Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Song from regional movies’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4175 Post No. : 15349 Movie Count :

4231

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 14
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‘Antony Firingee’ (1967) was a Bengali film which has attained a classic status among the Bengali films. The film was directed by Sunil Banerjee. The main cast included Uttam Kumar, Tanuja, Lolita Chatterjee, Bhanu Bandopadhyay, Asit Baran, Ruma Guha Thakurta, Chhaya Devi etc. The film was based on a real-life story of Hensman Antony, a Portuguese national, who visited Chandannagar (near Kolkata) with his father, a trader, sometime in the 19th century. However, in the film, the story has some deviation from the real story probably to give a better cinematic depiction of the characters. Let me set out first the real story which I have gathered from the on-line sources.

Hensman Antony (1786-1836) arrived in Chandannager with his father, a trader sometime in the 19th century. He got so obsessed with the Bengali folk music and language that he decided to settle down in Chandannagar. During his stay, he started learning Bengali language and also the folk music. His life took a fresh turn when he saved a brahmin widow, Saudamini from self-immolation and took her to his place. He married her much to the annoyance of orthodox Bengalis. A widow re-marrying and that too a Firingee (foreigner from Europe) was nothing less than an act of blasphemy. The conservatives regularly harassed Antony and Saudamini by various means.

The influence of Saudamini on Antony was such that he started worshipping Maa Kali and Maa Durga that made him a spiritually inclined person. He also started learning Kavigaan (Bengali folk performances by poets of two groups who sing and perform in front of the villagers as a competition). He was also good in singing hymns in praise of Goddesses. His literary Bengali was so good that he became one of the popular poets of Kavigaan. These things did not go well with the orthodox upper caste Bengalis who felt that a Firingee is entering their domain. One day, a few villagers burnt their cottage which resulted in Soudamini getting burnt to death. At that point of time, Antony was away giving his winning performance in a Kavigaan.

There is an old Kali temple located in Bowbazar area of Kolkata known as ‘Firingee Kalibari’ to which Antony Firingee was associated with its renovation and also as a devotee.

The film, ‘Antony Firingee’ (1967) is available on-line for viewing in 7 parts. However, there is no English sub-titles. After knowing the real story of Hensman Antony, it was not difficult for me to relate the scenes in the film and also the context. Since the early life of Hensman Antony in Bengal was not known, the director has taken the cinematic liberty by showing that Antony’s mother was a Bengali. He spends most of his time singing Bengali songs with the workers of a riverbank. Antony’s behaviour is completely in odd with his brother and Marina (Lolita Chatterjee) who loves him. They would prefer him to mingle with their own (white) people.

The director has fictionalized the romantic link between Antony (Uttam Kumar) and Soudamini (Tanuja. In the film, her role was named as Nirupama) by making her a courtesan after she became a widow. Her singing as a courtesan attracts Antony. She reveals him her sad story as to how she ran away from home after the death of her husband to escape death on her husband’s funeral pyre. She was forced to become a courtesan by changing her name to Shakilabai. Both are now becoming closer to each other as both share the same interest – singing. Antony rescues her from the kothi and marries her. There is a complete transformation of Shakilabai from a courtesan to Nirupama as a housewife. Despite the constant harassment from the conservative society surrounding them for their rebellions, they lead a contended married life. Rest of the story in the film has been mostly kept as per the real-life story.

The dramatization by way of the irony of the situations in the film has been well conceived. For instance, because of Antony’s foreign origin, Bhola Moira (Asit Baran), the most popular kabiyal (a bard, akin to ‘kirtankar’ in Maharashtra and Karnataka) at that time, refuses to teach him to become the kabiyal. But in the end, at a Kavigaan, he defeats Bhola Moira who not only accepts his defeat graciously, he removes the flower garland from his neck and place it on Antony as a mark of his respect for Antony. And another irony of situation is that while Antony has won the duel with Bhola Moira, fanatics are burning his cottage in which his wife is being burnt alive. The film ends with Antony carrying the dead body of Nirupama out of the burnt house and takes to the river ghat.

The film won Uttam Kumar the National Award for the best actor in 1968. About 50 years later, ‘Antony Firingee’ (1967) was the opening film at Kolkata International Film Festival, 2018.

The film had 10 songs and a Tarana sung by Malbika Kanan, the wife of Pandit A T Kanan. All the songs are said to have become very popular. I am presenting the only Hindi song in the film, ‘ghir ghir aayi kaari badariya’ sung by Sandhya Mukherjee based on a popular traditional kajri. But in the film, it is sung for a mujra singer (Tanuja in the role of Shakinabai)) which is set to music by Anil Bagchi.

In the video version of the song, it is interspersed with western dances Antony’s community is indulging where Antony is being taken to participate. But he so immersed in mujra song heard in the background that he closes the door of the dance floor to hear the song uninterrupted. The audio clip has the full rendition.

Video Clip (Partial):

Audio Clip:

Song-Ghiri ghiri aayi kaari badariya (Anthony Firangi)(Bangla)(1967) Singer-Sandhya Mukherjee, MD-Anil Bagchi

Lyrics(based on audio clip)

aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaaa aaa aaa
ghiri ghiri aayi kaari badariya
piya nahin aaye
main kaa karoon guinyaan
ghiri ghiri aayi kaari badariya
piya nahin aaye
main kaa karoon guinyaan
kaa karoon guinyaan
piyaa nahin aaa…ye
piya nahin aaye
haaa aa aa
piya nahin aaye
piya nahin aaye
main kaa karoon guinyaan

daadur morey
daadur morey papeeha gaa…..ye
daadur morey papeeha boley
mujh birhan kaa jiyara…..aa doley
mujh birhan kaa jiyara…..aa doley
nis din unki yaa……d sataaye
piya nahin aaye
main kaa karoon guinyaan
piya nahin aaye mora
kaa karoon guinyaan
piya nahin aaye mora
kaa karoon guinyaan
piya nahin aaye
main kaa karoon guinyaa….n


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4171 Post No. : 15345 Movie Count :

4230

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 13
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‘Monihar’ (‘Jeweled Neckless’, 1966, Bangla film) was directed by Salil Sen. The main cast included Soumitra Chatterjee, Biswajeet, Sandhya Roy, Kamal Mitra, Pahadi Sanyal, Chhaya Devi etc. The film is available on a video sharing site with English sub-titles. The film belongs to the genre of the musical family drama and is about two brothers who share a cordial relationship yet there are misunderstandings regarding the financial matters as well as their likings for the same girl. Yet there is no villainous attitude towards each other. And this is the highlight of the film. This is one more among Bangla films which has got the theme of declining influence of aristocracy in Bengal during the British rule. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Ajay (Soumitra Chatterjee) and Arun (Biswajeet) are two brothers belonging to an aristocratic family who stay with their widowed mother. The family’s financial position is not good. Except for a huge palace and some business ventures which are running at losses, they have almost nothing to indulge in aristocratic life style. Ajay being the elder, looks after the family business. He is also a good trained singer under the tutelage of an Ustad (Pahadi Sanyal). Arun, the younger one has gone to Calcutta (Kolkata) for higher study to become a doctor.

