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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Song from regional movies’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4131 Post No. : 15290 Movie Count :

4210

A couple of months’ back, I had come across a Hindi song ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from a Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) sung by Mubarak Begum under the music direction of Salil Chowdhury. I could not locate the picturised version of the song. The tune of the song gives me an impression that it is picturised as a mujra song. While it was a new song for me, the ‘mukhda’ of the song sounded familiar to me. Oh! Yes. It was the more famous song, ruke ruke se kadam from ‘Mausam’ (1975) sung by Lata Mangeshkar under the music direction of Madan Mohan. Both the songs have almost the same lyrics which are accredited to Gulzar. So, it is one song, composed in two tunes by two different music directors, depicting two different emotions.

There is a section of the Hindi film music lovers who feels that credit for both the songs should go to Mirza Ghalib as he had originally written this ghazal which Gulzar has merely changed a few words to give an easy understanding of the original words. So, I decided to make a reality check by comparing the original ghazal written by Mirza Gahlib and the versions written by Gulzar for both the films mentioned above.

The original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib has five she’rs. The ghazal written by Gulzar for the Bangla film ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) has four she’rs and that for ‘Mausam’ (1975) has three she’rs. Let us compare the she’rs of all the three versions of the ghazal in a tabular form for easy verification as to whether the ‘allegation’ on Gulzar has substance or not.

Original ghazal by Mirza Ghalib Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964) Gulzar’s version of the ghazal – ‘Mausam’ (1975)
Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar de ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.

Ruke ruke se kadam
mud ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale.

Ruke ruke se kadam
ruk ke baar baar chale.

Qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan jism kaa jaan par.

Chale jahaan se to
ye pairahan uttaar chale.

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Tumhaare kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par.

Le tere kadmon mein
ye karz bhi
utaar chale

Na jaane kaun si mitti watan ki mitti thhi.

Nazar mein dhool jigar mein liye ghubaar chale.

[Not used] [Not used]
Sahar naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

Thhi raat raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale.

Sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya.

Ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale.

Subah naa aayi kayi baar neend se jaage.

ki ek raat ki ye zindagi guzaar chale

Mili hai shama se ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamko.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

Shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne.

Gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale.

[Not used]

Note: Bold words indicate changes from the original she’rs.

It will be observed from the above table that Gulzar has made only some cosmetic changes in the original ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib which has been used in the two films mentioned above. Hence, the credit for the two ghazals used in the films should have rightly gone to Mirza Ghalib. I am aware that Gulzar is a great fan of Mirza Ghalib and he had used Mirza Ghalib’s she’rs in a couple of his other songs including dil dhoondhta hai phir wahi fursat ke raat din. So, I thought that he may have given due credit to Mirza Ghalib in his film ‘Mausam’ (1975) for his inspirations. But in the credit title of the film in DVD version, there is no acknowledgement to Mirza Ghalib.

Coming back to the song ‘ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale’ from the Bangla film, ‘Laal Pathore’ (1964), as mentioned earlier, this song is not available in the DVD version of the film. I feel that this mujra song may have been partially used in the film. But the full song is available on the record version which was issued by Saregama (then HMV). There is another Hindi song in the film, ‘saans ke zakhm bhar raha hai koi’ written by Gulzar and sung by Manna Dey which is partially used in the film.

‘Laal Pathore’ (1964, Bangla) in which Uttam Kumar, Supriya Devi (Chaudhury) and Srabani Basu acted in main roles was later made in Hindi as ‘Laal Pathar’ (1971) with corresponding roles for Rajkumar, Hema Malini and Rakhi. Both the versions were directed by Sushil Majumdar. While Salil Chowdhury composed the music for Bangla version, Shankar-Jaikishan composed the music for Hindi version.

I was enthralled with the Ghazal King Madan Mohan’s version of the ghazal, ‘ruke ruke se kadam’ from ‘Mausam’ (1975)’ Let us now enjoy Salil Chowdhury’s version of the same ghazal in a different setting.

Lastly, let us also give credit to Mirza Ghalib for the lyrics of both the version of the ghazal along with Gulzar.

Audio link:

Song-Ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale (Laal Pathore)(Bangla)(1964) Singer-Mubarak Begam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
sahar naa aayi kayi baar aaftaab aaya
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
ham intezaar mein ye raat bhi guzaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
shama se seekhi hai ye rasm-e-aashiqui hamne
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
gunaah haath pe le kar gunaahgaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale

uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
uthaaye phirte thhe ehsaan dil kaa seene par
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
tumhaare kadmon mein ye karz bhi utaar chale
qaraar le ke tere dar se beqaraar chale
ruke ruke se kadam mud ke baar baar chale

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4123 Post No. : 15277 Movie Count :

4202

For the general Hindi film audience, Suchitra Sen (real name: Roma Dasgupta) is synonymous with her lead roles in ‘Bambai Ka Babu’ (1960) with Dev Anand, ‘Mamta’ (1966) with Ashok Kumar and ‘Aandhi’ (1975) with Sanjeev Kumar. The second category of audience with academic interest in Hindi films will add four more of her Hindi films – ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro with Dilip Kumar, ‘Musafir’ (1957) with Shekhar, ‘Champakali’ (1957) with Bharat Bhushan and ‘Sarhad’ (1960) with Dev Anand. Those in the latter category of Hindi film buffs would also know that Suchitra Sen worked in many Bengali films and the Bengali film audience loved to watch their favourite on-screen couple, Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar.

