Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Theme song’ Category


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4251 Post No. : 15471

Back here on the blog after a fairly long break.
I daresay it would’ve been even longer if it were not a very special occasion today.

From today, we start the centenary celebrations of Sahir Ludhianvi’s birth.
Since he was born on 8th March 1921, today happens to be his 99th birth anniversary.

So yes, it is a very special occasion for Urdu poetry and classic HFM lovers. As a massive Sahir fan, I thought I owed it to him to write a post for the occasion. I’ve written so often about him here, on practically every birth and death anniversary, and have nothing new to say anymore – and yet it feels like a betrayal of sorts to let this day go by, without paying tribute to him.

So when Avinashji, an even bigger Sahir fan than myself, requested me to write a post for Sahir on this occasion, I could not, but agree. 🙂

But I must also admit that for the first time I told Avinashji that I don’t think I’d be in the right mental frame to be able to do this. For me, writing a post here is an investment of emotion – and right now, to be honest, I feel quite empty within. If it were not for Sahir, I don’t think I’d be able to pull myself together for this post.

To Avinashji’s credit, as always, he provided me with a list of songs and lyrics that I could choose from. And left it to me to see whether I could come up with a post. I owe this post to him too.

Ok, enough about myself and my “mental frame” – this post is about Sahir, not about me. 🙂

What can I say about Sahir that I haven’t said before?
Actually nothing.

But since it’s Sahir, whatever I’ve said before can hopefully be repeated, without sounding boring. 🙂
Just like whatever Sahir wrote as social messages, not once but repeatedly in different ways, was never boring, and only meant as a reminder to society, to show people a mirror.

For me, as for many others, Sahir was much more than just a poet or lyricist. Yes, he was a lyricist par excellence. But I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have had this level of regard for him if he’d limited himself to just writing lyrics or poetry on mundane matters, however beautifully worded.

Sahir’s greatness, in my mind, has a lot to do with the topics he chose to express his views on. And the manner of such expression.

Sure, he could write about romance – “abhi na jao chhod kar” will always be one of my all-time favourite romantic songs.

Sure, he could write about heartbreak too – “jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”, another favourite.

Sure, he could write about love in its multitude of shades – is there a more exquisite ode to love than “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq”?

Sure, he could write bhajans with consummate ease – “tora mann darpan kehlaaye” and “aan milo aan milo shyam saanwre” are just two examples.

Sure, he could write light-hearted, fun songs too – the first song that comes to mind in this category is an all-time favourite “sar jo tera chakraaye”.

Sure, he could write, and wrote quite often, on a mother’s love for her child – “tu mere pyar ka phool hai”, “tere bachpan ko jawaani ki dua deti hoon” and “tu mere saath rahega munne” come to mind.

And yet, Sahir rises, no, TOWERS, above all others when it comes to writing on social issues.

No one, NO ONE, showed a mirror to society as earnestly as Sahir. It was as if he truly came into his own on these occasions.

Whether he was writing about injustice towards the oppressed, society’s shocking treatment of women, casteism, communalism, labor exploitation, or the futility of war, Sahir’s words were like cries of anguish, straight from the heart. You could feel the raw sincerity in them, even if they were often laced with cynicism, sarcasm or anger. Or, occasionally, even hope.

So many songs come to mind.

“Tu Hindu banega na musalmaan banega” – where Sahir calls out communalism in all its ugliness
“Cheen-o-arab hamara” – where Sahir sarcastically exposes India’s hypocrisy over wealth disparity
“Jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain” – Sahir at his cynical best, showing society a mirror of its ugly reality
“Khuda-e-bartar teri zameen par” – where Sahir busts the myth about the glory of war, pointing out that there are no winners in war, only bloodshed
“Ponchh kar ashq” – where Sahir exhorts the oppressed to rise and demand their rights from the oppressor, pointing out that colour, religion, caste, race can never be above humanity
“Aurat ne janam diya mardon ko” – Sahir’s famous lament about society’s treatment of women
“Wo subah kabhi to aayegi”– where Sahir, in one of his less frequent refrains, chooses hope over despair

and many more.

Every single time asking questions of society, pointing out its flaws, exhorting it to reform.

That each of his songs is STILL relevant more than 50 years after he wrote them, is truly sad, and a reflection of Indian society – but no one can ever fault Sahir for not doing his utmost to put his writing ability to good use. If society is still languishing in darkness, it certainly isn’t Sahir’s fault.

And it is for this particular trait of Sahir’s that he has a very special place in my heart.

Yes, he’d have had his own place in my heart anyway for lyrics like “wo afsaana jise anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, use ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

But his attempt at social awareness, and his speaking truth to power, takes my regard for him to a different level altogether.

If I may say so, and no disrespect meant to any lyricists who have come since, but no one comes close to Sahir’s intensity in this one matter.

Or maybe times have changed too.

Now, coming to the song for today.

Avinashji gave me a few options – of the lot, I picked the title song of “Samaj Ko Badal Daalo” (1970). Lyrics have been provided by Avinashji, of course. 🙂

It’s a lament, not uncharacteristic of Sahir, where he lets loose on society itself, blaming it for its own ills. That it tolerates corruption and crime is the biggest reason society suffers these, in the first place. Reform cannot start unless society decides to step up, and adopt a zero tolerance policy towards these. Hence “samaj ko badal daalo”.

I honestly don’t think it’s a bad assessment of why we are the way we are.

Without coming across as too preachy, let me share a few thoughts quickly.

We Indians love to blame our politicians for everything. We blame them for corruption, for the poor state of our roads, education and healthcare, for dividing society along communal lines – basically everything.

And yes, since they are our leaders, and have power, it’s not unfair to place responsibility and accountability on them.

And yet, where do these politicians come from?

They don’t fall from the skies, they come from amongst US.

So if we’re complaining about corruption and bigotry in our politicians, we first need to acknowledge that we, as a society, are ourselves guilty of these very shortcomings in our character. We carry a lot of baggage historically, and don’t have a particularly high moral compass ourselves. Our politicians then just exploit our weaknesses.

For example, politicians pander to our base instincts, dividing us based on identity, or other group characteristic. And we fall for it. Every single time.

Then again, when it comes to governance, they manage to get away with promises because we don’t make a serious enough effort to hold them accountable anyway. We behave like slaves – and get treated as such. So our leaders end up with power, but no accountability.

This is OUR fault. If we didn’t allow them to exploit us like this, if we raised the bar and held them accountable to us, things would be very different.

So when Sahir writes “samaj ko badal daalo”, it does resonate a lot with me. And hopefully with others too.

End of “preaching”. 🙂

The song itself is sung by Rafisaab, at the start of the film, as credits roll. I remember seeing this film as a young boy – what I remember most about it from that time is that the hero (Parikshat Sahni, who was then still Ajay Sahni) gets stabbed midway in the film and dies. I’d never seen a film till then where the hero dies midway :-), so I couldn’t reconcile easily to this at all.

A few years ago, I watched this film again, just out of curiosity. I wouldn’t call it a bad film as such (I’ve seen worse), but the last 30 minutes or so, are very dark and depressing. After watching this film, it might linger in your mind – and you’re likely to feel sad for a while.

Considering people usually look towards cinema for escapist fare, and don’t want to be reminded of daily miseries of life, this film is definitely not one you should watch if you want a feel-good feeling from the film. Don’t get misled by the fun “tum apni saheli ko” song, picturised on Prem Chopra.

But none of this takes away from Sahir, who is the reason for this post. Rafisaab singing Sahir’s lines are always a joy for me – even if it’s a sad song.

I hope you will also listen to it – and possibly agree that what we need most is for society itself to reform, otherwise we will continue bad practice of the past, and only regress.

In my opinion, the greatest danger to a society is not economic bankruptcy (which, however hard, CAN be corrected through appropriate economic policy), but moral bankruptcy (which eats away at the very fabric of society, and is therefore far more difficult to correct).

Thank you for reading.

Audio
(audio) (lyrics noted are as per this link)
Video

Song-Samaaj ko badal daalo (Samaaj Ko Badal Daalo)(1970) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhianvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

(Ye ek katha jo laakhon logon ke ae
Jeevan ka darpan hai
Desh pita ke charnon mein
Ham sab ki ore se arpan hai)

***

Samaaj ko badal daalo o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo o o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ae tan-badan hai jinme zindagi ee nahin
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo o
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o

Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley
Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley ae
Oonch neech se bharaa
Nizaam kyun chale ae
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo o
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————-

समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो

कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने ए तन-बदन है जिनमे ज़िन्दगी ई नहीं
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो ओ
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ

सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले
सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले ए
उंच नीच से भरा
निजाम क्यूँ चले ए
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो ओ
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4205 Post No. : 15395

Memories that are pure gold – the mention of his name brings to mind a limited set of memories. Ah but these memories are pure gold.

Remembering Vijay Anand today, on his birth anniversary. He would have been 86 today.

Without any doubts, the best and the most remarkable sense of visualization of music. Not just thinking of films with Navketan – ‘Nau Do Gyaarah’ (1957), ‘Kaala Bazaar’ (1960), ‘Tere Ghar Ke Saamne’ (1963), ‘Guide’ (1965), ‘Jewel Thief’ (1967), ‘Johnny Mera Naam’ (1970) and more, his films outside of Navketan are also as memorable for their songs. ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966) being the most popular and loved film for its songs, and their presentation. Of course, no one counters the wholesome effect of “O Haseena Zulfon Waali”. But then, see “O Mere Sona Re Sona Re Sona Re”. The superb performances in this song by both Shammi Kapoor and Asha Parekh are the handiwork of a most capable director, who knows how to bring out the maximum impact of everything that goes into presenting a song – the ambience, the words, the music, the facial expressions, the body language, crafting the merger of actions with music, the give and take between the two protagonists – everything brought together to convey this latent feeling in the heart, bringing it to the lips, and then expressing it with an un-tethered exuberance on the part of the lady, and a coy displeasure (to start with) on part of the gentleman. The end result – as Atul ji has often pointed out – after three stanzas, all is well and the lovers are seen walking hand in hand.

