Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Ae baad e sabaa ithhlaati na aa

Posted on: March 3, 2013


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.

We missed a major anniversary three days ago. Remembering (belatedly) the litterateur, and the famous poet and lyricist, Pt. Narendra Sharma. 28th February, 2013, is the 100th birth anniversary of this illustrious man of letters. Narendra ji was born in 1913 in the village called Jehaangirpuri, in the vicinity of Bulandshehar in Uttar Pradesh, in a Brahmin Gaud family. He was a bright student. Despite losing his father at a very young age, he continued his education, while doing part time work to support himself. In 1936, he completed his Masters in Hindi Literature from Allahabad University.

By this time, his capabilities and prowess as an author and poet of mark were already becoming known. He had already started publishing his works in various magazines like ‘Chaand’, ‘Saraswati’ and ‘Madhuri’. He worked with the renowned poet Sumitra Nandan Pant ji in editing a Hindi magazine, and started his career as a teacher in the University. He joined the 1942 ‘Quit India’ movement, and also spent some months behind the bars, on that account.

Sitting so far away from Bombay, and with a focus far removed from the film world, it is a surprise that Narendra ji got connected with it. There is an interesting story behind that. The year was 1942 and Bombay Talkies was riding high on the unprecedented success of its film ‘Kismet’ (1942). In the storm of this success and the high profile of this film and the production company, a troubled drama was brewing behind the scenes. And by the end of 1942, beginning 1943 a part of the Bombay Talkies team, led by Shashadhar Mukherjee and Ashok Kumar, broke away to form the production house of Filmistan. With this transition, Kavi Pradeep, the lead poet and lyricist for Bombay Talkies, also left and joined Filmistan. Bombay Talkies was now without a big name poet lyricist.

The search began, and Devika Rani, who was running the show at Bombay Talkies, sent out feelers to people in her circle, for engaging a poet-lyricist of high caliber and high profile for her company. The message reached another famous poet and author of that period, Shri Bhagwati Charan Verma. He knew Pandit Narendra Sharma and his work, and suggested his name to Devika Rani. And then in Februray 1943, Bhagwati Babu visited Narendra ji in Allahabad, and presented the invitation from Devika Rani to come to Bombay. At first Narendra ji declined, saying that he has no experience or inclination to write for films. But Bhagwati Babu prevailed upon him, and convinced him to come to Bombay.

During the train journey to Bombay, Narendra ji was musing and pondering over his situation. In this frame of mind, he took up his pen and composed a song. Although better known for his skills with the Hindi language, the Urdu language was also very close to him, as it was taught as the second language, as part of the education system in Uttar Pradesh. He purposefully composed the song in Hindi-Urdu, knowing well that the Bombay film industry used more Hindi-Urdu than pure Hindi.

On reaching Bombay, he met with Devika Rani and other people on her team, including music director Anil Biswas. The appointment was immediate and Narendra ji was signed up for a four year contract with Bombay Talkies. With the contract came the immediate assignment to write lyrics for the next venture, which was ‘Hamaari Baat’ (1943). In preparation for the music and songs of this film, Narendra ji shared with Anil Biswas, the song he had written on the train, just to try out his hand at Hindi-Urdu poetry. Anil Biswas immediately liked the lyrics and decided to include the song in the film. And so was decided the debut song of Narendra ji in the films.

The song, “Ae Baad e Sabaa Itthlaati Na Aa” is being presented in this post, as a mark of honor and remembrance of the centenary celebration of this famous author and poet. The song is recorded in the voice of Parul Ghosh.

The next four years of working with Bombay Talkies and with music director Anil Biswas saw the creation of such memorable gems like “Main Unki Ban Jaaun Re” (Hamaari Baat, 1943), “Saanjh Ki Belaa Panchhi Akela”(Jwaar Bhaata, 1944) and “Bhool Gaye, Tum Pyaas Bujhaana Bhool Gaye” (Pratima, 1945).

In 1947, after the expiry of the contract with Bombay Talkies, Narendra ji started working independently. The transition in the fortunes of the nation also witnessed a transition in the arena of film music. Western music form was being integrated with the Indian classical and folk music, and clearly the lyricists and composers formed two streams. One stream was transformed with light workable creations using completely new rhythms. And the second stream continued to create the slow and sensitive music rooted in the culture and the folklore. Narendra ji continued to work in this slow stream, all his life. And it clearly is evident from the bevy of songs that he has contributed. Just sample the lyrics he has written in his later years – “Yashomati Maiyyaa Se Bole Nandlala”(‘Satyam Shivam Sundaram’, 1978) and “Bhanwre Ne Khilaaya Phool, Phool Ko Le Gayaa Raajkunwar” (‘Prem Rog’, 1982). And on the way he has created such fabulous icons like “Patjhad Ke Din Beet Gaye” and “Baadar Ki Chaadar Mein Bijuriyaa Aayee Re” (‘Uddhaar’, 1949), “Charan Tumnhaare, Phool Hamaare”(‘Narsinh Avtaar’, 1949), “Mann Mor Huaa Matwaala, Kisne Jaadu Daala Re”(‘Afsar’, 1950), “Baandh Preeti Phool Dor, Mann Le Ke Chit Chor” (‘Malti Maadhav’, 1951), “Wo Chaand Nahin Hai Dil Hai Kisi Deewaane Ka”(‘Aandhiyaan’, 1952), “Tum Bansi Ho Main Taan, Hum Tum Do Nahin”(‘Radha Krishna’, 1954), “Saajan Ke Paas Chali, Milan Ki Rajni Aayee” (‘Sajni’, 1956), “Tum Suno Suno Ghansyaam” (‘Gokul Ka Chor’, 1959), “Kyun Pyaala Chhalaktaa Hai” (‘Phir Bhi’, 1971) and many more. Any such list will never be complete without the mention of the songs of ‘Bhaabhi Ki Choodiyaan’ (1961) – “Kahaan Udd Chale Hain Mann Praan Mere”, “Tum Se Hi Ghar Ghar Kehlaaya”, “Lau Lagaati Geet Gaati” and the iconic song that has become a byword in the Hindi film music, “Jyoti Kalash Chhalke”.

