Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1960s (1961 to 1970)’ Category


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Blog Day : 4158 Post No. : 15327

“Street Singer”(1966) was directed by Chandrashekhar for Bhavdeep Films, Bombay. The movie had Chandrashekhar, Sarita, K N Singh, Manmohan Krishna, madan Puri, David, Sundar, ratna, Jeewan Kala, Keshav Rana, Agha, Tuntun, Polson, Bimal Chadha, Brijmohan, Ridku, Kundan, Sheikh, Amrit Patel etc in it.

This movie had seven songs in it. One song from the movie has been covered in the past.

Here is the second song from “Street Singer”(1966). This song is sung by Rafi. Hasrat Jaipuri is the lyricist. Music is composed by Suraj.

It is popularly thought that Suraj was Shankar of Shankar Jaikishan. But Mr Arunkumar Deshmukh, our beloved inhouse encyclopaedia tells us that Suraj was a pseudonym taken by Dattaram, Sebastian D’souza and Enoch Daniels. All these musicians, who were assistants of Shankar Jaikishan had only this movie to their credit under the name of Suraj.

Shankar had given music in a Marathi movie “Tee mee navhech” (1970) under the name of Suraj, and that is how this confusion about Shankar being the music director of “Street Singer” (1966) arose.

This song is picturised as a studio recording song on Chandrashekhar.


Song-Aa aaja aaja (Street Singer)(1966) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Suraj

Lyrics

aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aise mein tu to kahaan chala
kahaan chala hai saathiyaa
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aise main tu to kahaan chala
kahaan chala hai sathiya

dil mein hai tu
teri chhavi
phir kyun nazar pyaasi rahi
phir kyun nazar pyaasi rahi
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aise mein tu to kahaan chala
kahaan chala hai saathiya

aankhen teri
masti bhari
tarsa na tu
ham ko pila
tarsa na tu
hamko pila
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aa
aaja aaja
aa gale laga
aise mein tu to kahaan chala
kahaan chala hai saathiya


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4149 Post No. : 15315

Though most Hindi movies are based on native themes, often drawn from mythology, folk tales, history, contemporary day to day life etc, there have been movies based on non Indian topics as well.

Tarzan for some reason has been a very popular non Indian character that gets covered in Hindi movies quite often.

That is not all, it often gets combined with some other unrelated characters/ topics as well. For instance, we have movies that combine Tarzan with characters from enirely different locations, viz “Tarzan and Kingkong”, “Tarzan in Fairyland”, “Tarzan comes to Delhi”, “Tarzan and Captain Kishore” etc.

That is not all. Tarzan, an early 19th century character finds himself pitted against characters/ items separated in time by hundreds and even thousands of years. For instance “Tarzan and Delilah”, “”Tarzan and Hercules,” “Tarzan aur Jaadui Chiraag” etc.

1960s was a decade when Hindi B grade movie makers took particular fancy to Tarzan and made most of the above Tarzan movies. There were two Tarzan movies in 1963 and three each in 1964, 1965 and 1966, one each in 1968, 1969 and 1970. 15 Tarzan movies in one decade !

Here is a song from a Tarzan movie called “Rocket Tarzan”(1963). How Tarzan dwelling in Jungles of Africa meets American or European Rockets, only the moviemakers can tell. This movie was directed by B J Patel for Peoples Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Shanti Lal, Rajan Kapoor, Babu Raje, Bhopali, Polsan, Shakila Bano etc in it.

The movie had six songs in it. One song has been covered in the past. While covering that song, Mr Arunkumar Deshmukh, our beloved inhouse encyclopaedia, provided the story of the movie. It goes like this :

Professor Anil sets up his Lab to do research on rockets, in a Jungle to keep it a secret. His daughter Mala was looking after him. One day Mala is saved from a Tiger by the king of the Jungle Tarzan and as a duty, she immediately falls in his love. One day the king and queen of the jungle tribe come to meet the professor. The king has a tumour in his neck. The Professor treats him successfully and the king promises him full cooperation and protection. This is, however not liked by the King’s advisor Niranjan.

After few days, Niranjan kidnaps Mala and blackmails the professor to give him the secret formula to make such rockets which will take the man to the Moon. Tarzan arrives and in a fight rescues Mala.

Niranjan is very angry and he puts a fire to the Professor’s laboratory and in that fire all his secret formulae and the Rocket prototype is burnt down. Tarzan throws Niranjan into the same fire.

The professor decides to return to the City, but Mala chooses to remain with Tarzan in the Jungle.(Jungle mein mangal).

Here is another song from “Rocket Tarzan”(1963). The song is sung by Suman Kalyanpur and chorus. Yogesh is the lyricist. Music is composed by Robin Bannerji.

This song is a catchy and hummable song. One would imagine this to be a club dance song, rather than a song from a Tarzan movie. But that is how it is.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.


Song-Hum tumko mana rahe hain (Rocket Tarzan)(1963) Singer-Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Yogesh, MD-Robin Bannerji
Chorus

Lyrics

lalalala
lala
lalalala

hum tumko mana rahe hain
tum hamko mana rahe ho
chhodo bhi
chhodo bhi zaalim
hamko kyun aazma rahe ho
hum tumko mana rahe hain

ye bekaraar dil hi
meri to zindagi hai
manzil mujhe milegi
dil ko mere yaqeen hai
?? hoga ik din ye sab zamaana
hum tumko mana rahe hain
tum hamko mana rahe ho
chhodo bhi
chhodo bhi zaalim
hamko kyun aazma rahe ho
hum tumko mana rahe hain

kab tak juda rahenge
yoon manzilon se rahe
kab tak rahengi tanha
yoon aarzu ki baahen
raahon ki mushkilon ko
ik din hai sar jhukaana

hum tumko mana rahe hain
tum hamko mana rahe ho
chhodo bhi
chhodo bhi jalim hamko kyun aazma rahe ho
hum tumko mana rahe hain


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4147 Post No. : 15313

“Zingaaro” (1963) was directed by Chandrakant for Jai Films, Bombay. The movie had Jairaj, Zabeen, Tiwari, Bela Bose, Lakshmi Chhaaya, Aruna Irani, Maruti, Mridula, Baburao Pehalwan, Babu Raje, Radheyshyam, Moolchand, Gani Pehalwan, Julian etc.
The film has six songs. One song has been covered in the past.

