Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4211 Post No. : 14409 Movie Count :

4245

Today’s song is from the film Nav Jeevan-1939. It was a film made by Bombay Talkies, one of the heavyweight film making companies of those times. Bombay Talkies and Prabhat Film company of Poona were the companies that tackled offbeat and social reform issues through their films. They generally, combined social work with entertainment successfully and therefore their films became popular.

The owners of Bombay Talkies, Himanshu Roy and Devika Rani were Bengali. The company, no doubt, helped and gave opportunities to many capable Bangla artistes in different fields of film making, like cinematography, direction, acting etc. However, they were also known to recognise talents and offered opportunities to right persons irrespective of language, caste or religion – Bangla or non Bangla. Both the owners were foreign educated and Himanshu Roy had been in Germany to make films. Very few people know that his first wife was a German lady !

The couple had a soft corner for Germans because of their personal experiences. This was evident from the fact that Bombay Talkies had employed a team of German Technicians and other specialists like Director, Cinematographer etc. In the early stages of Bombay Talkies, from 1935 to 1939, almost all their films were directed by Franz Osten – a German.

Germany had a very good name in India during the olden days i.e. during the early part of the last century. I remember, my Grandfather ( who expired in 1975 at the age of 91 years) always praising Germany for so many things. In India, all things German were considered the Best- even better than the Vilayati or the British things !

Very few people know that Indian Cinema had a little known connection with the rise of Hitler in Germany in 1932-33. A group of men engaged in Cinema in Germany, flocked to India in the 30’s and played a vital role in Indian Cinema and the arts of that times. After Hitler took over Germany in 1933, the German Cine Studio’s glory days were over and they were turned into Nazi Propaganda Machines !

It was at this time that several of its men ( mostly persecuted Jews) left the studio and some arrived in India, and contributed to Indian cinema’s formative years.

The foremost among them is Frantz Osten, a German whom Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani met at the USA when they went to train there (they worked with Lang and Marlene Dietrich). Osten had already been directing films for the couple since 1925, when he made Light of Asia for them from Germany.

In 1934, he came to India and the next year, after Rai founded Bombay Talkies ‘the legendary film studio in Malad that now lies in ruins,’ Osten directed its first film.

He went on to direct the famous Devika Rani-Ashok Kumar starrer, Achhyut Kanya, without much knowledge of Hindi. The film, which featured the song “Main ban ke chiriya”, was shot by Cinematographer Joseph Wirsching; the sets were designed by Karl von Spreti, the laboratory was headed by Zolle, and the sound recordist was Len Heartley. This was Osten’s team of USA ex-members who worked for Rai’s state-of-the-art studio.

Osten and his fellow Germans directed 16 films for Rai. It was a remarkable feat for people who knew little Hindi mistaking the word “bulbul” once, for a pair of bulls.

“It’s not clear if they had anything to do with the Nazi ideology, either way,” said film historian Amrit Gangar.

“If they did, it did not show in their films. But there were two other people who almost certainly migrated to India because of the persecution of Jews.”

Franz Osten(23-12-1876 to 2-12-1956) Hindi director, was born in Munich as Franz Ostermayer, the elder brother of successful producer Peter Ostermayer. They set up a travelling cinema, Original Physograph (1907) and founded Munchner Kunstfilm (1909) after Osten had been making shorts for Pathé, Gaumont and Eclair. Their first feature: Die Wahrheit (1910). Osten’s début as director: Erna Valeska (1911). War correspondent in 1915. Joined Peter’s company Emelka (later Bavaria Film) in 1918. Made Der Ochsenkrieg (1920) with young cameraman Frank Planer of later Hollywood fame, one of Osten’s several contributions to a budding genre that after WW2 became known as the Heimatfilm. In fact, the Ostermayr/Osten brothers claimed to be the originators of the genre.

When Himanshu Rai and Emelka made a deal to produce Prem Sanyas aka Light of Asia, Osten was assigned to direct. Continued directing Rai’s productions, often shooting in India as well as in Europe, in addition to directing for numerous companies in Berlin. Moved with cameraman Josef Wirsching and set designer Karl von Spreti to India to work at Himansu Rai’s Bombay Talkies (1934).

While in Bombay, became a member of the Nazi Party (1936). He was interned by the British at the outbreak of WW2 while shooting his last film there, Kangan. Released and allowed to return to Germany (1940). Employed by Bavaria Film until 1945, for casting and setting up its film archive. In addition to Indian films, directed 33 silent features and 10 sound films.

After WW2 became manager of a Bavarian spa. His Indian films, following UFA tradition, were huge Orientalist spectacles with elephants, camels and expansive vistas often shot in deep focus. Effective authorship shared by producer Rai and scenarist Niranjan Pal. Adopted European conventions to introduce main actors, e.g. backlit mid-shots in soft focus gradually becoming more contrasted; also used mobile outdoor shots as in the railway-crossing sequence of Achhut Kanya. Strongly influenced younger Bombay Talkies film-makers Amiya Chakrabarty and Gyan Mukherjee, though they used his techniques for very different purposes.

Filmography-1925: Prem Sanyas, 1928: Shiraz, 1929: Prapancha Pash, 1935: Jawani Ki Hawa, 1936: Achhut Kanya, Janmabhoomi, Jeevan Naiya, Mamata, Miya Bibi, 1937: Izzat, Jeevan Prabhat, Prem Kahani, Savitri, 1938: Bhabhi, Nirmala, Vachan, 1939: Durga, Kangan, Navjeevan

In addition to the German team in Bombay Talkies, there were three more Germans who also came to India and worked in Hindi films. One was Walter Kauffman (1-4-1907 to 9-9-1984). The other was Wilhelm Haas (18-6-1915 to 30-3-1979), who was a writer. Both were Jews and friends. Kauffman, Haas and Bhavnani worked together in Premnagar (1940), Naushad’s first film as music director. Kauffman composed the background score; Haas wrote the screenplay.

“It is debatable, but Kauffman is probably also the person behind the All India Radio signature tune. Haas was a member of the Indian chapter of PEN,” Gangar said. Haas also wrote the script for Bhavnani’s Jhooti Sharam (1939).

The third German was Paul Zils ( 1-6-1915 to 30-3-1979 ). Zils, believed to be a Nazi sympathizer, turned up in India under strange circumstances: he was bound for Indonesia in a steamer that got torpedoed by an Indian naval ship during World War II and he was taken prisoner.

After his release, because of his film experiences, the leadership of the sales department in Ezra Mir led government documentary production company called him to join Information films of India. End of October 1945, he came to Bombay and started his work. Following the closure of the Information Films of India, Zils was freelancing and in 1948 founded his own company Documentary Films of India; in 1949 India created new state production company Films Division. To popularize the documentary he was supported in 1949 among others by Mulk Raj Anand , B.K.Karanjia , Vikram Sarabhai , Frene Talyarkhan and Jagmohan.

1950-1952 is Zils tried as a feature film director, turning three films with Dev Anand. Paul Zils directed 3 Dev Anand films, according to the documents. Hindustan Hamara-50 and Zalzala-52 are found in HFGK, but the third film called ‘ Shabash”, though listed in 1949, gives no details, except the film name.

Paul Zils was also active in organizations of filmmakers. From 1957 to 1959 he was president of the Indian Documentary Producers Association (IDPA). In March 1959 he returned to Germany.

As the studio system came to an end and individual producers took over, the days of the Germans in Indian cinema were over. Many, including Osten, went back to Germany. Set designer Spreti was appointed German ambassador to Guatemala and was later shot dead by terrorists.

Most of the others remained associated with the film world abroad.

Film Nav Jeevan-39 had music by Saraswati Devi (a Parsee). Amongst the first 3 women Music Directors of India – the first being Ishrat Sultana aka Bibbo, the second was Jaddanbai and then came Saraswati Devi (1912-10.8.1980) – she was the most consistent and prolific composer. She gave music to 31 films, composing 262 songs. She also sang 10 songs in 6 films.

The cast of the film was Hansa Wadkar, Rama Shukul, V H Desai, Mumtaz Ali, P F Peethawala, Lalita Deulkar and many others. Today’s song is written by J.S. Kashyap and this duet is sung by Lalita Deulkar and Balwant Singh.

LALITA was born in Bombay in 1924.She was not interested in acting or singing, but poor family conditions and father’s T.B. forced her to earn a living by singing and acting. During 1940-45, she recorded many songs. One Mr. Dulerai Pandya, a Gujarati, owned “The National Recording Co.Ltd.” in Bombay’s fort area. There was a Tricolour shown on the labels of the records,hence this company was known as Jhandewali record co.. V.Shantaram was also on its Board of Directors. Initially Prabhat and later Rajkamal film songs were issued on this Jhanda Chhap records only. The company had hired Datta Davjekar for Marathi and Avinash vyas and Lallubhai Bhojak for Hindi and Gujarati songs. She recorded many Darya songs and Bhavgeets in this company.Along with her, Gajanan Watwe, Jyotsna Bhole also recorded songs here. Some records named her as Lalita Devi. Once Saraswati Devi heard her and gave her chance to do small roles and sing in chorus of songs of Bombay Talkies films. Her Debut was made with the song ” Raja hamen na niharo”. It was a duet with Balwant Singh, in film Navjeevan-39.

After singing songs in films like Parbat pe apna dera-44,Valmiki-46 and Eight Days-46,she got a good break in film Saajan-1947. Her duet with Rafi, ” Humko tumhara hi aasra” is remembered even today. Film Nadiya ke paar-48 also had a duet with Rafi,”More raja ho,le chal nadiya ke paar” which was very popular. C.Ramchandra was MD for both these films. She sang in several other films like Bhakta Dhruv,Khidki,Jalan,Shaheed,Shakti,Vidya,Bedard,Daulat,Girls school,Jai Bheem,Roshni,Sanwariya,Shabnam,Apni Chhaya,Malti Madhav,Pahli Tarikh,Sajni etc.

In all she acted in 5 films and sang 79 songs in 36 films.

She got married to Composer Sudhir Phadke (25-7-1919 to 29-7-2002),on 29-5-1949 at Poona. Their common friend Mohd. Rafi sang a specially prepared and meticulously rehearsed ” Mangalashtak ” ( an eight stanza marriage song in Marathi), in their marriage. After marriage she sang only in films of Sudhir Phadke. After Sajni-56, she stopped singing completely and became a devoted housewife. She died on 25-5-2010. Their son Shridhar Phadke is a well known Marathi singer and composer.

The male voice in this duet belongs to Balwant Singh. BALWANT SINGH was born in Pandoga village of Hoshiyarpur on 9-12-1918 in a Jahagirdar’s family. He was quite rich.

After a training from Pt.Bhishmadev in classical music, he came to Bombay and joined Bombay Talkies at the age of 18 years. He first gave Playback in Jeevan Prabhat-37. In Nirmala-38 he acted and also sang a song. Then came Durga-39 where also he acted and sang.

V.Shantaram cast him in Padosi-41 and his songs in this film were hits.

He was Hero in Darpan, Swapna, Malan, Naukar, Paraya Dhan, Ashirwaad, Collegian, Dr.Kumar, Bhanwar, Hip hip hurray and Apni chhaya-50 etc. As a hero he sang less songs. His songs with Shanta Hublikar(Malan) and Parul Ghosh and Khan Mastana(Bhanwar) were very popular. He also acted in Nirmala,Vachan and Kangan.