Take ‘Black Mail’ (1973) and the wonderfully soft rendition of a surreal presence of the loved one – felt through the written word, the voice of lover echoing through the letters, and the presence is so real that the lady wakes up with a start having felt the reality of a kiss on her forehead. Yes, the song is “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas, Tum Rehti Ho”. I am never tired of replaying this song, the video I mean. Just the song itself is great, but its presentation on screen has enhanced its beauty and impact many folds.

Vijay Anand has also appeared in a handful of films. In some of the films that he directed himself, and he is not in the list of actors, one can catch a glimpse of him in very brief cameo appearances. However, he has appeared in bigger roles, and also as a hero. The first film in which he made his debut in a meaty role is ‘Joru Ka Bhai’ from 1955, a comedy film in which the lead pair was Balraj Sahni and Sheela Ramani.

His next major appearance is as the hero of the 1957 film ‘Agra Road’, a cops and robbers type of story. Next we see him on screen along with his two elder brothers, Chetan and Dev, in the 1960 film ‘Kala Bazaar’ which he also directed. In this film he plays the role of the ex-boyfriend of Waheeda Rehman, who has gone for higher studies to France, and returns with his amorous loyalties shifted elsewhere.

After a gap of four years, he is seen once again in a supporting role in ‘Haqeeqat’ (1964), a film that had a large ensemble of main line stars. The next gap is much longer – 7 years. And he makes his screen appearance once again in the 1971 film ‘Tere Mere Sapne’, a film that he has directed himself. His role in this film as Dr. Jagannath Kothari, a famous gynecologist (in film), is very impressive and effective.

The next film is ‘Chhupa Rustom’ in 1973. Dev and himself, are police agents who go undercover to capture a gang of smugglers. Once again, this film is directed by him. His role, masquerading as a shady, brash, small time, two-timing con man brings out the comedian in him – in my opinion one of his best screen appearances. This film is an Indianized version of the famous novel by Alistair MacLean – ‘Fear Is The Key’.

Parallel to ‘Chhupa Rustam’ in 1973, he also appeared in the film ‘Double Cross’. In this, he appears in a double role as the hero and his twin brother who is on the wrong side of the law. He was not yet 40, but he looked quite overage for this twin brothers roles. He appears to be trying very hard to be the role, but was not convincing. The con-man role in ‘Chhupa Rustam’ was a great act, but in ‘Double Cross’ he did not quiet click. It is interesting to note that in the role of the brother on the right side of the law, Vijay is a professional photographer. That rang a bell in my mind and I checked. Very much so, the film ‘Heera Panna’ in which Dev Anand plays the role of a professional photographer also, was released in 1973 itself. As one compares the two performances, they are quite similar in mannerism, attire and body language. Now who was copying from whom? 🙂

In 1973 came another good film, produced and directed by his elder brother Chetan – ‘Hindustan Ki Kasam’. He played the role of a fighter pilot, coming from a family of soldiers and pilots. There is a brief but a great monologue by him in this film – “Saathiyo, Dosto, Hum Hi To Aaj Ke Arjun Hain. . .”. (It can be viewed at 39:40 on the timeline at the link for the film ‘Hindustan Ki Kasam‘.) He presents this monologue, takes to the skies and then does not return. A short role, albeit an impressive one.

A year later he produced the film ‘Chor Chor’ (1974), but did not direct it himself. It is a suspense thriller that did not make it good on the box office, however, it was praised by the critics and reviewers. The film had no songs, and its star cast was very interesting. Vijay had assembled many actors of yesteryears for this film – Trilok Kapoor, Jairaj, and Ranjan. The female lead opposite to Vijay himself is Leena Chandawarkar. I have not seen this film, but it seems interesting enough to merit a view.

In 1974, he appeared in another film, in a very impressive performance once again. The film ‘Kora Kaagaz’, and he is cast with Jaya Bhaduri as the leading pair. The film is about an idealistic romance that transforms into matrimony. And the matrimony cannot withstand the reality of social relations and issues of personal choices – it breaks apart. Alas, there is a happy ending as the estranged spouses meet and make up in railway waiting room. Another very impressive performance.

Then, after a gap of another 4 years, Vijay appeared in another very good role – that of a rich landlord, very well performed. The film is ‘Main Tulsi Tere Aangan Ki’. A gem of a film by Raj Khosla, Vijay is pitted against two seasoned performers – Nutan as his first and legally wedded wife and Asha Parekh as his second companion in life, whom he brings home much to the dislike of the first lady of the house.

In 1981, came the film ‘Ghungroo Ki Awaaz’ – a tale of haunting and intrigues. Once again, Vijay finds himself out of his depth. Is that a reflection of being a very good director and then come to act under the direction of another director who may not be as well capable. Don’t know whether we should draw this comparison. But then this film is not in my list of impressive performances by Vijay.

In 1984, Chetan Anand produced and directed ‘Hum Rahe Na Hum’ in which Vijay and Shabana Azmi played the lead pair. Then in 2001, he produced and directed ‘Jaana Na Dil Se Door’ in which he and brother Dev played senior roles in a film with an impressive star cast that includes Kamini Kaushal, Mohnish Behl, Moushumi Chatterji, Indrani Bannerjee, Dinesh Hingoo and Vikram Gokhale.

Vijay also appeared in a mini series on TV in 1994, titled ‘Tehkikaat’, in the role of Sam D’Silva, an investigator.

Readers would remember that Alfred Hitchcock always made it point to appear in his own films in a fleeting cameo appearance. That was his signature mark in his films, and the audiences would eagerly await to catch his appearance as they viewed his films for the first time. Vijay Anand has also a similar reputation, albeit we are not sure we have tracked down his cameos in all the films that he directed. A brief list of what I have been able to compile.

He appears in ‘Funtoosh’ (1956) as a young out-of-work writer, who meets Funtoosh (Dev Anand) after he is released from the mental hospital. Funtoosh gifts him a pen to write.

Then in ‘Tere Ghar Ke Saamne’ (1963) he appears in the stairwell of Qutab Minar, wearing spectacles, walking down the stairs with two other persons, as Dev and Nutan are busy with their amorous inclinations singing “Dil Ka Bhanwar Karey Pukaar”.

In ‘Guide’ (1965), we hear his voice, as an unknown stranger is asking about Raju guide on the railway platform. Just a very brief dialogue.

In ‘Jewel Thief’ (1967), we hear his voice on the phone, in a brief conversation with Helen.

In ‘Prem Pujari’ (1970) he appears very briefly in the role of a spy, a fleeting cameo.

Again in 1970 ‘Johnny Mera Naam’, we hear his voice very briefly as an officer of Nepal Police greets Iftekhar at the Kathmandu airport, welcoming him to Nepal.

Here is a very interesting on screen appearance trivia. Hollywood producer and director, Mike Judge of the ‘Beavis And Butthead’ fame, was a great fan of Vijay Anand. In fact, in his animated film ‘Beavis And Butthead Do America’, there is a song being played in a casino in Las Vegas. On stage, among the musicians, there is a guitar player accompanying the singer. Mike Judge had based this character on Vijay Anand. The song in that film is ‘Love Roller Coaster’, available on YouTube; just click on the link.

A brief list of shelved films of Vijay Anand.

After ‘Rajput’ (1982) and before ‘Main Tere Liye’ (1988), Vijay Anand launched ‘Dekha Jaayega’ with Anil Kapoor and Jackie Shroff. Anil backed out at last moment. After a brief gap, the film was planned again with Saif Ali in place of Anil, but was later shelved.

In 1988, he planned the film ‘Dosti Ka Taqaaza’ starring Mithun and Govinda. It was later shelved.

He appeared in the film ‘Insha Allaah’ as the hero opposite to Zarina Wahab. The film was later shelved.

He directed ‘Chura Lenge Ankhon Se Kajal’ (1992) with Akshay Kumar and Kareena Karishma Kapoor. This film was also shelved.

In 1997 he starred in and directed the NFDC (National Film Development Corporation) film ‘Nyaymurty Krishnamurty’. This film also did not see the light of the day.

In the 1990s, he also started working on another film ‘Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas’, which could not be completed, probably did not go beyond the planning stage.

OK, so today’s song. It is contributed by Avinash ji. The film is ‘Ghungroo Ki Awaaz’. The story is of a family conspiracy with shades of reminders from the film ‘Mera Saaya’. The protagonist falls in love, the lady dies in confusing circumstances, then she returns as a ghost to haunt the man. The plot finally nails down another family member, who is attempting to get rid of the protagonist, for the sake of inheritance. There are maybe some more films that are based on this scenario.

The music is by RD Burman, the words are from the pen of Vijay Anand himself and Kishore Kumar is the playback voice.

A heartfelt salute to this celluloid artist who donned many a hat in his career, and had left behind a memorable legacy.