Here is the second song from “Zingaaro” (1963) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor, Suman Kalyanpur and chorus. Prem Dhawan is the lyricist. Music is composed by S N Tripathi.

Only the audio of the song is available. From the sounds of it, the song is a qawwaali. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.


Song-Arre adaa se muskura dena…aap se humko mohabbat ho gayi (Zingaaro)(1963) Singers-Mahendra Kapoor, Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Prem Dhawan, MD-S N Tripathi
Male chorus
Female chorus

Lyrics

are adaa se muskura dena
aur haseen sar jhuka lena aa aa
haseenon ko bhi kitna sahal hai
bijli gira dena

ae ji aap se haaye
aap se humko mohabbat ho gayi
ho gayi
ae ji aap se humko mohabbat ho gayi
ho gayi

aur hashr se pehle kayaamat ho gayi
ho gayi
aur hashr se pehle kayaamat ho gayi
ho gayi

ishq ka mat naam lo ae meharbaan aan
ishq ka

aji ishq ka mat naam lo ae meharbaan aan
kya karoge
hoye hoye
kya karoge
jo museebat ho gayi
ho gayi

aji aap se humko mohabbat ho gayi
ho gayi

aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
are ishq mein peechhe haten jo
hum vo deewaane nahin
aji kyun nahin ji, kyun nahin
nahin hum vo deewaane nahin
jalne se jo khauf khaaye
hum vo parwaane nahin
aji kyun nahin ji kyun nahin
nahin hum vo parwaane nahin
jo garajte hain baraste hi nahin
aayega na aap par humko yaqeen

jala do haaye
jala do haddiyaan meri
jala do o
uda do
uda do
dhajjiyaan meri uda do
khata-e-ishq ki aisi saza do
meri hasti hi duniya se mita do
mita do
mita do
mita do
o o o

chhodiye hum aazmaaish kar chuke
kar chuke ji kar chuke
hum aazmaaish kar chuke

aapki sachchi wafa pe mar chuke
mar chuke ji mar chuke
sachchi wafa pe mar chuke

aa aa aa aa
humko bhi haaye
humko bhi thhodi si chahat ho gayi

ho gayi
humko bhi thhodi si chahat ho gayi
ho gayi

aapse humko mohabbat ho gayi ee ee
aapse humko mohabbat
haay
mohabbat
hoye
mohabbat ho gayi ee ee
hashr se pehle kayamat ho gayi ee ee
hashar se pehle kayaamat
haay
kayamat
haay
kayamat ho gayi
ee ee

ho gayi ho gayi
ho gayi

ho gayi
ho gayi
ho gayi
ho gayi


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4145 Post No. : 15311

“Tarzan and Kingkong”(1965) was directed by A Shamsheer for Amrit Kala Mandir, Bombay. the movie had Randhawa, Dara Singh, Mumtaz, Shyam Kumar, Bela Bose, Rani, Heera Saawant, Rajen Kapoor, Bhagwan, Roopesh Kumar etc in it.

The movie had six songs in it. Two songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the third song from “Tarzan and Kingkong”(1965) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Suman Kalyanpur. Anjaan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Robin Bannerji.

The song is picturised as a rajdarbaar dance song. I am unable to identify the daner. I request our knowledgeable readers to help identify her. One can identify Shyam Kumar and Bhagwan among the audience.


Song-Dil toone kehna maana (Tarzan aur Kingkong)(1965) Singer-Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Anjaan, MD-Robin Bannerji

Lyrics

dil toone kehna maana kis beimaan ka aa aa
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
jiski jubaan ka
haay kehna maana kis beimaan ka aa aa
dil toone kehna maana

bedardi baalma khudgarzi
bedardi baalma khudgarzi
main samjhoon main jaanoon re teri marji
main samjhoon main jaanoon re teri marji
haay pahle churaaye jiyaa phir tadpaaye
bairi badala chukaaye kaise mere ehsaan ka aa aa
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
jiski jubaan ka
haay kehna maana kis beimaan ka aa aa
dil toone kehna maana

jaa julmi dekh li teri yaari
jaa julmi dehk li teri yaari
o chhaliyaa hai jhoothi ye dildaari
o chhaliyaa hai jhoothi ye dildaari
are ankhiyaan ji waade kare aankhe beisraaye
haay koi thikaana nahin jis beimaan ka aa aa
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
kuchh bhi bharosa nahin
jiski jubaan ki
haay re kehna maana kis beimaan ka aa aa
dil toone kehna maana aa aa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4144 Post No. : 15310 Movie Count :

4217

‘Aalor Pipasa’ (Thirst for Light) was a Bangla film released in January 1965. The film was directed by Tarun Majumdar. The film is available on-line with English sub-titles. The story of the film is about a courtesan (Sandhya Roy) who sacrifices her life for the betterment of her son. The entire story is depicted in the film by way of flash back when a senior doctor (Pahadi Sanyal) tells the story of the courtesan to his junior doctor (Asit Baran). The junior doctor happens to be the courtesan’s son.