In all, he acted in 18 films, sang 20 songs in 10 films and also wrote 6 songs in film Sumitra-1949.

He married a girl from the royal family of Palanpur, Gujarat. After leaving films, he worked in All India Radio for 4 years. The signature tune played just before the morning broadcast was composed by Balwant Singh, for A.I.R.

Then he settled in Ahmadabad, directing Dramas and Teaching music. Finally, he shifted to Ludhiana where, after a long illness, he died on 4-12-1985.

With today’s song, film Nav Jeevan-1939, makes its Debut here.

( Some information used herein is from the book ” The music that rings every dawn ” by Historian Amrit Gangar ji, The Record news Bulletins of S.I.R.C , Prof. Yogesh yadav ji’s book ” Hindi film singers ” and Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. My thanks to these sources.)

Audio

Video

Song-Raja hamen na nihaaro (Navjeevan)(1939) Singers-Lalita Deulkar, Balwant Singh, Lyricist- Jamuna Swarup Kashyap ‘Natwan’, MD-Saraswati Devi
Both

Lyrics

Raja hamen na nihaaro
o raja hamen na nihaaro
hamen to lag jaayegi najariya
ho raam
hamen to lag jaayegi najariya re

tirchhi najariya patri kamariya
tirchhi najariya patri kamariya

chhedo hamen na sanwariya
haan haan
chhedo hamen na sanwariya
haan haan
chhedo hamen na sanwariya
hamaari baali umariya
ho raam
hamen to lag jaayegi najariya
ho raam
hamen to lag jaayegi najariya re

kaun des se aayi gujariya
kaun des se aayi gujariya
ka matki bhar laayi gujariya
ka matki bhar laayi gujariya

brindawan ?? aayi gujariya
prem preet ras aagi gujariya
brindawan ?? aayi gujariya
prem preet ras aagi gujariya
daasi tihaari rasiyaa
haan haan
daasi tihaari rasiyaa
haan
daasi tihaari rasiyaa
sang sang beete umariya
ho raam
hamaari beete umariya
ho raam
hamaari beete umariya re


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4210 Post No. : 15406

Today’s song is from film Indrasabha-56.

From the title of the film, one can conclude easily that this was based on a Mythological story. However, it was not so. It was a remake of the film Indrasabha-1932, made by Madan Theatres, Calcutta. That film had Master Nissar and Jahanara Kajjan in the lead. That film had a world record of having the maximum songs-69 songs- details of which are given in the HFGK Volume-I. (It was suggested in the HFGK that there were 2 more songs also in the film, thus making a total of 71 songs).

The film was based on an Urdu play “Inder sabha, written by Syed Agfha Hasan “Amanat Lakhnavi” ( 1815-1859). This was probably the second play on imaginary story involving Mythological characters. The first one was Vishakha Datt’s play ” Mudra Rakshas “, written somewhere in the 9th century. Amanat’s play was written in 1853 and was first performed on stage in Lucknow in 1854. The original play had 46 songs, consisting of 8 geets of folk genres, 8 thumaries and 30 Gazals. When I was searching for information on the story or review of this film. I came across an article in http://www.bihartimes.com, from which I quote the relevant portion…

” “Indar Sabha” draws from both the rich tapestry of Persian dastans/masnavis and folklore as well as Hindu mythology. But it goes much further – amalgamating the strands of Urdu literary tradition, North Indian nautanki (folk theatre), Hindu devotional theatre/dance (Ram Lila, Ras Lila), classical Sanskrit drama and Wajid Ali Shah’s court pageants, contends Afroz Taj, professor of South Asian Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

In fact, Prof Taj has translated and extensively analysed the work in “The Court of Indar and the Rebirth of North Indian Drama” (Anjuman Taraqqi Urdu (Hind), 2007).

The story is that Indar (Hindu celestial king Indra) organises a concert for his court. His court dancers, the Pukhraj (Yellow/Topaz), Nilam (Blue/Sapphire), and Lal (Red/Ruby) Paris (fairies) dance and sing for him in a variety of styles. Amanat showcases his craft here with their songs corresponding to their colour motif – the Pukhraj Pari presents basant songs, Nilam mentions blue flowers and jewels, and Lal Pari incorporates the red of the twilight, gems and blood in her lyrics.

When it is the Sabz (Green) Pari’s turn, Indar falls asleep. She storms out and meets an old friend, the Kala Dev (dev here not the gods of the Indian mythology, but demons of Persian folklore) and confides she saw a sleeping human prince on her way and fell in love with him. She orders him to bring him before her and he complies.

Awoken to see a beautiful woman confessing she is in love with him, Prince Gulfam of Akhtarnagar (an obvious reference to Lucknow of Wajid Ali Shah “Akhtar”) is confused and then angry at being abducted. Learning he is at Indar’s fabled court, he is now most keen to see its legendary dancers. The Sabz Pari warns him of the peril but he is adamant and threatens to commit suicide. She gives in and smuggles him in before resuming her performance. Unfortunately, Gulfam is discovered and a furious Indar orders he be imprisoned in a deep well in the Koh-i-Kaf (Caucasus).

The Sabz Pari, herself humiliated and cast out of the court, wanders through fairyland in the guise of a “jogan (female hermit)” in search of the prince. Reports of a new singing talent reaches Indar, who summons her for a performance. He is moved so much that he offers to give her her heart’s desire – and it is hard not to guess what she wants – and gets.

Encapsulating the refined aestheticism of Wajid Ali Shah’s reign, the play, surviving British annexation of Nawabi Awadh and the horrors of 1857-59, got a new lease of life as it was taken up and performed by theatre companies, mostly Parsi troupes, all over British India. It was first performed in Bombay in 1864, hit Lahore and Calcutta in 1875, and overseas – Singapore (1913) and Rangoon (1927). And it was these Parsi troupes that eventually formed the nucleus of the Hindustani film industry.

Amanat’s play is significant in other respects too. Not only is it a linguistic kaleidoscope with ghazals in polished Urdu and folk songs in Awadhi/Braj, but it also reflects the composite multicultural ethos – by conscious mixing of Hindu and Muslim cultural traditions or featuring Persian/Urdu words in a Braj lyric and vice versa.”

Film ‘Indrasabha’-56 was directed by a veteran of such films – Nanubhai Vakil. He was one of the highly educated persons of those times (B.A.LL.B), who joined films in the silent era and successfully continued into the Talkie era till the 70’s decade. The film was made under the banner of Shah Pictures, and the producer was its owner Ramniklal Shah (husband of actress Indurani- a heroine in the 30’s decade) The MD was A R Qureshi aka Tabla Maestro Alla Rakha. His assistant for this film was Damodar Sharma – himself a Music Director of the early Talkie films. The cast of the film was, Chitra, Daljit, Heeralal, Ameeta, W M Khan, Al Nasir (husband of actress Veena), Sadiq, Rajan Haksar, Ranjana Shukla and many others.

How many names a person can have ? 2 – 3 – 4 ? Film actress Ameeta had 5 names. She was born Qamar Sultana. Her mother called her Indira, friends called her Indu, In film Thokar-53, she appeared as Jai jaiwanti and finally she was named Ameeta by Vijay Bhatt. Total 5 names. Ameeta was born on 11-4-1940 to Riaz Ahmed and Shakuntala Devi , in Calcutta. After her father’s death, they shifted to Bombay.

She started acting in Kaafila-52, Anmol Sahara-52 and Thokar-53. In 1953, she became Heroine of film ” Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu”, for which she got the name Ameeta. The film was a flop. After roles in popular films like Munimji-55 and Hum sab chor hain-56 she was selected as a lead actress, opposite Shammi Kapoor in film “Tumsa nahin dekha”-57. The film was a great Hit and she became a Star !

Though she acted in some good films like Dekh kabeera Roya-57 and Goonj uthi Shehnai-59 etc, she remained all the time a B grade Heroine. Till her last film Kisan aur Bhagwan-74, she acted in 47 films and then she left films. Her mother died soon after. Her daughter Sabeeha acted in few films, but shifted to a more successful business of Jewellery designing. (adapted,with thanks, from the book ” Beete hue din” by Shishir Krishna Sharma ji).

One more interesting name in the cast is Ranjana Shukla. Once upon a time, she was the Heroine of Dilip Kumar in film ” Milan”-46, made by Bombay Talkies, now relegated to ordinary roles in films.

Ranjana’s real name was Ratan Shantaram Deshpande. She was born in Nagpur on 20-10-1927. While studying in St. Ursula High School, she learnt dancing and music from well known ustads. After passing her 6th standard examination, she came to Bombay to her elder sister, Kusum Deshpande, who was already working as actress with Minerva Movietone films. Kusum married Vasant Thengadi, a handsome actor in Hindi films of those times.

Kusum arranged for specialised dancing for Ratan in the holidays. Later Ratan was taken to Vijay Bhatt of Prakash pictures for an interview. She was immediately selected and got a role in the famous film Ramrajya-1943. In this film she was Chitralekha, Sita’s sakhi. Vijay Bhatt also changed her name to Ranjana. She was on pay roles of Prakash for Rs. 2000 pm. She acted in films like police-44, Vikramaditya-45 and Hamara Sansar-45. Next films were Nai Maa-46 and Zamin Asman-46.

Ranjana was called by Bombay Talkies to do Heroine’s role opposite Dilip kumar in film Milan-46. This film was based on Bangla film Nauka Doobi written by Tagore. She did the role of Hem Nalini in this film’s Hindi version. The same role was done by Meera Sircar in the Bangla film Nauka Doobi.

After this film, Ranjana was in great demand, but she wanted to quit films and get married to live a simple life. She married a young and handsome writer Arvind Shukla. But after few months he fell sick and there was no income. So, she had to continue working in films till 1975. She also worked in many Marathi films. In all, she worked in about 35 films or so. Ranjana worked with many big stars of her times like, Prem Adeeb, Prithviraj Kapoor, Jairaj, Dilip Kumar, Jeevan, Umakant etc etc

It is interesting to note that her sister and her brother in law acted with her in few films. Some such films were Zamin Asman-46 and Shadi se pehle-47. In film Saajan ka Ghar-48 all three had worked together. We have many families like this in Hindi films. I remember Zubeida and her mother and sisters, Sitara Devi and her 2 sisters, Nargis,her mother and brothers, Kapoor family, Dilip kumar, his brother and sister in law, many film couples and families of several film people are examples. Ranjana was perhaps one early example. Thank God, this Ranjana was not around when yet another Ranjana came to Hindi films. She was Ranjana Deshmukh, niece of actress Sandhya(nee Vijaya Deshmukh). This Ranjana, however , worked mainly in Marathi films and did only 4 Hindi films starting with the famous film Chaani-77. Unfortunately, she first met with an accident and then died of Heart attack at the age of just 40 years or so.

Today’s song is sung by Asha, Geeta and chorus. The lyrics are by Shevan Rizvi. This is the 3rd song from this film to appear here.