I was in the second category insofar as Suchitra Sen was concerned until recently. But in my quest to get a few rare Hindi film songs in Bengali films made me to watch some of the popular and critically acclaimed Bengali films of the golden era (1950-75). In this process, I came to know about the important contributions made by Suchitra Sen and Uttam Kumar among others in reviving the Bengali film industry after the decline of big film productions banners like New Theatres, M P Productions (of P C Barua) and the collapse of the studio system.

Based on a number of articles available on-line including some from Gopal Krishna Roy, a film journalist with United News of India who remained one of the very few close confidants of Suchitra Sen until her death, I have given below some interesting aspects of her filmy career based on these readings:

1. Suchitra Sen (06/04/1931 – 17/01/2014) migrated from then East Bengal (now Bangla Desh) to Kolkata with her family in 1947. She joined film industry in 1952 when she was already married to Dibanath Sen, a Marine Engineer and the son of an Industrialist in 1947 at the age of 16.

2. She acted in her fist film ‘Shesh Kothay’ (1952, Bangla) which was never released. Her first officially released film was ‘Saat Number Kayedi’ (1953, Bangla)

3. Her second released film was ‘Sharey Chauttor’ (1953, Bangla), a light comedy film which was also her first film with matinee idol, Uttam Kumar, then nick named in the Tollygunj studio circle as a ‘flop hero’ because all the films he worked during 1948-52 were box office failures. With this film, Uttam Kumar made an impressive turnaround in his filmy career with Suchitra Sen. From this film onward, Bengali filmy audience adored them as the most iconic romantic pair in the Bengali films.

4. During her filmy career (1953-78), Suchitra Sen worked in 61 films (including 7 Hindi films) out of which she paired with Uttam Kumar in as many as 30 films. Almost all of their films were box office hits.

5. When Suchitra Sen was 39, she lost her husband, Dibanath Sen in 1970 while he was on a visit to USA. However, she kept her shooting schedules, more or less, as planned to avoid financial losses to the producers.

6. A glance through her filmography and brief story lines of most of her films gives an impression that Suchitra Sen had handled her filmy career, especially from 1960, onward very professionally. She appears to be selective in accepting the films. Most of her films have a strong story-line and she had almost equal footage in films along with lead actors. In this process, she had ensured that she had ample scope for portraying her characters in the films and was not over-exposed to her audience.

7. Suchitra Sen declined the offer of Satyajit Ray’s film because he had put a condition that she had to give bulk dates for shooting and during the making of the film, she should not work in any other films. Satyajit Ray decided to abandon the film rather than taking any other female actress. She had also declined the offer of Raj Kapoor to work in one of his films (My wild guess is that it was for ‘Sangam’ (1964) because he had also made an offer to Uttam Kumar for a role in his film ‘Sangam’ (1964) which he had also declined. The role went to Rajendra Kumar.)

8. Suchitra Sen was the first Bengali film actress to get the best actress award in any International Film Festival for her role in Bangla film ‘Saptapadi’ (1961) in Moscow International Film Festival, 1963.

9. After the box office failure of her last film ‘Pranay Pasha’ (1978), Suchitra Sen retired from the film industry at the age of 47. It was first thought that she had timed her retirement at the peak of her career. However, over a period of time, it became evident that with retirement from the films, she had also shunned public life. She spent her last 35 years in her house as recluse, confining herself with close circles of family and a few friends.

During her last 35 years, Suchitra Sen completely avoided public exposure. Even during the death of Uttam Kumar in 1980, she visited his house after mid-night to offer her condolence. It is believed that she had decline to accept Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 2005 mainly to avoid the public appearance. In 2012, Government of West Bengal gave her ‘Banga Bibushan Award’ but she did not attend the function. Moon Moon Sen, her daughter accepted the Award on her behalf.

Suchitra Sen suffered from lung infections for which she was admitted in a Kolkata hospital sometime in December 2013. She had almost recovered from her ailment but on January 17, 2014, she got a cardiac arrest which took her life. As per her wish, her body was put in the casket with tinted glasses and was cremated as the earliest (in about 5 hours from the time of her death). So even in death, she ensured her privacy.

Dilip Kumar who had worked with Suchitra Sen in her first Hindi film ‘Devdas’ (1955) in the role of Paro, paid tributes to her upon her death in January 2014 which are reproduced below:

Suchitra had peerless, expressive eyes. She conveyed volumes with a single look. During an intense scene in Devdas, I had to look straight into her eyes and convey romance filled with pathos. She reacted uniquely, looking with equal intensity at me and doing a slight lip movement which was excellent. Bimal da complimented her after that shot and so did I.