Obviously, the story of the film revolves around Sandhya Roy and I must say that she has given an outstanding performance in the film. Hitherto, my knowledge about Sandhya Roy was limited to her Hindi films like ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962), ‘Pooja Ke Phool’ (1964), ‘Jaane Anjaane’ (1971) etc. But in Hindi films she had only secondary roles like Dev Anand’s ‘munhboli bahen’ (adoptive sister) in ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962) where she displays her combative but soft at heart attitudes. The song from the film laakh chupaao chhup na sakega was picturised on her.

In Bangla films, Sandhya Roy has been one of the prominent actresses who has been active in Bangla film industry for over 5 decades starting with lead roles and switching over to character roles. She has worked in more than 100 films. She is also in politics having successfully contested parliamentary election from Mednipur in 2014 on Trinamul Congress ticket.

Sandhya Roy (born 11/04/1941) was born in Nabadwip (West Bengal). However, her family belonged to Khulna (now in Bangla Desh) where her grand father was a landlord. In her childhood, she lost her parents. She was brought up by her maternal uncle at Khulna where she had her early education.

In 1957, Sandhya Roy returned to Kolkata and stayed with her sister. This was the beginning of her unexpected journey to Bangla films. While watching the shooting of the film ‘Mamlar Fol’ (1957), the director saw her and offered her a role in the crowd. Her first full-fledged film was ‘Antariksha’ (1957). After the success of this film, she started getting offers of lead roles in many Bangla films. She remained one of the leading actresses in Bangla films during 1960-80. During this period, she was paired with Biswajeet in about 20 films.

Sandhya Roy had her stint in Hindi films with ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962) which was followed by ‘Pooja Ke Phool’ (1964), ‘Raahgir’ (1969), ‘Jaane Anjaane’ (1971), Bandagi’ (1972) etc. The last Hindi film she acted was ‘Ek Anaar Sau Bimaar’ (2008). However, despite her good acting, she could not actively pursue her career in Hindi films.

From 1980s onward, Sandhya Roy continues to work in Bangla films as a character actress beside pursuing her political career.

Sandhya Roy married Tarun Majumdar, one of the leading directors of Bangla films who had also directed Hindi films, ‘Balika Badhu’ (1967) and ‘Raahgir’ (1969).

‘Aalor Pipasa’ (1965) had nine songs of which as many as 5 songs were Hindi semi-classical songs. This was to be expected since the story of the film revolves around a courtesan who entertains her clients by singing and dancing. The film also has a Sanskrit strotra (hymns) which has been rendered by Hemant Kumar as a background song when credit titles roll in the film.

In the film, Lata Mangeshkar sings two solos for Sandhya Roy of which I have selected the song ‘ghir aayi badariya piya naahi aaye’. The song has been written by Kaifi Azmi which has been set to music by Hemant Kumar.


Song-Ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye (Aalor Pipaasa)(Bangla)(1965) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Kaifi Azmi, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahi aaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye

jaa jaa re badra tu pi ko manaa laa
jaa jaa re badra……aa aa aa aa aa
jaa jaa re badra tu pi ko manaa laa
pi ke bina mohe kachhu hi na bhaaye
pi ke bina mohe
pi ke bina mohe kachhu hi na bhaaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye

jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
megha re kaahe ko jhariya lagaaye
megha re kaahe ko
megha re kaahe ko jhariya lagaaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye….ye ye


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4139 Post No. : 15301 Movie Count :

4215

By now, I must have watched/heard about 20 Hindi songs from the Bangla films of 1950s-1970s. I have a feeling that there may be a few more Hindi songs in Bangla films which I have yet to explore.

A question came to my mind as to why some Bengali film directors have fascination to incorporate Hindi songs in Bangla films. Is it something to do with realism or the personal preferences of the film directors? After watching some of the videos of the Hindi songs in Bangla films, I have come to the conclusion that it is for the realistic depiction of the situations in the films. Almost, all the Hindi song situations in Bengali films that I have so far watched, belongs to semi-classical genre. The Hindi song situations mostly comprises of mujra dances, a teacher of Hindustani classical vocalist rehearsing with his student, actors in the role of Hindustani classical vocalists giving stage performances etc.

Today, I am presenting a semi-classical traditional dadra, ‘jiya mein laagi aan baan’ from the Bangla film ‘Atithi’ (1965). The film directed by Tapan Sinha is based on a short story of the same title by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. The dadra set in raag Gara has been sung by Meera Banerjee whose name I heard for the first time. A search on the internet revealed that Meera Banerjee was Hindustani classical vocalist belonging to Patiala Gharana. A brief profile of Meera Banerjee culled out from an article in ‘The Hindu’ July 5, 2012 issue is presented below:

Vidushi Meera Banerjee (28/03/1930 – 28/06/2012) was born in Meerut (Uttar Pradesh). Her father, Shailendra Kumar Chatterjee was a musicologist who gave her the initial training in music. Later she was trained by Pandit Chinmay Lahiri. She became the listed artist of All India Radio at the age of 14.

Pandit Harishchandra Bali of Jalandhar (see my note below) who was the Guru of Meera’s father saw her potential as a vocalist and gave her training in some rare bandishes composed by him. From 1950 onward, Meera Banerjee became the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan and remained so until his death in 1968.

Meera Banerjee attained the status of one of the prominent Hindustani classical vocalists in the genre of Khayal and Thumri in the 1950s. She participated in the National Programme of Music and other musical festivals in India. She travelled abroad as a part of cultural delegation of Government of India to give performances in various countries. She had won numerous awards for works.