Song-Laala laala Gulle laala pyaar kare hai kismetwaala (Indrasabha)(1956) Singers- Asha Bhonsle, Geeta Dutt, Lyricist- Shevan Rizvi, MD- A R Qureshi
Asha Bhonsle + Geeta Dutt + Chorus

Lyrics

Laala Laala Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
jisne kiya na pyaar
ho jisne kiya na pyaar
uska jeena hai bekaar
uska jeena hai bekaar
Laala Laala Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
Laala Laala Gulle laala

agar koi haseen qaatil
jo kabhi maange tumse dil
ajab se kehna lotar(?) ka
ajab se kehna lotar (?) ka
shaida tum par har dil waala
lalar lala lallar lalla
Laala Laala Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
Laala Laala Gulle laala

ke jab tak ?? na karna
ham kahaan phir tum kahaan phir hum
ke jab tak ?? na karna
ham kahaan phir tum kahaan phir hum
ye mausam aaye na har baar
ye mausam aaye na har baar
rang hai sab ka udne waala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
Laala Laala Gulle laala

haseenon ke ishaaron par
lutaa do din jhukaa do sar
haseenon ke ishaaron par
lutaa do din jhukaa do sar
warna jeena hi bekaar
warna jeena hi bekaar
pyaar ki duniya Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
Laala Laala Gulle laala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
pyaar kare hai kismat waala
Laaala Laaala


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4207 Post No. : 15401

Today’s song is from a ‘C’ grade stunt film – ‘Return of Mr. Superman’ aka ‘Superman Ki Wapsi’ (1960).

Hindi film industry is full of third grade, mindless and cheap copies of successful foreign films and stories. Indian films can not copy the costly scenes, sets and A grade actors for C grade films, so they make do with childish cheap sets, unknown producers or directors, actors who are at the fag end of their careers and overall an easy treatment to films. It is painful to see such films.

There was an era, when even action/stunt films carried some prestige. They were made by reputed or specialist film makers like, Wadias, Mohan Pictures, Imperial, Ranjit or even Master Bhagwan. They used to spend a fair amount on erecting sets or on outdoor shootings. Above all, their stunts used to be real and actually breath taking. Famous stunt actors like Azad, Prakash, John Cavas, Fearless Nadia, Vasantrao and Baburao Pehelwan etc. used to undertake thrilling stunts using trained animals like tigers, lions, horses, monkeys, dogs and even jalopy cars and motor cycles. The audience went to watch the stunts. Story, histrionics or music/songs were secondary.

Superman is a comics character popularised first in USA. The first cinema on Superman came in 1948 with actor Kirk Alyn as the hero. This was like a film serial. The feature film came in 1951 with George Reeves first and then the most popular Christopher Reeves. Many actors have done this role till now. A Superman with extraordinary powers has been a dream for mankind since a long long time. May be, perhaps, the Gods in almost every religion were endowed with such powers in fiction and the mythology.

Indian film makers were hardly to miss such stories. But I find that more than flying in the air or jumping from building to building, like Batman or Spiderman, Indian audiences lapped up the ‘Invisible Man’ theme more. The first such film was made by Prakash Pictures, ‘Khwaab Ki Duniya’ in 1938. Then came the successful 1957 film ‘Mr. X’ and lastly the most popular film came on this theme in 1987 as ‘Mr. India’.

On this background, no wonder, Superman, Batman or Spiderman never captured the imagination or fascination of Indian film audience. 1960 saw 2 films on Superman and one was in 1987. Comparatively, Tarzan films became more popular here. Creative producers combined Tarzan with any and every character of Arabian nights, gave him son, daughter and brought him to city or even Circus. Indian avatars of Tarzan like, Zambo and Zimbo were also popular. these films helped Dara Singh to establish himself in Hindi films. Anyway, gone are the days when action or stunt films had special audience. Neither that audience nor those films have any presence now.

Since the day SFX (special effects – an improved version of old trick scenes) became popular in India, every hero has become a stuntman himself. Except probably Ajay Devgan and Akshay Kumar, most other actors are stuntmen by SFX only.

Coming to today’s film ‘Return of Mr. Superman’, the film was made by Manmohan Films – owned by the producer, director and lyricist Manmohan Sabir. From 1952 to 1986, he had directed 10 films. Today’s film was his 6th film as a director. Some songs of the film were also written by PL Santoshi, Kaif Irfani and Anand Bakshi. The cast of the film was Jairaj, Sheila Ramani, Majnu, Naazi, David, Ram Mohan, Rajan Haksar, Master Navin and many others.

Music Director of this C grade stunt film was Anil Biswas, who was once upon a time an A grade composer and many other composers followed him as their ‘Guru’. Anil Biswas (7-7-1914 to 31-5-2003) started his career in music in the early 1930’s. Usually, one generation is considered as 25 to 30 years, but in film music the generation period is 12 to 15 years. So, in his career from early 30s to late 60s, Anil Biswas saw two generations of music lovers. It was easier for him to adapt to changing tastes of music from 30s to late 40s. However, to adapt to changed tastes from 50s to 60s, it became difficult for him. The audience tastes changed drastically from 1930s to 60’s music. In the 30s and the 40s , the music was closer to traditional Indian music, but in the 60s, the film music followed the world music trends like Rock N Roll, Twist and other types.

In this stage of his career, Anil Biswas was in two minds – whether to continue what he knew best or to change over to new way of film music demands. He chose to mix the two, but this took him nowhere. This film music was a compromise on his abilities. After this film, he did two more non descript movies – ‘Lucky Number’ (1961) and ‘Hamen Khelne Do’ (1962). At last he retired after completing his last film ‘Chhoti Chhoti Baaten’ (1965) and left for Delhi to serve at AIR (All India Radio), Delhi. He gave music to 90 films composing 767 songs. He also sang 59 songs in 31 films.

The heroine of this film Sheila Ramani was one of my early favourites, from the time I saw her with Dev Anand in film ‘Funtoosh’ (1956). Earlier too I had seen her in few films, but she looked quite attractive and glamorous in ‘Funtoosh’.

Sheila Ramani, a forgotten name today, but most of us still remember her in Navketan’s ‘Taxi Driver’ (1954) where she was cast as Anglo-Indian club Dancer – Sylvie. Sheila was born on 2-3-1932, in Sindh province. She was selected as ‘Miss Mussoorie 1948’ and adjudged ‘Miss Simla 1950’. Made her debut as Champa, the femme fatale of ‘Badnaam’ (1952), and revealed herself as a danseuse of charm in ‘Anand Math’ (1952). She was one of the few Sindhi actresses besides Sadhana, who made it big in Bollywood. She was mostly seen as upper class mod girl in the 50s, a role she enacted to perfection all through that swinging era in films like V Shantaram’s ‘Teen Batti Chaar Raasta’ (1953), Sheikh Mukhtar’s ‘Mangu’ (1954), ‘Meenar’ (1954), ‘Railway Platform’ (1955), and ‘Funtoosh’ (1956).

Her Uncle Sheikh Latif alias Lachchu was a famous Pakistani producer who produced films like ‘Pattan’ (1955), ‘Khizan Kai Baad’ (1955), ‘Darbar-e-Habib’ (1956) etc. Sheila visited Karachi – Pakistan on the request of her uncle, to play the lead in Pakistani film ‘Anokhi’ (1956). The film was based on Hollywood’s ‘Fabulous Senorita’. “Gaadi Ko Chalana Babu, Zara Halkey Halkey Halkey, Zara Dil Ka Jaam Na Chalkey” sung by Zubaida Khanum was the popular song from the film which did modest to good business in Pakistan. The movie’s great music was composed jointly by Timir Baran (a Bengali who came from India for this purpose) and Hassan Latif. Sheila went back to India and remained as a middle-of-the-range performer in Bombay films. In the later part of her career, she was reduced to obscure films with titles that sounded like ‘Jungle King’ (1959), and ‘The Return of Superman’ (1960). In all, she acted in 24 films. Her last film was ‘Awaara Ladki’ (1967).

Sheila was very fond of sports especially football and swimming. Ballroom dancing was a virtual addiction for her and she used to go out for dancing as often as she could. Sheila was 5 feet four inches tall, and was so fastidious that any dress she would wear won’t be repeated for six months to come at least.

According to her son Rahul Cowasji, she married late Jall Edi Cowasji (President of Bombay Dyeing) on 31st March 1963 and retired from acting in 1962. Part of her family that remained in Pakistan converted to Islam. She was a Hindu. She used to live in Bombay with her husband Jall Cowasji till 1981. They moved to Khartoum (in Sudan, Africa) for 3 years and then to Sri Lanka for 3 years. After her husband’s death in 1984 she migrated to Australia on her own in the late 1980’s and lived in Sydney and Surfer’s Paradise until health problems required her to return to India in the new millennium. She used to live in her husband’s ancestral home in Mhow, near Indore (Madhya Pradesh). She was frail and bed ridden for few years before her death on 15-7-2015.

Her favorite Hindi film of her career was ‘Taxi Driver’ (1954). Sheila was also the leading lady of India’s first Sindhi film after partition – ‘Abana’ (1958), in which, young Baby Sadhana played her younger sister’s role. (Thanks to Cineplot and Sheila’s son Rahul, for some of the information in this Bio).

One more person from the cast of the film – Ram Mohan – needs introduction to our readers with his short Bio. Ram Mohan Sharma, a young, handsome lad from Ambala, was born on 2-11-1929. He was a graduate (BA) and had come to Bombay in 1945 in search of a career in cinema.

The youngster, who was in his early twenties, with fair colour, curly hairs & sharp features, approached Jagdish Sethi to get work in movies as an actor.  Jagdish Sethi found him sincere and gave him a supporting role in ‘Jaggu’ (52), which he was to make. The movie had very good music, scored by Hansraj Behl & it had moderate success, when released. Later, Ram Mohan got small roles in few movies & in 1954, Sethi Sahab took him in the romantic role opposite Shyama in ‘Pensioner’. The movie did not do well & it was the end of Ram Mohan’s career as hero.

Life goes on and he decided to accept any role offered to him. Soon he was a known name in the film circles. In ‘Do Behnen’ (1959), which had Shyama in double role, Ram Mohan enacted the role of villain, which gave his career a big boost as bad man. Later he came in contact with Sunil Dutt & Nargis and forged a permanent friendship with them. Although Ram Mohan mostly got roles of tough characters, but inside he was soft hearted. He was a member of film artists association. He requested Sunil Dutt Ji who was feeling depressed after Nargis Ji passed away, to help the ‘Have Nots’ of film industry. Virtually an encyclopedia of film industry, Ram Mohan knew every technician, junior artists as well as old & forgotten artists, who needed help. Whenever they both were free, they used to visit the ailing artists in hospital or their residences, to give them moral and financial support. Charatcter actor Rajan Haksar was in a charity hospital, after failure of his kidneys. Both benevolent persons visited the hapless artist to boost his spirit. Ram Mohan was a confidant of Asha Parekh, the kind hearted lady who was president of the Artists Association & they together helped many artists, who were in dire need of assistance.

Ram Mohan was also the vice president of CINTAA (Cine and TV Artists Association) for 4 years and secretary for 6 years. Ram Mohan Ji had high reputation every where and when he came to know about the miserable condition of AK Hangal, he met a political leader and arranged the financial help through Maharashtra Govt, on a regular basis. At the time of bereavement, he made it a point to help the family till all religious formalities were over. Every one in the film industry used to address him as Ram Mohan Ji ,to show their genuine respect to him.

In his career of more than five decades, Ram Mohan appeared in more than 250 movies (the number varies from 240 to 277), mostly in negative roles. He did not believe in self publicity and did his philanthropic work quietly. Ram Mohan was keeping indifferent health for six months, when his pillar of strength, his life partner passed away. Ram Mohan Ji also followed suit and breathed his last on 06th December 2015 .