 

Video

Audio

Song – Tere Ghungroo Ki Awaaz  (Ghungroo Ki Awaaz) (1981) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Vijay Anand, MD – RD Burman

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

sitaaron ne sajaayee thhi dagar
hawaaon ne jhulaaya bhi magar
hmm hmm hmm
sitaaron ne sajaayee thhi dagar
hawaaon ne jhulaaya bhi magar
jalaa daaley
jalaa daaley
pankh naseebon ne
reh gayee hasrat e parwaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

andheron mein chhupi hai kiran
milan hai par ye kaisa milan
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
andheron mein chhupi hai kiran
milan hai par ye kaisa milan
adhura hai
adhura hain
geet jeewan ka
aur toota toota saaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghoonghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghoonghroo
ki aawaaz

————————————————————————————-
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————————————-

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

सितारों ने सजाई थी डगर
हवाओं ने झुलाया भी मगर
हं हं हं
सितारों ने सजाई थी डगर
हवाओं ने झुलाया भी मगर
जला डाले
जला डाले
पंख नसीबों ने
रह गयी हसरत ए परवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

अंधेरों में छुपी है किरण
मिलन है पर ये कैसा मिलन
हं हं हं
हं हं हं
अंधेरों में छुपी है किरण
मिलन है पर ये कैसा मिलन
अधूरा हैं
अधुरा हैं
गीत जीवन का
और टूटा टूटा साज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू ..
कि आवाज़


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4192 Post No. : 15375 Movie Count :

4238

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) was produced by B R Chopra and directed by Ravi Chopra for B R Films, Bombay. This movie had Raj Babbar, Smita Patil, Nana Patekar, Om Shivpuri, Dheeraj Kumar, Shafi Inamdar, Vijay Arora, Arun Bakshi, Ashalata, Chandrashekhar, Ifthekhar, Alok Nath, Goofi Paintal, Dalip Tahil, Dinesh Thakur, Bashir Khan, Chaandni, Deepak Kaajir, Sonika Gill, Urmila Bhatt, Raksha Chauhan etc in it.

The movie was based on Hollywood blockbuster “Death Wish”(1974).

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) had seven songs in it.

Today (9 january 2019) is the 86th birth anniversary of Mahendra Kapoor (9 January 1934 – 27 September 2008). On this occasion, here is the title song of the movie. This song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor. This song plays in the background as the movie begins with credits appearing on the screen.

Hasan Kamaal is the lyricist. He won Filmfare best lyrics award for this song.

Ravi is the music director.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala (long long ago in 2012).

With this song ,”Aaj Ki aawaaz”(1984) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Aaj ki aawaaz jaag ae insaan (Aaj Ki Aawaaz)(1984) Singer-Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics-Hasan Kamaal, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Aaj ki aawaaz
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Zindagi kitni
Behifaazat hai
Kal bhi aayegaa
Kya jamaanat hai
Din pareshan hai raat hai hairaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dar ke saaye mein
Gar jawaan hongi
Ye nayee naslen kal kahan hongi
Hosh me aa ja ab to aye nadaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Kya nagar hai ye
Kaisi basti hai
Ya to mitti se jaan sasti hai
Zindagi mushkil maut hai aasaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dekh ghar aangan loot nahi jaayen
Pyaar ke rishtey chhut nahi jaayen
Kal bachane ka aaj hi kar dhyaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4188 Post No. : 15369

“Jhamela”(1953) was produced and directed by Bhagwan dada for Bhagwan arts Productions, Bombay. This comedy movie had Bhagwan, Geet Bali, Badri Prasad, Baby Shakuntala, Bibi bai, Baburao, Leela Gupte, Usha Shukla etc in it.

The movie had eleven songs in it. Four songs have been covered in the past.

Today (5 january 2020) is the 38th remembrance day of C Ramchandra (5 january 1982). On this occasion, here is a song from “Jhamela”(1982). The song is sung by C Ramchandra. Rajinder Krishan is the lyricist. Music is composed by C Ramchandra as well.

Only the audio of the song is available. It is clear that the song, which is the title song of the movie, was picturised on Bhagwan.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Peevesie’s mom.


Song-Ye duniya hai ek jhamela (Jhamela)(1953) Singer-C Ramchandra, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-C Ramchandra

Lyrics(Provided by Peevesie’s mom)

yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
ho char dinon ka hai mela
ho
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

kanjoos jo makhee choos ho
jode baithke kaudi kaudi
arre jahaan bhi ruk gayi chalte chalte
beta saans ki ghodi
phir saath na jaaye dhela
phir saath na jaaye dhela
ho
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

khel jawaani mastaani ka
yeh powder yeh laali
arre ho jaayengi badle jaisi
ek din zulfen kaali
yeh qamar banegi thela
yeh qamar banegi thela
hoye
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

hooooo
motor tez chalaanewale
baat yeh meri maan
arre jinke paas nahi hai motor
woh bhi hai insaan
tu dhan daulat mein khela
tu dhan daulat mein khela
hoye
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4178 Post No. : 15354

Yesterday (25 december 2019) was the birth centenary of Naushad (25 december 1919- 5 May 2006). The special occasion called for a post but my internet connection let me down and that day ended up becoming a dot day- the third such day in the year.

According to my calculations Naushad had composed music for 601 songs in 64 Hindi movies.

61 out of these 64 movies are represented in the blog. The first four movies where Naushad was the music director are “Prem Nagar”(1940), “Darshan”(1941), “Maala”(1941) and “Nayi Duniya” (1942). All available songs of these movies are covered in the blog but still some songs (unavailale as of now) are not posted so these movies are unYIPPEED. After that, each and every Naushad movie beginning from “Sharda”(1942) till “Ganwaar”(1970) are already YIPPEED in the blog ! Moreover, two more movies viz “Aaina”(1974) and “Dharam Kaanta”(1982) are also YIPPEED.

The only Naushad movies (apart from the four movies of 1940s), whose songs are not fully covered in the blog are “Paakeeza”(1971), “Taangewaala”(1972), “My Friend”(1974), “Sunahra Sansaar”(1975), “Chambal Ki Raani”(1979), “Love and God”(1986), “Aawaaz De kahaan Hai”(1990), “Teri Paayal Mere Geet”(1993), “Guddu”(1995) and “Taj Mahal”(2005).

Overall 535 out of 601 Naushad compositions are already showcased in the blog.

On this occasion, here is a song from “Taangewaala”(1972). This song is sung by Rafi. Majrooh Sultanpuri is the lyricist. Music is composed by Naushad.

The song is picturised as a Tanga song, with Rajendra Kumar playing the Taangewaala and driving the taanga holding a small child his arms. It is very risky, according to present day safety standards. Rajendra Kumar would get fined heavily and his tonga driver licence cancelled by traffic police if he was to operate in present day India. 🙂

This song is an appropriate song for the occasion because Rafi too had his birth anniversary on 24 december, one day prior to Naushad’s birth anniversary.


Song-Thhap thhup thhip ki taal pe mera ghoda chaal dikhaaye(Taangewaala)(1972) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-Naushad

Lyrics

Thhap thhup thhip ki taal pe mera ghoda chaal dikhaaye
lipat lipat ke taange ke sang raah guzarti jaaye
Thhap thhup thhip ki taal pe mera ghoda chaal dikhaaye
lipat lipat ke taange ke sang raah guzarti jaaye
daada daan
daadaa daan
daada daan
daadaa daan

chhail chhabeela ghhoda hai
chaal chale hai saajan ki
chhail chhabeela ghhoda hai
chaal chale hai saajan ki
peechhe peechhe taanga hai
doli jaise dulhan ki
peechhe peechhe taanga hai
doli jaise dulhan ki
zaalim yoon lehraaye ke jaise
koi sharaabi jaaye ae ae
Thhap thhup thhip ki taal pe mera ghoda chaal dikhaaye
lipat lipat ke taange ke sang raah guzarti jaaye
kaaka jee
o maamaa jee
ho zara bach ke
ho zara hatt ke

mandir koi jaata hai
masjid se koi aata hai
mandir koi jaata hai
masjid se koi aata hai
ye dilwaala sabko hi
manzil tak pahunchaata hai
ho ye dilwaala sabko hi
manzil tak pahunchaata hai
taanga mera pyaar bhara dil
jo chaahe aa jaaye
Thhap thhup thhip ki taal pe mera ghoda chaal dikhaaye
lipat lipat ke taange ke sang raah guzarti jaaye
hurr
ho ho


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4163 Post No. : 15334 Movie Count :

4225

Today’s song is from an obscure film from Calcutta,- Arzoo-1944.

It is my observation that barring very early Talkie films made by Madan Theatres, Calcutta, films made by other film makers of Calcutta – other than New Theatres – were, generally, not successful or popular in the Hindi belt. At the peak times in the 30’s, there were about 20+ film making companies in Bengal, but New Theatres alone had got the best of Hindi artistes in almost every department of film making and Music, available in the Eastern sector. Accordingly, even Arzoo, made by I.B.Films, Calcutta also did not create any ripples in the Hindi belt. It was directed by R N Vaidya (a successful Silent Film maker ) and M.Issa. The Lyricist was Khwaja Kidwai and the Music was by Subal Dasgupta. The cast of the film was, Dhiraj Bhattacharya, Panna, Pramod Gangully, Renuka Roy, Fazal, Shanta etc.etc.

In Hindi film arena, there were many brother pairs as Music Directors like Husnalal-Bhagatram, Kalyan ji-Anand ji etc. Most of them were prolific and successful too. But there were no cases worth noticing, where two brothers operated separately as MDs, in the same period but never worked as a Team. Two such cases were from Calcutta. The first was that of Timir Baran and Mihir Kiran and then Kamal Dasgupta and Subal Dasgupta. Neither Timir-Mihir nor Kamal-Subal worked as a pair and individually only one became famous in Hindi films. Mihir kiran gave music to only 1 film- Kaarvan e hayat-35 and Timir Baran did 11 Hindi films compsing 86 songs.Subal Dasgupta gave music to only 2 films Subah Shaam and Arzoo both in 1944, Kamal Dasgupta did 17 Hindi films and composed 157 songs.