In 1957, she married Pandit Prasoon Banerjee, also a Hindustani classical vocalist who also became the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan.

At the later stage of her life, due to poor health, she stopped giving public performances. Meera Banerjee left for her heavenly abode on June 28, 2012 in Kolkata.

———————————————————————————————–

Note : Pandit Harishchandra Bali is the same person as H C Bali who was the music director for about 25 Hindi films during 1930s and 40s. His disciples included Pandit Amarnath Chawla, Husnalal and Bhagatram.

Probably, this may be the only song Meera Banerjee sang for a film. In the film, the song has been partially picturised as part of a medley of three songs which follows one after another. The situations in the film seem to be many families travelling in boats. While the first song is a dadra, the second is a folk song and the last one is the Bangla song.

This dadra song in raag Gara is in the traditional lyrics which was first recorded in 1916 in the voice of Gauhar Jaan. Later, many prominent Hindustani classical singers have rendered this dadra including Meera Banerjee and Rasoolan Bai in a more elaborate way. The music director for the film was Tapan Sinha.

Video Clip (Partial):


Audio Clip

Song-Jiyaa mein laagi aan baan (Atithi)(Bangla)(1965) Singer-Meera Bannerji, MD-H C Bali

Lyrics

aaaaaaaan aa
aaaa..n baaaa..n
aaaa..n baaaa..n
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein
jiya mein laagi aaaa..n baaaa..n
jiya mein laagi aaaa..n baaa..n
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan
o pyaari chitwan aa ??
jiya mein basi kaise phansi
jiya mein basi kaise phansi
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan
jiyaa…aa mei…n laaa..gi
aan baan re
aan baan
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan

pairan laagi jhuk ke saiyyan
pairan laagi jhuk ke saiyyan
koi na meherbaan saiyyan
koi na meherbaan saiyyan
tum bin mohe kal na pade
tum bin mohe kal na pade
tumhre kaaran jaa..gi re
tumhre kaaran jaa..gi
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan

1965


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4138 Post No. : 15299

“Warrant”(1961) was directed by Kedar Kapoor for Shanti Niketal Films, Bombay. The movie had Ashok Kumar, Raj Kumar, Shakila, Cuckoo, Helen, Dhumal, Raj Mehra, Baburao etc in it.

The movie had six songs in it. One song has been covered in the past.

Today (16 november 2019) is the remembrance day of Roshan (14 July 1917 – 16 November 1967). On this occasion, here is the second song from “Warrant”(1961) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Asha Bhonsle. Anand Bakshi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Roshan.

Only the audio of the song is available. It sounds like a club dance song to me. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the movie as well as the picturisation of this song.


Song-Le gaya dil nikaal ke (Warrant)(1961) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Roshan

Lyrics

le gaya dil nikaal ke
bin poochhe
o bin poochhe anaari
anaari
de gaya gham kamaal ke
bin maange
o bin maange anaari
anaari
hic
haaye

kal sadak par mil gaya thha ek begaana aa
kal sadak par mil gaya thha ek begaana aa
mujhse bola maangta hoon tujhko apnaana
dar gayi main
mar gayi main
kar gayi main haaye
khel khela kamaal ke
hic
khel khela kamaal ke
nainon ka
ho nainon ka khilaari
anaari
de gaya gham kamaal ke
bin maange
o bin maange anaari
anaari

roop mera phir milaaya chaand taaron se ae
roop mera phir milaaya chaand taaron se ae
pyaar apna phir milaaya gulbahaaron se
maine jaana
hai deewaana
thha sayaana haaye
rakhte kab tak sambhaal ke
haan
rakhte kab tak sambhaal ke
khud ko main
ho khud ko main bechaari
anaari
de gaya gham kamaal ke
bin maange
o bin maange anaari
anaari
aan
hic
haaye

aankhon aankhon maine bheji pyaar ki arzi
aankhon aanhkon maine bheji pyaar ki arzi
baaton baaton maine poochhi pyaar ki marzi
majnu chhaila
dil ka maila
bola laila haaye
maana bulbul ko daal ke
hic
maana bulbul ko daal ke
pinjre mein
ho pinjre mein shikaari
anaari
hic
haaye


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4131 Post No. : 15290 Movie Count :

4210

A couple of months’ back, I had come across a Hindi song ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from a Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) sung by Mubarak Begum under the music direction of Salil Chowdhury. I could not locate the picturised version of the song. The tune of the song gives me an impression that it is picturised as a mujra song. While it was a new song for me, the ‘mukhda’ of the song sounded familiar to me. Oh! Yes. It was the more famous song, ruke ruke se kadam from ‘Mausam’ (1975) sung by Lata Mangeshkar under the music direction of Madan Mohan. Both the songs have almost the same lyrics which are accredited to Gulzar. So, it is one song, composed in two tunes by two different music directors, depicting two different emotions.

There is a section of the Hindi film music lovers who feels that credit for both the songs should go to Mirza Ghalib as he had originally written this ghazal which Gulzar has merely changed a few words to give an easy understanding of the original words. So, I decided to make a reality check by comparing the original ghazal written by Mirza Gahlib and the versions written by Gulzar for both the films mentioned above.

The original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib has five she’rs. The ghazal written by Gulzar for the Bangla film ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) has four she’rs and that for ‘Mausam’ (1975) has three she’rs. Let us compare the she’rs of all the three versions of the ghazal in a tabular form for easy verification as to whether the ‘allegation’ on Gulzar has substance or not.

Original ghazal by Mirza Ghalib Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Mausam’ (1975)
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar de ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.