The mother, before her death, had taken an assurance from Ajay the he would look after Arun in the same way as she would have looked after him. She also hands over a ‘monihar’ (jeweled necklace) to Ajay for her prospective wife whenever he gets married as this has been passed over three generation to the eldest daughter-in-law in the family.

Due to losses in business, Ajay finds it difficult to meet the expenses of Arun. He takes loans from a moneylender who eyes his palace in case he fails to repay the loan. Over a period of time, he had to sell his investments in losses and also the family jewelries to repay the loan to the moneylender. Arun is aware of the financial conditions of the family but Ajay tells him to concentrate on his studies and leave the financial matters to him.

As a part of improving his financial position, Ajay takes to teaching music with a pseudo name, Kumar and one of the students is Bandana (Sandhya Roy) whom he likes for her good singing. But before that Bandana has met Arun in a picnic and both fall in love. All the three – Ajay, Arun and Bandana are unaware of these developments. In the meanwhile, due to his popularity as a singer and the music teacher, Ajay’s financial position improves.

During one of his occasional visits, Arun comes to know that Ajay has sold family assets without consulting him. But he is not aware that Ajay has sold them mainly to take care of Arun’s education. This create some misunderstanding between the two brothers. Also, during his musical training to Bandana, Kumar ( who in reality is Ajay) had given to her monihar as a token of his blessing. When Arun see Bandana with monihar, he thinks that Ajay has sold monihar to Kumar for raising money. The monihar also creates misunderstanding between Arun and Bandana as he thinks that Bandana loves Kumar.

In the meanwhile, Ajay is sick and also to avoid further misunderstanding with his younger brother, he transfers all his assets in the name of Arun and decides to leave the house forever. However, the call of his mother for the responsibility of Arun brings him back to his house. The explanations from Ajay and also from Bandana’s parents about the monihar, clear all misunderstandings and Arun gets married to Bandana.

‘Monihar’ (1966) had 9 songs of which one song was in Hindi. The highlight of remaining 8 Bengali songs was that Lata Mangeshkar sang for Sandhya Roy, Hemant Kumar sang for both Soumitra Chatterjee and Biswajeet. One dance song was sung by Suman Kalyanpur.

I am presenting the only Hindi song from the film ‘piya bin nis din roun saheli’. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this song was rendered by the great maestro Pankaj Mullick who lent his voice for Pahadi Sanyal in the film. In fact, the film starts with this song. I was under the impression that Pankaj Mullick had no occasion to sing filmy songs in Hindi after ‘Kasturi’ (1954). Probably, this song may be his last filmy song in Hindi. The song is available only on sound track and no gramophone record of the song seems to have been issued. Mp3 clip of the sound track of the song is now available on SAREGAMA for sale. The song was penned by Kaifi Azmi which was set to music by Hemant Kumar.

It is a lovely song. Pankaj Mullick sings in almost the same resonance as he used to sings in the 1940s.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Piya bin nis din roun saheli (Monihar)(Bangla)(1966) Singer-Pankaj Mullick, Lyrics-Kaifi Azmi, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aa
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli

o o o
mann ki paheli sab jag boojhe
mann ki paheli sab jag boojhe
kisko bujhhaaun tan ki paheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli

o o o
kajara ko tarase kaare naina
kajara ko tarase kaare naina
mehndi ko tarase gori hatheli
piya bin nis bin roun saheli

o o o
pi ko bulaaun dhoondhan jaaun
pi ko bulaaun dhoondhan jaaun
kaise bitaaye roun akeli
piya bin nis din roun saheli
piya bin nis din roun saheli ee ee ee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4168 Post No. : 15342 Movie Count :

4229

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 12
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‘Kshudhit Pashan’ (‘The Hungry Stones’ 1960, Bangla film) was based on a short story of the same name by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. It is said that Gurudev wrote this unusual ghost story towards of end of 19th century based on his visit to Ahmedabad where his elder brother, Satyendranath Tagore ICS, was posted as a District Magistrate. At that time, he had stayed in Shahi Mahal Palace built by Shah Jahan in 1620, situated at the banks of river Sabarmati, a part of which was converted in to residential quarters for civil servants by the British Government. Since during the day time, his brother would go for work as a District Magistrate leaving Gurudev alone in large rooms, the palace gave him a feeling of a haunted house. However, in the story, the names of the place and the river were changed.

The film belonged to the ghost/mystery genre which was directed by Tapan Sinha. The main cast included Soumitra Chatterjee, Arundhati Devi (wife of Tapan Sinha), Chhabi Biswas, Radhamohan Bhattacharya, Dilip Roy, Padma Devi etc. The film is available for viewing (albeit in 10 parts) on a video sharing platform with English sub-titles. However, I feel that it is an edited version of the original film to suit the maker of DVD as sometime the story link is broken. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

A tax collector (Soumitra Chatterjee) is posted in a small town where he decides to stay at an old palace constructed during Mughal period. He is warned by his servant, the local post master and others that the palace is haunted and he should avoid staying there. When his servant, Karim Khan was showing him the palace, he hears an unknown voice shouting in Hindi ‘bhaag jaao, bhaag jaao. Ye sab jhoot hai’. Karim Khan says that it was the voice of a mad man who had become the victim of the ghost.

Karim Khan explains as to why this palace has become haunted. About 250 years back, this palace was built by a Nawab for his merry making and leisure. Beautiful girls from Iran, Iraq, Arab and also from all over India were brought here who became the victims of his lust. There used to be musical and dance performances to entertain Nawab. Now the palace has become haunted because of thousands of tortured women’s spirits are moving there. So, whoever stays there in the night became their victim. Even thieves would not venture in the palace after dark. There are as many stories of crime and atrocities as the number of stones used in building the palace. Instead of getting terrified, the tax collector becomes more determine to stay in this haunted palace despite the fact that no servant would stay in the palace during the night.

In the very first night, the tax collector (no name has been given to Soumitra Chatterjee’s role) gets the first-hand experience of the weird sounds of anklets, the musical instruments and a Tarana (sung by Ustad Amir Khan), the kind of dance and music that would have been performed in a court of Nawab. He also gets to see a beautiful noble woman named Mumtaz from the Mughal era (enacted by Arundhati Devi), who turns out to be a ghost from that time. She was one of the victims of Nawab’s lust who had been kidnapped from one of the Arab countries and thus gets separated from her beloved. Eventually she dies without meeting her beloved. The tax collector is attracted by Mumtaz and has conversations with her even though she remains quiet. Now onward, he waits for her every night. She appears but remains quiet without answering his queries. (The reasons could be that either she does not understand the language spoken by the tax collector or she is a ghost). He feels that he was her beloved in his earlier birth. In one of the nights, he witnesses well-choreographed Kathak dance when she appears by his side. But the next moment, she is missing and found watching the dancers in the court and then she vanishes. (This is one of the best kathak dances I have seen in the films. The way the kathak dancer synchronises notes by notes of the Sarod player is mind boggling).

Whether the tax collector is imagining the scenes as per the story told by his servant or he is getting dreams or he is hallucinating is not clear. Probably, Tapan Sinha, the director has left to the imagination of the viewers. But in either case, the tax collector is caught in a time warp where his past and present is divided between nights and days respectively. There is a scene in the film where he tells his post master friend that he feels as if he is living in the Arabian nights.