Kamal Dasgupta ( 28-7-1912 to 20-7-1974) gave music to 17 Hindi films from Jawab-42 to Phulwari-51. Subal gave music to only 2 films as mentioned. He was, however, a prolific composer in Bangla films and NFS. The credit for composing music for Talat Mehmood’s First recorded NFS, ” sab din ek samaan nahi tha” goes to Subal Dasgupta. Some sites and You Tube erroneously mention Kamal Dasgupta’s name as its composer, but it is wrong. I quote here an excerpt from the book ” Talat Mehmood-The Velvet touch” a biography by Manek Premchand,

” His first recording happened in September 1941, the song being Sab din ek samaan naheen tha, Ban jaoonga kya se kya main, iska to kuchh dhyaan naheen tha, written by Fayyaz Hashmi and composed by Subal Dasgupta. Present at this recording was the great singer-composer-actor Pankaj Mullick, who patted the young émigré for a job well done. In Calcutta, the young man started learning Bengali. After six recordings for HMV in Calcutta, Talat returned in 1942 to complete his studies at Marris and in the next couple of years, he heard a lot of Gangubai Hangal, Fayyaz Khan and Roshanara Begum. ” pp 13

Not much information is available on Subal in books or on the net. Even Dr. J.P.Guha has no information on him. Here is something from a Bangladeshi site.

Subal Dasgupta was born at Kalia (Narail) of the old Jessore district in Bangladesh. His parents shifted to Calcutta long before the partition of 1947. His eldest brother professor Bimal Dasgupta was a gifted musician, while his elder brother Kamal Dasgupta also emerged as one of the most successful music directors of his times. His sisters Sudhira, Indira, Basanti—–all were talented singers in their own rights. All of them had recorded songs under HMV banner. He belonged to an immensely accomplished musical family. At a very tender age Subal Dasgupta took lessons in classical music from Ustad Zamiruddin Khan, a renowned maestro of Kheyal and Thumri. It was here, that he met Kazi Nazrul Islam, the great poet , who also started taking classical vocal lessons from the same master. The meeting between the two, later turned out to be of historic significance. This is all that could be collated about Subal Dasgupta.

Today’s song is sung by Jagmohan Sursagar. In older times, when when films had not yet become ” inevitable ” in the society, for the period 30s to 50s, Non Film Songs (NFS) ruled the nation. The A.I.R. regularly broadcast NF Bhajans, Geets and Gazals etc. These were extremely popular and their private records used to make a big sale too. Among the NFS male singers, the best was Jagmohan and in the female group, the best was Juthika Roy.

Somewhere in the late 2011 AK ji, of Songsofyore.com, had written on this Blog about the importance of NFS. After reading his views, I too wrote a rather lengthy comment supporting the inclusion of NFS on this Blog. Our contention was that, prior to the Hindi Film Music becoming popular all over India,it was those ghazals, Geets and Bhajans, privately sung and recorded by various artists which had ruled the tastes of music lovers. In fact many famous singers had recorded NFS in the beginning phase of their singing careers. Some names are Talat Mehmood, Saigal, Pankaj Mullick, Jagmohan and JUTHIKA ROY !

I do not think there was a single singer in those days who had not sung a Non Filmi geet of some type like Bhajan or ghazal etc. I am sure many senior readers from this Blog must have grown listening to these NFS Bhajans and Geets. In fact more than a filmi song, may be these people have some old geet or Bhajan embedded in their memories with some persons, events or places.

Today’s singer Jagmohan Sursagar was very well known and close to Rajnikumar Pandyaji and he has elaborated his Bio data in the book ” Aap ki Parchhainyan”. The following information is adapted from this. Born on September 6,1918,Jagmohan whose real name is Jaganmoy Mitra came from a conservative family of land-lords.Sometime before he was born,his father died of a stomach ailment, while his mother was still in her teens. Though Jagmohan had no problems in childhood,he was to grow up an ardent devotee of his mother.When she died in 1981,and was followed by the singer’s wife,in a few months time,Jagmohan felt a terrible void in his life,something that he appears to have been unable to fill ever.

There was an atmosphere of music in his maternal grandfather’s house where they went to live after Jagmohan’s father died.He literally grew up listening to dhrupad,khayal,thumri and tappa,surreptitiously learning from his uncle’s ustads ragas and raginis as also the tabla.It all paid off when after passing his matriculation examination, Jagmohan took part in all Bengal music competition ,topping the list in dhrupad,tappa,thumri,kritan and baul,religious folk music of Bengal.The year was 1937.In the same year,his professional singing career began at All India Radio.The next year,he stood first in khayal singing in an all India competition at Allahabad.

A music recording company, HMV,grabbed him for recording.Says Jagmohan: ” I had a tune and had been trying to compose a song to suit it.But,an acquaintance, Hembabu asked me to see Kazi Nazrul Islam,the great poet.Hembabu took me to him and left me with the poet.The poet was a very kindly man and my diffidence vanished after a while. I sang the few lines I had composed.He praised my tune and music but offered to write a song for me to fit them.I sang the tune several times as the Kazi sat writing stanza after stanza;his words, as if poured after,and there nary was a change or scratching out of a word here or there.That was the song Saaon Ratey Jadi…. on which my re-cording was made.” It was a great hit.Then,in 1940, came two songs of Rabindranath Tagore,both approved by the Nobel prize winning poet.Tagore permitted him to record two more of his songs.

In 1945,Jagmoohan was given the award of Sursagar (ocean of music) in Bengal.The award has not since been given to anyone else,and the singer was only the second recipient of the honour.( The other recipient was Himangshu Datta ). In fact, most people have forgotten that Mitra is Jagmohan’s real surname; it has just become Jagmohan Sursagar, a name under which he also wrote an auto-biography in Bengali. It has recently been translated into Gujarati and brought out under the title of one his more famous songs, Dil Dekar Dard Liya Hai Maine…
Gandhiji too had appreciated Jagmohan’s singing and the singer recorded Sapt Kand Ramayana in six minutes at the Mahatma’s suggestion.Another national leader fond of his singing was Jay Prakash Narayan.

Jagmohan toured abroad also extensive and has been to among other countries East Africa,the U.K.,the U.S.A.and Canada,earning vast fan following everywhere. Speaking at the Ontario College of Art in Toronto,Jagmohan held his audience spell-bound,claiming there essentially was no barrier to music.He sang a Bengali composition in Bhairavi and followed up with an English song ,rendered in the same raga.

He came to Bombay in 1950 to become a Playback singer, but the Bombay film world atmosphere did not impress him and he did not sing in any film. In fact after 1955, he did not cut any record for Hindi films. In 1955, he sang under his own baton, for the only Hindi film for which he was the composer. This movie was “Sardaar”(1955).

A dignified individual, Jagmohan never turned bitter,became more of an introvert,paying heed to the calls of none but his inner voice.After the deaths of his mother and his wife in 1981,feeling lonely,he had moved residence thrice– from Bombay to Delhi for two years while he was a member of Censor Board,then to Calcutta and to Ahmedabad.

He did not seem to regard his moving from one city to another as something of great importance. He declared :”I crave for affection ,respect and human warmth and go wherever my inner-self tells me to. I have followed the dictates of my inner-self only all my life.”
“I can go away from a city,but I cannot go away from music”,he said.

He had become so popular due to his NFS in Hindi and Bangla, that he had neither the time nor the desire to sing for films. However Jagmohan sang 23 songs in 12 films, The films were, Bhakta Kabeer-42, Bhaichara-43, Hospital-43, Arzoo-44, Subah Shaam-44, Ameeri-45, Meghdoot-45, Krishnaleela-46, Pehchaan-46, Zameen aur Aasmaan-46, Iran ki ek raat-49 and Sardar-55.

After many attempts, it became clear as to how many Non film songs or Geets he sang in Hindi and the number is 75 songs. However. his songs are few on this Blog.The generation born in the 40s grew on Saigal,Jagmohan and Pankaj Mullick songs. There was a period when Non film Geets were extremely popular, even in the presence of film music, but gone are those days now when record collection was a respectful hobby. With this, the decline of such songs too came fast and only memories lived on.

In his book, Aap ki parchhainyan, shri Rajnikumar Pandyaji has mentioned an incident when Jagmohan went all the way to a far off place, just so that a dying fan of his songs, could listen to him while on deathbed. This is how Rajnikumar Pandya ji described this incident -in an E mail sent to me after I posted above information earlier. ” The patient was Manubhai Trivedi,father of my writer friend Niranjan Trivedi, I was knowing that Manubhai was an ardent fan of Jagmohan but due to his serious ailment it was not possible for him to come down to my place to see Jagmohanda who just arrived by morning train from Bombay .

“I therefore requested to Dada to pay a visit to Manubhai . He reluctantly agreed to it,We went to Manubhais place which was just few minutes form my place, After seeing his serious condition he expressed hid desire to sing a Bhajan before him though Manubhai was not in his senses, Anyway he sang a Bhajan “Ab tim kab sumiroge Raam, Jeevn do din ka maehamaan,’There were tears in the eyes of all who were present there including me and my small daughter who is party seen in the photograph attached with this mail. ( he attached a photograph for me).
Manubhai passed away after a week of this incident. ” The family members of the fan became eternally obliged to Jagmohan’s noble gesture.
Jagmohan returned to Bombay, after almost 2 years in Ahmedabad. He died on 4-9-2003, in Bombay.

The Hero of film Arzoo was Dhiraj Bhattacharya ( 5-11-1905 to 1959 ) worked in 10 Hindi films, namely Radha krishna-33, Seeta-34, Chandragupta-34, Balaa ki raat-36, Mandir-37, Kumkum the dancer-40, Arzoo-42, Wapas-43,Shri Ramanuj-43 and Irada-44.

Today’s song is not only a very rare song, but also an excellent Gazal. In the NFS, there is no parallel to jagmohan and Pankaj Mullick. You too will fall in love with this song, when you hear it. With this song, film Arzoo-44 makes its Debut on the Blog.