Professional to the core, Suchitra maintained a distance from film folk and never opened up unless she was comfortable with the person she was interacting with. She preferred to work in silence. But she never disrespected anyone. As an artiste, she gave full respect to even a spot boy.

Her Hindi had a Bengali accent but it sounded sweet. She could give five modulations to a single dialogue. After Devdas, we worked in Musafir in 1957, but we were not paired together. I will never forget the serenity she lent to the bhajan, ‘man re hari naam karna’ by Lata Mangeshkar.

We shared a great work rapport, but I must confess, her pairing with Uttam Kumar was the greatest. Suchitra was unparalleled in ‘Saat Paake Bandha’, ‘Uttar Phalguni’ and ‘Deep Jwele Jai’. An actress of international calibre, her looks were simply haunting. [Source: The Times of India, updated version dated 17/01/2017].

Many of Suchitra Sen’s Bangla films were not only box office hits, some of them were critically acclaimed and were remade in Hindi like ‘Mamta’ (1966) from ’Uttar Phalguni’ (1963), ‘Kora Kaagaz’ (1974) from ‘Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963), ‘Khamoshi’ (1966) from ‘Deep Jwele Jaai’ (1959) etc.

I am presenting a Hindi song ‘zindagi ki ye bhool thhi’ from the film ‘Uttar Phalguni’ (1963, Bangla) sung by Sandhya Mukherjee. The name of the lyricist is not known. The song was set to music by Robin Chatterjee.

Suchitra Sen had a double role – both mother and daughter in this film which was produced by Uttam Kumar. But he did not act in this film. Suchitra Sen later did the same double role in the Hindi version ‘Mamta’ (1966).

Unfortunately, the video clip of the song is not available. In fact, I did not find the song in the DVD of the film. Since Sandhya Mukherjee had sung for Suchitra Sen in this film, I guess, the song was picturized on Suchitra Sen. The wordings of the song give me an impression of a mujra song, the similar situational song in Hindi version of the film could be rahte thhe kabhi jinke dil mein.

Audio Clip:

Song-Zindagi ki ye bhool thhi (Uttar Phalguni)(Bangla)(1963) Singer-Sandhaya Mukherjee, MD-Robin Chatterji

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
mohabbat ki thandi chhaon mein
naadaan dil thha so gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
kaisi ye dillagi huyi
dil nahin akthiyaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
gumnaam ek sandesha hai
koyal ki har pukaar mein
lut gayi main to jeete jee
haay kisi ke pyaar mein
phool dikha ke dhool mein
kaanta koi chubho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi

meri nasheeli aankh mein ae
meri nashee….li aankh mein
tasveer kiski bas gayi
tasveer kiski bas gayi
khel samajh ke prem ke
jaal mein main to phans gayi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
lut gayi dil ki har khushi
hansne ko main taras gayi
saahil pe la ke naav ko
saahil pe la ke naav ko
mallah khud dubo gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi
pyaar kisi se ho gaya
zindagi ki ye bhool thhi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4115 Post No. : 15268 Movie Count :

4196

I came to know about actress Chhaaya Devi for the first time some time in 2011 when I found her name mentioned in Kidar Sharma’s autobiography, ‘The One And Lonely Kidar Sharma’ (2002) in the context of the shooting of the film ‘Vidyapati’ (1937). At that time, I thought her to be one of many female actors connected with New Theatres who had short acting career. For me, the only female actor of that time who mattered in Kolkata film industry was actor-singer Kanan Devi. What a wrong impression I had about Chhaya Devi when I came to know later that she had a long filmy career of over 5 decades – both in Bangla and Hindi films.

Being born in Bhagalpur and a part of her schooling done in Delhi, Chhaya Devi (1914-27/04/2001) was proficient in Hindi besides her mother tongue, Bengali. Sometime in early 1930s, her family shifted to Kolkata when she was put under the tutelage of K C Dey, the singer and music director. She was trained in Hindustani classical music and sang Khayal and Thumri on All India Radio. She was also trained in Kathak dance. It was on the recommendation of K C Dey that Chhaya Devi got her first bilingual film in Bengali and Hindi under the banner of New Theatres (NT), ‘Sonar Sansaar’/’Sunehra Sansaar’ (1936) which was directed by Devaki Bose.

Chhaya Devi’s next bilingual film for NT in Bengali and Hindi was ‘Vidyapati’ (1937) in which she did the role of Queen Laxmi, which brought her fame. Another NT film, ‘Abhinetri’/’Haar Jeet’ (1940) in which she acted did not find favour with the audience. Outside NT, she did ‘Chowranghee’ (1942) for Fazli Brothers.

After having worked in Kolkata in about 15 films, Chhaya Devi worked in Mumbai with her first film ‘Mera Gaon’ (1942) directed by Sarvottam Badami in which Jairaj was the hero. Probably, she came to Mumbai along with her mentor K C Dey who was the music director for the film. From her filmography, it appears that she had 2-year hiatus from the film industry (1943-45).