Ram Mohan had 3 sons and 1 daughter, all very well settled in life. He will always be gratefully remembered by thousands of anonymous film artists who were helped by him. His memories will be cherished by his admirers, who loved his work on and off the screen. Truly, to find people like him, in this era is rarity. Let us hope his selfless work will inspire other persons connected with the film industry to help their less fortunate colleagues and the tradition of Vasudhaiva Kutumbkam set by him will continue. He found an admirer in Gulzar Sahab ,who always referred him as Ram Mohan Ji. Please see the credit titles of Izaazat, where his name is mentioned as Ram Mohan ji. (Thanks to Blog – ‘Beete Hue Din’, and Shri MN Sardana ji, for some of this information).

Today’s song certainly reminds us the type of club music of the late 1950s and early 1960s. This, of course, is not a club song, but a love song between hero and heroine. The song does not have anything to suggest the famous Anil Biswas touch of yore. It is one of those routine songs of those times.


Song – Dekh o babu dekh (Return of Mr Superman) (1960) Singer – Meena Kapoor, Lyricist – PL Santoshi, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dil ki dukaan se main layi hoon ye cake
marzi ho to take baabu
marzi ho na take
o babu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh

bahut hai mehngi
bahut hai sasti
gaahak ki jaisi ho hasti
bahut hai mahangi
bahut hai sasti
gaahak ki jaisi ho hasti
le jaayega koi dilwaala kismat waala cake
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o ba abu dekh

dekh ke iski lazzat mister
ho jaayegi ulfat mister
dekh ke iski lazzat mister
ho jaayegi ulfat mister
lekin sun lo shart humari
doge na tum phenk
for godsake
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh

hum to tumse pyaar karega
pyar ka hi iqraar karega
hum to tumse pyaar karega
pyar ka hi iqraar karega
chaahe ho nadiya ka kinara
chaahe romantic lake
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh

dil se dil ka sauda kar lo
pyaar se apna pocket bhar lo
dil se dil ka sauda kar lo
pyaar se apna pocket bhar lo
beet gayi gar yoonhi jawaani
ho jaaoge late
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh
o baabu dekh
dekh o baabu dekh

———————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————–
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
दिल की दुकान से मैं लाई हूँ एक केक
मर्ज़ी हो तो टेक बाबू
मर्ज़ी हो ना टेक
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख

बहुत है महंगी
बहुत है सस्ती
गाहक की जैसी हो हस्ती
बहुत है महंगी
बहुत है सस्ती
गाहक की जैसी हो हस्ती
ले जाएगा कोई दिलवाला किस्मत वाला केक
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख

देख के इसकी लज़्ज़त मिस्टर
हो जाएगी उलफत मिस्टर
देख के इसकी लज़्ज़त मिस्टर
हो जाएगी उलफत मिस्टर॰॰र्र
लेकिन सुन लो शर्त हमारी
दोगे ना तुम फेंक
फॉर गॉड सेक
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख

हम तो तुमसे प्यार करेगा
प्यार का ही इक़रार करेगा
हम तो तुमसे प्यार करेगा
प्यार का ही इक़रार करेगा
चाहे हो नदिया का किनारा
चाहे रोमांटिक लेक
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख

दिल से दिल का सौदा कर लो
प्यार से अपना पाकिट भर लो
दिल से दिल का सौदा कर लो
प्यार से अपना पाकिट भर लो
बीत गई गर यूं ही जवानी
हो जाओगे लेट
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख
ओ बाबू देख
देख ओ बाबू देख


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4204 Post No. : 15393 Movie Count :

4243

Today’s song is from an obscure film ‘Angoori’ (1943).

The film was produced by The Indian Art Pictures, Bombay. This was a new company formed and this film was their first venture. They did not have their own studio, like many other producers. Due to the second world war, many new financiers turned to film making, using their black money earned during the rationing of many essential commodities. Even the raw film stock, used to make a movie, was controlled and naturally was available in black market freely at a premium price. Such producers got their films shot in some established studios by renting a shooting floor. The prolific film company, Ranjit, had reserved 2 floors out of their 8 shooting floors, only to be given on rent to such producers. Film ‘Angoori’ was shot in the studios of Circo Production company.

The film was based on a novel by writer LK Shukla. For the director, Mahesh Kaul, this was his debut film as a Director. So far he had been only a writer and a sundry actor in films.

Mahesh Kaul (10-4-1911 to 2-7-1972) was born in Lahore and educated in Moni College, Nagpur. After graduation, he worked as a journalist and a bank manager. He then entered films as a lyricist and dialogue writer. He debuted as an actor in KA Abbas scripted film ‘Naya Sansar’ (1941) and played Dronacharya’s role in film ‘Mahatma Vidur’ (1943). His other films as an actor were ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942), ‘Gopinath’ (1948), ‘Kaaghaz Ke Phool’ (1959) and ‘Tere Mere Sapne’ (1971). His first film as a director was ‘Angoori’, then came ‘Paristan’ in 1944. He produced and directed film ‘Gopinath’, with Raj Kapoor and IPTA actress Tripti Mitra. Some of his major films as a director are ‘Naujawaan’ (1951), ‘Aakhri Dao’ (1958), ‘Talaaq’ (1958), ‘Sautela Bhai’ (1962), ‘Palki’ (1967), ‘Sapnon Ka Saudagar’ (1968) etc. In all he directed 15 Hindi films. His last film ‘Agni Rekha’ came after his death, in 1973.

The music director for this film was GM Durrani and the lyricist was Rammurty Chaturvedi. Earlier, when the film was planned and an advertisement was published in ‘Film India’ magazine, the film had given the name of Pt. Indra as the lyricist, but later on probably he was replaced by Rammurty. The cast of the film was Ulhas, Kaushalya, Dar Kashmiri, Mukul, Chandrahas, Sunetra, PR Joshi, Angre, Ranjan, Peer Muhammad, Mukul etc. This was Durrani’s first film as an MD.

Ghulam Mustafa Durrani, often abbreviated as GM Durrani (1919 – 8 September 1988) was a popular and legendary Indian radio drama artist, playback singer, actor and music director. To his credit, he tried to make his own identity as a playback singer and not try to follow the KL Saigal type of singing. GM Durrani was notable for sad songs, romantic songs, patriotic songs, Quraan Khani, qawwalis, ghazals and bhajans. He was also one of the first Muslim singers to get to sing Hindu Devotionals. GM Durrani was also the most senior Punjabi singer-actor at that time. He was radio drama artist and full-time singer of Lahore, Delhi and Bombay stations of AIR (All India Radio, aka Akashvani (radio broadcaster)). His native language was Pashto but he had a strong command over Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi. He sang in many Indian languages including Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi and Pashto language in Indian movies in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. After the 50s Durrani sang very few songs. Durrani was the disciple of radio broadcaster Zulfiqar Ali Bukhari.

Ghulam Mustafa Durrani was born in Peshawar, British India in 1919. He was a Pathan (Pashtun) and belonged to the Mohammad Zai Durrani Kabila. He was from a conservative family where even tea was not taken. Milk and lassi were the drinks of choice. When he used to go to those shops and some songs used to be heard, he used to hum along with them. Everyone used to say this boy should go to Bombay, as his voice was very good. The thought of becoming an actor entered his mind as well. He soon ran out of money to make ends meet.

His mother had expired when he was very young. Father was educated and of artistic mind but very strict, and the only ally at the home was his loving grandmother. But she could also not protect him from his father’s anger.

The last job Durrani did in Peshawar was of at a painter’s shop where an artist always used to hum the tunes of the songs composed by highly respected composer and actor Rafiq Ghaznavi. He also started imitating those songs and got appreciation from the colleagues which inspired him. Durrani started practising Rafiq Ghaznavi’s songs and assumed him as his master. During this time, his father took him to another job at his uncle’s motor-part shop. But the artist within, didn’t stay long there and Durrani ran away from the home to Lahore with only 22 rupees in his pocket.

In Lahore, Durrani did odd jobs along with singing on radio. This brought him fame and passion for radio singing which took him to Delhi first, and then to Bombay. He came to Bombay on 14 April 1935. In Bombay, he got somehow a job at the Radio Station and from here he got recognition. Film wallahs started calling him to sing.

His singing career started from AIR. Durrani was discovered by film producer Sohrab Modi of Minerva Film Company (later known as Minerva Movietone). Modi gave him his first break around 1935-36 in the movie ‘Saed-e-Havas’ (1936), a historical under the music director, classical musician Bundu Khan popularly known as ‘Taan-Talwar‘ Bundu Khan.

When Durrani came to Bombay playback system was not there and one had to act on screen. He didn’t like running around trees and refused to work further. He faced a lot of difficulties and could not return as people would call him a ‘Kanjar‘. Minerva was reportedly to close down soon too. He soon joined the Delhi Radio Station of AIR (Akashvani). Durrani was working at the Delhi Radio Station where he got acquainted with poet Behzad Lakhnavi whose many ghazals had been sung by Mallika-e-Ghazal (Queen of Ghazals) Akhtari Bai Faizabadi, later to become famous as Begum Akhtar.

He later shifted to the Bombay Radio Station where he met a big personality at the time, whom he considered his ustad (master), Station Director of Bombay station of AIR (Akashvani), Baba-e-Nasharayat (Father of Broadcasting) Zulfiqar Ali Bukhari who helped the radio station come up a lot. Durrani always referred to Zulfiqar Ali Bukhari as ustad as a mark of honour. (ZA Bukhari, was the Station Director of Delhi station and then Bombay station of AIR (Akashvani). After the partition of India and creation of Pakistan, Bukhari migrated to Pakistan. He was made the first director-general of Radio Pakistan (Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation) and later, he served as general manager of PTV (Pakistan Television Corporation)).

Durrani’s salary was fixed at Rs 40 per month. Here he was working as a drama artist. He was soon counted as one of the best drama artist on the radio those days. Over a period of three years his salary had gone up to Rs 70 per month. But fate would soon call him back to films. In 1939-40, when the method of playback singing was already in use, he returned to films, to lend his voice for a film titled ‘Bahurani’ (1940) as his first playback singing assignment. The film was made by Sagar Movietone and its music director was Rafiq Ghaznavi. Durrani was then working as a full-time Singer in AIR (Akashvani). Those were British days and they were not allowed to do any private recordings. But Ghaznavi insisted. and Durrani laid down some conditions, like; the recording should be fixed on a Sunday night so that no outsiders would be allowed to enter the studio. Secondly, he said that his name shouldn’t appear in credit titles or on discs. The song was a duet with Miss Rose, an Anglo-Indian, who didn’t have much experience as a singer. He was paid Rs. 75 for the song as against his salary of Rs. 70 a month at AIR (Akashvani). He then left  his job at AIR on 31st December 1940 and decided to concentrate fully on his film career.

Thereafter he sang for, among others, noted music directors like Khawaja Khurshid Anwar, friend Naushad, Shankar Rao Vyas and AR Qureshi (also known as Alla Rakha, Pandit Ravi Shanker’s famous tabla accompanist) for films like ‘Namaste’ (1943), ‘Shama’ (1946), ‘Mirza Sahiban’ (1947), ‘Magroor’ (1950), ‘Sabak’ (1950), ‘Humlog’ (1951) and scores of others. He became very popular. Many singers started their careers with him and he inspired many others too.