(I thank Rajnikumar Pandya ji, Manik Premchand ji, wiki and my notes for information used in the above article. )


Song- Hai kaun dil nahin jo pareeshaan e Aarzoo (Aarzoo)(1944) Singer- Jagmohan Sur Sagar, Lyricist-Khwaja Kidwai, MD- Subal Dasgupta

Lyrics

Hai kaun dil nahin jo pareeshan e aarzoo
Hai kaun dil nahin jo pareeshan e aarzoo
ye zindagi hai asal mein saamaan e aarzoo
ye zindagi hai asal mein saamaan e aarzoo
murjhaati hai jo ye ke to khilti hai doosri
murjhaati hai jo ye ke to khilti hai doosri
kaliyon se yoon bhara hai gulistaan e aarzoo

uske karam se ae ae ae
badhhta hai har dil ka hauslaa
uske karam se badhhta hai
har dil ka hauslaa
har dil ka hauslaa
phaila hua hai is liye daamaan e aarzoo
phaila hua hai is liye daamaan e aarzoo
maayoosiyaan bhi deti hain ummeed ko janam
maayoosiyaan bhi deti hain ummeed ko janam
naakaam e aarzoo ki to jaan hai aarzoo

shaayad isi tarah se khule girah phaans(?) ki
shaayad isi tarah se khule girah phaans(?) ki
girah phaans(?) ki
ham chhodte hain baandh ke paimaane aarzoo
ham chhodte hain baandh ke paimaane aarzoo


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4124 Post No. : 15279 Movie Count :

4204

Hullo Atuldom

Let us all wish the Baadshah of Bollywood on his 54th birthday.

Wish this was an audio post, then I would have started my post with what we used to hear on the radio Ads in the 70s and 80s. I would have first played a line “aashiq hoon main qaatil bhi hoon” then after the voice over by a Vijay Behl or Ameen Sayani or a Vinod Sharma or it could be Harish Bhimani (I don’t remember the names of all the announcers, sorry) the Radio Ad would have closed with the repeat of the last line of the mukhda of the song – “Baadshah o baadshah, baadshah hey baadshah, baadshah”.

But then this is neither an audio post nor a radio ad. But our today’s birthday boy is a huge fan of those days, when we used to hear songs on the radio. Up the volume when our favourite song was played and sat glued to hear all the details of the song viz: singer, lyricist, composer, movie name etc. And if due to some disturbance on the frequency waves or any other reason we missed the details then we would have to wait for god-knows-how-long to hear it again. Because back then, Radio Ceylon and Vividh Bharati were our sole source for HFM- Doordarshan happened much later and IMDB and other sites were not even on the horizon. Right Birthday Boy? I am talking of our Sudhirji here. We have seen him mention about his love for HFM being fed by what he heard on the Radio in many of his posts.

He is an ‘Aashiq’ of film music and is so knowledgeable about its many aspects. And he keeps discovering new angles of HFM and his posts are rich because of this constant search of his. And occasionally he also doubles up as Atulji’s most trusted aide in keeping the blog running. Thank you Atulji for introducing us to Sudhirji- the dilldaar Dilliwala. Wish you a very Happy Birthday Sudhirji, may you never run out of ideas for new posts and series.

November 2nd also happens to be the birthdate of music director/ singer Anu Malik- son of yesteryear-music director Sardar Malik. He has been around in the industry since 1980 – debuting with an obscure movie “Hunterwaali 77” (never heard of this movie before 🙂 ). He has worked his way to the A-list music directors with successful albums like “Mard”, “Sohni Mahiwal”, “Ganga Jamuna Saraswati” etc. His albums of the 90s had many melodies which got their movies a slightly long run at the box-office; movies like “Sir”, “The Gentleman”, “Vijaypath”. “Naaraz’’, “Naajayaz’’ etc. Music by Anu Malik in “Chamatkaar” was the first collaboration of SRK (the other birthday boy for today). Subsequently Anu Malik has given music to a few of SRK’s movies- “Baazigar”, ‘Ram Jaane”, “Duplicate”, “Baadshah”, “Josh”, “Asoka”, “Main Hoon Na” etc etc. Wish you a very Happy Birthday Anu Malik.

As can be seen in the list in the previous paragraph we have a huge library from which to choose a song for today. I have had suggestions from my Peevesie and Nahmji too about which could be a good choice for today’s triple birthday and I am settling for the song with which I opened the post as I have inside information about the possibility of Peevesie’s suggestion being fulfilled today.

From his debut in movies in 1992 to 1998 SRK had about 3 or 4 releases every year. 1999 had only one SRK movie- Baadshah (it was after the success of this movie that Shahrukh was given the epithet “Baadshah of Bollywood”), which was directed by Abbas – Mustan. It had him playing a bumbling detective with Sudhir, Johnny Lever, Sharad Sankhla, Harpal as his team mates and Twinkle Khanna was the female lead. It had Rakhee and Amrish Puri with Sharat Saxena, Deepshika, Sachin Khedekar etc in supporting roles and Shashikala and Prem Chopra in guest appearances. Our song today is from “Baadshah” which was written by Sameer and filmed as a disco song performed in a night club with Twinkle, Amrish Puri, Viju Khote etc as audience and Pankaj Dheer makes an entry towards the end of the song. It is sung by Abhijeet (who turned 61 on 30th October).

A very Happy Birthday to all the Birthday Boyz. Lets enjoy the party.


Song-Aashiq hoon main qaatil bhi hoon (Baadshah)(1999) Singer-Abhijeet, Lyrics-Sameer, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

Aashiq hoon main 
qaatil bhi hoon
sabke dilon mein shaamil bhi hoon

o ho o oh o ho o ho
o ho o oh o ho o ho

Aashiq hoon main 
qaatil bhi hoon
sabke dilon mein shaamil bhi hoon
Aashiq hoon main 
qaatil bhi hoon
sabke dilon mein shaamil bhi hoon
dil ko churaana,
neendein udaana
bas yahi mera kusoor
waadon se apne mukarta nahin 
marne se main kabhi darta nahin
baadshah o baadshah,  
baadshah hey baadshah
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah 

hae ae ae ae yo
hae yo

chaaron taraf hain mere hi charche
honthon pe hai bas mera naam
rangon bhari subah meri
masti mein doobi hai meri sham
jhoothi kahaani sacchi lage
aawargi mujhe achchi lage
nagmein sunaana
sabko nachaana 
bas yahi mera kusoor
waadon se apne mukarta nahi
marne se mai kabhi darta nahi
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah hey baadshah
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah

ho o ho o ho o

hai yeh mohabbat kamzori meri
chaahat ki duniya pe mera raaz
bas rab ke aage jhukta mera sar
jhukte mere saamne takhto taaj
andaaz mera sabse juda
mein baadshahon kaa baadshah
sapne sajaana
hansna hasaana
bas yahi mera kusoor
waadon se apne mukarta nahin
marne se mai kabhi darta nahin
baadshah o baadshah 
baadshah hey baadshah
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah hey baadshah
baadshah o baadshah,
baadshah


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4118 Post No. : 15271 Movie Count :

4198

Today’s song is from film Kasauti-41. This was a film made by National Studios, after Sagar Movietone withdrew from it. The film was directed by a protege of Sagar- Ramchandra Thakur. The music was by Ashok Ghosh and the songs were written by Kanhaiyalal Chaturvedi (brother of actor Sankatha Prasad-a regular fixture of Sagar. Later on Kanhaiyalal himself became a famous character actor and a comic villain.) and Neelkanth Tiwari. The cast of the film was, Miss Rose, Prahlad, Veena, Sunalini Devi, Satish, Marutirao Pehelwan, Baby Meena, Ansari and many others.

In the early phase of the cinema, there were very few artistes hailing from respected families or who were educated, but as the time went by, slowly and steadily, educated people also started joining films.Most Marathi actresses from the beginning, like Durga Khote, Leela Chitnis,Nalini Tarkhad,Shanta Apte, Snehprabha Pradhan, Vanmala were graduates. Among men, Mohan Bhavnani, Nanubhai vakil, Surendra, Motilal, Dev Anand, Ashok kumar etc were graduates. Surendra was B.A;LL.B and in initial his degrees were flaunted prominently in film credits and advertisements. By the turn of the 30’s decade, majority of artistes were educated.

Ramchandra Thakur – the director of this film was one such scholarly person who was a Postgraduate and a prolific writer on films in English, Hindi and Gujarati, before joining films. Ramchandra Thakur was born in Suver of Sabarkantha district in Gujarat, on 17-12-1908. He moved to Bombay when he was just 9 year old. He pursued his higher education in Bombay and emerged as a scholar of Pali language. When he gave his M.A. final exam, he wanted to become a teacher in a college, if he got First class. If not, he would join film industry as a director. During his college years he had written many articles on films. He had translated Sound Recordist Minu Katrak’s English works in Hindi and Gujarati.

When he did not get First class, he joined Sagar Movietone, in its Marketing department. After few months, Baburao Patel took over from him and he became an assistant director to Chimanlal Luhar for film Dynamite-38. Next, along with Virendra Desai ( Nalini Jaywant’s first husband), he became a co-director of film The Gramophone Singer-38. His first film, as an independent Director was the Debut film of Snehprabha Pradhan – Civil marriage-40.

Then he joined Ranjit Movietone. He directed mythological, Social and Comedy films. Art Director Kanu Desai’s film Geet Govind was directed by him. Thakur directed 20 films. He also wrote script for the popular film Baiju Bawra-52. He produced 5 films. He directed 2 Gujarati films and wrote stories and screenplays for several Gujarati films.

He was an accomplished writer. He wrote 4 novels – Amrapali, Budhidhan Birbal, Prem Diwani and Urmila. He wrote several satirical commentaries too. He wrote a detailed article on Sagar Movietone and Chimanlal Desai in Gujarati magazine ” Jee”. His last Hindi film as a director was Nawab Sirajuddaula-67, which he had produced also. He died on 31-10-1992.