From the late 1950s onward, Chhaya Devi had already shifted to doing character roles in films. It is interesting to note that it is during this phase of her career that she became hyper active in doing Bengali films. For example, in the 1960s, she did around 40 films and in the 1970s, the figure was about 30. Her last film was ‘Tomar Rakte Amaar Sohag’ (1993). In all, she worked in about 120 films.

Some of the Hindi films in which Chhaya Devi worked were ‘Sunehra Sansaar’ (1936), ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Haar Jeet’ (1940), ‘Mera Gaon’ (1942),’Chowranghee’ (1942), ‘Shri Ramanujam’ (1943), ‘Uttara Abhimanyu’ (1946), ‘Ratnadeep’ (1951), ‘Mamta’ (1966), ‘Tu Hi Meri Zindagi’ (1965), ‘Zindagi Zindagi’ (1972), ‘Alaap’ (1977), ‘Rang Birangi’ (1983). These films were mostly bilingual or the remakes of Bengali films.

Recently, I have watched about half a dozen Bengali films directed by Tapan Sinha in which Chhaya Devi had acted in them. I have also watched a few of her other films. What I have realised with my limited exposure to some of her Bengali and Hindi films that Chhaya Devi was a versatile actress. If she was widow, Anandima in ‘Apnajan’ (1968) who is virtually a peacekeeper between two warring groups of unemployed youth, she is equally good in portraying the villainous looking but soft at heart madam (Baijee) in ‘Uttar Falguni’ (1963)/’Mamta’ (1966). Also, her portrayal of a dominating mother was effective in ‘Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963) which was remade in Hindi as ‘Khora Kaagaz’ (1974). In Hindi films, we have Lalita Pawar, Achala Sachdev, Meena Kumari doing their respective specialized roles very convincingly. In my view, Chhaya Devi was ‘three-in-one’ for Bengali films.

Chhaya Devi was not only a talented actress, she was also a good singer. She had the potential to becoming one of the leading singer-actors in Bengali film industry. Alas! It was not to be. While apart from talent, the luck factor plays an import role in making a film artist successful, I feel that in the case of Chhaya Devi, there was another factor which may have put a sort of speed breaker in the early part of her filmy career. And that factor was the successful emergence of actor-singer Kanan Devi, the first female super star of the Indian film industry.

When Chhaya Devi joined the Bengali film industry, Kanan Devi was already on a threshold of becoming a successful actor-singer. Kanan Devi’s stint with NT during 1937-41 and thereafter with M P Productions of P C Barua in 1942-48 did not give Chhaya Devi the much scope to show her histrionic. Incidentally, Chhaya Devi never got opportunity to worked with K L Saigal and also with P C Barua, an eminent director.

One of the Tapan Sinha’s films in which Chhaya Devi has portrayed the role of madam (Baijee) of a brothel was ‘Harmonium’ (1976). In this film, she sings two songs on herself. The film is available for viewing in 5 parts on a video sharing platform. The story in brief as I understood from the film is as under:

In this film, harmonium has been used as props. The harmonium which was first purchased by an aristocrat widower for her daughter for learning music has to be auctioned as the father dies and his estate manager forges his property paper to his name making the daughter orphaned. All through the harmonium’s journey through various section of the society, it is branded as ill luck to the family owning it.

The harmonium now goes to a middle-class home and then to a brothel. The harmonium is used for singing and dancing activities of the brothel. However, a murder takes place in the brothel forcing Baijee to leave the place with the harmonium. Finally, harmonium is bought by a Government officer for his daughter to learn music where the aristocrat’s orphaned daughter is the governess. After seeing the harmonium which was the same as the one bought by her aristocrat father, the governess is painfully reminded of her childhood days and is worried about the ill luck it may bring to the family. The film ends with a song which the governess is teaching to the daughter of Government officer.

As I have mentioned earlier, in this film, Chhaya Devi sings two songs one of which is in Hindi. I am presenting the song ‘armaan kuchh to dil mein tadapte hi rah gaya’. It is a short thumri of less than 2 minutes, written in a ghazal format. The name of the lyricist is not known though in one of the audio clips, the song is attributed to Gulzar saab. But I have not been able to get it confirmed from any other reliable sources. The song has been set to music by Tapan Sinha. I thought that at least the audio clip of SAREGAMA (HMV) may have full song. But it is also of the duration of less than 2 minutes.

This song is one more example of Chhaya Devi’s versatility in acting and singing. Note how nicely she uses the ‘harkat’ and ‘taan’ when she repeats the lines. Also note her gestures, ‘mudras’ and expressions. She may have learnt all these from her training in classical singing and kathak dance training.

Video


Audio Clip:

Song-Armaan kuchh to dil mein tadapte hi rah gaya (Harmonium)(Bangla)(1976) Singer-Chhaaya Devi, MD-Tapan Sinha

Lyrics

aa aa aa
armaan
armaan kuchh to dil mein tadap…a a a
te hi rah gaya aa
te hi rah gaya aa
kuchh aansoo banke
banke
kuchh aansoo banke
banke
aankhon mein…en en en
aaya ke dhal gaya
haay
aaya ke dhal gaya

aa aa aa
karte khuda se ishq gar
aur ban jaayen aur bhi kuchh
bandon ke ishq ne mujhe
ae ae ae ae
banda bana diya
haay
banda bana diya


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4111 Post No. : 15262 Movie Count :

4193

The troika of Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak and Mrinal Sen had taken Indian cinema to a great height from the 1950s onward. They were regarded as the harbinger of the new wave cinema, also called the parallel cinema. They were all from Bengal and made the films mostly in Bengali. But they had not only had the pan India reach but also, they were globally famous through their films. They won many awards – both National and International.