In parallel developed another, albeit lesser known part of his most prolific career. In 1953 he got associated with Akaashwani (All India Radio), and was appointed as the producer for Hindi programs at the Bombay station. In 1961, he came to the Delhi station for a tenure of 5 years, after which he returned to Bombay in 1966. His contributions to the program design at Akaashwani, are some of the most significant accomplishments of Narendra ji. He envisioned a national program channel that would tie together Akaashwani into a single thread broadcasting nationwide. And he named this program channel as Vividh Bharti – the channel that we have all grown up listening to. Many of the enduring programs, some of which still continue, like ‘Hawa Mahal’, and ‘Chhaayageet’ have been envisioned by him. And then, on to ‘Doordsarshan’, the popular ‘Chitrahaar’ program was his dream-child. He is also known as the resident lyricist for the iconinc historical serial ‘Mahaabhaarat’. Most of the songs, including the famous title song, “Ath Shri Mahaabhaarat Katha” have been written by him. He is also the poet behind the famous ‘Ath Swaagatam, Shubh Swaagatam” which was the welcome song played at the 1982 Asiad in New Delhi. A prolific writer, he has authored 12 collections of poetry and 10 novels, besides many other works on the Hindi language and literature. Reading about and getting to know the depth and breadth of his talent, the words “Jyoti Kalash Chhalke” so aptly represent his eminent persona.

Narendra ji continued his journey away from this world on 11th February, 1989.

‘Hamaari Baat’ (1943) is a film from the production house of Bombay Talkies. The film is directed by MI Dharamse. The star cast of the film includes Devika Rani, Jairaj, Suraiya, Shah Nawaaz, Mumtaz Ali, David, Prabha, Rajkumari Shukla, Kamta Prasad, Uday Kumar, Arun Kumar, Dulaari, Raj Kapoor.

Yes, amazing trivia, this is the first screen appearance of Raj Kapoor, later to become one of the moguls of Indian cinema. More trivia, this film was to be the last film in which Devika Rani appeared on the screen.

There are a total of 10 songs in this film, penned by Pandit Narendra Sharma and tuned into music by Anil Biswas. The singing voice is that of Parul Ghosh. A lovely sound of sadness, sadness of having lost all the happiness. And a pensive voice telling the morning breeze not come this way, the flowers of the heart have withered away. Sensitivities magnified.

(NOTE: Details about the life history of Pandit Narendra Sharma documented above, are adapted from an article on him, in the book ‘Hindi Filmon Ke Geetkaar’ by Shri Anil Bhargava.)

ae baad e sabaah ithlaati na aa
mera gumcha e dil to sookh gayaa
mere pyaase labon ko chhuye binaa
paimaana khushi ka toot gayaa

O the cool rejuvenating breeze of early morn
Do not drift pompously this way
For the flower of my heart is already withered
The cup of happiness is broken
Without even touching my thirsty lips

(NOTE: baad = breeze,

sabaah = dawn, morning

baad-e-sabaah = early morning breeze

ithlaati = variant of ithlaana – to be self pompous, to walk carefree,
pretentiously

gumcha = flower

gumcha-e-dil = flower of the heart

labon = lips

paimaana = drinking cup)

ghaayal pe lagaana ghaath hi kyaa
jo bigad gayi wo baat hi kyaa
nanhe se dil ki bisaat hi kyaa
jo toot gayaa so toot gayaa

What good it is to again hurt the wounded
What good is a story that has turned sour
What is the power, the worth of a tiny fledgling heart
What if this heart is shattered
So be it

ab dil mein aas ummed nahin
dukhiya aankhon mein neend nahin
maalik ne aisa naseeb diya
jo aaj milaa kal phoot gayaa

The heart has no more hopes, no expectations
And the cheerless eyes have no more sleep
My Maker has written a fate for me
That is on the up today
But is destroyed, in a day