Ruke ruke se kadam
mud ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.

Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan jism kaa jaan par.

Chale jahaan se to
ye pairahan uttaar chale.

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Tumhaare kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Le tere kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Na jaane kaun si mitti watan ki mitti thhi.

Nazar mein dhool jigar mein liye ghubaar chale.

[Not used] [Not used]
Sahar naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

Thhi raat raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale.

Sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya.

Ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale.

Subah naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

ki ek raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale

Mili hai shama se ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamko.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

Shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

[Not used]

Note: Bold words indicate changes from the original she’rs.

It will be observed from the above table that Gulzar has made only some cosmetic changes in the original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib which has been used in the two films mentioned above. Hence, the credit for the two ghazals used in the films should have rightly gone to Mirza Ghalib. I am aware that Gulzar is a great fan of Mirza Ghalib and he had used Mirza Ghalib’s she’rs in a couple of his other songs including dil dhoondhta hai phir wahi fursat ke raat din. So, I thought that he may have given due credit to Mirza Ghalib in his film ‘Mausam’ (1975) for his inspirations. But in the credit title of the film in DVD version, there is no acknowledgement to Mirza Ghalib.

Coming back to the song ‘ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale’ from the Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964), as mentioned earlier, this song is not available in the DVD version of the film. I feel that this mujra song may have been partially used in the film. But the full song is available on the record version which was issued by Saregama (then HMV). There is another Hindi song in the film, ‘saans ke zakhm bhar raha hai koi’ written by Gulzar and sung by Manna Dey which is partially used in the film.

‘Laal Pathore’ (1964, Bangla) in which Uttam Kumar, Supriya Devi (Chaudhury) and Srabani Basu acted in main roles was later made in Hindi as ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971) with corresponding roles for Rajkumar, Hema Malini and Rakhi. Both the versions were directed by Sushil Majumdar. While Salil Chowdhury composed the music for Bangla version, Shankar-Jaikishan composed the music for Hindi version.

I was enthralled with the Ghazal King Madan Mohan’s version of the ghazal, ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from ‘Mausam’ (1975)’ Let us now enjoy Salil Chowdhury’s version of the same ghazal in a different setting.

Lastly, let us also give credit to Mirza Ghalib for the lyrics of both the version of the ghazal along with Gulzar.

Audio link:

Song-Ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale (Laal Pathore)(Bangla)(1964) Singer-Mubarak Begam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4123 Post No. : 15277 Movie Count :

4202

For the general Hindi film audience, Suchitra Sen (real name: Roma Dasgupta) is synonymous with her lead roles in ‘Bambai Ka Babu’ (1960) with Dev Anand, ‘Mamta’ (1966) with Ashok Kumar and ‘Aandhi’ (1975) with Sanjeev Kumar. The second category of audience with academic interest in Hindi films will add four more of her Hindi films – ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro with Dilip Kumar, ‘Musafir’ (1957) with Shekhar, ‘Champakali’ (1957) with Bharat Bhushan and ‘Sarhad’ (1960) with Dev Anand. Those in the latter category of Hindi film buffs would also know that Suchitra Sen worked in many Bengali films and the Bengali film audience loved to watch their favourite on-screen couple, Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar.

I was in the second category insofar as Suchitra Sen was concerned until recently. But in my quest to get a few rare Hindi film songs in Bengali films made me to watch some of the popular and critically acclaimed Bengali films of the golden era (1950-75). In this process, I came to know about the important contributions made by Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar among others in reviving the Bengali film industry after the decline of big film productions banners like New Theatres, M P Productions (of P C Barua) and the collapse of the studio system.

Based on a number of articles available on-line including some from Gopal Krishna Roy, a film journalist with United News of India who remained one of the very few close confidants of Suchitra Sen until her death, I have given below some interesting aspects of her filmy career based on these readings:

1. Suchitra Sen (06/04/1931 – 17/01/2014) migrated from then East Bengal (now Bangla Desh) to Kolkata with her family in 1947. She joined film industry in 1952 when she was already married to Dibanath Sen, a Marine Engineer and the son of an Industrialist in 1947 at the age of 16.

2. She acted in her fist film ‘Shesh Kothay’ (1952, Bangla) which was never released. Her first officially released film was ‘Saat Number Kayedi’ (1953, Bangla)

3. Her second released film was ‘Sharey Chauttor’ (1953, Bangla), a light comedy film which was also her first film with matinee idol, Uttam Kumar, then nick named in the Tollygunj studio circle as a ‘flop hero’ because all the films he worked during 1948-52 were box office failures. With this film, Uttam Kumar made an impressive turnaround in his filmy career with Suchitra Sen. From this film onward, Bengali filmy audience adored them as the most iconic romantic pair in the Bengali films.

4. During her filmy career (1953-78), Suchitra Sen worked in 61 films (including 7 Hindi films) out of which she paired with Uttam Kumar in as many as 30 films. Almost all of their films were box office hits.

5. When Suchitra Sen was 39, she lost her husband, Dibanath Sen in 1970 while he was on a visit to USA. However, she kept her shooting schedules, more or less, as planned to avoid financial losses to the producers.

6. A glance through her filmography and brief story lines of most of her films gives an impression that Suchitra Sen had handled her filmy career, especially from 1960, onward very professionally. She appears to be selective in accepting the films. Most of her films have a strong story-line and she had almost equal footage in films along with lead actors. In this process, she had ensured that she had ample scope for portraying her characters in the films and was not over-exposed to her audience.