In the early era of silent films, many Anglo-Indian, European and Jew girls joined the films. They were free in behaviour and not averse to intimate scenes or kissing on the screen, hence film makers also preferred them. However they did not/could not speak Hindi or Urdu, but for silent films, this was not a hindrance. For Talkie films, this became a problem for these girls and their number went down considerably.

Among these actresses,there were mostly Baghdadi Jewish women and the rest were from the Bene Israel community, not the Cochini community. That community was small, did not speak Hindi or Urdu, and lived far from the film making cities of Bombay and Calcutta. A single Baghdadi family contributed greatly to Indian films, by giving us the actress-producer Pramila (Esther Victoria Abraham), her sister the actress Romila (Sophie Abraham), and her cousin the starlet Rose (Rose Musleah). Pramila’s son Haider Ali is an actor, who is best known as the co-writer of the blockbuster film Jodhaa Akbar.

Miss Rose Musleah was the heroine of film Kasauti-41 Sometime back our Sadanand kamath ji has provided the life story of Rose on this Blog, so I am not repeating it. Instead of that, let us know something about a ” Cloak and Dagger” personality from Hindi films. His name is N A Ansari.

Nisar Ahmed Ansari was the son of the late Dr. Ameer Ahmed Ansari. He was born on 29-8-1917 at Jhansi. His father had been serving in Military for 11 years and he expired in 1938. He was well known in Jhansi as he practiced there for 40 years.

Ansari matriculated from Allahabad University in 1933. In 1935, he passed his Inter from Aligadh. By 1939 he was a graduate of the Bombay University. He was keen to join films and in this, Mehboob khan helped him by recommending him for film Aasra-40, made by National Studios. It was directed by Mehboob’s assistant Chimanlal Gandhi.

By watching him, no one can ever visualise that a suave and respectable man like him can be a scheming villain . Competition for him was tough,initially when he joined the film industry ,as there were many character actors already there ,who were specialist of negative roles . But young and energetic Nisar Ahmad Ansari had faith in his potentials .

He believed that it is not necessary that villain should have thick eye brows with roving eyes and have a permanent frown on his face. A person having negative traits may have a smiling face also ,to conceal his evil designs . Therefore in most of his movies , he was a well dressed person ,always beaming and had friendly smile on his face . In his films , he use to be boss of a criminal syndicate and have an army of foot soldiers who carried out dirty work on his behalf . To keep a distance between master and servant , instead of calling them by their name he use to call his cronies by their allotted numbers like Number Ten Or Number Five .

With a hit movie ‘Mangu’, he became a director and later directed many successful movies like Black Cat ,Tower House ,Mr Lamboo ,Zara Bach Ke, Wanted etc for various producers and after he established his own banner Bundel Khand Films ,he made many memorable movies . Although, he had to look after his own company and permanent staff ,but he did not disappoint other film makers ,who wanted to have him in their movies in the role of villain. It is a fact, that it was his Black Cat which helped G P Sippy to be a part of the league of big producer ,but it is also true ,Mr Sippy forgot him later and never acknowledged Mr Ansari’s contribution .

Mr N A Ansari ,was essentially a dedicated film maker and had no false illusions about his own capabilities . His movies were never lavishly made and had average production value ,but it did not deter his fans and sizable majority of film viewers ,who adored him and his pictures to patronise his movies . Those who love the movies of golden age ,fondly remember his movies which used to have him in the role of villain ,beside good music, suspense, comedy, ,dance with a plausible story and a strong message for society ,that “Crime Never Pays”.

With producer/actor Sheikh Mukhtar, Nisar Ahmad Ansari had earlier worked as an actor in Dada, Dara & Ustad Pedro. Sheikh Mukhtar, aware of Ansari’s capability ,in 1954,offered him Mangu, to direct. The big success of Mangu was a game changer for Ansari & O P Nayyar. They both were immensely benefited with the favourable outcome of the movie & it’s music. Mangu had predictable Jodi of Sheikh Mukhtar & Mukri ,with Nigar Sultana ,Sheila Ramani & Ansari himself, as a suave villain. Mangu had breath taking, thrilling climax, involving the speeding train. Some real shots, few stock shots & rest studio shoot with back projections (Aadhi Haqeeqat ,Aadha Fasaana ),made the climax awe-inspiring. Unfortunately, the movie could not be preserved & the the present generation has been deprived of witnessing Ansari’s first effort as director. Mangu is one of the most searched movie at youtube.

He again directed Mr Lambu, a big success, for Sheikh Mukhtar. This time with the classic beauty Suraiyya with music by O P Nayyar, but similar tragedy happened, again. No print of the movie is available. In almost all his films N.A.Ansari played the role of an urbane & sophisticated Don. He always appeared, well dressed in impeccably tailored suits, fedora, trade mark pipe between his teeth & walking stick, in his hand.

Besides Sheikh Mukhtar, he directed movies, like Black Cat, Tower House, Jara Bach Ke, Wanted for other producers and playing the main villain. He had no qualms working in movies directed by other film makers & in this category, movies like Private Secretary, Fareb ,Do Thug ,Khota Paisa, Gunda,Ustad 420,Gunahon Ke Raaste can be named. Under his own banner Bundel khand Films he made Wahan Ke Log,Mulzim,Zindagi Aur Maut,Mr Murder, Jurm Aur Sazaa and Noor E Ilahi. The last one being his last production in 1976 & then he decided to hang his boots.It was a big journey for Ansari,who was discovered by Mehboob & given a role in Aasra ,released in 1941.

He could not say “No” to film maker Sultan Ahmad ,when he insisted him to appear in Dharam Kanta (1982 ) & later in Jai Vikranta. N.A.Ansari closed his eyes for ever on 11 Jan 1993, in Canada, thousands of kilometres away from his beloved city Jhansi ,much before the release of his last movie Jai Vikranta in 1995.

Film Kasauti-41 had 13 songs – effectively only 12, as one song was deleted from the film later, for reason not known to us. The Music Director Ashok Ghosh is the ” Mystery Man” of Hindi cinema. That is because, there is absolutely no information about his life story, available anywhere on internet or in any of the several music related books I have with me. All that we know about him is that he assisted MD Pransukh Nayak, while serving in Sagar and that he started independentl composing with film Manmohan-36, in which Anil Biswas was his assistant. The very next year Anil Biswas took over from him as MD for film Jagirdar-37 and spent a long association with Sagar and National studios.

Ashok Ghosh did only 12 films as an MD – Manmohan-36, Sanskar-40, Radhika-41, Nirdosh-41, Kasauti-41, Garibi-42, Sharafat-43, Inkaar-43, Miss Devi-44, Angoothi-44, Aarti-45 and last film Gunjan-48. After this , there is a total black out of information on Ashok Ghosh. Strange !

According to the November 41 issue of Film India magazine, film Kasauti-41 was released on 11-10-41 at Pathe Cinema in Bombay. In its review of the film, Baburao Patel had hardly anything good about it. He only appreciated the acting of Sunalini Devi, as the mother of the hero. He says that the film was a tear jerker story. Raju (Prahlad) tries to prevent the suicide of a woman, who anyway dies. This is witnessed by the victim’s sister Meena (Veena), who is a vamp. She starts blackmailing him . She, calling herself now as Manjula announces her love for Raju. Raju is slated to marry Madhuri (Miss Rose). After some time, she tries to force Raju for her marriage with him. Raju’s mother comes to know all this. As a true mother she goes to Manjula’s house, gives her poison and kills her. Thus a dutiful mother saves the life of her son.

Today’s song is sung by Marutirao pehelwan. A Pehelwan and a song ? Matter for laughing or serious thinking ?
Marutirao Pehelwan also acted in this movie. He was originally from Kolhapur. In the early era of talkie films, many wrestlers joined film companies. They worked mostly in action films. Some such actors were Baburao Pehelwan (he was the hero of Master Bhagwan’s stunt films; later on worked as a stuntman with fight master Azim Bhai), Vasantrao Pehelwan (he was the one who brought Indurani from Poona to Bombay; was a popular villain in stunt films), Nandram Pehelwan (very popular in silent films but fell on bad days in the talkie era), Sadiq Pehelwan, Maane Pehelwan, Amir Khan Pehelwan etc

Marutirao Pehelwan was different. He was handsome, tall, well built, could act and sing well. He was selected for the hero’s role in first Gujarati talkie film ‘Narsi Mehata’ (1932), made by Sagar Movietone. He acted as hero and other roles in about 40 films and sang 56 songs in 17 films. His first Hindi film was ‘Lanka Dahan’ (1933) and last his film was ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942)

He married his co-star of many films – Tara (sister of Sitara Devi and Alaknanda). They left films and settled in Dhule, Maharashtra. Marutirao started a dairy business there. Famous dancer Gopi Krishna was their son. After Marutirao’s demise Tara had a terrible time. She stayed in Bombay slums and did any extra role in films.

From 1946, there was another comedian actor named Maruti (Marutirao Parab), active in Hindi films. Initially, he too was billed as Marutirao, creating confusion. He was the father of comedienne Guddi Maruti.

So, here is the philosophical song.