Song-Ae baad e sabaa ithhlaati na aa (Hamaari Baat)(1943) Singer-Parul Ghosh, Lyrics-Pt Narendra Sharma, MD-Anil Biswas

Lyrics

ae baad e sabaah
ithlaati na aa
mera gumcha e dil to
sookh gayaa
baad e sabaah
ithlaati na aa
mera gumcha e dil to sookh gayaa
mere pyaase labon ko
chhuye binaa
paimaana khushi ka toot gayaa
ae baad e sabaah

ghaayal pe lagaana ghaat hi kyaa
jo bigad gayi ee ee ee
jo bigad gayi wo baat hi kyaa
ghaayal pe lagaana ghaat hi kyaa
nanhe se dil ki bisaat hi kyaa
nanhe se
nanhe se dil ki bisaat hi kyaa
jo toot gayaa
so toot gayaa
ae baad e sabaah
ithlaati na aa
mera gumcha e dil to sookh gayaa
ae baad e sabaah

ab dil mein aas ummed nahin
dukhiya aankhon mein neend nahin
ab dil mein aas ummed nahin
dukhiya aankhon mein neend nahin
maalik ne aisa naseeb diya
maalik ne aisa naseeb diya
jo aaj milaa
kal phoot gayaa
ae baad e sabaah
ithlaati na aa
mera gumcha e dil to sookh gayaa
ae baad e sabaah

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

ए बाद ए सबा
इठलाती ना आ
मेरे गुंच ए दिल तो
सूख गया
बाद ए सबा
इठलाती ना आ
मेरे गुंच ए दिल तो सूख गया
मेरे प्यासे लबों को
छूए बिना
पैमाना खुशी का टूट गया
ए बाद ए सबा

घायल पे लगाना घात ही क्या
जो बिगड़ गई
जो बिगड़ गई वो बात ही क्या
घायल पे लगाना घात ही क्या
नन्हें से दिल की बिसात ही क्या
नन्हें से
नन्हें से दिल की बिसात ही क्या
जो टूट गया
सो टूट गया
ए बाद ए सबा
इठलाती ना आ
मेरे गुंच ए दिल तो सूख गया
बाद ए सबा

अब दिल में आस उम्मीद नहीं
दुखिया आँखों में नींद नहीं
अब दिल में आस उम्मीद नहीं
दुखिया आँखों में नींद नहीं
मालिक ने ऐसा नसीब दिया
मालिक ने ऐसा नसीब दिया
जो आज मिला
कल फूट गया
ए बाद ए सबा
इठलाती ना आ
मेरे गुंच ए दिल तो सूख गया
बाद ए सबा

7 Responses to "Ae baad e sabaa ithhlaati na aa"

Thank you very much for the article on Pandit Narendra Sharma.

Just a few hours ago I realised that we missed his birth centenary when I was writing a short article on a song where the reference to Vivid Bharati came. Then I was consoling myself that being the centenary, an article on him can be written anytime during his centenary year. So I thought of writing the article sometime during the next couple of days.

Coincidentally, I had also selected a song from the film ‘Hamari Baat’ (1943) but a different song ‘bistar bichha diyaa hai’ an unusual song from the pen of Pandit Narendra Sharma picturised on Raj Kapoor and Suraiya. I will write on this song sometime in the next couple of days.

Pandit Narendra Sharma proved a point that a poet and writer can also start a successful commercial venture called Vivid Bharati despite various odds.

Like

Thanks Sadanand ji

Yes, the accomplishments of Pandit Narendra Sharma are varied and excpetional.

I look forward to your write up also – the song you have selected, as you say, is unusual indeed, :).

Rgds
Sudhir

Like

Dear Sudhir,

earthmusic.net and Anil Biswas’s filmography list in PDF form in ‘gitayan.com’ give the name of the lyricist of the song ‘bistar bichha diya hai’ as Wali Sahab where as ‘myswar.com gives the credit to Pandit Narendra Sharma.

Can you check it on HFGK for the correct position in this regard?

Thanks.

Like

Sir, thank you very much for the article on Shri.Narendra Sharma ji. Got to know the details of journey to films and other facets of his personality. Listening this song for the first time, but many of them from the songs mentioned by you have been in my collection.
Yes, he was a great poet and litterateur. ‘hamare desh mein unhone janam liya ye hamare liye gaurav ki baath hain! ham unhe shraddha aur samman se yaad kartein hain aur karte rahenge !!!

Like

Sir,

ae baad e sabaah ithlaati na aa
mera ‘ guncha-e dil ‘ to sookh gayaa

I am puzzled, why the this word is spelled as ‘ gumcha-e-dil ‘ in this script, where as in devnagari, it is proper ‘ guncha-e-dil ‘ . guncha-e-dil or gooncha-e-dil would be correct in english script as well as true to pronounciation of the word.

Regards.

Like

What a voice; as clear as a river.
Shame she could not get that elusive fame

Like

Thanks for the interesting information on Narendra Ji. I remember the lovely song and it was a treat to learn the context. Could baad-e-shaba perhaps mean breeze of the evening? Is Hamari Baat available on DVD?
Please continue the good work.
Regards

Like

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