7. Suchitra Sen declined the offer of Satyajit Ray’s film because he had put a condition that she had to give bulk dates for shooting and during the making of the film, she should not work in any other films. Satyajit Ray decided to abandon the film rather than taking any other female actress. She had also declined the offer of Raj Kapoor to work in one of his films (My wild guess is that it was for ‘Sangam’ (1964) because he had also made an offer to Uttam Kumar for a role in his film ‘Sangam’ (1964) which he had also declined. The role went to Rajendra Kumar.)

8. Suchitra Sen was the first Bengali film actress to get the best actress award in any International Film Festival for her role in Bangla film ‘Saptapadi’ (1961) in Moscow International Film Festival, 1963.

9. After the box office failure of her last film ‘Pranay Pasha’ (1978), Suchitra Sen retired from the film industry at the age of 47. It was first thought that she had timed her retirement at the peak of her career. However, over a period of time, it became evident that with retirement from the films, she had also shunned public life. She spent her last 35 years in her house as recluse, confining herself with close circles of family and a few friends.

During her last 35 years, Suchitra Sen completely avoided public exposure. Even during the death of Uttam Kumar in 1980, she visited his house after mid-night to offer her condolence. It is believed that she had decline to accept Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 2005 mainly to avoid the public appearance. In 2012, Government of West Bengal gave her ‘Banga Bibushan Award’ but she did not attend the function. Moon Moon Sen, her daughter accepted the Award on her behalf.

Suchitra Sen suffered from lung infections for which she was admitted in a Kolkata hospital sometime in December 2013. She had almost recovered from her ailment but on January 17, 2014, she got a cardiac arrest which took her life. As per her wish, her body was put in the casket with tinted glasses and was cremated as the earliest (in about 5 hours from the time of her death). So even in death, she ensured her privacy.

Dilip Kumar who had worked with Suchitra Sen in her first Hindi film ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro, paid tributes to her upon her death in January 2014 which are reproduced below:

Suchitra had peerless, expressive eyes. She conveyed volumes with a single look. During an intense scene in Devdas, I had to look straight into her eyes and convey romance filled with pathos. She reacted uniquely, looking with equal intensity at me and doing a slight lip movement which was excellent. Bimal da complimented her after that shot and so did I.

Professional to the core, Suchitra maintained a distance from film folk and never opened up unless she was comfortable with the person she was interacting with. She preferred to work in silence. But she never disrespected anyone. As an artiste, she gave full respect to even a spot boy.

Her Hindi had a Bengali accent but it sounded sweet. She could give five modulations to a single dialogue. After Devdas, we worked in Musafir in 1957, but we were not paired together. I will never forget the serenity she lent to the bhajan, ‘man re hari naam karna’ by Lata Mangeshkar.

We shared a great work rapport, but I must confess, her pairing with Uttam Kumar was the greatest. Suchitra was unparalleled in ‘Saat Paake Bandha’, ‘Uttar Phalguni’ and ‘Deep Jwele Jai’. An actress of international calibre, her looks were simply haunting. [Source: The Times of India, updated version dated 17/01/2017].

Many of Suchitra Sen’s Bangla films were not only box office hits, some of them were critically acclaimed and were remade in Hindi like ‘Mamta’ (1966) from ’Uttar Phalguni’ (1963), ‘Kora Kaagaz’ (1974) from ‘Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963), ‘Khamoshi’ (1966) from ‘Deep Jwele Jaai’ (1959) etc.

I am presenting a Hindi song ‘zindagi ki ye bhool thhi’ from the film ‘Uttar Phalguni’ (1963, Bangla) sung by Sandhya Mukherjee. The name of the lyricist is not known. The song was set to music by Robin Chatterjee.

Suchitra Sen had a double role – both mother and daughter in this film which was produced by Uttam Kumar. But he did not act in this film. Suchitra Sen later did the same double role in the Hindi version ‘Mamta’ (1966).

Unfortunately, the video clip of the song is not available. In fact, I did not find the song in the DVD of the film. Since Sandhya Mukherjee had sung for Suchitra Sen in this film, I guess, the song was picturized on Suchitra Sen. The wordings of the song give me an impression of a mujra song, the similar situational song in Hindi version of the film could be rahte thhe kabhi jinke dil mein.

Audio Clip:

Song-Zindagi ki ye bhool thhi (Uttar Phalguni)(Bangla)(1963) Singer-Sandhaya Mukherjee, MD-Robin Chatterji

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
mohabbat ki thandi chhaon mein
naadaan dil thha so gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
lut gayi main to jeete jee
haay kisi ke pyaar mein
phool dikha ke dhool mein
kaanta koi chubho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

meri nasheeli aankh mein ae
meri nashee….li aankh mein
tasveer kiski bas gayi
tasveer kiski bas gayi
khel samajh ke prem ke
jaal mein main to phans gayi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
hansne ko main taras gayi
saahil pe la ke naav ko
saahil pe la ke naav ko
mallah khud dubo gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day : 4116 Post No. : 15269

Here is that date again.

The 25th of October is a date that many Hindi film lovers, and lovers of shaayari, remember with some pain. For it was on the 25th of October 1980 that one of the tallest figures of the industry, and certainly of the world of poetry, bade farewell to us.

Sahir Ludhianvi.

I’m usually careful with my choice of adjectives, especially when using them in the superlative. But in the case of Sahir, I don’t have the slightest hesitation in saying “one of the tallest”. For he comfortably satisfies this criterion.

There have been more famous figures in the industry.

And there have certainly been more popular and liked figures in the industry. If anything, Sahir, with his uncompromising nature, and and ego and mood to match, wasn’t the easiest person to get along with.