( I thank Biren kothari ji for his book ” Sagar movietone” and shri M N Sardana ji for some information about N A Ansari, used in this post)

With this song, “Kasauti”(1941) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Kho kar bhi sab kuchh izzat na khona (Kasauti)(1941) Singer-Maruti rao Pehelwan, Lyrics- Kanhaiyalal Chaturvedi, MD-Ashok Ghosh

Lyrics

Kho kar bhi sab kuchh a a
izzat na khona aa
zuroori hai ae ae ae ae
jeewan mein ae ae
izzat ka hona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona
zuroori hai
jeewan mein
izzat ka hona
zuroori hai
jeewan mein
izzat ka hona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona

pareeksha ho jis dam
hansna na rona
pareeksha ho jis dam m m
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
pareeksha ho jis dam
hansna na rona
kasauti pe utre jo sachcha
wo sona
kasauti pe utre jo sachcha
wo sona
kasauti pe utre jo sachcha
wo sona
kasauti pe utre jo sachcha
wo sona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona
Kho kar bhi sab kuchh
izzat na khona aa


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day : 4116 Post No. : 15269

Here is that date again.

The 25th of October is a date that many Hindi film lovers, and lovers of shaayari, remember with some pain. For it was on the 25th of October 1980 that one of the tallest figures of the industry, and certainly of the world of poetry, bade farewell to us.

Sahir Ludhianvi.

I’m usually careful with my choice of adjectives, especially when using them in the superlative. But in the case of Sahir, I don’t have the slightest hesitation in saying “one of the tallest”. For he comfortably satisfies this criterion.

There have been more famous figures in the industry.

And there have certainly been more popular and liked figures in the industry. If anything, Sahir, with his uncompromising nature, and and ego and mood to match, wasn’t the easiest person to get along with.

And yet, when it comes to stature, that too in his particular field, Sahir was truly a giant.
Without belittling any of the others who also produced outstanding work in the form of lyrics, Sahir always seemed to be in a league of his own.

They say that an actor is not real – after all, it is his job to act. He is only putting on a show. Which is one reason Kishore Kumar preferred singing to acting. He felt a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, whereas an actor’s job is to pretend.

A lyricist goes a step further than even a singer.

While a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, he does not create it. He only renders it.

The text comes from the lyricist.

And therefore the lyricist has the best chance of putting his heart and soul into his creation. He talks to his audience through his lines. He can use his poetry as an outlet for his thoughts, his feelings, his joys and his frustrations.

And I feel no one did this better than Sahir.

With Sahir, what you saw was what you got.

Sahir was pretty much an open book in terms of his preferences, his likes and dislikes. Nothing duplicitous or fake about him. He had strong views on certain topics, and he had absolutely no qualms about expressing them.

He even got into trouble early in his life with the Government of Pakistan for this reason – and fled Lahore (and thus, Pakistan) to come to India in 1949.

Imagine if this had not happened. Imagine what might have been lost to us.

Whatever issues Indians might have with the Government of Pakistan, I thank the Pakistan Government, on behalf of all Indians, for creating an “enabling” environment for Sahir to move to India. 🙂

And Sahir never looked back.

From “thandi hawayen” (Naujawan-1951), the song that got him noticed, to “pal do pal ka saath hamaara” (The Burning Train-1980), one of the last films for which he wrote lyrics, Sahir was one of the most highly regarded lyricists of his time.

I remember saying this before. When Sahir passed away, I only knew his name as a lyricist. In those days, still a teenager, I had limited knowledge of song details. I’d know the song, and the singer. Yes, some chance I’d know the composer, but unless I’d listened carefully to the lyricist’s name while listening to it on radio, not much chance I’d know the lyricist. In those days, to be honest, I enjoyed songs without knowing whether it was a Majrooh or Sahir or Shailendra or Hasrat Jaipuri song.

With this limited knowledge, I read the obituary on Sahir in the Illustrated Weekly of India in 1980. It was a fairly long obituary, and naturally many of his songs were mentioned.

That was when it hit me.

Oh, “aage bhi jaane na tu” was Sahir’s?

And “ye raat ye chaandni phir kahaan”?

Oh, and “udey jab jab zulfen teri” also?

And “abhi na jao chhod kar”?

And “zindagi bhar nahin bhoolegi wo barsaat ki raat?”

And “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”?

Oh, and “jeevan ke safar mein raahi” also?

And “tadbeer se bigdi hui taqdeer bana le”?

There were many more – and each one was a song I knew, a classic. Yet, such was my pathetic knowledge at the time of who the lyricist was, that I never realized these were all Sahir.

At that time, if you’d asked me to mention a few Sahir songs, I’d have come up with Pyaasa and Kabhie Kabhie songs. These I always knew as Sahir songs. But I am ashamed now to think of how ignorant I otherwise was.

It was only at that moment I realized what a legend Sahir had been. And what the world had lost.

After that, I paid a lot more attention to the lyricist, while listening to songs.

And often it was Sahir.

Much later in life, I read that it was only on Sahir’s insistence that All India Radio itself started mentioning the name of the lyricist also, in its radio programmes.

It was not only the name of the lyricist, but also the lyrics themselves, that I started paying attention to.

And that is when I realized that Sahir’s lyrics were different.

They were deep, they conveyed an emotion that came from the heart – and often a strong emotion at that. They were not the “baith ja, baith gayi, khadi ho ja, khadi ho gayi” types.

If today lyrics are a very big, in fact the biggest, part of my love for a song, it is entirely due to Sahir. I listen to lyrics carefully today – no appreciation of a song is complete for me, without appreciating the lyrics.

Whether Sahir was writing romantic poetry (“abhi na jao chhod kar”) or mocking the government for its failures (“cheen-o-Arab hamaara”), whether he was lamenting the state of society (“jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain”), or trying to uplift those seemingly with no hope (“wo subah kabhi to aayegi”), whether he was exhorting the oppressed to fight for their rights (“ponchh kar ashq” , “na munh chhupa ke jiyo”), or showing a mirror to society about its treatment of women (“aurat ne janam diya mardon ko”), whether he was trying to promote communal harmony (“tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”), or talking about the futility of war (“khuda-e-bartar”), every single time Sahir’s lyrics tugged at your heart strings.

Not just because the poetry was beautiful and the lyrics powerful (which they absolutely were), but because you could feel that every word was written with heart and soul. No wonder it went straight from Sahir’s heart to our hearts.

You could feel Sahir’s anguish and despair when he says “ye duniya agar mil bhi jaaye to kya hai”. Or his cynicism when he says “aasmaan pe hai khuda aur zameen pe hum, aajkal wo is taraf dekhta hai kam”.

At the same time, you could feel the romance in the air, with “tum agar saath dene ka waada karo” and “parbaton ke pedon par”. Just listen to poetry like “thehre thehre paani mein, geet sarsaraate hain….bheege bheege jhonkon mein, khushbuon ka deraa hai”. Waah!
And “abhi na jao chhod kar”, one of my alltime favourites, and surely one of the most perfect songs ever in every respect.

Sahir’s poetry for the hurt felt by the jilted lover was no less powerful. “Jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”. Or lines like “laut rahi hain meri sadaayen, deewaaron se sar takra ke….haath pakad kar chalne waale, ho gaye rukhsat haath chhuda ke (sad version of in hawaon mein)”. And of course, “chalo ek baar phir se ajnabi ban jaayen hum dono” with lines like “wo afsaana jisey anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, usey ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

Then you have the Barsaat Ki Raat qawwalis. Roshan’s masterpiece “na to karwaan ki talaash hai” merging into “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq” is one of the greatest ever compositions in Hindi cinema, with Sahir’s contribution in lyrics being no less significant. With lines like “jo dawaa ke naam pe zeher do, us chaaraagar ki talaash hai”.

I can go on and on. Dharamputra, Taj Mahal, Aaj Aur Kal, Mujhe Jeene Do, Chitralekha, Kaajal, Waqt, Neel Kamal, Humraaz, Bahu Begum, Aadmi Aur Insaan. Each one with memorable lyrics. One of my favourites is “poochhe koi ki dard-e-wafaa kaun de gaya, raaton ko jaagne ki sazaa kaun de gaya…kehne se ho malaal, to hum kya jawaab dein….duniya kare sawaal, to hum kya jawaab dein”.

Although Sahir was less productive in the 70s, he still came up with poetry that reminded us of Sahir of yore. The 70s was a decade where poetry began steadily losing ground to more “chaalu” lyrics. Urdu also began losing ground in the process.

This was a development that Sahir could not prevent, but did leave him disillusioned. His “main pal do pal ka shaayar hoon” very correctly represents his then state of mind. He continued to write though, but mostly for the Chopra family’s films, for films like Karm, Trishul, Insaaf Ka Tarazu, Kaala Patthar and The Burning Train.

Since Sahir started as a poet, and moved into film song lyrics, the sense of poetry comes across strongly in his lyrics. Much like with Kaifi Azmi.

So much for Sahir’s poetry. No one can do justice to it in one article. I’ve barely scraped the surface.

But what really makes me put Sahir on a different pedestal altogether is not the QUALITY of his poetry, but the CONTENT of his poetry.

Clearly Sahir was a rebel, a non-conformist.

And his poetry often reflected this, since he wrote straight from the heart.

But importantly, he never shied away from expressing his views. He never tried to be politically correct. He showed society a mirror, whether society liked it or not. For example, his line “kaho ji tum kya kya khareedoge, yahaan to har cheez bikti hai” is a much underrated, but powerful, line, in my opinion.

Yes, he railed and ranted – whether it made a difference or not. “Samaj ko badal daalo” he wrote.

Today, 39 years after his death, we are still languishing with most of the ills that existed in Sahir’s time, and which he spoke against.

It is a sad commentary of our times that many of his laments feel just as relevant today as they felt then. Yes, “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko, mardon ne usey bazaar diya” and “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega, insaan ki aulad hai insaan banega” are just as relevant in 2019, as they were in 1958-59.

If Sahir were alive today, he’d probably be writing just as strongly today as he wrote then. The issues haven’t gone, sadly only Sahir has.

That’s a sobering thought.

Now, let’s move on to the song for today.

It’s from the 1969 film, Paisa Ya Pyaar.

As has now become customary :-), the lyrics for this song have been sent to me by Avinashji.