Tapan Sinha was one more film-maker from Bengal who was a contemporary of Satyajit-Ghatak-Mrinal. He also made mostly Bengali films and had won National and International awards. But the general impression carried in the film circle was that he was not in league with the the troika. The reason was that he was regarded as ‘the middle of the road’ film maker whose films would have some mild doses of commercial ingredients. It is only after Tapan Sinha’s death in January 2009 that some film writers feel that he should have been a part of quartet, Satyajit-Ghatak-Mrinal-Tapan for the realism depicted in his films.

Tapan Sinha made his first film ‘Ankush’ (1954) in Bengali. Since then until 2000, he made 37 films which included some films in Hindi like ‘Zindagi Zindagi (1972), ‘Sagina’ (1974), ‘Ek Doctor Ki Maut’ (1991) etc. He also made some children’s films like ‘Safed Haathi’(1978), ‘Aaj Ka Robinhood’ (1987). Most of his films were based on the stories written by well-known Bengali writers like Gurudev Rabiindranath Tagore, Tarashankar Bandopadhyay, Ramapada Chowdhury, Samresh Basu etc.

Some of Tapan Sinha’s successful Bengali films were remade in Hindi. These include ‘Mere Apne’ (1971) by Gulzar adapted from ‘Apanjan’ (1968), ‘Baawarchi’ (1972) by Hrishikesh Mukherjee from ‘Gulpo Holeo Satti’ (1966), ’Zindagi Zindagi’ (1972) from ‘Khoniker Atithi’ (1959), ‘Sagina’ (1974) from ‘Sagina Mahato’ (1970) and ‘Ijaazat’ (1987) from ‘Jatugriha’ (1964).

‘Haate Baazare’ (Market Place, 1967) was one of the successful films in Bengali directed by Tapan Sinha. Ashok Kumar and Vyjayantimala were in the lead roles with Rudraprasad Sengupta, Ajitesh Bandopadhyay, Bhanu Bandopadhyay, Chinmoy Roy, Chhaya Devi, Samit Bhanja, Partho Mukherjee etc in the supporting roles. It was the first Bengali film for Vyjayantimala. Probably, it was also for the first time, Vyjayantimala sang for herself a Bengali song, cheye thaki cheye thaki along with Mrinal Chakraborty in this film. Vyjayantimala did not know Bengali. But Tapan Sinha did not dub her dialogues in the film with borrowed voice, Instead he made her to rehearse her dialogues after listening to the pre-recorded dialogues on the cassette.

The film was based on a novel of the same name by Banaphul (real name: Balai Chand Mukhopadhyay). The film is available for watching on video sharing platform but there are no English subtitles for those who do not understand Bengali. Still, one can get a feel of the story of the film.

Dr. Mukherjee (Ashok Kumar) is a doctor in a tribal town in Birbhum. He is well respected by the tribal folks as well as others which include Chhipli (Vyjayantimala), a young widow. In his jest to serve the people, Dr Mukherjee has no much time to attend to his wife’s illness of a chronic heart ailment. After the death of his wife, Dr Mukherjee leaves his job and starts a mobile clinic for the poor. Lachhman Lal (Ajitesh Bandopadhyay), the spoilt son of a local landlord is at a loggerhead with him as he protects Chhipli from his lustful eyes. This is resented by Lachhman Lal and as a vengeance, he spreads the rumour about Dr Mukherjee’s relationship with Chhipli who has been working with him as his assistant.

In a night of a tribal get-together where Chhipli also participates in songs and dances, Lachhman Lal hoodwinks Chhipli by sending a message through Nani (Chhaya Devi) that she has been called by Dr Mukherjee. On her way back, he tries to molest Chhipli. In the nick of time, Dr Mukherjee saves her but, in the fight, Dr Mukherjee strangulates Lachhman to death and in the process, he is also seriously injured. Dr Mukherjee dies the next day. But Chhipli continues to carry forward the work of the mobile clinic in the village with the help of a young doctor.

The film was not only a commercial success, it also won the National Film Award for the Best Feature Film.

By the way, there is a train named as ‘Haate Bazare Express’ which runs from Sealdah (Kolkatta) to Saharsa Junction/Purnia.

‘Haate Baazare’ (1967) had 3 songs, one of which I am presenting here because it is in Hindi. The song is ‘aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaya’ sung by Chinmoy Roy, Mrinal Chakraborty and Aarati Mukherjee. The song is set to music by Tapan Sinha. The name of the lyricist for Hindi song is not mentioned. But the wordings of the song seem to indicate that it is a traditional song. Incidentally, Majrooh Sultanpuri also used some lines from this song in pyaare nanadaya sarota kahaan bhool aaye for Hindi film, ‘Zamaana’ (1985), strengthening my guess that it is based on a traditional folk song. Most importantly, this song has the quality of captivating the listeners and the folk song has that quality even with the meaningless lyrics.

