubilee hero, but a phenomena, a legend – that continues to surprise with the ease and grace, with which he gets, and he executes, befitting roles.

‘Nishabd’ is a 2007 film by Ram Gopal Verma, who is known more for his films of the horror genre.  In some ways, I believe this film is also exposing a dark side of the human mind.  The music is by Vishal Anand, lyrics are by Munna Dhiman and the singing voice is that of Amitabh himself.
View, listen and enjoy.

Video (partial)

Audio (complete)

Song – Rozaana Jiyen Rozaana Maren Teri Yaadon Mein Hum (Nishabd) (2002) Singer – Amitabh Bachchan, Lyrics – Munna Dhiman, MD – Vishal Bhardwaj

Lyrics

rozaana jiyen
rozaana maren
teri yaadon mein hum
teri yaadon mein hum
rozaana
rozaana

rozaana jiyen
rozaana maren
teri yaadon mein hum
teri yaadon mein hum
rozaana
rozaana

ungli teri
thaame huye
har lamhaa chalta hoon main
ungli teri
thaame huye
har lamhaa chalta hoon main
tujhko liye
ghar lautun aur
ghar se nikalta hoon main
ik pal ko bhi
jaata nahin
tere bin kahin
yoon raat din
bas tujh mein hi
bas tujh mein hi
liptaa rehta hoon main
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
hummm rozaana

rozaana jiyen
rozaana maren
teri yaadon mein hum
rozaana chalen
rozaana ghoomen
teri yaadon mein hum
teri yaadon mein hum
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
hummm rozaana

har din teri
aankhon se is
duniya ko taktaa hoon main
tun jis tarah
rakhti thi ghar
vaise hi rakhta hoon main
teri tarah
sang sang chalen
yaadein teri
kyon har ghadi
baaton mein bas
baaton mein teri
gum sa rehta hoon main
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
hummm rozaana

kuchh gaaun to yaad aate ho
gungunaaun to yaad aate ho
kuchh pehnoon to yaad aate ho
kahin jaaun to yaad aate ho
kuchh khone pe yaad aate ho
kuchh paaun to yaad aate ho
rozaana chale
yaadon pe teri
zindagi ka safar
tujh se hai roshan
tujh se hai zinda
mere dil ka shehar
mere dil ka shehar
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
hummm rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana
rozaana. . .haan
rozaana. . .haan

———————————————————

Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

रोज़ाना जिएं
रोज़ाना मरें
तेरी यादों में हम
तेरी यादों में हम
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना

रोज़ाना जिएं
रोज़ाना मरें
तेरी यादों में हम
तेरी यादों में हम
रोज़ाना

उंगली तेरी
थामे हुये
हर लम्हा चलता हूँ मैं
उंगली तेरी
थामे हुये
हर लम्हा चलता हूँ मैं
तुझको लिए
घर लौटूँ और
घर से निकलता हूँ मैं
इक पल को भी
जाता नहीं
तेरे बिन कहीं
यूं रात दिन
बस तुझ में ही
बस तुझ में ही
लिपटा रहता हूँ मैं
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
हुम्म रोज़ाना

रोज़ाना जिएं
रोज़ाना मरें
तेरी यादों में हम
रोज़ाना चलें
रोज़ाना घूमें
तेरी यादों में हम
तेरी यादों में हम
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
हुम्म रोज़ाना

हर दिन तेरी
आँखों से इस
दुनिया को तकता हूँ मैं
तू जिस तरह
रखती थी घर
वैसे ही रखता हूँ मैं
तेरी तरह
संग संग चलें
यादें तेरी
क्यों हर घड़ी
बातों में बस
बातों में तेरी
गुम सा रहता हूँ मैं
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
हुम्म रोज़ाना

कुछ गाउँ तो याद आते हो
गुंगुनाऊँ तो याद आते हो
कुछ पहनूँ तो याद आते हो
कहीं जाऊँ तो याद आते हो
कुछ खोने पे याद आते हो
कुछ पाऊँ तो याद आते हो
रोज़ाना चले
यादों पे तेरी
ज़िंदगी का सफर
तुझसे है रोशन
तुझसे है ज़िंदा
मेरे दिल का शहर
मेरे दिल का शहर
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
हुम्म रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना
रोज़ाना॰ ॰ हाँ
रोज़ाना॰ ॰ हाँ


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Yeh Hai Bombay Meri Jaan – 5
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

         Bombay Gangout – Part 5
         The Day After.

The next day to the gangout meeting, we had plans for a visit to our dear Arun ji.  As the readers may be aware, Arun ji had not attended the gangout meeting.  The personal family circumstances in the recent past, had been exigent to the extreme.  His life partner had passed away just 10 days prior to the scheduled meeting.  We had decided to go ahead with the meeting, sans his participation.