He was the idol of Mohammed Rafi who imitated him in the initial days. Now what could be a better tribute to singer than that, that the symbol of divinity in the Indian Music Industry, Mohammad Rafi, followed him. In fact, in 1944 Rafi recorded what he considered his first Hindi language song for the film ‘Gaon ki Gori (1944) for Shyam Sunder, “Aji Dil Ho Kaaboo Mein To Dildaar Ki Aisi Taisi” with GM Durrani and chorus.

Geeta Dutt also started her career in her break through movie ‘Do Bhai’ (1947) with the song “Aaj Preet Ka Naata Toot Gaya“, a duet with GM Durrani for SD Burman.

Similarly, “Haaye Chhore Ki Jaat Badi Bewafa“, (in film ‘Chaandni Raat’, (1949), a duet with GM Durrani, was Lata’s first song for composer, Naushad.

Durrani has sung many songs during his career. His output later reduced. According to a story he was influenced not to sing for some time after his Hajj visit and Rafi then helped him get back to singing but by then his career was over. Music composer Khawaja Khurshid Anwar in his first film ‘Kurmai’ (Punjabi-1941) took Durrani as his assistant and later gave him the film ‘Angoori’ (1943) as music director.

In the period of KL Saigal – Surinder, Khan Mastaana and GM Durrani were also famous. GM Durrani was one of the 40s legendary playback singers. Durrani tried to make his own identity as a playback singer and not try to follow the KL Saigal type of singing. His singing style was to inspire Rafi and others in the years to come. Later GM Durrani became a model to many playback singers who followed then. The soulful renditions of Durrani were to be reminded of by Talat’s singing as well.

Mohammed Rafi was influenced most notably, by GM Durrani on whose style he based his singing. He sang with his idol in some of the songs such as “Humko Hanste Dekh Zamana Jalta Hai” (Hum Sab Chor Hain, 1956) and “Khabar Kisi Ko Nahin Wo Kidhar Ko Dekhte Hain” (Beqasoor, 1950).

Durrani considered his first famous song was “Duniya Mein Sab Jode Jode” of the film ‘Sharda’ (1942) composed by Naushad.

The song “Neend Hamaari Khwaab Tumhaare Kitne Meethe Kitne Pyaare“, that made him a real rage was however composed by Shyam Sundar for the movie ‘Nai Kahaani’ (1943). This song, sung most part by GM Durrani with some support by child-star Balakram, was playing everywhere. When he sang, this song, the listeners went crazy. This timeless melody can never be forgotten by fans of Indian Cinema. Nearly 40 years later, when Tata Oil Mills did a program Mortal Men Immortal Melodies to celebrate fifty years of talkies in India, they invited him to re-render the song. Although many had forgotten him, his voice was still great and he got a standing applause for it.

There was a time when GM Durani was the favourite and most preferred singer for most composers in the industry. From 1941 to 1951, he sang over 300 songs. He is a case of “Riches to Rags”. Once a rich and famous singer,he spent his last few years fighting with throat cancer, poverty and loneliness. His end was quite pathetic.

GM Durani was a leading singer, like Surendra. The difference was Surendra sang only in his own films and thus had limitations,but Durrani was a playback singer, without much competition. In the 40s, there were hardly any male Playback singers,because most singers were actors themselves and sang their own songs, like Asit Baran. Karan Dewan, Ashok Kumar, Prem Adeeb, Arun Ahuja, Balwant singh, CH Atma, Ishwarlal, kantilal, KL Saigal, Pahadi Sanyal etc. There were of course few playback singers like Khan Mastaana, SD Batish, AR Oza, Balbir etc., but they were no competition to Durrani at all.

Because of this ,some singers were jealous of him and there was an attempt to poison him with Mercury Chloride (sindoor) given in a paan  by another well known singer. All relevant stories point out fingers to Hafeez Khan Mastaana in this incident as the culprit. Before he could confess, which he wanted to it seems, Mastaana died in absolute poverty and in total neglect near Mahim Dargah.  Later on his only son used to be seen begging there for quite some time. One of the RMIM members had met him there.

After singing assignments dried up, he opened a provision stores in Mahim, Bombay and ran it for 3 years. Finally, when the losses mounted, he sold off the business in loss.

In his last days, Durrani had throat cancer. He was looked after well by his sons and daughters. In his last days, he was interviewed by the famous writer Shri Rajnikumar Pandya ji. After I came to know Shri Pandya ji, he kindly gifted me a CD containing this last interview of Durrani. The interview was conducted just one day prior to his death . So I have not only Durrani’s real voice, but also a song he sang from his deathbed for this interview ! Thanks to Shri Pandya ji. GM Durrani, in that last interview claimed that he had helped both financially and professionally two rising singers – Mohd. Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar, in their initial struggling period. He describes his first meetings with them in the interview.

GM Durani sang many memorable songs like, “Haath Seene Pe Jo Rakh Do To Qaraar Aa Jaaye“, with Noorjehan in ‘Mirza Sahiban’ (1947), “Laara Lappa Laara Lappa Laai Rakhda” with Lata in ‘Ek thi Ladki’ (1949), “Nazar Phero Na Ham Se” with Shamshad Begum in ‘Deedar’ (1951), “Gaaye Chala Jaa“, with Lata in ‘Hum Log’ (1951), “Humko Hanste Dekh Zamana Jalta Hai” with Rafi in ‘Hum Sab Chor Hain’ (1956. Durrani sang about 300 songs. His last song came in ‘Lal Pathar’ (1971). Co-incidentally, in this last film, he also appeared on screen, lip syncing a song by Mohd Rafi – “Unke Khayaal Aaye To Aate Chale Gaye“.

GM Durrani acted in 16 films, from 1949 to 1978. He sang 305 songs in 168 films. He gave music as MD in 8 films and also wrote lyrics in film ‘Nazaare’ (1949).

An odd name in the cast of ‘Angoori’ is Dar Kashmiri. A little information about this name. He was the eldest brother of Omkar Nath Dar aka OK Dar  aka Jeevan.

Om Prakash Dar was born into a  large family. He had 23 siblings. His grandfather was the Governor of Gilgit in Gilgit-Baltistan. He lost his father when the youngest- Jeevan – was 3 years old and his mother died at childbirth. Being the eldest, he came to Bombay in search of jobs and entered films. Instead of his original long name, he was called Dar Kashmiri.

Actually, when Jeevan came to Bombay in search of film roles, Om Prakash Dar aka Dar kashmiri, his elder brother, was already working in films. Jeevan appeared first time in ‘Fashionable India’ (1935). Since his name was Onkar Nath, he was billed as OK Dar (and not Dar Kashmiri – please note).

His elder brother Dar Kashmiri worked in many films- some of them are – ‘Noor Mahal’ (1934), ‘Watan Parast’ (1934), ‘Yaad Rahe’ (1940), ‘Abla’ (1941), ‘Saugandh’ (1942), ‘Angoori’ (1943), ‘Naya Taraana’ (1943), ‘Room No. 9’ (1946), ‘Hua Savera’ (1948′, ‘Kundan’ (1955) and ‘Ayodhyapati’ (1956). and many other films. In every film, he was billed as Dar Kashmiri only.

Jeevan was billed as  OK Dar (Jeevan) from film ‘Romantic India’ (1936) onwards and then on as Jeevan only – except still a few films where he was billed as OK Dar (Jeevan). In film ‘Patit Paavan’ (1955), both brothers acted and they were individually billed as Jeewan and Dar Kashmiri. This settles their name issue completely.

Let us now listen to this duet. With this song, film ‘Angoori’ of 1943, makes its debut on the blog.

(Information about GM Durrani here, is based partly on an article in www.peoplepill.com and from Rajani Kumar Pandya ji’s book ‘Aap ki Parchhainyan’. I acknowledge and my thanks to both. Information on Dar Kashmiri is from Filmdom-46).


Song – Nainon Mein Naina Deenho Daal. . . O. . . Baanke Naina Waale (Angoori) (1943) Singer – Kaushalya, GM Durrani, Lyricist – Ram Murty Chatruvedi, MD – GM Durrani
Kaushalya + GM Durrani

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

nainon main naina deenho daal
nainon main naina deenho daa..aal
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waale
nainon main naina deenhi daal
nainon main naina deenhi daa..aal
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waali
nainon main naina deenho daal

jaat dagariya lad gaye sajni
jaat dagariya lad gaye sajni
chanchal nain hamaare
chanchal nain hamaare
chhail tere zulmi nainon se
chhail tere zulmi nainon se
nain hamaare haare
nain hamaare haare
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waale
nainon main naina deenhi daal
nainon main naina deenhi daa..aal
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waale
nainon main naina deenho daal

baney baawre pyaase naina
baney baawre pyaase naina
ab to naa tarsaao
ab to naa tarsaao
bas kar ke nainon mein pi
bas kar ke nainon mein pi
nainon ki pyaas bujhaao
nainon ki pyaas bujhaao
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waale
nainon main naina deenho daal
nainon main naina deenho daa..aal
oo oo ooooo
baanke naina waale

nainon main naina deenho daa..aal
nainon main naina deenho daa..aal

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डाल
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डा॰॰ल
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाले
नैनों में नैना दीन्हीं डाल
नैनों में नैना दीन्हीं डा॰॰ल
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाली
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डाल

जात डगरिया लड़ गए सजनी
जात डगरिया लड़ गए सजनी
चंचल नैना हमारे
चंचल नैना हमारे
छैल तेरे ज़ुल्मी ननों से
छैल तेरे ज़ुल्मी नैनों से
नैन हमारे हारे
नैन हमारे हारे
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाले
नैनों में नैना दीन्हीं डाल
नैनों में नैना दीन्हीं डा॰॰ल
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाली
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डाल

बने बावरे प्यासे नैना
बने बावरे प्यासे नैना
अब तो ना तरसाओ
अब तो ना तरसाओ
बस करके नैनों में पी
बस करके नैनों में पी
नैनों की प्यास बुझाओ
नैनों की प्यास बुझाओ
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाले
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डाल
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डा॰॰ल
ओ ओ ओss
बाँके नैना वाले

नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डाल
नैनों में नैना दीन्हों डा॰॰ल


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4200 Post No. : 15384

Today’s song is from the first decade of the talkie era and from one of the very popular Saigal films coming from New Theatres, Calcutta, ‘President’ (1937).

Ardeshir Irani of Imperial Film Co. won the race with Calcutta’s Madon Theatres and released the first talkie film of India – ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) and a revolution took place in the Indian Film Industry ! With just one shot, scores of Anglo-Indian actresses of the silent era became jobless, because they could not speak Hindi or sing a song. Smaller producers of silent films just shut their shops, because now, a single talkie film needed 4 times more investment compared to cheaper varieties of silent films produced earlier. The financial wizards understood the new opportunity of making money by investing in talkie film production. The number of staff of film companies increased and the big players with sound finances, became ready to grow bigger.

By 1934, the production of silent films ceased completely. Some of the noted film makers like V Shantaram, for example, who had shunned the talkie films initially as a temporary aberration, now took keen interest in making talkie films. They realised that talkie films could be an excellent vehicle for giving out social reform messages to the society. Initially, though the talkie films were made on folk tales, Parsi dramas and mythological stories, after 4-5 years the trend changed in its content and we can see a variety of genres in films then.