The tax collector’s confused state of mind makes him ill and he is not able to concentrate on his office work for which he was posted. His servant advises him to shift to to a new place for stay and avoid visiting the palace which he agrees. But the attachment to Mumtaz is so strong that he visits the palace. He is so obsessed with Mumtaz that he takes on rent the Mughal attire to match with that of Mumtaz. His illness becomes severe and he is advised to go back to his home town. The film ends with his servant arranging a horse cart to take him to the railway station.

In the original story by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore, the English translation of which is available here, there is no end as the narrator of the story to the protagonist, a railway co-passenger waiting for the train to arrive on the platform, suddenly picks up his luggage to join an Englishman in the first class compartment without completing the story.

The cinematic treatment given to the story in the film is interesting. Tapan Sinha has used dream and fantasy to make it interesting for the viewers. He has transformed the original ghost story to a romantic haunted story. There are not many dialogues in the film. Even among the limited dialogues, most of dialogues involving the servant, Karm Khan and with Mumtaz are in Hindi. The highlight of the film is the beautiful background music given by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan (who was also the music director for the film). I think, it is for the first time that for creating a haunting atmosphere, solo Sarod recitals by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan and the solo Sitar recitals by Pandit Nikhil Banerjee have been effectively used.

The film won a National Award for the second-best feature film in 1960 and an award in the Ireland Cork Festival in 1960. After about 30 years from the release of the film, Gulzar made the Hindi version film ‘Lekin’ (`1991) with his adaptation of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s ‘Kshudhita Pashan’.

There are 5 songs in ‘Kshudhita Pashan’ (1960) which have been used as background songs. Three of them in Hindi are rendered by Ustad Amir Khan. All these three classical songs are of different genres and have also been used for the background score which are played on the Sarod/Sitar. ‘dhimta dhimta dhimta’ is rendered as Taraana, ‘piya ke aavan ki’ as Dadra and ‘kaise katey rajani ab sajani’ as Chhota Khayal. Incidentally, Ustad Amir Khan never sang semi-classical genre – Thumri, Dadra, Ghazal etc. in concerts. Nor did he record the song in these genres. The only exceptions were that he sang a ghazal for a Film Division’s documentary film ‘Mirza Ghalib’ and a Dadra in ‘Khudhito Pashan’ (1960).

I am presenting a traditional bandish ‘kaise katey rajani ab sajani’ rendered in Raag Bageshree as Chhota Khayal by Ustad Amir Khan and Pratima Banerjee. On screen, it is a background song when Soumitra Chatterjee (the tax collector) and Arundhati Devi (Mumtaz) meets for the first time in the palace in the night. The rendition gives an aura of the bygone Mughal era court where classical singings, dancing and poetry recitation were common. The bandish is also symbolic for Soumtra Chatterjee for his state of mind as also to Arundhati Devi as the ghost of Mumtaz who had been separated from her beloved. This bandish has been often played in the film as short renditions as well as the background score on musical instruments.

Video Clip (Partial):

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaise kate rajni ab sajni (Kshudhita Pashan)(1960) Singers-Ustad Amir Khan, Pratima Banerjee, MD-Ustaad Ali Akbar Khan
Both

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaa aaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa aa
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani
piya bin mose raho na jaaye
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani

ghadi pal chin mohe jug si beetat hai
ghadi pal chin mohe jug si beetat hai
un bin jiya atu hi akulaaye
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
sajani ee ee ee
saja….ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
sajani eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
saja…aa..ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaa sa…..ja…..ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
naina more daras ke pyaase
naina more daras ke pyaase
asha jhute det dilaase
asha jhute det dilaase
mann ka panchhi rowat tarpat
mann ka panchhi rowat tarpat
maanat naahi manaa aa aa aa aa ye
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
kaise katey rajani ee ee ee ee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4164 Post No. : 15337 Movie Count :

4227

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 11
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‘Dhuli’ (‘The Drummer’ 1954, Bangla film) was directed by Pinaki Mukherjee. The main star cast included Prashanta Kumar, Suchitra Sen, Mala Sinha, Anil Chatterjee, Pahadi Sanyal, Chhabi Biswas etc. The film is available for viewing with English sub-titles on the video sharing platforms.

The main theme in the story of the film is music. The story also throws some points for the audience to ponder as to how a simple villager’s life is threatened by the modernity of the city life. Also, how the innocence of a villager is affected by the materialistic life in the city. At the end, the virtues of a villager triumph over the materilism of a city dweller, of course at the cost of the death of the former who was a talented singer from the village. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Parashar (Prashanta Kumar), the grandson of a celebrated drummer in his village develops interest in singing when he witnesses a singer singing a devotional song during Durga Pooja. However, his grandfather wants him to continue playing Dhol as his family has been playing it for ages in the village. After the death of his grandfather, Parashar moves to Calcutta (Kolkata) to learn singing from a renowned music teacher (Pahadi Sanyal) who has a daughter, Minoti (Suchitra Sen). Since Parashar has no place to stay in Calcutta, he is given a room to stay in his teacher’s house. Soon after the completion of his musical training, his music teacher dies leaving him and Minoti in the house. In due course of time, Parashar becomes one of the popular radio singers. He also trains Minoti for singing. Both Parashar and Minoti develops liking in each other’s company. Both of them refrain from telling that they love each other.

There is a musical competition in which Minoti and Ratri (Mala Sinha), the daughter of a wealthy family, are the participants among others. Minoti wins the competition. Ratri who comes second in the competition is upset. She manages to employ Parashar as her new music teacher to improve her singing. However, he has to leave Minoti’s house as this was a pre-condition put in by Ratri’s mother lest it may become a scandal that Parashar was sharing the house with Minota after the death of her father.

The training sessions bring Parashar and Ratri close to each other who started liking Parashar. The closeness of Ratri and the respect Parashar gets from Ratri’s family is not liked by Pulak, a family friend who also acts as a Manager for Ratri’s singing concerts who believes that in a concert, appearance is more important than the singing talent. He tries to create a rift between Ratri and Parashar. Pulak wants to commercially exploit the singing talent of Ratri through publicity much against the wishes of Parashar. This leads to some rifts between them.

In the meantime, Parashar’s grandmother in the village is very sick. His uncle comes to Ratri’s house to take Parashar to his village. It is at this point, Pulak comes to know that Parashar belongs to drummer’s community. Ratri is upset as she thinks that he deliberately concealed his low caste identity. Upset with Ratri’s outburst, Parashar leaves Calcutta to visit his village to see his grandmother. But the turns of events have so much shattered the mind of Parashar that he becomes vagabond without eating for days. One day, he collapses at the banks of a river due to exhaustion and weakness. Minoti who comes to know about Parashar being missing, finds him and brings him to her house. But he does not recover from his illness and dies. So, the end is unconventional for a love triangle of this type in which it is one of the heroines who usually dies at the end.

Being a musical film, there are many songs in the film which I have lost count because some of the songs are very short. But I have noted that there are at least 3 full-pledged Hindi songs of three different genre – ghazal, semi-classical and devotional.