Bharat Bhai, Khyati Ben, Sadanand ji and myself – we coordinated to arrive at the Versova Metro station at around 10.30 am.  Bharat Bhai traveled directly from his residence, which is connected with Versova, on the metro line.  Sadnand ji and Khyati Ben coordinated to meet at Borivali, then travel to Andheri via the local train, and then change over to Metro line.  I followed the same method, except that coming from Santa Cruz where I was staying, I took the local train in the opposite direction.  Getting on to the metro and then traveling to Versova – it was a very nostalgic experience for me.  A while back, in 1987-88, when I had started working with the Tatas (their erstwhile software engineering unit TUL – Tata Unisys Ltd.), I was posted in Bombay to start with.  The office was in Andheri (East) in an area that is called ‘SEEPZ’, which, if I recall correctly, stands for Sant Cruz Electronic Export Promotion Zone.  This was located just after the MIDC Complex (Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation) in Marol area.  For a major part of my stay in Bombay, I was staying in Andheri (West), in the Versova area, in a flat that I had rented from an office colleague, who was then stationed abroad on a project.  Getting that flat was a providential blessing – that was my first real stay in Bombay.  Stay as in living for an extended period of time, as opposed to visiting, which I had done on numerous occasions in the past.  That experience was a culture shock, as well as a wonderful lesson of life.  I will be covering that experience in the next post in this series.

So coming back to the nostalgia part, the short trip from Andheri station to Versova going by JP Road, was a reminder of my daily back and forth trip from my place of stay to the TUL office.  A lot had changed.  Of course the trip itself was happening many meters up in the air, as compared to the daily trip earlier, in BEST buses and or three wheeler auto rickshaws, all driving very much on the terra firma at the ground level.  But the route was same.  As the metro wended its way to Versova, I could see that lot of the skyline had changed.  Lot of landmarks that I was familiar with – some were still there, and many were changed.  It was a short trip down the memory lane, that tickled the strings of my heart, as I recalled the months that I had spent in this area, with memories mostly sweet.  Anyway, I will come back to that later.

So the four gang members landed up and met at the Versova station.  Bharat Bhai, who had earlier visited Arun ji, guided us as to the direction to take.  Arun ji’s residence is just a walking distance from the metro station.  So we walked, and enquired on way, and reached Jyoti Apartments.  As we were entering, I just happened to look across the road, and lo, I could see the Avinash Apartments complex where I had stayed for almost a year, and I could see the very apartment on the 4th floor where I lived.

We went towards block B in Jyoti Apartments.  In response to our call to him, Arun ji was waiting for us at the window of his first floor apartment, and guided us to the correct gate to enter.  We went up and reached his apartment B-13.

It was a very emotional encounter, especially for Khyati Ben and myself.  It would be the first time that the two of us were meeting Arun ji, and the circumstances could not have been more solemn and subdued.  It was a traditional greeting, touching his feet, and then I held him in my hug for a long time.  Any other occasion, I am sure there would have been some lively exchange on his “jet black” moustache, but it was not to be so that day.

We entered and we settled down in the study area, where Arun ji works on his computer, generating the many hundreds of posts that he has added to the blog.  The bookshelf just next to his work table, is full of books and notebooks.  Notebooks in which he stores his memories in writing.  His daughters were also present, and we were briefly introduced.

We talked about his loss and the current family situation.  Arun ji was quite composed and assured us that he is doing ok.  Yes, the loss is surely extreme, but then life is such.  One pauses and grieves for the loss, but then also one takes the next breath, the next step and the life continues.  Altered in some ways, but the relentless clock continues to tick and the life has to go on.

Next, we talked about the gangout meeting from the previous day.  Arun ji was very keen to know the details, and between the four of us, we gave him a fairly good briefing, on the gangout proceedings.  That was a lively discussion, as the four of us were quite keen to review the previous days program, and Arun ji, on his part was equally keen to know about how the day went.

It was a good almost couple of hours that we had spent there, sharing, reminiscing, discussing and reviewing, the program and events of the previous day.  It was a very lively session, as we all sat and discussed.  I assure you that being in the presence of Arun ji, is completely a wonderful experience.  Ah yes, I did mention to him that I had been living across the road from him for almost a year.  And then Arun ji in turn informed us that he had already moved into Jyoti apartments around 1985 or so, very well in time.  And so, the two of us have been neighbors for many months in the years 1987-88.  Just that, at that time, we did not holler across the road, checking into lyrics and songs information.  :)

Time came, and we had to take leave.  With sentiments still fresh in the hearts, we bade good bye to Arun ji.

The subsequent plans were that Nalin ji Shah, invited us all to his flat, for a brief get together.  Bharat Bhai took leave, as he had other things to attend to.  So, Khyati Ben, Sadanand ji and myself, we took the three wheeler auto rickshaw and via th Juhu Road, we traveled to Santa Cruz, to Nalin ji’s apartment.  As a gracious host, he had prepared ‘bataka pao’ for a lunch savory.  As we reached his place, the phone call exchange confirmed that Ranjan Sain had already reached and was waiting for us.  Ranjan ji is the cousin of Manju Amarnath Das, and a nephew to the producer director K Amarnath.