In the song, while Chinmoy Roy sings for himself, Mrinal Chakraborty sings for an actor whom I guess to be Partho Mukherjee. He sings in a mix of Bengali and Hindi words, probably that is the dialect spoken in Birbhum, a border district with Bihar. Aarati Mukherjee sings for Vyjayantimala.

Enjoy this fun filled teasing song.

Video


Audio

Song-Aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya (Haatey Baazaarey)(Bangla)(1967) Singers-Chinmoy Roy, Mrinal Chakraborty, Aarti Mukherjee, MD-Tapan Sinha
Chorus

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aur taar peechhone aami choli
aamaar peechhe shojni
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

nat mori nanadi khaayi peda nanadaiyya
nat mori nanadi khaayi peda nanadaiyya
main bechaari rabdi khaaye
main bechaari rabdi khaaye
joothha chaate sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

nanadi mori thhaali dikhaaye chaate nanadaiyya
nanadi mori thhaali dikhaaye chaate nanadaiyya
main bechaari paan khaaun
main bechaari paan khaaun
choona chaate sainyyan
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanodi chole peechhe nanodini
aar taar peechhone aami chaale
aamaar peechhe sojni
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye

aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aage aage nanadi chale peechhe nanadaiyya
aur uske peechhe main bechaari
mere peechhe sainyyaa
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye
pyaare nanadaiyya
sarota kahaan bhool gaye


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4075 Post No. : 15213 Movie Count :

4182

It is a well-known fact that Shailendra wrote maximum number of songs for the music director, Shankar-Jaikishan (around 365 songs) out of about 750 songs he wrote during his life time. The second in line among music directors was Salil Chowdhury for whom Shailendra wrote around 105 songs. The third place was taken by S D Burman for whom he wrote around 70 songs. There were others music directors for whom he wrote songs albeit in comparatively lesser numbers. They were Roshan, S N Tripathi, Hemant Kumar, Anil Biswas, C Ramchandra, Ravi, Dattaram, and Kishore Kumar.

With major chunk of Shailendra’s songs (around 90% his total songs) written for the music directors listed above, I was curious to know as who were the other music directors to whom Shailendra wrote songs probably for one or two films. I traced almost all ‘other’ music directors. They were Basant Prakash (‘Badnam’ 1952), Manohar Arora (‘Chingaari’, 1955), Mukul Roy (‘Sailaab’ 1956 and ‘Detective’ 1958), Jimmy (Shrimatiji, 1952), Ninu Mazumdar (‘Bhai Saheb’, 1954), Sardul Kwatra (‘Pilpli Saheb, 1954 and ‘Tis Maar Khan’, 1955), Shivram (‘Naya Kadam’ 1958), Shailesh Mukherjee (‘Savera; 1958), Chitrgupt and Gajanan (‘Kal Hamaara Hai’ 1959), Kalyanji-Anandji (‘Satta Baazar’ (1959), Pandit Ravi Shankar (‘Anuradha’ 1960), R D Burman (‘Chhote Nawab’ 1961), Suhrid Kar (‘Kaanch Ki Gudiya’ 1961), and Sapan-Jagmohan (‘Begaana’ 1963).

But the surprise catch among ‘other’ music director to whom Shailendra wrote a song was Nachiketa Ghosh who has composed music for only one Hindi film ‘25th July’ (1951). But Shailendra was not the lyricist for this film. It transpired that Shailendra did write a Hindi song for Nachiketa Ghosh but for a Bengali film ‘Indraani’ (1958). Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen were the lead actors in the film. The film is available on YT with English sub-title.

So here is probably Shailendra’s only Hindi song for a Bengali film, ‘Indraani’ (1958). There are 7 songs in the film of which one song is in Hindi. The song is ‘sabhi kuchh lutaakar huye hum tumhaare’ which is sung by Mohammad Rafi. Nachiketa Ghosh is the music director.

The background for this song is that Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen get married despite opposition from her parents as Uttam Kumar is unemployed. On the wedding night, their feelings for each other is reflected in this song through a wayside singer playing guitar. The mood of the song appears to me the same as that of songs like ek haseen shaam ko dil mera kho gaya.

The song in the video clip is longer than the audio clip (78 RPM record version) because of the repetition in the former of mukhda part in each antara. Also, there are short dialogues in Bengali between Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen during the interludes of the song.