I have selected a ghazal, ‘taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi’ sung by Pratima Banerjee. Since Pt. Bhushan’s name appears as one of the lyricists in the film, others being Narayan Gangopadhyay, Pranab Roy and Bimal Ghosh, I have taken him as the lyricist for this song which has been set to music by Rajen Sarkar. The song is picturised on a young Mala Sinha.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi (Dhooli)(Bangla)(1954) Singer-Pratima Bannerji, Lyrics-Pt Bhushan, MD-Rajen Sarkar

Lyrics

aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi

chupke chupke nigaahon ne
kya keh diya
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
jin ki har baat honthon pe aane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani sunaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani sunaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi

dard unke mohabbat ka badhne laga
chaandni raat jab muskuraane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani

jal rahi ee ee hoon tamanna ki aag mein en en en
meri kismat mujhe ae ae ae ae
aazmaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi ee ee ee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4156 Post No. : 15325 Movie Count :

4222

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 10
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Saheb Bibi Golam’ (1956, Bangla film) was based on a story by the same title, written by Bangla novelist, Bimal Mitra. The film was directed by Kartik Chattopadhyay. The main star cast of the film was Uttam Kumar, Sumitra Devi, Anubha Gupta, Chhabi Biswas, Chhaya Devi, Nitin Mukherjee and Padma Devi. The story of the film relates to the time when the aristocracy of feudal lords was on the decline under the British rule by the end of 19th Century. The story revolves around the platonic relationship between the feudal lord’s neglected wife (Sumitra Devi) and a clerk (Uttam Kumar). The film was not only critically acclaimed, it was also a box office success.

The Hindi version of the film titled ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) was produced by Guru Dutt and directed by Guru Dutt’s right hand man, Abrar Alvi. Although the Hindi version of the film was released 6 years after the release of the Bangla version of the film, the idea to produce the Hindi version of the film was put forward to Guru Dutt by SD Burman as early as 1956 when he saw the shooting of the Bangla version  on his visit to Calcutta (now Kolkata) where Guru Dutt was already doing location hunting for his film ‘Pyaasa’ (1957). Guru Dutt had a meeting with novelist Bimal Mitra in SD Burman’s house in Calcutta, after which he decided to produce and direct the film with SD Burman as the Music Director.

When Guru Dutt  heard the story, he had decided that it had to be Meena Kumari who would be performing the role of Chhoti Bahu, the central character in the film. However, Kamal Amrohi, Meena Kumari’s husband declined the offer saying that she did not have dates. So, after failing to find any alternative actress for the role, the film was put in the back burner. It was only after the box office success of ‘Chaudhvin Ka Chaand’ (1960), Guru Dutt decided to revive ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). This time, after a lot of hard bargaining, Kamal Amrohi agreed with a raise in her fees and also giving bulk dates of 45 days at a stretch from January 1, 1962. He also put a condition that she would not travel to Calcutta to shoot in the haveli. So, the sets of Chhoti Bahu’s rooms in the haveli had to be created in a Mumbai studio.

Biswajit was identified for the role of Bhootnath, the clerk. But he did not agree for a condition of the exclusive contract with Guru Dutt Films. Shashi Kapoor was approached for the role which fell through as he came considerably late to discuss the role by which time Guru Dutt had decided to act in the film for the role of Bhootnath.

The film’s shooting started on January 1, 1961, exactly one year before Meena Kumari’s shooting schedule was to start. Probably, ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) was the first film from the stable of Guru Dutt Films which was ready in the cans in the record time except Meena Kumari’s part and the picturization of the songs which had to be postponed as the music director, SD Burman was ill during the first half of 1961. When he had recovered from his illness, he was selected by the Government of India to be part of the cultural delegation to the then USSR and other European countries. Guru Dutt lost his patience with SD Burman and entrusted the music direction to Hemant Kumar.

When SD Burman returned from his foreign trip, he was dismayed to find that he was no longer the music director of ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). Instead Hemant Kumar was roped in his place. SD Burman was very much upset as he felt that it was Hemant Kumar who had maneuvered to take over the music direction during his absence. He was so much involved with the film that he had already composed tunes for some songs with dummy lyrics without waiting for a formal contract. After this incidence, the relations between SD Burman and Hemant Kumar got affected. This explains as to why Na Tum Hamen Jaano Na Hum Tumhen Jaane from ‘Baat Ek Raat Ki’ (1962) was the last song Hemant Kumar sang for SD Burman.

[Note: Information in this article about what went behind the making of ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) is mainly based on (1) ‘Ten Years with Guru Dutt – Abrar Alvi’s Journey’ (2008) by Sathya Saran, (2) ‘Meena Kumari – The Classical Biography’ (2013) by Vinod Mehta and (3) ‘S D Burman – The Prince Musician’ (2018) by Anirudha Bhattacharjee & Balaji Vittal.]

The Hindi version of the film was not a frame by frame remake of its Bangla version film. Instead, the screen-play/dialogue writer and director Abrar Alvi and Bimal Mitra had a month-long sittings to finalise the screen-play and dialogues in tune with the taste of Hindi film audience without diluting the basic theme of the story. As a result, the visualization of scenes in Hindi version is quite different from the Bangla version. Let me give an example of the scene in which Bhootnath meets Chhoti Bahu for the first time.

In Bangla version, Bhootnath visits Chhoti Bahu’s (Sumitra Devi) room when she was about to complete her daily puja with her back to the camera. And then she looks back and tells  Bhootnath to sit down on the chair. Bhootnath introduces himself to Chhoti Bahu. There is not much movements in camera angles. In Hindi version, Chhoti Bahu calls him to sit as soon as he enters her room. The camera is focused on her feet the first time Bhootnath sees her. Even when she walks to her chair, the camera is still focused on her feet. But Bhootnath instead of sitting on the chair, he sits on the floor with his his dropping eyes. When he introduces himself as Bhootnath, the camera suddenly focuses on Chhoti Bahu’s  face and she tells him that it is a lovely name. It is at this point, Bhootnath who was speaking to her with eyes down looks up to see her face and is surprised that she was not amused by his name as it has been his experience with others. On the contrary, she says it is one of many names of the God. Also, there is a  empty bed shown while both of them are conversing symbolising the state of her marital life.

The Bangla version of the film kept the end as per the original story, that is Bhootnath (Uttam Kumar) does not get to marry Jaba (Anubha Gupta). But in Hindi version, there is an indirect hint by way of a dialogue and the last scene in which Bhootnath (Guru Dutt) travels with Jaba (Waheeda Rehman) in a horse cart. Since story has been told in the film in the flash back mode, it was possible in Hindi version of the film to change some sequences in the narration of the story.

The Bangla version of the film had 5 songs of which 2 songs were semi-classical songs in Hindi. Hindi version of the film had 7 songs. The background song in the Bangla version was in Hindi  using a part of a traditional dadra, ‘Ab Ke Saawan Ghar Aaja’ whereas in Hindi version, it was a haunting song, Koi Door Se Aawaaz De Chale Aao.