And thus followed a very lively session for the rest of the afternoon, at Nalin ji’s residence.  To start with, he recounted and reminisced about the numerous get togethers that had happened at the very place where were now sitting – gatherings that were attended by the stalwart artists of the industry, all friends of Nalin ji.  People like Kavi Pradeep, Anil Biswas, Indeevar, Rajkumari, Jairaj, Qamar Jalaalabaadi, Meena Kapoor, Bulo C Rani, Nini Majumdar, Sudha Malhora, and more.  He shared anecdotes from such gatherings.  The group had a lot of eager queries and Nalin ji recounted the things he knew.  Somehow, being a person with whom others simply confide, he carries in his head a lot of things that are proverbially from the horse’s mouth.  And some of them, he is not able to share.

Nalin ji’s apartment is also an interesting curio’s place.  There are rare photographs, rare books and records, some of them signed by the artists themselves.  Being a journalist, his habit is to collect and catalog documents and artifacts.  In fact he has original documents from the past, that have historical importance for the interested folks.  He recounted how met the family members of Saigal Sb, of music director Husnlal, Anil Biswas himself, OP Nayyar himself, Naushad Sb himself, and many more.  And with each such encounter, his collection of documents, photographs and artifacts became richer.

We also turned to Ranjan ji, and requested him to recount his memories of being the nephew of the great producer director.  He recounted the gala days when K Amarnath was a name that spelt success in the industry, and the also told about the days when his popularity and status waned, the episodes and events not all that happy anymore.

As we were talking, Nalin ji wandered away into another room. He returned after a few minutes, carrying in his hand, what looked like a large register.  This is his scrapbook, one of the many volumes that has prepared, to store the documents and photographs – a partial record of the history of the film industry itself.  He had the register opened at a particular place and he showed it to us and to Ranjan ji in particular.  Ranjan ji almost jumped up with joy.  What Nalin ji was displaying was a document that is the original contract document by which K  Amarnath retained the services of music director Shyam Sunder for the film ‘Alif Laila’ (1953).  This is an important document for Manju ji, and her archival web page for her father, producer director K Amarnath.  He requested for a copy, and Nalin ji promptly promised to send a scanned copy via email.

The string of interesting episodes continue to flow.  However, we came to a time when sitting any later would have been difficult for most of those present.  So we decided to close the session.  Ranjan ji, Khyati Ben and Sadanand ji took leave and departed.  It had been a very lively session.

So with this post, we have now documented all the events related to the gangout and the other outings of the gang members on the 21st and 22nd of December, 2014.

For this post, I present this lively song from the 1966 film ‘Gogola’, starring Azad, Tabassum, Rani, Paulson, Niyampalli, Habeeb, Bhale Rao, Sharma, and Chander K.  The songs of this film are written by Baalkavi Bairaagi and the music is by Roy Frank.  The singing voice is that of Mahendra Kapoor. It seems as if  the creators of this song tried to recreate an aura of “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Jeena Yahaan” (‘CID’, 1956).  Tried, but have been able to get just a shadow of that classic. However, the song does take you on a trip from Boribunder in the extreme south, to Borivali in the north.  Another suggestion of a new category – ‘searching for love’.

A fun song, reasonably good.  Listen and enjoy.

Song – Boribunder Se Borivali Dekh Li Maine Gali Gali (Gogola) (1966) Singer – Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics – Balkavi Bairaagi, MD – Roy Frank

Lyrics

boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali

railon mein dekha
melon mein dekha
chhail chhabeele chhailon mein dekha
caron mein dekha
thelon mein dekha
kaarkhaanon mein dekha
jailon mein dekha
nahin mili par nahin mili
boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali

sau sau baar samandar dekha
chidiya ghar ke andar dekha
bhaalu dekha
bandar dekha
overbridge ke under dekha
nahin mili par nahin mili
boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali

batua khoyea
jeb kataaya
terylene ka pant ganwaaya
isey pataaya usey pataaya
bhookhon reh kar weight ghaaaya
nahin mili par nahin mili
boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali
dekh li maine gali gali
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
meri saanwri mujhe nahin mili
boribunder se borivali

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली

रेलों में देखा
मेलों में देखा
छैल छबीले छैलों में देखा
कारों में देखा
ठेलों में देखा
करखानों में देखा
जेलों में देखा
नहीं मिली पर नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली

सौ सौ बार समुंदर देखा
चिड़िया घर के अंदर देखा’
भालू देखा
बंदर देखा
ओवर ब्रिज के अंडर देखा
नहीं मिली पर नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली

बटुआ खोया
जेब कटाया
टैरीलीन का पैंट गंवाया
इसे पटाया उसे पटाया
भूखों रह कर वेट घटाया
नहीं मिली पर नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली
देख ली मैंने गली गली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
मेरी सांवरी मुझे नहीं मिली
बोरिबंदर से बोरीवली


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

As we all know, there are thousands of songs out there and they can all be classified in many different ways. Here on the blog, Atul himself has categorized songs into several categories, depending on mood (sad/happy), or content (birthday/Diwali), or style (qawwali/disco) or even musical instrument (guitar/harmonium). And many other ways.