The playback was introduced in 1935 at Calcutta and in 1937 at Bombay – both by Bengali MDs. So, in 1937 films became mature. The other major highlights of 1937 were. . .
1.The first songless film – ‘Naujawan’ – was made by the Wadias
2. First English poem was used as a song in a Hindi film – which is available even today.
3. Younger MDs like Gobind Ram, Gyan Dutt, Ram Gopal Pande etc started their film careers.
4. Prabhat Films brought out their first film on social reforms – ‘Duniya Na Maane’. Same time New Theatres gave ‘Mukti’, ‘Ánath Ashram’ and ‘President’, on social issues.
5. First colour film – ‘Kisan Kanya’, indegenously shot and processed by Imperial, was released.

In 1937, a total of 176 films were made in India, out of which 102 were Hindi films. 14 films were made in Calcutta, 2 in Poona, 1 each in Kolhapur and Lahore and 83 films were made in Bombay alone, establishing itself as the undisputed Capital of Film Industry. In Bombay, the major players (film companies) made films in 1937 alone, thus – Prabhat-2, Ranjit-8, Sagar-6, Bombay Talkies-4, Minerva-2, Huns Pictures-3, Wadias-4, Prakash-3 and the maximum films were made by Imperial-9. The rest films were made by dozens of smaller production houses and individual producers under their banners. The major companies made 41 films, which was a major chunk of the 83 Bombay made films, in 1937.

Out of this, some notable films were – ‘Khwab Ki Duniya’ made by Prakash, was based on the famous novel and a subsequent Hollywood film ‘The Invisible Man’ (1933). The trick scenes were lapped up by the audiences. ‘Mahageet’ made by Sagar, heralded the playback singing in Bombay. ‘Savitri’ made by Bombay Talkies, was Ashok kumar’s first mythological film (he acted in another film ‘Úttara Abhimanyu’ (1946) later on). ‘Naujawan’ was Wadia’s first songless talkie film of India.

By 1937, the film music had also undergone total change. From stage drama style music, now MDs tried various other original melodies. Thus music became one of the major attractions of a film. Particularly some film songs are such that they occupy a special place in our heart. Many such songs of Hindi films are known to all of us and at some point of time we all had also got carried away with such songs. The other day, I was reading the book- “Golden period of film music 1931-1960” by film historian and writer Isak Mujawar ( चित्रपट संगीताचा सुवर्णकाळ १९३१-१९६०), in which he has related an anecdote…

When Producer Director Raj Khosla was a small boy, his father used to love Saigal songs. They had an ancient type of gramophone and his father would always play Saigal’s song “Ik Bungala Bane Nyaara” from film ‘President’-1937. It was his favourite song. Even Raj used to like this song. As he grew older he always used to remember his father and this song. In 1969, when he made film “Do Raaste”, he created a scene in it, in which Balraj Sahani – the eldest  of the three brothers in the film, always listens to this song on his gramophone. The same song is played in the film many times. In fact,the entire film story is built around that song.”
(free translation from Marathi).

When I read this, out of curiosity I opened my laptop and went to You Tube. I searched for the film ‘Do Raaste’ and watched it. Lo and behold ! The song indeed is played by Balraj Sahani and I too – along with Balraj Sahani – enjoyed the song again. Nowadays, we find in many films, old songs are played. Our own Sudhir ji is also running a series of such songs on this blog.

About a month back, I came across 2 song snippets, from film President-37, which I found were not covered in the Blog so far. The problem was, one song was of only 40 seconds and the other was of 50 seconds. Next day, I had urgent engagements till next 10 days, so I left the matter at that. However, when I became free, I sent those snippets to Atul ji and Sudhir ji. Sudhir ji informed me that the shorter song was opening part of the famous song “Ek Bangala Bane Nyaara” and was already covered in the blog. However the other 50 second snippet needed some work on it. Sudhir ji restored it by editing, cutting, joining and adding the missing song lines to it, etc. to make it a song of respectable duration of 2+ minutes. It included some dialogues also. He even uploaded it. I thank Sudhir ji for mending, amending and sending the song to me for presentation.

As per HFGK, there are 8 songs in film President. 6 songs are already discussed. In these posts, lot of information about the film and related matters has already been given , so there is nothing left to write about these matters. However, I have found that the synopsis of the film given by the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema takes a different angle of the story than what is already given in the blog. So I am reproducing it here to know what it means. . .

A famous Saigal musical narrating a strange love story set against 1930s industrialisation and worker-management relations. The 16-year-old Prabhavati (Chandrabati Devi/Kamlesh Kumari) inherits a mill and turns it into an extremely profitable enterprise.

Prakash (Saigal) is a worker who designs a more efficient machine for the factory for which he first gets sacked and then is re-employed. He falls in love with Prabhavati’s sister Sheila (Leela Desai), who later makes way for Prabhavati who is also in love with Prakash.

Her withdrawal distresses Prakash, causing him to bully the workers who then go on strike. Prabhavati realises the problem and presumably commits suicide (she disappears into an office and locks the door) for the good of her sister and of the business. The hint is about her death.

The unmistakable thrust of the story is that the ‘personal’ (i.e. relations with women) should not be allowed to interfere in male pursuits like business or management, equated with social good. The film has Saigal’s classic number Ek bangla bane nyara. The plot echoes the Guru Dutt script for the unfinished Baharain Phir Bhi Ayengi.

Let us now listen to this reborn 7th song. Some dialogues come free with the song…


Song – Door. . . Bahut Door (President) (1937) Singer – Bikram Nahar, Lyricist – [Unattributed], MD – Pankaj Mullick
Leela Desai
Jagdish Sethi

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

[jeejee
ae ree jeejee
toone jo kiya thheek kiya
tujhe ye sab kuchh chhod kar chala jaana hoga
door
bahut door
bahut door
]

door
bahut door
phir bhi tum itne nahin door
jitna aankhon se noor
phir bhi tum itne nahin door
jitna aankhon se noor

[damn it
daam aankhen
damn noor
]

ras bhari vaani se to
man ki kali
khil gayi
khil gayi
hic
theeeeeeee
kathor vachan
hic
sunte hi
murjhaayi
hic

[Vikram
ye bakwaas band karoge ya nahin]

[. . .]
[..clipped dialogues..]
[. . .]

[apne us rascal se keh dena ki
uski daal ab yahaan nahin galegi

Sheela darling us’se nafrat karti hai

Sheela dear. . .]

[tum isi laayak ho

raat khatm hone waali hai
jee bhar ke ro sako to ro lo
savere tak dil ki bhadaas nikal jaayegi
ghabraane ko koi baat nahin
]

mere nainan ke tat pe shnaan
birha ki kaali raat
karti hai jis bhaant(?)
ho jaati hai parbhaat
mere nainan ke tat pe shnaan
birha ki kaali raat
karti hai jis bhaant(?)
ho jaati hai parbhaat

haar mein hoti hai jeet
yahi ee
hai
preeet ki reeeet

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

[जीजी
ए री जीजी
तूने जो किया ठीक किया
तुझे ये सब छोड़ कर चला जाना होगा
दूर
बहुत दूर
बहुत दूर]

दूर
बहुत दूर
फिर भी तुम इतने नहीं दूर
जितना आँखों से नूर
फिर भी तुम इतने नहीं दूर
जितना आँखों से नूर

[डैम इट
डैम आँखें
डैम नूर]

रस भरी वाणी से तो
मन की काली
खिल गई
खिल गई
हिक
थी॰॰॰
कठोर वचन
हिक
सुनते ही
मुरझाई

[विक्रम
ये बकवास बंद करोगे या नहीं]

[. . .]
[..संवाद कट..]
[. . .}

[अपने उस रास्कल से कह देना कि
उसकी दाल अब यहाँ नहीं गलेगी

शीला डार्लिंग उससे नफरत करती है

शीला डियर ॰ ॰ ॰]

[तुम इसी लायक हो

रात खत्म होने वाली है
जी भर कर रो सको तो रो लो
सवेरे तक दिल कि भड़ास निकाल जाएगी
घबराने कि कोई बात नहीं]

मेरे नैनन के तट पे श्नान
बिरहा  कि काली रात
करती है जिस भाँत(?)
हो जाती है परभात
मेरे नैनन के तट पे श्नान
बिरहा  कि काली रात
करती है जिस भाँत(?)
हो जाती है परभात

हार में होती है जीत
यही॰॰॰
है
प्रीत कि रीत


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4199 Post No. : 15382 Movie Count :

4241

Today’s song is a very rare song from an obscure and unheard of film – Anjaam-1940. Films with the title Anjaam were made in 1940, 1952, 1968, 1978, 1986 and 1993. Today’s film was the first and then in every decade one film was made on this title. First I thought that this title wins the highest number, but NO. The honour of ‘same title maximum films made’ goes to INSAAF, which was made 7 times !

It gives me a pleasure to write about rare, obscure old films. Mainly because, it is a challenge to gather or literally excavate information from various different sources about the film, director, MD, the actors or the singers. Many times, some names are so obscure that it takes several days or even months to get the information. While reading an article, the readers rarely realise the hard work that has gone into the presentation. Not all information is available on beck and call. Sometimes a windfall comes with plenty of information from unexpected sources, but that is rare. Many times days and months are blank. I call this as a challenge.

Film Anjaam-40, made by Vishnu Cinetone- owned by Dhirubhai Desai, was a Costume drama. The music for the film was by Shanti kumar Desai and the cast was Anil kumar, Meher Sultana, Yeshwant Dave, Rajkumari, Samson, Bulbule, Fazlu etc. All the songs were written by Munshi Qabil. The film was directed by Kanjibhai Rathod.

The name Kanjibhai Rathod will not ring any bells in the ears of any reader. That is because, this was his last film as a director. Since his directorial career ended 80 years ago, it is unlikely that any reader has even heard his name. I had come across this name earlier, but there was no opportunity to write on any song from his films. So, when I finally got hold of this rare song, I knew this was my last chance to write about him as this was his last film as a director. Of course, he was very much in the film industry for another 20 odd years, but as a Production manager.

After I got this song, it took me almost one month to collect enough information about Kanjibhai Rathod. I had to literally dig out information from quite old articles. I knew if at all his bio is available, it had to be in Gujarati alone. So I scanned Gujarati articles. Harish Raghuwanshi ji also helped me in this and also provided his own Gujarati article on Kanjibhai Rathod.

In the Hollywood filmdom, in the early years, Blacks were not given any jobs. Over a period, this changed and Blacks became a part of film industry. Similarly, in early years, in Indian film world, backwards and Dalits were not preferred except for menial jobs. However, it is to the credit of the Gujarati filmdom that they encouraged Kanjibhai Rathod and gave him opportunities to showcase his skills as an actor and a very successful silent film director. Kanjibhai Rathod was a Dalit.

Kanjibhai Rathod from Maroli village in south Gujarat, was considered the first successful commercial director in Indian cinema. His rise to fame was in an era when most people stayed away from films, due to a peculiar stigma attached to the filmdom.

Not much is known about Rathod’s personal life. Film historian Virchand Dharamsey writes, “Kanjibhai was coming from a Dalit family and he can be considered the first successful professional director of India.”

Rathod began as a still photographer with the Oriental Film Company, owned by a U.S. trained film maker Sachet Singh,in Baroda. His experience earned him a job in Kohinoor Film Company and its owner Dwarkadas Sampat made him a director. Till then he worked as an actor in many silent films. In film Narsi Bhagat, he did the Hero’s role.

Rathod’s ‘Bhakta Vidur’ released in 1921, was perhaps the first criticism of the British colonialism in a popular feature film.