I am presenting another Hindi song from a Bangla film – ‘Saheb Bibi Golam’ (1956), ‘Kankar Mohe Laage Paniya Bharan Kaise Jaaun’ which has been rendered by Sandhya Mukherjee in dadra style. Lyrics are traditional which have been set to music by Robin Chatterjee. In the film, it has been picturised as mujra song. The equivalent song picturised in Hindi version of the film is Saaqiyaa Aaj Mujhe Neend Nahin Aayegi.

Song – Paniya Bharan Kaise Jaaun, Kankar Mohey Laage  (Saheb Bibi Golam) (1956) Singer – Sandhya Mukherjee, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Robin Chatterjee

Lyrics

aa aaa aaaaaa aaa aaaa
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
aa aa aa aa
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage  
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
paniya bharan kaise jaaun  
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
 
natkhat roke
meri dagariya aa

natkhat roke
meri dagariya aa

laakh bachaa ke chalun najariya
laakh bachaa ke
laakh bachaa ke chalun nazariya
gher let hai bairi saanwariyaa aa
gher let hai bairi saanwariyaa
kaise paanv badhaaun
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
 
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage

kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laaaaa…..ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

आ आss आsssss आss आsss
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
आ आ आ आ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

नटखट रोके
मेरी डगरीया॰॰आ
नटखट रोके
मेरी डगरीया॰॰आ
लाख बचा के चलूँ नजरिया
लाख बचा के
लाख बचा के चलूँ नजरिया
घेर लेत है बैरी साँवरिया॰॰आ
घेर लेत है बैरी साँवरिया
कैसे पाँव बढ़ाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4144 Post No. : 15310 Movie Count :

4217

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 8
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‘Aalor Pipasa’ (Thirst for Light) was a Bangla film released in January 1965. The film was directed by Tarun Majumdar. The film is available on-line with English sub-titles. The story of the film is about a courtesan (Sandhya Roy) who sacrifices her life for the betterment of her son. The entire story is depicted in the film by way of flash back when a senior doctor (Pahadi Sanyal) tells the story of the courtesan to his junior doctor (Asit Baran). The junior doctor happens to be the courtesan’s son.

Obviously, the story of the film revolves around Sandhya Roy and I must say that she has given an outstanding performance in the film. Hitherto, my knowledge about Sandhya Roy was limited to her Hindi films like ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962), ‘Pooja Ke Phool’ (1964), ‘Jaane Anjaane’ (1971) etc. But in Hindi films she had only secondary roles like Dev Anand’s ‘munhboli bahen’ (adoptive sister) in ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962) where she displays her combative but soft at heart attitudes. The song from the film laakh chupaao chhup na sakega was picturised on her.

In Bangla films, Sandhya Roy has been one of the prominent actresses who has been active in Bangla film industry for over 5 decades starting with lead roles and switching over to character roles. She has worked in more than 100 films. She is also in politics having successfully contested parliamentary election from Mednipur in 2014 on Trinamul Congress ticket.

Sandhya Roy (born 11/04/1941) was born in Nabadwip (West Bengal). However, her family belonged to Khulna (now in Bangla Desh) where her grand father was a landlord. In her childhood, she lost her parents. She was brought up by her maternal uncle at Khulna where she had her early education.

In 1957, Sandhya Roy returned to Kolkata and stayed with her sister. This was the beginning of her unexpected journey to Bangla films. While watching the shooting of the film ‘Mamlar Fol’ (1957), the director saw her and offered her a role in the crowd. Her first full-fledged film was ‘Antariksha’ (1957). After the success of this film, she started getting offers of lead roles in many Bangla films. She remained one of the leading actresses in Bangla films during 1960-80. During this period, she was paired with Biswajeet in about 20 films.

Sandhya Roy had her stint in Hindi films with ‘Asli Naqli’ (1962) which was followed by ‘Pooja Ke Phool’ (1964), ‘Raahgir’ (1969), ‘Jaane Anjaane’ (1971), Bandagi’ (1972) etc. The last Hindi film she acted was ‘Ek Anaar Sau Bimaar’ (2008). However, despite her good acting, she could not actively pursue her career in Hindi films.

From 1980s onward, Sandhya Roy continues to work in Bangla films as a character actress beside pursuing her political career.

Sandhya Roy married Tarun Majumdar, one of the leading directors of Bangla films who had also directed Hindi films, ‘Balika Badhu’ (1967) and ‘Raahgir’ (1969).

‘Aalor Pipasa’ (1965) had nine songs of which as many as 5 songs were Hindi semi-classical songs. This was to be expected since the story of the film revolves around a courtesan who entertains her clients by singing and dancing. The film also has a Sanskrit strotra (hymns) which has been rendered by Hemant Kumar as a background song when credit titles roll in the film.

In the film, Lata Mangeshkar sings two solos for Sandhya Roy of which I have selected the song ‘ghir aayi badariya piya naahi aaye’. The song has been written by Kaifi Azmi which has been set to music by Hemant Kumar.


Song-Ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye (Aalor Pipaasa)(Bangla)(1965) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Kaifi Azmi, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahi aaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye

jaa jaa re badra tu pi ko manaa laa
jaa jaa re badra……aa aa aa aa aa
jaa jaa re badra tu pi ko manaa laa
pi ke bina mohe kachhu hi na bhaaye
pi ke bina mohe
pi ke bina mohe kachhu hi na bhaaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye

jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
jeewan hai pyaasa ankhiyaan hain pyaasi
megha re kaahe ko jhariya lagaaye
megha re kaahe ko
megha re kaahe ko jhariya lagaaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
tan man jale mora birha sataaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye
ghir aayi badariya piya naahin aaye….ye ye


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4139 Post No. : 15301 Movie Count :

4215

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 7
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By now, I must have watched/heard about 20 Hindi songs from the Bangla films of 1950s-1970s. I have a feeling that there may be a few more Hindi songs in Bangla films which I have yet to explore.

A question came to my mind as to why some Bengali film directors have fascination to incorporate Hindi songs in Bangla films. Is it something to do with realism or the personal preferences of the film directors? After watching some of the videos of the Hindi songs in Bangla films, I have come to the conclusion that it is for the realistic depiction of the situations in the films. Almost, all the Hindi song situations in Bengali films that I have so far watched, belongs to semi-classical genre. The Hindi song situations mostly comprises of mujra dances, a teacher of Hindustani classical vocalist rehearsing with his student, actors in the role of Hindustani classical vocalists giving stage performances etc.

Today, I am presenting a semi-classical traditional dadra, ‘jiya mein laagi aan baan’ from the Bangla film ‘Atithi’ (1965). The film directed by Tapan Sinha is based on a short story of the same title by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. The dadra set in raag Gara has been sung by Meera Banerjee whose name I heard for the first time. A search on the internet revealed that Meera Banerjee was Hindustani classical vocalist belonging to Patiala Gharana. A brief profile of Meera Banerjee culled out from an article in ‘The Hindu’ July 5, 2012 issue is presented below:

Vidushi Meera Banerjee (28/03/1930 – 28/06/2012) was born in Meerut (Uttar Pradesh). Her father, Shailendra Kumar Chatterjee was a musicologist who gave her the initial training in music. Later she was trained by Pandit Chinmay Lahiri. She became the listed artist of All India Radio at the age of 14.