Apart from all these, there is one category that we don’t have but I think all of us will agree could be a fun category. That is “songs that if I hadn’t heard in my childhood or seen the movie, I don’t think I would ever have heard in my life”. :-)

Now I am not suggesting Atul should create such a category – and in any case, this would be a totally personal category because it would depend on each person’s own childhood. A birthday song is a birthday song, but one person’s childhood song is different from another person’s childhood song.

But if there WERE such a category, I can think of several songs from my childhood that would safely qualify for being slotted in. :-)

Let’s be clear about one thing. I am not saying these are terrible songs. I think a lot of effort goes into producing ONE song. There are many who put in effort – the lyricist, singer(s), composer(s), musicians and others – so we need to appreciate the effort at least. No, I am just saying, that for some reason, the song just disappeared from public attention. As we all know, this blog is doing its bit to bring back some of those into the limelight.

Anyway, if I talk about my childhood – and into my teenage years, I am clearly talking about the 70s.

Most music lovers say (and it is hard to disagree with them) that the golden period of music ended with the 60s (or, at the most, early 70s). By the end of the 60s, music had lost two of its biggest names. First Roshan died. Jaikishen died soon after. S D Burman fell ill and though he composed for a few films (and still great music at that), he also died by the mid-70s. As did Madan Mohan. Naushad was practically non-existent through the 70s. Except for the odd films, the same could be said for Ravi and OP Nayyar. Shankar (of the Shankar-Jaikishen combo) tried to succeed on his own (though under the Shankar Jaikishan banner) but without his partner of so many years, his music was only a shadow of what Shankar Jaikishan had produced earlier.

The truth is, music itself had changed. And films had changed. The audience had changed, tastes had changed. As Tennyson said “the old order changeth, yielding place to new”. Rafisaab had yielded place to Kishore Kumar as the leading male voice of the industry. Shammi Kapoor had yielded place to Rajesh Khanna, who further yielded his place to Amitabh Bachchan during the 70s.

The harbinger of change in music was probably none other than R D Burman. His style was distinctly different from that of previous composers. And the audience lapped it up. Films got loud and garish – and the music often had to follow suit. Perhaps the best examples are the Dev Anand films of the 70s. Compare Navketan of the 70s with earlier decades and you get the picture.

Of course, there were the “gentler” films too (like Gulzar’s films or the Rajshri Productions films) but the average 70s commercial film was pure masala. With the music usually composed by one of the three biggies of the era – RD Burman, Laxmikant Pyarelal or Kalyanji Anandji.

This was the era I grew up in – and got used to. With songs like “aap ke kamre mein koi rehta hai”, “jai jai Shiv Shankar” and “rafta rafta dekho aankh meri ladi hai”. All popular songs at the time.

The 70s also saw a spate of actors (male and female) trying to make their name in the industry. Among the male actors, we had the likes of Anil Dhawan, Rakesh Roshan, Navin Nischol, Vinod Mehra, Vijay Arora, Rakesh Pandey, Ajay (Parikshit) Sahni, Vinod Khanna & Shatrughan Sinha (villains turned heroes), Amitabh Bachchan (yes, he too), Vikram, Kabir Bedi and some more.

Among the female actors, we had Rekha, Raakhee, Zeenat Aman, Parveen Babi, Sulakshana Pandit, Reena Roy, Moushumi Chatterjee and some more. Hema Malini had started earlier than this lot – and already got a head start in terms of success too.

But let’s talk about Moushumi Chatterjee.

Why Moushumi ? Because it’s her birthday today.

I must say I have extremely fond memories of Moushumi movies that I saw during the 70s. That was the era when Hema reigned. Everybody was crazy about Hema Malini (or at least Zeenat Aman) but, rebel that I tried to be, I used to prefer Moushumi to Hema and Zeenat.

Not that Moushumi was not popular. I remember she used to be referred to, early on, as the Balika Badhu girl. A reference to her role in the Bengali film by that name.

But in general, Moushumi was the “sweet” heroine of the time. With that sweet smile and that child-like dialogue delivery, she won over many hearts. Including mine. So what if she wasn’t slotted in the same league as Hema or Zeenat?

Moushumi and Vinod Mehra was a famous pairing of the time. Maybe it was triggered by the success of Anuraag (1972). I remember seeing them in Raftaar, Do Jhoot and Sabse Bada Rupaya. And then there was also Us Paar, which I haven’t seen. I quite liked the pairing.

A Moushumi film from the early years that does not feature Vinod Mehra, but which I like, is Ghulam Begum Baadshah (1973). I like the fact that she doesn’t play a typical, submissive woman in that film.

Moushumi has acted opposite bigger stars like Sanjeev Kumar, Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan but somehow I always liked her opposite Vinod Mehra. There was a charm in those films and a sort of chemistry between them that is difficult to explain.

The song I have picked for today is from one such film.

Do Jhoot.

There’s a reason I picked this particular film for today, though I had others in mind too. The music in this film is composed by Shankar (under the Shankar Jaikishen banner). By then, of course, Jaikishen was long gone, so it was all down to Shankar.

And today also happens to be Shankar’s death anniversary.

So it seemed appropriate to pick a song featuring Moushumi and composed by Shankar.