I remember seeing this film as a young boy, but I don’t remember the story now. It was a remake of a Tamil film Panama Paasama, starring Gemini Ganesan and Saroja Devi, which was a pretty big hit at the time. In fact, the name Panama Paasama, translates in Hindi to Paisa Ya Pyaar.

I remember the song “Ber lo, ber lo” was a lift from the very popular “yelantha pazham yelantha pazham” song of Panama Paasama. 🙂

But today’s song is different. It is a typical Sahir song – Insaan ne paise ke liye.

Here, Sahir’s lament is about how money destroys relationships. He talks about how people lose everything, even their own self-respect, for money. He concludes by saying that love is the biggest wealth there is.

The song is sung by Hemant Kumar, music composed by Ravi.

Please do listen.

I’d like to end by saying that Sahir was wrong in one respect.

He wrote

“kal koi mujh ko yaad kare
kyon koi mujhko yaad kare
masroof zamaana mere liye
kyon waqt apna barbaad kare”

Sahir saab, I can only say you grossly underestimated our love and respect for you.

jo aapse mila hai, wo itna hai anmol
roz sunte hain, aap hi ke hum bol
aap ko bhool jaayen, ye mumkin nahin
aap ki yaad na aaye, aisa koi din nahin

Thank you SO MUCH for what you’ve given us, Sahir saab.

And, very importantly, for just being you.

Video

Audio

Song-Insaanon ne paise ke liye aapas ka pyaar mita daala (Paisa Ya Pyaar)(1969) Singer-Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhainvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics (based on audio link) (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Hanste baste ghar phoonk diye
Dharti ko narak banaa daalaa

Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Jazbaat ke naazuk rishton ko
Mitti ke taley dafnaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Mandir Masjid aur Girjon ko
Bankon ki bhent chadhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Daulat ki hawas mein logon ne
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Chaahat izzat mehnat gairat
Sabkaa neelaam uthhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi insaan ne
Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi ee insaan ne
Kudrat ke banaayi daulat ka
Sikkon mein mol lagaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

————————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————–
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
हँसते बसते घर फूँक दिए
धरती को नरक बना डाला

मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
जज़्बात के नाज़ुक रिश्तों को
मिटटी के तले दफना डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
मंदिर मस्जिद और गिरिजों को
बैंकों की भेंट चढ़ा डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दौलत की हवस में लोगों ने
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
चाहत इज्ज़त मेहनत गैरत
सबका नीलाम उठा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी इंसान ने
प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी ई इंसान ने
कुदरत के बनायी दौलत का
सिक्कों में मोल लगा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4102 Post No. : 15252 Movie Count :

4190

The Dadasaheb Phalke Award is India’s highest award in cinema. It is presented annually at the National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals, an organisation set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. The recipient is honoured for their “outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinema” and is selected by a committee consisting of eminent personalities from the Indian film industry. The award comprises a Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus) medallion, a shawl, and a cash prize of ?1,000,000 (US$14,000). Presented first in 1969, the award was introduced by the Government of India to commemorate Dadasaheb Phalke’s contribution to Indian cinema. Phalke (1870–1944), who is popularly known as and often regarded as “the father of Indian cinema”, was an Indian filmmaker who directed India’s first full-length feature film, Raja Harishchandra.

The first recipient of the award was actress Devika Rani, who was honoured at the 17th National Film Awards held in 1969. As of 2017, there have been 49 awardees. Among those, actor Prithviraj Kapoor (1971) and actor Vinod Khanna (2017) are the only posthumous recipients. Raj Kapoor accepted the award on behalf of his father Prithviraj Kapoor at the 19th National Film Awards in 1971 and was himself a recipient in 1987 at the 35th National Film Awards ceremony. Bommireddy Narasimha Reddy (1974) and Bommireddy Nagi Reddy (1986); Raj Kapoor (1987) and Shashi Kapoor (2014); Lata Mangeshkar (1989) and Asha Bhosle (2000) along with B. R. Chopra (1998) and Yash Chopra (2001) are the siblings who have won the award.

Note:- all of the above information I have extracted from Wikipedia and apologize for any wrong information therein.

October 11th 1942 was the date when Teji Bachchan- wife of Shri. Harivansh Rai Bachchan gave India the Shahenshah of Bollywood. He goes by the name Shri. Amitabh Bachchan. Anyone who has even the faintest knowledge about Indian movies -anywhere in the world- would have heard about this actor. He may have not been India’s first mega-superstar, that title will always be associated with Rajesh Khanna. The reason I have used the term Mega-Superstar for Rajesh Khanna is because Dilip Kumar- Dev Anand-Raj Kapoor were equally big stars of their generation and the trio were inspiration for the next set of actors like Manoj Kumar, Dharmendra, Rajendra Kumar, Rajesh Khanna, Jeetendra, Amitabh Bachchan etc. The popularity and fan-following that Rajesh Khanna achieved was much more than what the trio of the 50s and 60s may have experienced collectively. Amitabh Bachchan had a long journey to reach the level of popularity that was Rajesh Khanna’s; but even at the height of his superstardom one has never heard of girls writing letters to Amitabh with blood, or throwing themselves at his car or trying to commit suicide at the news of his marriage to Jaya Bhaduri etc.

What Amitabh experienced was a different kind of affection from his fans. There were people who prayed for his life in 1982 when he had an accident during the shoot of “Coolie”. There are accounts of people walking barefoot from far-flung places to the hospital where AB was admitted and battling for life after the accident; people offering prayers at various places of worship cutting across religious differences. AB has always thanked his fans for all the love they showered on him during that period. In fact, he always greets them on Sunday evenings (whenever he is in Mumbai i.e.) for which there is a huge crowd of fans waiting outside his Mumbai residence.

He may have been dubbed the angry-young-man in the early phase of his career but he was equally adept at emotional, romantic or comic roles. “Mahaan” (1983) had him in three roles where we had him as an emotional father/ husband, serious-faced inspector and comic stage artist. The turn of the century saw him change his style and take on a variety of roles and characters- strict father who will not accept his son marrying against his wishes (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham), strict principal who wanted all his students to adhere to the ‘parampara’ ‘pratishtha’ etc laid down by the college (Mohabbatein), friendly-indulgent father to Akshay Kumar (“Ek Rishtaa: the bond of love” and “Waqt: the race against time”) etc. etc. etc. We saw him as a rustic near-bumbling cop in “Bunty Aur Babli”; aging teacher of a deaf-blind girl in “Black”; these successful experiments have seen him through 50 years in an industry which has many talented actors but no one has been given epithets like “Shahenshah of Bollywood”, “Big B” or “Star Of The Millennium”. He continues his reign over the hearts of his fans in spite of the next generation and the one after it giving movies that gross over 100 crores per film. He still gets author backed roles that befit his age and many-a-times is the central character of the story as in “Baghban” and “Baabul”. His detractors may feel that he is the most off-key (besura) singer (and I believe he agrees that he is mostly off-key) but the songs that he has sung (from the first full song “mere pass aao mere doston”) have been well received by his die-hard fans-yours truly included. 🙂

Coming back to the opening para of this post- here is the connection- Amitabh Bachchan is the recipient of this prestigious award for this year. He joins an august list of personalities who have had a major influence on the Indian film industry beginning from Devika Rani who is acknowledged as the first lady of Indian cinema.

This is the latest feather in AB’s cap in addition to the Padma awards – Padma Shri, Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan; 4 National Awards for best actor and 15 Filmfare awards and numerous other awards from various national and international organisations.

Today he turns 77 and I am confused as to which is an appropriate song that should go with this post- I have a big collection to choose from- the blog has about 20 songs which have had Amitabh Bachchan in the recording room as a singer or uttering a few words with the main singer.

Today’s song is from the BR films produced 2006 release “Baabul”. It had AB play an indulgent and friendly father to Salman Khan and a loving father-in-law to Rani Mukherjee. The movie had a simple story of the loving father-in-law, fighting the opposition from his own wife and other family members, against his decision of getting his son’s widow remarried. The song comes at the fag end of the movie. It was on my list of songs under consideration for this post. What clinched the matter in its favour is that the song has two versions to it. The version in the movie is in the voice of Amitabh Bachchan and the album version is in Jagjit Singh’s voice. And only this morning I saw a message on our WhatsApp group that yesterday was Jagjit Singh’s anniversary.

So, we wish our Big B a long and healthy life and lots more years of entertaining us along with remembering Jagjit Singh and his smooth voice.

Video (Amitabh Bachchan voice)

Audio

Song-Kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya (Baabul)(2006) Singer-Amitabh Bachchan/ Jagjit Singh, Lyrics-Sameer, MD-Aadesh Srivastava

Lyrics

kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
daakiya koyi jab aayega
tujhko churaa ke le jaayega
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata aa aa
jiyuga kaise tanha tere bina bata

tu suhaagan rahe sang saajan rahe raat din
iss khushi ke liye har sitam main uthha loonga aa
tere jaane kaa gham mujhko hoga magar laadli
leke iss dard ko main sada muskuraaoonga
baabul toh dil se de raha duaa yahi
khushi ke saaye mein ho zindagi teri
baabul toh dil se de raha duaa yahi ee
khushi ke saaye mein ho zindagi teri

waqt ke saath zakhm yeh bhar jayega
pal guzar jayega tu meri baat maan le ae
yaadon ke aasre umr kat’ti nahin
hai haqeeqat yahi abb too jaan le ae ae
samundaron ka paani koyi naa pi saka
akela khaara jeevan koyi naa jee saka aa
samundaron ka paani koyi naa pi saka
akela khaara jeevan koyi naa jee saka

kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
daakiya koyi jab aayega
tujh ko churaa ke le jaayega
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15501

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1193
Total Number of movies covered =4270

Total visits so far

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Active for more than 4000 days.

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