What a lovely song which I heard for the first time. I have been mesmerized by Rafi’s rendition of antara part of the song. Just note, how he goes one octave higher but keep his rendition soft on the antara lines ‘kisi ka tu ho jaa’, ‘hai khaamosh hum bhi’ and ‘ye khwaabon ki duniya’.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip :

Song-Sabhi kuchh lutaa kar huye ham tumhaare (Indraani)(Bangla)(1958) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-Nachiketa Ghosh

Lyrics(based on Video Clip)

sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

mohabbat mein kho jaa..aa
kisi ka tu ho jaa
falak se zameen tak huye ye ishaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ki hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

hai chupchaap wo bhi
hain khaamosh hum bhi
khule jaa rahe hain magar raaz saare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

wo rangeen duniya
wo khwaabon ki duniya
simat kar ke baahon mein aayi hamaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4049 Post No. : 15178 Movie Count :

4171

Today’s song is from a Marathi film- Dhananjay-66. This is a Hindi song, sung by Chitalkar, under his own baton ! Lyrics are by P L Santoshi. The film was based on a story by Marathi’s renowned Detective Novelist of yesteryear – Baburao Arnalkar.

In the early 50s,when I was about 10-11 years old, I first read a Marathi detective novel written by Baburao Arnalkar. In those days, reading such stuff was a no-no for children, and so I had to read it, sitting in some lonely corner, keeping one eye and one ear for checking if anybody is seeing me. I was simply thrilled by reading this book and then started the marathon reading of detective novels- of course chori chori ! Happily I found some of my friends also doing the same thing and even my elder brother was seen reading these books.

Shortly, this became an open programme and I joined a local book library, catering to such books. Every month such 10 books used to come there and all these books were written by one author- Baburao Arnalkar. We always wondered how can any one man write so many books, so varied and entertaining every month. As the time went by, the author wrote in a magazine, how he was impressed by novels of Edgar Wallace, Berkeley grey, Roderick Graeme, Peter Cheyney, Sax Rohmer and few others. He decided to adapt their stories to Indian environment, culture and customs, so that Marathi readers felt affinity for them. Certain books, however, were just not possible to adapt lest they lost their charm and such books were presented just in a translated form, with same name and places to maintain reality.

Baburao’s main character, on whom he wrote more books was Dhananjay ( he got this name from Bhagwadgeeta) – a private detective with a sharp intelligence, fearlessness, a high degree of common sense and an ability to use logic rightly. This character seemed to be a combination of Perry Mason (Earl Stanley Gardener), Hercule Poirot (Agatha Christie) and Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Connon Doyle).

Baburao also brought into Marathi the dashing ” Normon Conquest ” of author Berkeley Grey as Zunjar (झुंजार) along with his wife Joy (Vijaya) and the faithful assistant Biji (Netaji). Novels of Zunjar were particularly more popular because he was flamboyant, adventurous and of humorous nature with a speciality of getting his commission from every villain,before Police arrested him. He was one who would not hesitate to cross legal boundaries in order to book the villains in the final chapter. Zunjar’s Guru Bhimsen and successor Golandaz also had many books on them.

The other popular character Baburao Arnalkar brought was Roderick Graeme’s famous “Black Shirt”. In Marathi he became Kalapahad(काळापहाड)- a successful Novelist by day and a daring adventurer by night. Baburao brought stories of Peter Cheyney and Ellery Queen. Brett Haliday’s Mike Shane became Jayant in Marathi. Carter Brown’s private detective was Sanjay in Marathi. Additionally he created from Edgar Wallace, Kodand rao- Public Prosecutor (J.G.Reader), Major(Retd.) Sudarshan- a private investigator and C.I.D. Inspector Murar Rao.

Shifting from the usual, Baburao brought Jungle stories of British Settlements in Africa by Edgar Wallace, featuring Commissioner Sanders, Capt.Hamilton and funny but brave Lt.Bones. These were brought in original form having English names and places. Similarly, the “Justmen” series by Edgar Wallace featuring George Manfred, Leon Gonsalves and Raymond Poicort – each having different skill and together punishing secretly the difficult to catch criminal, helping the Police. Baburao was too versatile. he brought stories of Sailors, featuring Capt Daryasarang and his assistant Savlaram. The seafaring criminal stories were an entirely different world for Marathi readers.

Baburao also gets credit for introducing the deadly Dr. Fu Manchu, a character created by Sax Rohmer. Fu Manchu is a Chinese scientist who wants to rule the world. An entire generation born in the 40s was mesmerised by Baburao’s detective novels and feasted on the stories of heroes created by British, American and German authors, in the 1920s and 1930s. These novels re-created the pre-war times and entertained people.

Having read Baburao Arnalkar’s books based on foreign authors, I got and read almost every English book that Baburao had translated. Novels by Edgar Wallace and others are still in my library. I had about 200 selected books-Marathi- of Baburao Arnalkar, which I gifted to my niece recently.

Baburao Arnalkar (real name Chandrakant Sakharam Chavan) was born on 9-6-1906 at Arnala in Vasai. He studied only up to 10th, but earned a proficiency in English, as he was an avid reader of books. In the 1942 Freedom struggle, he was jailed for 18 months. In this jail, he got hands on the books of Edgar Wallace. He was so thrilled that he decided to bring these books in Marathi. He had already written his first detective novel ” Queen of Diamonds” (चौकटची राणी) in 1939.