I think it would be fair to say that Shankar had a tough time after Jaikishen’s death. The music composed by him fared miserably, leading to people drawing the inevitable conclusion that it was Jaikishen who was primarily responsible for the success of their banner.

Shankar tried hard to fight this – he said in interviews “if I had died first, people would have said, Shankar was the main guy. That’s how people are”. But the fact is, he could not churn out successes (except for the rare one) – and finally that is what counts.

Even Raj Kapoor, with whom Shankar-Jaikishen’s name was inextricably linked since Barsaat (1949), chose to dump Shankar and go with Laxmikant Pyarelal for Bobby (1973). Raj Kapoor was then fighting his own internal demons, after the colossal and very expensive flop of Mera Naam Joker. Anyway, I remember Shankar taking this very badly – he felt very hurt by this. (To be fair to Shankar, the music of Mera Naam Joker had been very successful, even if the film had not). But post-Jaikishen, Shankar had not shown anything to give Raj Kapoor confidence that he could carry the show solo.

I remember an interview with Raj Kapoor where he said he missed Jaikishen so much that working with just Shankar would have constantly reminded him of Jaikishen. This might have contributed to his decision, but the fact that Shankar’s music wasn’t quite working, might also have played a big part. Raj Kapoor just HAD to make sure Bobby worked for him.

Anyway, Shankar continued to compose music through the 70s, for the odd film. But, post-Jaikishen, he never quite clicked.

Let’s now move on to the song.

It is “chalo bhool jaayen” from Do Jhoot.

Now this is a movie I fondly remember from my childhood. When I saw it then (in the mid-70s), I loved the film. When I saw it again recently, I will admit the love had diminished considerably. Not that I didn’t like the movie, but it didn’t have quite the same charm. It seemed like “just another 70s film”. Of course, it had one of my childhood favourite songs “chhatri na khol”. :-)

The story has similarities with Professor, with Moushumi doing a Shammi Kapoor type role. She is a young woman but has to disguise herself as an old woman in order to get a job of being a governess to a young girl (Aruna Irani). Pran falls in love with the “old” Moushumi, Vinod Mehra in love with the “young” Moushumi. There are the usual villain scenes – and all ends well in the end.

Coming to this song and the special category I mentioned at the start of this post, I have never heard this song other than seeing it in the film when I was young. And again, when I saw the film recently. Other than that, never. And that’s a bit of a pity, because it’s a pretty nice tune, once you listen to it a couple of times. Maybe others have heard it more often – but somehow I never got to hear it otherwise.

But then, like I said, music itself had changed in the 70s. Maybe Shankar was out of tune, not just with the S-J standard of music, but with the times too.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy the song.

And we of course, wish Moushumi Chatterjee a very happy Birthday!

WE also pay a big tribute to the memory of Shankar with this song as this song happens to be the 800th song of Shankar Jaikishan in the blog as music directors.

Video

Audio (Full)

Song-Chalo bhool jaayen jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi (Do Jhooth)(1975) Singers-Kishore Kumar, Lata, Lyrics-Vitthalbhai Patel, MD-Shankar Jaikishan
Both

Lyrics(Based on Audio version)

Chalo bhool jaayen
jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi
beete huye pal
nahin laut’te phir kabhi
aaa aaa
haathon pe likh de
mera naam honthon se tu
wahin meri manzil
jahaan le chale aaj tu

Chalo bhool jaayen
jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi
beete huye pal
nahin laut’te phir kabhi
haathon pe likh de
mera naam honthon se tu
wahin meri manzil
jahaan le chale aaj tu

teri maang mein hum iraade bharein
poore sabhi aaj waade karein
dil ko yakeen mere aata nahin
bharam mere dil se ye jaata nahin
bharam mere dil se ye jaata nahin

chalo bhool jaayen
jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi
beete huye pal
nahin laut’te phir kabhi
aaa aaa
haathon pe likh de
mera naam honthon se tu
wahin meri manzil
jahaan le chale aaj tu

laaa laa laa laa
laaalalalala
laalaalaalaa

ho o o o
o
o o
o o o o
o o o o

koi bhool ho
maaf karna sanam
kabhi waqt dhaaye jo hum pe sitam

wafa ki dagar par hamesha chalein
khushi ho ya gham
saath har dam rahein
khushi ho ya gham
saath har dam rahein
chalo bhool jaayen
jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi
beete huye pal
nahin laut’te phir kabhi

haathon pe likh de
mera naam honthon se tu
wahin meri manzil
jahaan le chale aaj tu

chalo door kohre mein kho jaayen ham
alag is zamaane se ho jaaye ham
kal ham jahaan mein rahenge nahin
yaaden hamaari rahengi yahin
yaaden hamaari rahengi yahin

chalo bhool jaayen
jahaan ko yahaan do ghadi
beete huye pal
nahin laut’te phir kabhi
aaa aaa
haathon pe likh de
mera naam honthon se tu
wahin meri manzil
jahaan le chale aaj tu

laaa la
la la
laaalalalala
laaa la
la la
laaalalalala
laaa la
la la
laaalalalala a


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Remembering Shamshad Begum on the second anniversary of her passing away (23rd April 2013). Born in Lahore on 14th April 1919, Shamshad Begum had an inclination towards singing right from her school days. Her school principal impressed with her singing, made her sing the classroom prayers, something which Naushad captilised elegantly in ‘Dard’ (1947) for a group song.