And yet, when it comes to stature, that too in his particular field, Sahir was truly a giant.
Without belittling any of the others who also produced outstanding work in the form of lyrics, Sahir always seemed to be in a league of his own.

They say that an actor is not real – after all, it is his job to act. He is only putting on a show. Which is one reason Kishore Kumar preferred singing to acting. He felt a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, whereas an actor’s job is to pretend.

A lyricist goes a step further than even a singer.

While a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, he does not create it. He only renders it.

The text comes from the lyricist.

And therefore the lyricist has the best chance of putting his heart and soul into his creation. He talks to his audience through his lines. He can use his poetry as an outlet for his thoughts, his feelings, his joys and his frustrations.

And I feel no one did this better than Sahir.

With Sahir, what you saw was what you got.

Sahir was pretty much an open book in terms of his preferences, his likes and dislikes. Nothing duplicitous or fake about him. He had strong views on certain topics, and he had absolutely no qualms about expressing them.

He even got into trouble early in his life with the Government of Pakistan for this reason – and fled Lahore (and thus, Pakistan) to come to India in 1949.

Imagine if this had not happened. Imagine what might have been lost to us.

Whatever issues Indians might have with the Government of Pakistan, I thank the Pakistan Government, on behalf of all Indians, for creating an “enabling” environment for Sahir to move to India. 🙂

And Sahir never looked back.

From “thandi hawayen” (Naujawan-1951), the song that got him noticed, to “pal do pal ka saath hamaara” (The Burning Train-1980), one of the last films for which he wrote lyrics, Sahir was one of the most highly regarded lyricists of his time.

I remember saying this before. When Sahir passed away, I only knew his name as a lyricist. In those days, still a teenager, I had limited knowledge of song details. I’d know the song, and the singer. Yes, some chance I’d know the composer, but unless I’d listened carefully to the lyricist’s name while listening to it on radio, not much chance I’d know the lyricist. In those days, to be honest, I enjoyed songs without knowing whether it was a Majrooh or Sahir or Shailendra or Hasrat Jaipuri song.

With this limited knowledge, I read the obituary on Sahir in the Illustrated Weekly of India in 1980. It was a fairly long obituary, and naturally many of his songs were mentioned.

That was when it hit me.

Oh, “aage bhi jaane na tu” was Sahir’s?

And “ye raat ye chaandni phir kahaan”?

Oh, and “udey jab jab zulfen teri” also?

And “abhi na jao chhod kar”?

And “zindagi bhar nahin bhoolegi wo barsaat ki raat?”

And “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”?

Oh, and “jeevan ke safar mein raahi” also?

And “tadbeer se bigdi hui taqdeer bana le”?

There were many more – and each one was a song I knew, a classic. Yet, such was my pathetic knowledge at the time of who the lyricist was, that I never realized these were all Sahir.

At that time, if you’d asked me to mention a few Sahir songs, I’d have come up with Pyaasa and Kabhie Kabhie songs. These I always knew as Sahir songs. But I am ashamed now to think of how ignorant I otherwise was.

It was only at that moment I realized what a legend Sahir had been. And what the world had lost.

After that, I paid a lot more attention to the lyricist, while listening to songs.

And often it was Sahir.

Much later in life, I read that it was only on Sahir’s insistence that All India Radio itself started mentioning the name of the lyricist also, in its radio programmes.

It was not only the name of the lyricist, but also the lyrics themselves, that I started paying attention to.

And that is when I realized that Sahir’s lyrics were different.

They were deep, they conveyed an emotion that came from the heart – and often a strong emotion at that. They were not the “baith ja, baith gayi, khadi ho ja, khadi ho gayi” types.

If today lyrics are a very big, in fact the biggest, part of my love for a song, it is entirely due to Sahir. I listen to lyrics carefully today – no appreciation of a song is complete for me, without appreciating the lyrics.

Whether Sahir was writing romantic poetry (“abhi na jao chhod kar”) or mocking the government for its failures (“cheen-o-Arab hamaara”), whether he was lamenting the state of society (“jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain”), or trying to uplift those seemingly with no hope (“wo subah kabhi to aayegi”), whether he was exhorting the oppressed to fight for their rights (“ponchh kar ashq” , “na munh chhupa ke jiyo”), or showing a mirror to society about its treatment of women (“aurat ne janam diya mardon ko”), whether he was trying to promote communal harmony (“tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”), or talking about the futility of war (“khuda-e-bartar”), every single time Sahir’s lyrics tugged at your heart strings.

Not just because the poetry was beautiful and the lyrics powerful (which they absolutely were), but because you could feel that every word was written with heart and soul. No wonder it went straight from Sahir’s heart to our hearts.

You could feel Sahir’s anguish and despair when he says “ye duniya agar mil bhi jaaye to kya hai”. Or his cynicism when he says “aasmaan pe hai khuda aur zameen pe hum, aajkal wo is taraf dekhta hai kam”.

At the same time, you could feel the romance in the air, with “tum agar saath dene ka waada karo” and “parbaton ke pedon par”. Just listen to poetry like “thehre thehre paani mein, geet sarsaraate hain….bheege bheege jhonkon mein, khushbuon ka deraa hai”. Waah!
And “abhi na jao chhod kar”, one of my alltime favourites, and surely one of the most perfect songs ever in every respect.

Sahir’s poetry for the hurt felt by the jilted lover was no less powerful. “Jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”. Or lines like “laut rahi hain meri sadaayen, deewaaron se sar takra ke….haath pakad kar chalne waale, ho gaye rukhsat haath chhuda ke (sad version of in hawaon mein)”. And of course, “chalo ek baar phir se ajnabi ban jaayen hum dono” with lines like “wo afsaana jisey anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, usey ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

Then you have the Barsaat Ki Raat qawwalis. Roshan’s masterpiece “na to karwaan ki talaash hai” merging into “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq” is one of the greatest ever compositions in Hindi cinema, with Sahir’s contribution in lyrics being no less significant. With lines like “jo dawaa ke naam pe zeher do, us chaaraagar ki talaash hai”.