He started an Optical lenses shop in Bombay for earning a living. His writing started from 1946, but in the period 1952 to 1966, he was very prolific, writing 6 to 10 books a month. On completing 500 books,the then Maharashtra Government felicitated him and awarded Rs. 10000 also. He wrote 1042 detective novels, before he put his pen down due to old age. His name was entered in Guinness Book of World Records in those days.

He received several awards and honours from prestigious institutions. However the so called Classic literature writers never conceded Detective Novels as a respected form of literature. This always remained an entertainment for the middle class society who dreamt of super powered heroes. More than this recognition, he valued the love and affection an entire generation poured on him. He not only gave entertaining books but also sustained and developed the reading habit among the youngsters of those times.

Baburao Arnalkar died peacefully on 5-7-1996 at the ripe age of 90 years. He must have been a contented man. My thanks to him, for being a true entertainer.

Film Dhananjay-66, based on Baburao Arnalkar’s story, was produced by C.Ramchandra. After parting ways with Lata, in the late 50s, C.Ramchandra did not do well in Hindi films. He disappeared slowly. He turned to Marathi films and stage shows around the world. He got married second time to Shantabai and had a son and a daughter from this marriage. Most of his time he stayed in his Poona Bungalow. His son and daughter are leading doctors in USA, and are well settled. I do not know if Shantabai is still alive. C.Ramchandra had produced 2 Marathi films. The other film was Gharkul.

C.Ramchandra played the Hero- Dhananajay’s role in this film. After his first flop film Naganand-1935 ( only 9 people in the first show. There was no second show), this was his second film in the Hero’s role. The film did average business. The cast was Chitalkar, Uma, Arun Sarnaik ( he had acted in 2 Hindi films…Subhadra haran-64 and Lady killer-68), Ashalata, Gulab Mokashi, Jaymala , Shakuntala etc etc.

The film was directed by Raja Thakur. Rajaram Dattatreya Thakur was born in 1923 at Ponda in Goa. He did work as an assistant to Master Vinayak and later Raja Paranjape. Raja Thakur had produced an English film ” Birbal – My brother “-1973. His another film “Mumbaicha Jawai” (मुंबईचा जावई)-1970, was remade in Hindi as ‘Piya ka Ghar’-1971 by Basu Chatterjee.

There were 6 songs in the films. 3 songs were in Hindi. 1 song was in Konkani. This song “Hatat bangdi sonyachi, hi pori konachi ( हातात बांगडी सोन्याची, ही पोरी कोनाची ) became an evergreen song, so popular that even now, it is played in Ganesh utsav, Holi etc. programmes. Only 2 songs were in Marathi, in this Marathi film.

Today’s song has a tune, which Chitalkar seems to have borrowed from his own film Aazad-1955 – “Marna bhi muhabbat mein kisi kaam na aaya”. Enjoy today’s song in Chitalkar’s voice.


Song- Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin (Dhananjay)(Marathi)(1966) Singer – Chitalkar, Lyricist – P L Santoshi, Music – C Ramchandra
Chorus

Lyrics

Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin
Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin
Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin een een een
suniye
main musaafir hoon
meri subah kahin shaam kahin
main musaafir hoon
meri subah kahin shaam kahin
main musaafir hoon
meri subah kahin shaam kahin

o o o
o o o
main chala to chal diya zindagi ka kaarwaan
arre main ruka to ruk gaya zindagi ka kaarwaan
hans ke jisne dekh liya
arre hans ke jisne dekh liya
main usi ka ho gaya
aa aa aa aa
do ghadi bhar ke liye kar liya mukaam wahin
do ghadi bhar ke liye kar liya mukaam wahin
do ghadi bhar ke liye kar liya mukaam wahin

do ghadi bhar ke liye kar liya mukaam wahin een een
Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin
Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaraam kahin
main musaafir hoon
meri subah kahin shaam kahin

o o o
o o o o
raat ke hai baad din aur din ke baad raat hai
arre chal rahi isi tarah saari kaaynaat hai
main bhi chala jaa raha
main bhi
main bhi chala jaa raha
gham aur khushi saath liye
ae ae
meri is zindagi mein thaharne ka kaam nahin
meri is zindagi mein thaharne ka kaam nahin
meri is zindagi mein thaharne ka kaam nahin

o meri is zindagi mein thaharne ka kaam nahin
een een een
Na mila hai na milega mujhe aaram kahin
main musaafir hoon
meri subah kahin shaam kahin


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Songs to Tickle Your Memory – 9
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

A small child’s memory is so retentive, just like a sponge. I am sure other friends and listeners who lived by the music broadcast on the radio, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, would surely remember this fabulous Bhojpuri song. It is one of those unforgettable memories that will continue to play in the minds forever. It is just the way that Rafi Sb has sung this, makes it so endearing. The feeling is almost as if someone is tickling.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

= = = == == = = = = = = = = = = = =
Rafi Sb – In The Seventies – 23
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

(1971 – Solo – Regional – Chhattisgarhi)

One more song, the final one of this series – it belongs to the category ‘heard- just-once-o-but-never-forgotten’. And once again, another dramatic reunion, this one just two days ago.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15296

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Movies with all their songs covered =1180
Total Number of movies covered =4212

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