Coming from a conservative family, she was not very much encouraged to take up singing. However, one of her uncles took keen interest in her talent and secretly introduced her to composer Ghulam Haider who was the launching pad for Shamshad Begum in Hindi film music. Later on it was Mehmoob Khan himself who paid a visit to Lahore to convince her father to send her to Mumbai for singing in his new film ‘Taqdeer’ (1943) in which Motilal was paired opposite to Nargis as the lead actress and also as debutant. Soon her extraordinary talent was recognized by some of the biggest composers of that time such as Anil Biswas, Naushad, C Ramchandra, Govindram etc. After shuttling from Lahore to Bombay for some time, Shamshad soon moved to Bombay permanently with her husband Ganpat Lal Batto whom she got married to at the age of 15, much against the wishes of her family.

Shamshad Begum’s singing career was at its zenith from 1940 to 1955 and she was also the highest paid female playback singer during this period. Incidentally, the start of her singing career coincided with the initial starting phases of playback era in Indian cinema and as such she is also considered as one of the pioneers in this field. Having a distinct and unique voice made her to stand out against most of her contemporaries. She helped many composers such as SD Burman, OP Nayyar, Madan Mohan etc. by singing in their debut movies.

Writing a post on Shamshad Begum and not about her unique voice will be unfair by any means. Her voice has a perfect diction and a strong metallic timbre which was also very melodious. Fast numbers or slow pitches, her voice never fails to impress. Love songs, sad numbers, duets with various singers both male and female, teasing songs, you name it and you find various popular hits in her voice. Many of her songs have been remixed and have been forgotten. But the original songs sung by her will remain in the memories of music lovers forever.

Some of my personal favourites, not in chorological order are as follows. The famous piano song “Milte Hi Aankhen Dil Hua Deewaana Kisi Ka” from ‘Babul’ (1950) with Talat Mehmood is an absolute gem. Only a composer like Naushad could come up with such an offering with a duet sung by two very different singers as far as timbre in their respective voices are concerned. Some of her duets with Lata Mangeshkar are quite popular and famous. Though the one from the film ‘Deedar’ (1951) is great, her duet in ‘Babul’ – “Kisi Ke Dil Mein Rehna Tha” again is the one that lingers in one’s thoughts for a long time. The comparision of the two songs from the same film also validates the versatility of Shamshad Begum’s highly recognized talent, having pictured on the same actresses in two different situations.

An offering from the “King of Duets” Chitragupt from ‘Sindbad the Sailor’ (1952) with Rafi Sb – “Adaa Se Jhoomte Huye” is an evergreen rendering. Madan Mohan’s debut movie ‘Aankhen’ (1950) had a very interesting duet with Mukesh – “Humse Nain Milaana BA Pass Kar Ke“. The transition of Shamshad Begum’s voice from authoritative at the beginning of the song to the sort-of-submissive at the end is worth nothing.

Coming to ‘Mela’ (1948), Shamshad Begum under Naushad was again a lead singer with some excellent haunting voiced songs in the movie. Particular reference can be made of “Gham Ka Fasaana Kisko Sunaayen” and “Mohan Ki Muraliya Baaje” – songs that are deluged with pathos which only she could do justice. The interluding non-worded pleas in the song are sung so beautifully that they could have reached and heard even in the heavens too.

Several of her songs with OP Nayyar and SD Burman are so famous that they are remixed to this day. There are many movies which are remembered to this day only for the songs of the legend.

The famous song “Inhi Logon Ne Le Linha Dupatta Mera” was first sung by Shamshad Begum way back in 1941 for the film ‘Himmat’. “Jab Usne Gesu Bikhraye Baadal Aaya Jhoom Ke” from Shahjehan 1946, “Kaahe Koel Shor Machaaye Re” from ‘Aag’ (1948), “Aaj Kahaan Jaa Ke Nazar Takraayi” from ‘Anokhi Ada’ (1948), “Mere Piya Gaye Rangoon” from ‘Patanga’ (1949), “Ye Duniya Roop Ki Chor” from ‘Shabnam’ (1949), “Leke Pehla Pehla Pyar“, “Kahin Pe Nigahen Kahin Pe Nishaana“, and  “Boojh Mera Kya Naam Re” from ‘CID’ (1956), “Kabhi Aar Kabhi Paar Laga Teer-e-Nazar“, (Aar Paar), “Kajra Mohabbatwala Ankhiyon Mein Aisa Daala” from ‘Kismat’ (1968), “Ek Do Teen Aaja Mausam Hai Rangeen” from Awara (1951).

Each of the above songs and hundreds more are phenomena in themselves. A huge void will be very much evident minus of the voice of Shamshad Begum in most of the films that she sang for.

There was some confusion and rumour of her death in 1998 due to mistaken identity. However, Shamshad Begum also went to be conferred the Padma Bhushan in 2009. Her photo of receiving the award was published in newspapers. I remember running straight for the scissors to cut this news clipping as her photo was such a rare sight. It was so very pleasant to see the legend in the photograph. It’s one of my prized possessions to this day.