I can go on and on. Dharamputra, Taj Mahal, Aaj Aur Kal, Mujhe Jeene Do, Chitralekha, Kaajal, Waqt, Neel Kamal, Humraaz, Bahu Begum, Aadmi Aur Insaan. Each one with memorable lyrics. One of my favourites is “poochhe koi ki dard-e-wafaa kaun de gaya, raaton ko jaagne ki sazaa kaun de gaya…kehne se ho malaal, to hum kya jawaab dein….duniya kare sawaal, to hum kya jawaab dein”.

Although Sahir was less productive in the 70s, he still came up with poetry that reminded us of Sahir of yore. The 70s was a decade where poetry began steadily losing ground to more “chaalu” lyrics. Urdu also began losing ground in the process.

This was a development that Sahir could not prevent, but did leave him disillusioned. His “main pal do pal ka shaayar hoon” very correctly represents his then state of mind. He continued to write though, but mostly for the Chopra family’s films, for films like Karm, Trishul, Insaaf Ka Tarazu, Kaala Patthar and The Burning Train.

Since Sahir started as a poet, and moved into film song lyrics, the sense of poetry comes across strongly in his lyrics. Much like with Kaifi Azmi.

So much for Sahir’s poetry. No one can do justice to it in one article. I’ve barely scraped the surface.

But what really makes me put Sahir on a different pedestal altogether is not the QUALITY of his poetry, but the CONTENT of his poetry.

Clearly Sahir was a rebel, a non-conformist.

And his poetry often reflected this, since he wrote straight from the heart.

But importantly, he never shied away from expressing his views. He never tried to be politically correct. He showed society a mirror, whether society liked it or not. For example, his line “kaho ji tum kya kya khareedoge, yahaan to har cheez bikti hai” is a much underrated, but powerful, line, in my opinion.

Yes, he railed and ranted – whether it made a difference or not. “Samaj ko badal daalo” he wrote.

Today, 39 years after his death, we are still languishing with most of the ills that existed in Sahir’s time, and which he spoke against.

It is a sad commentary of our times that many of his laments feel just as relevant today as they felt then. Yes, “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko, mardon ne usey bazaar diya” and “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega, insaan ki aulad hai insaan banega” are just as relevant in 2019, as they were in 1958-59.

If Sahir were alive today, he’d probably be writing just as strongly today as he wrote then. The issues haven’t gone, sadly only Sahir has.

That’s a sobering thought.

Now, let’s move on to the song for today.

It’s from the 1969 film, Paisa Ya Pyaar.

As has now become customary :-), the lyrics for this song have been sent to me by Avinashji.

I remember seeing this film as a young boy, but I don’t remember the story now. It was a remake of a Tamil film Panama Paasama, starring Gemini Ganesan and Saroja Devi, which was a pretty big hit at the time. In fact, the name Panama Paasama, translates in Hindi to Paisa Ya Pyaar.

I remember the song “Ber lo, ber lo” was a lift from the very popular “yelantha pazham yelantha pazham” song of Panama Paasama. 🙂

But today’s song is different. It is a typical Sahir song – Insaan ne paise ke liye.

Here, Sahir’s lament is about how money destroys relationships. He talks about how people lose everything, even their own self-respect, for money. He concludes by saying that love is the biggest wealth there is.

The song is sung by Hemant Kumar, music composed by Ravi.

Please do listen.

I’d like to end by saying that Sahir was wrong in one respect.

He wrote

“kal koi mujh ko yaad kare
kyon koi mujhko yaad kare
masroof zamaana mere liye
kyon waqt apna barbaad kare”

Sahir saab, I can only say you grossly underestimated our love and respect for you.

jo aapse mila hai, wo itna hai anmol
roz sunte hain, aap hi ke hum bol
aap ko bhool jaayen, ye mumkin nahin
aap ki yaad na aaye, aisa koi din nahin

Thank you SO MUCH for what you’ve given us, Sahir saab.

And, very importantly, for just being you.

Video

Audio

Song-Insaanon ne paise ke liye aapas ka pyaar mita daala (Paisa Ya Pyaar)(1969) Singer-Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhainvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics (based on audio link) (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Hanste baste ghar phoonk diye
Dharti ko narak banaa daalaa

Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Jazbaat ke naazuk rishton ko
Mitti ke taley dafnaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Mandir Masjid aur Girjon ko
Bankon ki bhent chadhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Daulat ki hawas mein logon ne
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Chaahat izzat mehnat gairat
Sabkaa neelaam uthhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi insaan ne
Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi ee insaan ne
Kudrat ke banaayi daulat ka
Sikkon mein mol lagaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

————————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————–
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
हँसते बसते घर फूँक दिए
धरती को नरक बना डाला

मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
जज़्बात के नाज़ुक रिश्तों को
मिटटी के तले दफना डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
मंदिर मस्जिद और गिरिजों को
बैंकों की भेंट चढ़ा डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दौलत की हवस में लोगों ने
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
चाहत इज्ज़त मेहनत गैरत
सबका नीलाम उठा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी इंसान ने
प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी ई इंसान ने
कुदरत के बनायी दौलत का
सिक्कों में मोल लगा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला


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(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15327

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1180
Total Number of movies covered =4221

Total visits so far

  • 12,685,339 hits

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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