This mythological allegory directly alluded to political issues, particularly the controversy over the Rowlatt Act.

An adaptation from a section of the Mahabharata, this film showed the British as the Kauravas and its protagonist Vidur as Gandhi. Sampat himself played the role donning the Gandhi cap and khadi shirt. The film raised a storm – while a big hit in Bombay, it was banned by the British in Karachi and Madras, write historians.

Rathod was the first film-maker to direct a crime thriller in 1920s on contemporary events. His Kala Naag (1924) was based on famous double murder case in Bombay. Rathod introduced Zubaida to film industry with his Gulbakavali.

By the time he left for Saurashtra Film Company in Rajkot in 1924, Rathod had enough work on his name. At the launch of Krishna Film Company, he returned to Mumbai in 1931, the year of first talkies.

Dharamsey writes in his ‘Light of Asia: Indian Silent Cinema 1912–1934’ that Rathod directed five talkies out of 17 made in 1931. The films were, Chintamani, Ghar ki Laxmi, Harischandra, Laila Majnu and Paak Daaman, all for Krishna Movietone. He remained active in the industry even in 1940s, but he was not as successful directing talkies.

In the early film making, the contribution of Gujarati men is substantial. Out of the 1313 silent films made during 1913 to 1934, more than half were made by Gujarati producers. Companies like Sagar, Kohinoor, Shrikrishna, Sharda etc at Bombay and Elphinston Film co. at Calcutta were owned by Gujaratis. They not only did business, but also made many Gujarati and Non Gujarati artistes. Gujarati writers always provided story lines.

From 1921 to 1924, Kanjibhai Rathore directed 31 silent films for Kohinoor Film Co. For Shrikrishna film Co. of Maneklal Patel, he directed 21 silent films. For some time he did work for Saurashtra Film co. at Rajkot also.

Kanjibhai directed total 59 silent films and 16 Hindi Talkie films and 1 Gujarati Talkie film . A grand total of 76 films in all. Quite a substantial number. Kanjibhai Rathod was much ahead of times. In one silent film-Sati Anusuya-1921, an actress, Sakeena, was shown fully naked. During silent film era major actors like Raja Sandow, Jaleel, Fatima Begum, Ermelin, Gohar, Putlibai, Gulab, Rampyari etc worked for him. In Talkie era, actors like Sardar Akhtar, Prem Adib, Charlie, Navinchandra, Azuri, Marutirao pehelwan etc acted in his films.

Kanjibhai joined as Production Manager in Chandrakala Pictures of Dhirubhai Desai, after retiring from direction. Dhirubhai remade several of Kanjibhai silent films as Talkie films, like Bolti Bulbul-42, Devkanya-46, Bhakta Prahlad-46 etc. Kanjibhai had 2 wives. He wedded Kanta Ben in a traditional way and he wed Ganga Ben in Arya Samaj style. Ganga Ben gave him a son, Suresh. unfortunately, he died at the age of just 16 years. Then Kanjibhai retired and lived in village Ponsara in Gujarat. He died peacefully on 31-12-1970. Thus ended a superb career.

Film Anjaam’s hero was Anil kumar. Actor Anil Kumar (Sardar Gul) was born in 1915 at Calcutta.His father had a fruit business. They were from Peshawar (just like Dilip Kumar). He was not much educated but could speak Hindi, Urdu and English fluently. Once he went to Bombay to meet a friend. There he met an old acquaintance, who took him to Sohrab Modi.

The good looking Sardar Gul was liked by Modi and he offered him the lead role in his film ‘ Saed E Havas’-36. Sardar Gul was given a screen name of Chandra Kumar. The film was based on a translation of William Shakespeare’s drama- King John, by Agha Hashra Kashmiri in 1907. Sardar Gul was to get Rs. 200 for this work. The film was a flop and Sohrab Modi refused to pay him more that Rs 50. Annoyed, he left Bombay and returned to Calcutta.

However he came back in 1938 and did his first film with a new screen name Anil Kumar. The film was Talwar ka Dhani-38. Soon he was well known and acted in 10 films in next 3 years. As the decade of the 40s saw many new actors, producers and directors, he was reduced to Character roles and side roles. By 1950, he was almost like an extra. He did work in many films, but only few films credited him, as his roles were negligible. We find his name in just 30 films, where he was credited, the last such film being Tarzan and Deliailah-64.

The side hero in this film was Yeshwant Dave. It was not uncommon during the days of early cinema for people to hang around studios and filming locations in the hopes of being discovered. One such intrepid soul was Yeshwant Dave (or Yashwant Dave), who was at Kohinoor Studios observing a picture being made by producer J.B.H. Wadia. The handsome and athletic Yeshwant cornered Wadia, insisting that he would make a fine hero for an action film.

Wadia agreed to test Yeshwant by having him jump from the roof of one set piece to another. He did so successfully, and J.B.H. decided to cast him in a film that he was to direct for Young United Players, the 1931 silent THUNDERBOLT (aka DILER DAKU) featuring Mumtaz as the heroine.

Yashwant was again directed by Wadia in TOOFAN MAIL (1932) and there after became a sought after action star appearing in the stunt films of other directors like Aspi, Dhirubhai Desai, Nari Ghadiali, Chunilal Parekh, and Harshadrai Mehta. Some of his films include BHARAT VEER (1932), JADUI JUNG (1934), BOMBSHELL (1935), VASANTBENGALI (1937), FLYING RANEE (1939), MAGIC CITY (1940), TORPEDO (1941), ROYAL MAIL (1946), and KAUN PARDESI (1947).

Growing out of the stunt hero persona, he turned to character parts and made infrequent onscreen appearances throughout the 1950s, including in SHEIKH CHILLI and MAKKHEE CHOOS both released in 1956 and starring comedian Bhagwan. What became of Yeshwant Dave afterwards is anybody’s guess, as the once popular action star faded into obscurity and, sadly, is barely remembered today.

Today’s song is sung by Meher Sultana and chorus. Not much information is available on Meher Sultana. From HFGK, we find that she featured in 19 films as an actress and sang 6 songs in 3 films also. Her songs in this film were her last songs. Her first film as an actress was Bhool ka Bhog-1935 and last film was O Jaanewale-1948. Today’s song, though 80 year old is of good quality and pleasantly sung in tune, to listen to. Enjoy…

( Information for this article is culled from 2 Gujarati articles of Shri Urvish Kothari ji, a Gujarati article by Harish Raghuwanshi ji, wiki, Filmdom-1946, cinemajadu.com. muVyz.com and Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. My thanks to all.)


Song- Wo man nagari mein aayenge (Anjaam)(1940) Singer-Meher Sultana, Lyricist-Munshi Qabil, MD- Shanti Kumar

Lyrics

Wo man nagari mein aayenge
man nagri mein aayenge
hans hans ke bhaag jagaayenge
hans hans ke bhaag jagaayenge
wo man nagari mein
man nagari mein
man nagari mein aayenge
main dulhan ban sharmaaungi
main dulhan ban sharmaaungi
munh pher pher ithhlaaungi
munh pher pher ithhlaaungi
aur darshan ko tarsaaungi
aur darshan ko tarsaaungi

wo ghoonghat aap uthaayenge
wo ghoonghat aap uthaayenge
Mohan ki murali baajegi
Mohan ki murali
Mohan ki murali baajegi
chhum chhum chhum Raadha naachegi
chhum chhum chhum Raadha naachegi
mridang jhaanjh bajaayenge
mridang jhaanjh bajaayenge
madhuwan mein raas rachaayenge
madhuwan mein raas rachaayenge
wo man nagari mein
man nagari mein
man nagari mein aayenge
hans hans ke bhaag jagaayenge
hans hans ke bhaag jagaayenge
wo man nagari mein aayenge
wo man nagari mein aayenge


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4182 Post No. : 15361

Today’s song is from film Ranee-43. The film was made by Barua Productions, floated by producer, director, actor and singer, P C Barua, before he had joined New Theatres. He joined NT on the invitation of B N Sircar, though he had his own production outfit and studio. In fact, he wanted a merger of his company with NT, but Sircar declined and offered Barua a paid job at NT, on monthly basis.

While in NT, Barua gave hit films, one after another like, Rooplekha-34, Devdas-35, Maya-36, Manzil-36, Mukti-37, Adhikar-38 and Zindagi-40. During the making of film Zindagi, differences between him and Sircar thickened. The reason was Barua felt, he was not given as many films to make as Nitin Bose and Harischandra Chunder got. Ego of both the giants persisted and culminated in their separation.

In the History of Hindi Cinema,till the Golden 50s started,Bengal had a dominating position in films and music. Its meaningful,entertaining films and the Film and the Non Film music ruled the roost, from the early 30s. In this conquest of the East,the Lion’s share was that of NEW THEATRES-set up and owned by B N Sircar. New Theatres was not just a production company,but it was an Institution and a school for developing artistes in the 30s and the 40s.

Out of these 20 years,I would say the first almost 10 years was the Peak Golden Period for NT. 1940, being one of the best years for NT, also was the beginning of its end, with the First major shock, when P C or Pramathesh Barua left NT because of differences with B N Sircar. In the period of 1940 to 1950, one by one many people left NT. Most went to Bombay, in search of greener pastures.

There were 3 reasons. One, during the period 1946 and 1947, production at NT was almost Nil ( 1946-due to communal riots in Bengal and 1947- due to Partition blues), but NT had to pay salaries of their employees. In peak years, their salary bill alone amounted to about 45000 rupees every month. Secondly, one of their main markets for Bangla and Hindi films-East Bengal, had become another country-East Pakistan and they lost this market. Thirdly, the New Government imposed a heavy ‘Excess profit ‘Tax ‘ on successful companies like NT. This damaged them financially very much. Added to this,of course, B N Sircar failed to hold people together due to Ego problems, recognitions etc etc.

By 1950,according to Dilip Sircar-son of B N Sircar,” many people left, Finance was in disarray and we had many court cases slapped on us.” The result- B N Sircar closed the shop ! In 1954,NT was handed over to Arora Film company. Then in 1955, Deluxe Films took them over. In January-56, the company closed down officially and in August 56,a Receiver was appointed by the High Court. New Theatres went into Liquidation in March-62 and a Glorious Chapter came to a close for ever !

Even in the tumultuous and troubled final years,few Loyal artistes did not leave NT. Pankaj Mullick was one of them,who stayed with B N Sircar till the last,despite differences with him.Many others like Kidar Sharma, Kanan Devi, Uma Shashi, PC Barua, Nitin Bose, Debk Bose,Phani Muzumdar, Nabendu Ghosh, Bimal Roy, K N Singh, Prithviraj Kapoor, Kumar etc and above all, K L Saigal- the pride possession of NT, left, at different times. Most came down to Bombay.

But, you will notice that actors from this lot who came from Calcutta to Bombay, were all Non-Bangla people. From the very beginning, actors from Bengal or South, rarely came to make their acting careers. Those who came at all, majority of them were actresses, who were ready to learn Hindi to continue here or they had Non-Bangla backgrounds. For example- actress Smriti Biswas, though a Bengalee, grew up and started acting in Lahore.

There were 3 reasons why actors did not come to Bombay from Bengal or South…
1.Difficulty and reluctance in picking up Hindi language and coping up with Bombay culture.
2. King size Regional Pride and
3. Their own areas became big production centres and scope was available on familiar grounds.