After a prolonged illness, she passed away in Mumbai on 23rd April 2013 leaving behind a legacy and a voice that will continue to rule the sound space for ever.

Here is a nice philosophical song sung by Shamshad Begum for “Doosri Shadi” from 1947.


Song – Mann Bhooli Khataayen Yaad Na Kar (Doosri Shaadi) (1947) Singer – Shamshad Begum, Lyrics – IC Kapoor, MD – Pt Gobindram
Lyrics

mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar
o mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar
phir saawan ke din aayenge
haan.. phir saawan ke din aayenge
mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar

phir koyal kook sunaayegi
phir koyal kook sunaayegi
phir pawan jhoomti aayegi
phir pawan jhoomti aayegi
pee aayenge
muskaayenge
pee aayenge
muskaayenge
tujhe roothaa hua manaayenge
tujhe roothaa hua manaayenge
man bhooli khatayen yaad na kar
o man bhooli khatayen yaad na kar

phir aasha rang dikhaayegi
phir aasha rang dikhaayegi
phir kali phool ban jaayegi
mann chaahegaa so paayegaa aa aa
mann chaahegaa so paayegaa
tere beete din phir aayenge
mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar
o mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar
phir saawan ke din aayenge
haan.. phir saawan ke din aayenge
mann bhooli khataayen yaad na kar

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————

मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर
ओ मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर
फिर सावन के दिन आएंगे
हाँ फिर सावन के दिन आएंगे
मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर

फिर कोयल कूक सुनाएगी
फिर कोयल कूक सुनाएगी
फिर पावन झूमती आएगी
फिर पावन झूमती आएगी
पी आएंगे
मुस्काएंगे
पी आएंगे
मुस्काएंगे
तुझे रूठा हुआ मनाएंगे
तुझे रूठा हुआ मनाएंगे
मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर
ओ मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर

फिर आशा रंग दिखाएगी
फिर आशा रंग दिखाएगी
फिर काली फूल बन जाएगी
मन चाहेगा सो पाएगा॰ ॰आ॰ ॰आ
मन चाहेगा सो पाएगा
तेरे बीते दिन फिर आएंगे
मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर
ओ मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर
फिर सावन के दिन आएंगे
हाँ फिर सावन के दिन आएंगे
मन भूली खताएँ याद ना कर



This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The film ‘Jwala’ was started sometimes in the second half of 1950s.  It was finally released in 1970, a year after the passing away of Madhubala.  As with some of her last films, this film also has deficient and compromised editing, and possible use of a double in some scenes, just to try and complete the storyline.  But forever, this will be known as her last released film.

Produced and directed by MV Raman for his own banner, Raman Productions, the film has an impressive star cast that reads like Sohrab Modi, Madhubala, Sunil Dutt, Pran, Ulhas, David, Jagirdar, Raj Mehra, Asha Parikh, Kamla Lakshman, Vijaylakshmi, Lalita Pawar, Leena Nazar, Roshan, Poonam, Naaz, Shivraj, Chaman Puri, Mukri, Kammo Tripathi, Keshav Kapoor, Vijay, Shobha, Sabeena, Shashi, Bhardwaj, Kesari, Vishwas Kunte, and Daisy Irani.  Interesting to note that Asha Parekh plays a supporting role in this film, that indicates the period of this film to be prior to when Asha ji became a leading lady with the film ‘Dil Deke Dekho’ in 1959.

There are 8 songs in this film, two of which are written by Shailendra and the remaining are by Rajinder Krishan.  This song is from the pen of Rajinder Krishan.  Music is by Shankar Jaikishan.  The singing voice is that of Mukesh, and the online performance is by Sunil Dutt, in the company of a lot of elephants, leopards and lions.  The song is the typical ‘announcing the arrival’ of the leading man.  There are so many songs of this type in Hindi films – maybe we should be getting on with another special category for such songs.

It is the voice the makes everything special for the songs he has sung.  As is the sound of this song.  Recorded sometimes in the second half of 1950s, probably 1957 or thereabouts.  Listen and enjoy.


Song – Thaam Lo Kaleja Sab Apna Apna (Jwaala) (1971) Singer – Mukesh, Lyrics – Rajinder Krishan, MD – Shankar Jaikishan
Lyrics

thaam lo kaleja
thaam lo kaleja
sab apna apna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
thaam lo kaleja
sab apna apna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
laaya hai ulfat ka rangeen sapna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
thaam lo kaleja

azaad pacnhhi masti mein ghoomun
munh badliyon ka ud ud ke chhoomun
azaad pacnhhi masti mein ghoomun
munh badliyon ka ud ud ke chhoomun
paayal ki awaaz sun sun ke jhoomun
paayal ki awaaz sun sun ke jhoomun
thaam lo kaleja
o thaam lo kaleja
sab apna apna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
laaya hai ulfat ka rangeen sapna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
thaam lo kaleja

dil bijliyon ke maine uchhaale
aur aandhiyon ke armaan nikaale
dil bijliyon ke maine uchhaale
aur aandhiyon ke armaan nikaale
himmat hai jiski nazar to milaa le
himmat hai jiski nazar to milaa le
thaam lo kaleja
o thaam lo kaleja
sab apna apna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
laaya hai ulfat ka rangeen sapna
raahi aaya hai jhoomta jhaamta
thaam lo kaleja