Pandit Harishchandra Bali of Jalandhar (see my note below) who was the Guru of Meera’s father saw her potential as a vocalist and gave her training in some rare bandishes composed by him. From 1950 onward, Meera Banerjee became the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan and remained so until his death in 1968.

Meera Banerjee attained the status of one of the prominent Hindustani classical vocalists in the genre of Khayal and Thumri in the 1950s. She participated in the National Programme of Music and other musical festivals in India. She travelled abroad as a part of cultural delegation of Government of India to give performances in various countries. She had won numerous awards for works.

In 1957, she married Pandit Prasoon Banerjee, also a Hindustani classical vocalist who also became the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan.

At the later stage of her life, due to poor health, she stopped giving public performances. Meera Banerjee left for her heavenly abode on June 28, 2012 in Kolkata.

———————————————————————————————–

Note : Pandit Harishchandra Bali is the same person as H C Bali who was the music director for about 25 Hindi films during 1930s and 40s. His disciples included Pandit Amarnath Chawla, Husnalal and Bhagatram.

Probably, this may be the only song Meera Banerjee sang for a film. In the film, the song has been partially picturised as part of a medley of three songs which follows one after another. The situations in the film seem to be many families travelling in boats. While the first song is a dadra, the second is a folk song and the last one is the Bangla song.

This dadra song in raag Gara is in the traditional lyrics which was first recorded in 1916 in the voice of Gauhar Jaan. Later, many prominent Hindustani classical singers have rendered this dadra including Meera Banerjee and Rasoolan Bai in a more elaborate way. The music director for the film was Tapan Sinha.

Video Clip (Partial):


Audio Clip

Song-Jiyaa mein laagi aan baan (Atithi)(Bangla)(1965) Singer-Meera Bannerji, MD-H C Bali

Lyrics

aaaaaaaan aa
aaaa..n baaaa..n
aaaa..n baaaa..n
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein
jiya mein laagi aaaa..n baaaa..n
jiya mein laagi aaaa..n baaa..n
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan
o pyaari chitwan aa ??
jiya mein basi kaise phansi
jiya mein basi kaise phansi
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan
jiyaa…aa mei…n laaa..gi
aan baan re
aan baan
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan

pairan laagi jhuk ke saiyyan
pairan laagi jhuk ke saiyyan
koi na meherbaan saiyyan
koi na meherbaan saiyyan
tum bin mohe kal na pade
tum bin mohe kal na pade
tumhre kaaran jaa..gi re
tumhre kaaran jaa..gi
aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan baan
jiya mein laagi aan

1965


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4131 Post No. : 15290 Movie Count :

4210

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 6
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A couple of months’ back, I had come across a Hindi song ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from a Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) sung by Mubarak Begum under the music direction of Salil Chowdhury. I could not locate the picturised version of the song. The tune of the song gives me an impression that it is picturised as a mujra song. While it was a new song for me, the ‘mukhda’ of the song sounded familiar to me. Oh! Yes. It was the more famous song, ruke ruke se kadam from ‘Mausam’ (1975) sung by Lata Mangeshkar under the music direction of Madan Mohan. Both the songs have almost the same lyrics which are accredited to Gulzar. So, it is one song, composed in two tunes by two different music directors, depicting two different emotions.

There is a section of the Hindi film music lovers who feels that credit for both the songs should go to Mirza Ghalib as he had originally written this ghazal which Gulzar has merely changed a few words to give an easy understanding of the original words. So, I decided to make a reality check by comparing the original ghazal written by Mirza Gahlib and the versions written by Gulzar for both the films mentioned above.

The original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib has five she’rs. The ghazal written by Gulzar for the Bangla film ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) has four she’rs and that for ‘Mausam’ (1975) has three she’rs. Let us compare the she’rs of all the three versions of the ghazal in a tabular form for easy verification as to whether the ‘allegation’ on Gulzar has substance or not.

Original ghazal by Mirza Ghalib Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Mausam’ (1975)
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.Qaraar de ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.
Ruke ruke se kadam
mud ke baar baar chale.Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan jism kaa jaan par.

Chale jahaan se to
ye pairahan uttaar chale.

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Tumhaare kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Le tere kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Na jaane kaun si mitti watan ki mitti thhi.

Nazar mein dhool jigar mein liye ghubaar chale.

[Not used] [Not used]
Sahar naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

Thhi raat raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale.

Sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya.

Ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale.

Subah naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

ki ek raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale

Mili hai shama se ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamko.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

Shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

[Not used]

Note: Bold words indicate changes from the original she’rs.

It will be observed from the above table that Gulzar has made only some cosmetic changes in the original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib which has been used in the two films mentioned above. Hence, the credit for the two ghazals used in the films should have rightly gone to Mirza Ghalib. I am aware that Gulzar is a great fan of Mirza Ghalib and he had used Mirza Ghalib’s she’rs in a couple of his other songs including dil dhoondhta hai phir wahi fursat ke raat din. So, I thought that he may have given due credit to Mirza Ghalib in his film ‘Mausam’ (1975) for his inspirations. But in the credit title of the film in DVD version, there is no acknowledgement to Mirza Ghalib.

Coming back to the song ‘ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale’ from the Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964), as mentioned earlier, this song is not available in the DVD version of the film. I feel that this mujra song may have been partially used in the film. But the full song is available on the record version which was issued by Saregama (then HMV). There is another Hindi song in the film, ‘saans ke zakhm bhar raha hai koi’ written by Gulzar and sung by Manna Dey which is partially used in the film.

‘Laal Pathore’ (1964, Bangla) in which Uttam Kumar, Supriya Devi (Chaudhury) and Srabani Basu acted in main roles was later made in Hindi as ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971) with corresponding roles for Rajkumar, Hema Malini and Rakhi. Both the versions were directed by Sushil Majumdar. While Salil Chowdhury composed the music for Bangla version, Shankar-Jaikishan composed the music for Hindi version.

I was enthralled with the Ghazal King Madan Mohan’s version of the ghazal, ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from ‘Mausam’ (1975)’ Let us now enjoy Salil Chowdhury’s version of the same ghazal in a different setting.

Lastly, let us also give credit to Mirza Ghalib for the lyrics of both the version of the ghazal along with Gulzar.

Audio link:

Song-Ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale (Laal Pathore)(Bangla)(1964) Singer-Mubarak Begam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4123 Post No. : 15277 Movie Count :

4202

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 4
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

For the general Hindi film audience, Suchitra Sen (real name: Roma Dasgupta) is synonymous with her lead roles in ‘Bambai Ka Babu’ (1960) with Dev Anand, ‘Mamta’ (1966) with Ashok Kumar and ‘Aandhi’ (1975) with Sanjeev Kumar. The second category of audience with academic interest in Hindi films will add four more of her Hindi films – ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro with Dilip Kumar, ‘Musafir’ (1957) with Shekhar, ‘Champakali’ (1957) with Bharat Bhushan and ‘Sarhad’ (1960) with Dev Anand. Those in the latter category of Hindi film buffs would also know that Suchitra Sen worked in many Bengali films and the Bengali film audience loved to watch their favourite on-screen couple, Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar.