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————

थाम लो कलेजा
थाम लो कलेजा
सब अपना अपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
थाम लो कलेजा
सब अपना अपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
लाया है उलफत का रंगीन सपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
थाम लो कलेजा

आज़ाद पंछी मस्ती में घूमूँ
मुंह बदलियों का उड़ उड़ के चूमूँ
आज़ाद पंछी मस्ती में घूमूँ
मुंह बदलियों का उड़ उड़ के चूमूँ
पायल की आवाज़ सुन सुन के झूमूँ
पायल की आवाज़ सुन सुन के झूमूँ
थाम लो कलेजा
ओ थाम लो कलेजा
सब अपना अपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
लाया है उलफत का रंगीन सपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
थाम लो कलेजा

दिल बीजलियों के मैंने उछाले
और आंधीयों के अरमान निकाले
दिल बीजलियों के मैंने उछाले
और आंधीयों के अरमान निकाले
हिम्मत है जिसकी नज़र तो मिला ले
हिम्मत है जिसकी नज़र तो मिला ले
थाम लो कलेजा
ओ थाम लो कलेजा
सब अपना अपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
लाया है उलफत का रंगीन सपना
राही आया है झूमता झामता
थाम लो कलेजा


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The twinkling eyes and the arresting smile get to your heart when she sings “Kabhi Aar Kabhi Paar Laaga Teer e Nazar”. An accomplished dancer, who has the capability to take a song, many levels higher.  Witness that in “Diya Na Bujhe Ri Aaj Hamaara” (‘Son of India’, 1962), “Dagaa Dagaa Wai Wai Wai” (‘Kaali Topi Laal Roomaal’, 1959), “Tera Jalwa Jisne Dekha Wo Tera Ho Gaya” (‘Ujaala’, 1959), “Tera Teer O Bepeer Dil Ke Aaram Paar Hai”, (‘Sharaarat’, 1959), “Madhuban Mein Radhika Naache Re” (‘Kohinoor’, 1960), “Rang Rangeela Saanwra Mohe Mil Gayo Jamna Paar” (‘Baarood’, 1960), “Ab Na Chhupo Re Chhalia” (‘King Kong’, 1962), “Kaanha Jaa Re Teri Murli Ki Dhun” (‘Tel Maalish Boot Polish’, 1962), “Zulmi Hamaare Saanwariya Ho Ram” (‘Mr X In Bombay’, 1964), “Tujhse Wo Neha Lagaaye” (‘Shreeman Funtoosh’, 1965), “Door Kahin Door Hamen Le Chalo Sanam” (‘Ek Sapera Ek Lutera’, 1966), “Main To Khadi Re Khadi Re, Aankh Ladi Re Ladi Re” (‘Sab Ka Ustad’, 1967), “Mera Naam Hai Chameli, Main Hoon Maalan Albeli” (‘Raja Aur Runk’, 1968), and many more.  Once again request Atul ji to create a new category – ‘Kum Kum Dances’.

Greetings to Kum Kum on her birth anniversary today (22nd April).
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

‘. . . given a chance, I’d choose to be an actress all over again.’ Closing words in an interview that she gave ten years before she passed away in 2000.  She is the recipient of the very first Filmfare award for best female supporting role – she won it for her portrayal of a young fisherwoman, Mohnia, in the film ‘Baadban’ (1954).

Remembering Usha Kiran, on the anniversary of her birth today (22nd April).
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The first lady of Bangla cinema. And the first lady singing superstar of Indian cinema. It is said that at the height of her popularity, she required protection when she was traveling.

Remembering Kanan Devi on the anniversary of her birth today (22nd April). (It is her 99th anniversary)
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This is his 400th article in the blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

MISSING GEMS FROM THE GOLDEN 50s…Song No. 18….LAST SONG OF THIS SERIES
—————————————————————————
Today’s song is from film Bewaqoof-60. This is the last song of this series. This series has been very interesting and it gave a pleasure of discussing songs from the 50’s decade. Some of the songs were well known and popular in those times and the most others were good enough to provide nostalgic feelings.

Today’s article happens to be my 400 th article on this Blog. I started writing consistently on this Blog from 1-10-2012. Thanks to ATUL ji’s encouragement and active substantial help in writing Lyrics for me,I was able to reach the figure of 400 articles on songs in 30 months. This is an average of about 13-14 songs every month. During these months,our readers from all over the music loving world gave comments of appreciation,which worked as a motivation for me. In this period,I did 21 series of songs on different Themes. My endeavour has always been to present forgotten pearls from Hindi films and side by side,provide useful,unique information on films, songs, singers, composers, actors, directors, production houses, mythology and behind the scene stories.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than six years. This blog has over 11000 song posts by now.

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