I was in the second category insofar as Suchitra Sen was concerned until recently. But in my quest to get a few rare Hindi film songs in Bengali films made me to watch some of the popular and critically acclaimed Bengali films of the golden era (1950-75). In this process, I came to know about the important contributions made by Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar among others in reviving the Bengali film industry after the decline of big film productions banners like New Theatres, M P Productions (of P C Barua) and the collapse of the studio system.

Based on a number of articles available on-line including some from Gopal Krishna Roy, a film journalist with United News of India who remained one of the very few close confidants of Suchitra Sen until her death, I have given below some interesting aspects of her filmy career based on these readings:

1. Suchitra Sen (06/04/1931 – 17/01/2014) migrated from then East Bengal (now Bangla Desh) to Kolkata with her family in 1947. She joined film industry in 1952 when she was already married to Dibanath Sen, a Marine Engineer and the son of an Industrialist in 1947 at the age of 16.

2. She acted in her fist film ‘Shesh Kothay’ (1952, Bangla) which was never released. Her first officially released film was ‘Saat Number Kayedi’ (1953, Bangla)

3. Her second released film was ‘Sharey Chauttor’ (1953, Bangla), a light comedy film which was also her first film with matinee idol, Uttam Kumar, then nick named in the Tollygunj studio circle as a ‘flop hero’ because all the films he worked during 1948-52 were box office failures. With this film, Uttam Kumar made an impressive turnaround in his filmy career with Suchitra Sen. From this film onward, Bengali filmy audience adored them as the most iconic romantic pair in the Bengali films.

4. During her filmy career (1953-78), Suchitra Sen worked in 61 films (including 7 Hindi films) out of which she paired with Uttam Kumar in as many as 30 films. Almost all of their films were box office hits.

5. When Suchitra Sen was 39, she lost her husband, Dibanath Sen in 1970 while he was on a visit to USA. However, she kept her shooting schedules, more or less, as planned to avoid financial losses to the producers.

6. A glance through her filmography and brief story lines of most of her films gives an impression that Suchitra Sen had handled her filmy career, especially from 1960, onward very professionally. She appears to be selective in accepting the films. Most of her films have a strong story-line and she had almost equal footage in films along with lead actors. In this process, she had ensured that she had ample scope for portraying her characters in the films and was not over-exposed to her audience.

7. Suchitra Sen declined the offer of Satyajit Ray’s film because he had put a condition that she had to give bulk dates for shooting and during the making of the film, she should not work in any other films. Satyajit Ray decided to abandon the film rather than taking any other female actress. She had also declined the offer of Raj Kapoor to work in one of his films (My wild guess is that it was for ‘Sangam’ (1964) because he had also made an offer to Uttam Kumar for a role in his film ‘Sangam’ (1964) which he had also declined. The role went to Rajendra Kumar.)

8. Suchitra Sen was the first Bengali film actress to get the best actress award in any International Film Festival for her role in Bangla film ‘Saptapadi’ (1961) in Moscow International Film Festival, 1963.

9. After the box office failure of her last film ‘Pranay Pasha’ (1978), Suchitra Sen retired from the film industry at the age of 47. It was first thought that she had timed her retirement at the peak of her career. However, over a period of time, it became evident that with retirement from the films, she had also shunned public life. She spent her last 35 years in her house as recluse, confining herself with close circles of family and a few friends.

During her last 35 years, Suchitra Sen completely avoided public exposure. Even during the death of Uttam Kumar in 1980, she visited his house after mid-night to offer her condolence. It is believed that she had decline to accept Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 2005 mainly to avoid the public appearance. In 2012, Government of West Bengal gave her ‘Banga Bibushan Award’ but she did not attend the function. Moon Moon Sen, her daughter accepted the Award on her behalf.

Suchitra Sen suffered from lung infections for which she was admitted in a Kolkata hospital sometime in December 2013. She had almost recovered from her ailment but on January 17, 2014, she got a cardiac arrest which took her life. As per her wish, her body was put in the casket with tinted glasses and was cremated as the earliest (in about 5 hours from the time of her death). So even in death, she ensured her privacy.

Dilip Kumar who had worked with Suchitra Sen in her first Hindi film ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro, paid tributes to her upon her death in January 2014 which are reproduced below:

Suchitra had peerless, expressive eyes. She conveyed volumes with a single look. During an intense scene in Devdas, I had to look straight into her eyes and convey romance filled with pathos. She reacted uniquely, looking with equal intensity at me and doing a slight lip movement which was excellent. Bimal da complimented her after that shot and so did I.

Professional to the core, Suchitra maintained a distance from film folk and never opened up unless she was comfortable with the person she was interacting with. She preferred to work in silence. But she never disrespected anyone. As an artiste, she gave full respect to even a spot boy.

Her Hindi had a Bengali accent but it sounded sweet. She could give five modulations to a single dialogue. After Devdas, we worked in Musafir in 1957, but we were not paired together. I will never forget the serenity she lent to the bhajan, ‘man re hari naam karna’ by Lata Mangeshkar.

We shared a great work rapport, but I must confess, her pairing with Uttam Kumar was the greatest. Suchitra was unparalleled in ‘Saat Paake Bandha’, ‘Uttar Phalguni’ and ‘Deep Jwele Jai’. An actress of international calibre, her looks were simply haunting. [Source: The Times of India, updated version dated 17/01/2017].

Many of Suchitra Sen’s Bangla films were not only box office hits, some of them were critically acclaimed and were remade in Hindi like ‘Mamta’ (1966) from ’Uttar Phalguni’ (1963), ‘Kora Kaagaz’ (1974) from ‘Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963), ‘Khamoshi’ (1966) from ‘Deep Jwele Jaai’ (1959) etc.

I am presenting a Hindi song ‘zindagi ki ye bhool thhi’ from the film ‘Uttar Phalguni’ (1963, Bangla) sung by Sandhya Mukherjee. The name of the lyricist is not known. The song was set to music by Robin Chatterjee.

Suchitra Sen had a double role – both mother and daughter in this film which was produced by Uttam Kumar. But he did not act in this film. Suchitra Sen later did the same double role in the Hindi version ‘Mamta’ (1966).

Unfortunately, the video clip of the song is not available. In fact, I did not find the song in the DVD of the film. Since Sandhya Mukherjee had sung for Suchitra Sen in this film, I guess, the song was picturized on Suchitra Sen. The wordings of the song give me an impression of a mujra song, the similar situational song in Hindi version of the film could be rahte thhe kabhi jinke dil mein.

Audio Clip:

Song-Zindagi ki ye bhool thhi (Uttar Phalguni)(Bangla)(1963) Singer-Sandhaya Mukherjee, MD-Robin Chatterji

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
mohabbat ki thandi chhaon mein
naadaan dil thha so gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
lut gayi main to jeete jee
haay kisi ke pyaar mein
phool dikha ke dhool mein
kaanta koi chubho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

meri nasheeli aankh mein ae
meri nashee….li aankh mein
tasveer kiski bas gayi
tasveer kiski bas gayi
khel samajh ke prem ke
jaal mein main to phans gayi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
hansne ko main taras gayi
saahil pe la ke naav ko
saahil pe la ke naav ko
mallah khud dubo gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4115 Post No. : 15268 Movie Count :

4196

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 3
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I came to know about actress Chhaaya Devi for the first time some time in 2011 when I found her name mentioned in Kidar Sharma’s autobiography, ‘The One And Lonely Kidar Sharma’ (2002) in the context of the shooting of the film ‘Vidyapati’ (1937). At that time, I thought her to be one of many female actors connected with New Theatres who had short acting career. For me, the only female actor of that time who mattered in Kolkata film industry was actor-singer Kanan Devi. What a wrong impression I had about Chhaya Devi when I came to know later that she had a long filmy career of over 5 decades – both in Bangla and Hindi films.

Being born in Bhagalpur and a part of her schooling done in Delhi, Chhaya Devi (1914-27/04/2001) was proficient in Hindi besides her mother tongue, Bengali. Sometime in early 1930s, her family shifted to Kolkata when she was put under the tutelage of K C Dey, the singer and music director. She was trained in Hindustani classical music and sang Khayal and Thumri on All India Radio. She was also trained in Kathak dance. It was on the recommendation of K C Dey that Chhaya Devi got her first bilingual film in Bengali and Hindi under the banner of New Theatres (NT), ‘Sonar Sansaar’/’Sunehra Sansaar’ (1936) which was directed by Devaki Bose.

Chhaya Devi’s next bilingual film for NT in Bengali and Hindi was ‘Vidyapati’ (1937) in which she did the role of Queen Laxmi, which brought her fame. Another NT film, ‘Abhinetri’/’Haar Jeet’ (1940) in which she acted did not find favour with the audience. Outside NT, she did ‘Chowranghee’ (1942) for Fazli Brothers.

After having worked in Kolkata in about 15 films, Chhaya Devi worked in Mumbai with her first film ‘Mera Gaon’ (1942) directed by Sarvottam Badami in which Jairaj was the hero. Probably, she came to Mumbai along with her mentor K C Dey who was the music director for the film. From her filmography, it appears that she had 2-year hiatus from the film industry (1943-45).

From the late 1950s onward, Chhaya Devi had already shifted to doing character roles in films. It is interesting to note that it is during this phase of her career that she became hyper active in doing Bengali films. For example, in the 1960s, she did around 40 films and in the 1970s, the figure was about 30. Her last film was ‘Tomar Rakte Amaar Sohag’ (1993). In all, she worked in about 120 films.

Some of the Hindi films in which Chhaya Devi worked were ‘Sunehra Sansaar’ (1936), ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Haar Jeet’ (1940), ‘Mera Gaon’ (1942),’Chowranghee’ (1942), ‘Shri Ramanujam’ (1943), ‘Uttara Abhimanyu’ (1946), ‘Ratnadeep’ (1951), ‘Mamta’ (1966), ‘Tu Hi Meri Zindagi’ (1965), ‘Zindagi Zindagi’ (1972), ‘Alaap’ (1977), ‘Rang Birangi’ (1983). These films were mostly bilingual or the remakes of Bengali films.

Recently, I have watched about half a dozen Bengali films directed by Tapan Sinha in which Chhaya Devi had acted in them. I have also watched a few of her other films. What I have realised with my limited exposure to some of her Bengali and Hindi films that Chhaya Devi was a versatile actress. If she was widow, Anandima in ‘Apnajan’ (1968) who is virtually a peacekeeper between two warring groups of unemployed youth, she is equally good in portraying the villainous looking but soft at heart madam (Baijee) in ‘Uttar Falguni’ (1963)/’Mamta’ (1966). Also, her portrayal of a dominating mother was effective in ‘Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963) which was remade in Hindi as ‘Khora Kaagaz’ (1974). In Hindi films, we have Lalita Pawar, Achala Sachdev, Meena Kumari doing their respective specialized roles very convincingly. In my view, Chhaya Devi was ‘three-in-one’ for Bengali films.

Chhaya Devi was not only a talented actress, she was also a good singer. She had the potential to becoming one of the leading singer-actors in Bengali film industry. Alas! It was not to be. While apart from talent, the luck factor plays an import role in making a film artist successful, I feel that in the case of Chhaya Devi, there was another factor which may have put a sort of speed breaker in the early part of her filmy career. And that factor was the successful emergence of actor-singer Kanan Devi, the first female super star of the Indian film industry.

When Chhaya Devi joined the Bengali film industry, Kanan Devi was already on a threshold of becoming a successful actor-singer. Kanan Devi’s stint with NT during 1937-41 and thereafter with M P Productions of P C Barua in 1942-48 did not give Chhaya Devi the much scope to show her histrionic. Incidentally, Chhaya Devi never got opportunity to worked with K L Saigal and also with P C Barua, an eminent director.

One of the Tapan Sinha’s films in which Chhaya Devi has portrayed the role of madam (Baijee) of a brothel was ‘Harmonium’ (1976). In this film, she sings two songs on herself. The film is available for viewing in 5 parts on a video sharing platform. The story in brief as I understood from the film is as under:

In this film, harmonium has been used as props. The harmonium which was first purchased by an aristocrat widower for her daughter for learning music has to be auctioned as the father dies and his estate manager forges his property paper to his name making the daughter orphaned. All through the harmonium’s journey through various section of the society, it is branded as ill luck to the family owning it.

The harmonium now goes to a middle-class home and then to a brothel. The harmonium is used for singing and dancing activities of the brothel. However, a murder takes place in the brothel forcing Baijee to leave the place with the harmonium. Finally, harmonium is bought by a Government officer for his daughter to learn music where the aristocrat’s orphaned daughter is the governess. After seeing the harmonium which was the same as the one bought by her aristocrat father, the governess is painfully reminded of her childhood days and is worried about the ill luck it may bring to the family. The film ends with a song which the governess is teaching to the daughter of Government officer.

As I have mentioned earlier, in this film, Chhaya Devi sings two songs one of which is in Hindi. I am presenting the song ‘armaan kuchh to dil mein tadapte hi rah gaya’. It is a short thumri of less than 2 minutes, written in a ghazal format. The name of the lyricist is not known though in one of the audio clips, the song is attributed to Gulzar saab. But I have not been able to get it confirmed from any other reliable sources. The song has been set to music by Tapan Sinha. I thought that at least the audio clip of SAREGAMA (HMV) may have full song. But it is also of the duration of less than 2 minutes.

This song is one more example of Chhaya Devi’s versatility in acting and singing. Note how nicely she uses the ‘harkat’ and ‘taan’ when she repeats the lines. Also note her gestures, ‘mudras’ and expressions. She may have learnt all these from her training in classical singing and kathak dance training.

Video


Audio Clip:

Song-Armaan kuchh to dil mein tadapte hi rah gaya (Harmonium)(Bangla)(1976) Singer-Chhaaya Devi, MD-Tapan Sinha

Lyrics

aa aa aa
armaan
armaan kuchh to dil mein tadap…a a a
te hi rah gaya aa
te hi rah gaya aa
kuchh aansoo banke
banke
kuchh aansoo banke
banke
aankhon mein…en en en
aaya ke dhal gaya
haay
aaya ke dhal gaya

aa aa aa
karte khuda se ishq gar
aur ban jaayen aur bhi kuchh
bandon ke ishq ne mujhe
ae ae ae ae
banda bana diya
haay
banda bana diya


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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