Artistes from other disciplines like Direction, Music, Singing, Editing, Cinematography etc came here and prospered, but not actors, worth mentioning.

Film Ranee-43 was made as a Bilingual film in Bangla ( Chandaar Kalank) and Hindi. The MD was Kamal Dasgupta, Lyricist was Pt. Madhur and the cast was Jahar Ganguly, Kalavati, P C Barua, Jamuna, Patience Cooper, Vikram Kapoor (father of Meena Kapoor-singer and wife of Anil Biswas) and others. When I first heard this name “Jahar”, I was shocked, but then realised that this was a Bangla name. Obviously, its meaning must be something else,other than ” Poison”. I started searching on Google and at one place found that Jahar in Bangla means ” Gift of God “. My Bangali friend in Mumbai says it means ” Gem “.

Jahar Ganguly (October 1904 – 1969) was a Bengali film actor and theater personality. He received Best actor award in 6th Annual Bengal Film Journalists’ Association Awards in 1943 for his performance in Bandi.
Ganguly was born in undivided 24 Parganas Dist, British India. He worked in number of Bengali and Hindi films in 40s and 50s as a supporting actor in comedy counterparts to the dramatic lead. He got break through in Dena Paona directed by Premankur Atorthy. Ganguly acted under Satyajit Ray’s direction in Parash Pathar and Chiriyakhana. He also performed as stage actor until the 1960.

Information on actress Patience Cooper has not yet been given on our Blog. She was one of the 7 sisters, out of whom 3 sisters-Patience, Violet and Pearl worked in Hindi and Bangla films. Patience Cooper (1905–1993) was an Anglo-Indian from Calcutta. Cooper had a successful career in both silent and sound films. She was one of the early superstars of Bollywood. Cooper is credited with the first Female double roles of Indian cinema—as twin sisters in Patni Pratap and as mother and daughter in Kashmiri Sundari, even though earlier in 1917, actor Anna Salunke had played roles of both the male lead character Ram and the female lead character Seeta in the film Lanka Dahan.

Cooper began her career as a dancer in Brandmann’s Musical Comedy, a Eurasian troupe. She later joined Jamshedji Framji Madan’s Corinithian Stage Company as an actress. Cooper first made an impact with Nala Damayanti (1920). The film starred Keki Adajania as Nala and Cooper as Damayanti. The film was a big budget Madan Theatre production and was directed by Eugenio de Liguoro, known in Italy for his Orientalist spectacles like Fascino d’Oro (1919). Nala Damayanti was famous for its special effects at the time — Narada’s ascent of Mount Meru to heaven, the transformations of four gods into impersonations of Nala, the transformation of Kali into a serpent among others.
Her next film was Vishnu Avtar, released in 1921. De Liguoro also directed Dhruva Chartitra (1921), a mythological based on the legend of Dhruva whose quest for eternal knowledge and salvation was rewarded when he became the brightest star in the heavens, the pole star also known as Dhruvatara. The film was made as a bid for an international breakthrough for Madan Theatres and featured many Europeans in the cast along with Cooper who played the female lead, Suniti.

One of Cooper’s biggest successes was Pati Bhakti (1922). Cooper played Leelavati in the film, directed by the great JJ Madan himself, advocating that women should be devoted to their husband. The film is regarded as her greatest film and was also involved in a small controversy as in Madras, the censor demanded that a dance number be removed on the grounds of obscenity.

Cooper also played perhaps the first ever double roles in Hindi films — Patni Pratap (1923), where she played two sisters and Kashmiri Sundari (1924), where she played mother and daughter.

Cooper did films right through to the mid-1930s. One of her last major films was Zehari Saap (1933). The film was a typical Cooper vehicle about a medieval chieftain’s revolt against the good Nawab Bakar Malik. The nawab’s outlaw son vows revenge and finally all’s well that ends well. The dramatic conflict in the film sees the chieftain wanting to marry the princess, whom he had raised as his own daughter.

Cooper acted in over 40 films until she retired after performing in her last films, Iraada-44 and Khan Bahadur-46. Cooper was often cast in the role of a sexually troubled but innocent woman, always at the centre of moral dilemmas, often caused by the men in her lives.

A major aspect of Cooper’s star image was the successful achievement of the ‘Hollywood look’ in spite of different light and technical conditions. Her distinctively Anglo-Indian features, like dark eyes, sharp features, ebony hair and light skin tone, allowed technicians to experiment with the imported technique of eye-level lighting and achieve an appearance similar to Hollywood stars of the silent era.

The low number of women, especially Hindus, in the film industry during the 1920s (due to conservative attitudes) meant Anglo-Indian actresses like Cooper, were in demand. Her appearance in a string of successful films has led her to being called the first ever female Indian film star.

It is generally supposed Cooper married Mirza Ahmad Ispahani Saheb (MAH Ispahani), a well-known Indian businessman. In 1947, they migrated to Pakistan. Actually she was married to MAH Ispahani at the age of 21 and divorced soon after. She then married Gul Hamid Khan, one of the first early silent movie actors. He died six years later from Hodgkin’s Disease. She remained friends with MAH Ispahani till the end of her life. Cooper changed her name to Sabra Begum and lived the last of her days with her two adopted daughters Zeenat and Haleema in Karachi, Pakistan. Her foster daughter Syeda Nafees Rizvi lives in Houston, Texas, USA. She fostered and/or adopted 17 children during her lifetime. Cooper died in 1993. (adapted from wiki and upperstall, with thanks.)

After Partition in 1947, it did not take long for things to become normal in the Indian film industry. This was mainly because ready replacements were available in plenty to fill the vacancies caused by migration. As far as producers and financiers were concerned, almost all producers and film makers had arrived here from Lahore. It was actually Lahore which felt the absence of Film makers. Pakistan film Industry was somehow managed well by the experienced people who went from India and Pakistan enjoyed a ” GOLDEN AGE OF FILMS AND MUSIC ” from 1959 to 1977. Once the old generation retired, there was no second line to take over from them.

The film industry in Pakistan was never an organised one. Moreover the often changing Goverments did not bother to do anything to protect, sustain, help or develop the infrastructure of Film industry. Unlike India, there was neither a Films Division, nor was there anything like Film and Television Institute to build local artistes in different fields.

By 2010,the film industry in Pakistan was in such a poor shape that, against India’s film production of 13526 films in 2011, Pakistan had produced only 7 films in that year !

While Indian films were distributed in over 90 countries, there was no International market for Pakistan films.

All studios in Pakistan were in ruins and Theatres had been demolished.

Can you believe, In the entire Islamabad city, there is ONLY ONE Theatre-a multiplex of 4 screens ! (info from-Filmistan-Javed Shaikh 0n pk.politics.in dated 10-4-2014 )

We have heard songs composed by the Music Directors who migrated to Pakistan,i.e. West Pakistan. Today we will listen to a film song composed by a famous and talented composer of Hindi/Bangla films, who migrated to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). His name is KAMAL PRASANNA DASGUPTA or simply, Kamal Dasgupta ( 28-7-1912 to 20-7-1974.)

It is a moot point whether Kamal should be called a Film composer or a NFS composer in Hindi and Bangla. He can be called the Originator or the Pioneer, who established NFS during the period from 1935 to 1955. It was he who introduced the word ” Hindustani Song” for NFS on the 78 RPM records.

He gave music in 16 Hindi films like Jawab, Hospital, Rani, Meghdoot, Arabian Nights, Bindiya, Krishna Leela, Pehchan, Zameen Aasmaan, Faisla, Giribala, Manmaani, Chandrashekhar, Vijay yatra, Iran ki ek raat and Fulwari. However, except for Jawab and Hospital his songs did not become very popular. Kanan Devi became a National name after she sang “Ye duniya Toofan mail” in Jawab-42. He also gave music in 22 Bangla films.

He was not in good terms with his wife, Firoza Begum. In his final days, he contracted T.B. Finally he said Good-Bye to this world on 20-7-1974. The originator and populariser of NFS in India and a maker of memorable songs like “Toofan mail” left us forever-unsung !

Today’s song is the second song from this film. The story of this film was provided earlier by Sadanand Kamath ji, with the first song, so I am not repeating it here. The duet is sung by Anima Dasgupta (nee Sengupta…wife of Subal Dasgupta, MD) and an unidentified male. I liked this song .I hope you too will like it.


Song-Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali (Raanee)(1943) Singers- Kamal Dasgupta, Anima Dasgupta, Lyricist- Pt. Madhur, MD- Kamal Dasgupta

Lyrics

Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
Sawan ne boondan ki jhalar daali
boondan ki jhaalar daali re ae
boondan ki jhaalar daali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
daali ee
boondan ki jhaalar daali
jhaank jhaank kar dil ki duniya
dekh raha hoon aaj
armaanon ke sar pe rakkha hai khushiyon ka taaj
chhupi huyi hai iske andar
chhupi huyi hai iske andar
jeewan ki hariyaali ee
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali

<em.Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
arre papaiyya
zara bataa aa
kyun piyoo piyoo raha pukaar
kyun piyoo piyoo raha pukaar
gulshan mein kyun aayi
kyun aayi hai
saj dhaj kar nayi bahaar
sada ye saawan ki kyun aaye
man ko harne waali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
ye jhaalar nahin hai
ye maikhaana
jiski boonden hain masti ka paimaana
pee pee kar dekho jhoom rahi hai
pee pee kar dekho jhoom rahi hai
aur ghata ye kaali kaali ee ee
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4179 Post No. : 15358 Movie Count :

4233

Today’s song is from a Non-Descript film-Mazaq-43. I call it a Non Descript film because no information is available on this film anywhere. As the film was released on 31-12-1943, its review was expected in the 1944 January or February issue, but as 1944 issues of Film India are not available in Internet Archive, it is not possible to know about this film. I did not see any film advertisement of Mazaq in any issue of 1943. Either I missed it or it was not there. The gist is, we do not know anything about who wrote the film story or what was the story, how it was received by the public etc.

The film was made by Raja Movietone, which was established by Zahoor Raja, after he directed film Badal-1942, made by Eastern Pictures, Bombay. Film Mazaq-43 was the maiden venture of Raja Movietone. It went on to make 3 more films. All four films were directed by Zahoor Raja and he acted in every film also. Only in film Mazaq-43, he tried his hand at composing songs, as Music Director. Thankfully, he never tried it again. Actress Radha Rani (Bombywali) also acted in all films with him.

The cast of the film was Madhuri, Pahadi Sanyal, Radha Rani (B), Zahoor Raja, Shyam kumar,Haroon and others. As far as Madhuri was concerned, she got married in 1941 and was in the process of ending her acting career. After this film, she completed few more films on hand and retired from film. In this film, the lead pair was Madhuri and Pahadi Sanyal. Zahoor Raja had done a negative role in the film.

ZAHOOR RAJA (Born 7 July 1918 Abbottabad (now in Pakistan)– Died 1992 England) Pre Partition Hindi/Urdu Film Actor, Producer, Director, Editor, Writer, Singer, Lyricist & Music Composer. He graduated from editing and story writing to become a producer-director in 1943.

Zahoor Raja was born in a wealthy family in Abbottabad. After schooling , he studied BA from Rawalpindi but could not complete his graduation as he was more interested in sports than in studies. His father, a Police Inspector, was keen in admitting him in Dehradun for a career in the army. But he ran away from home and landed in Bombay with a letter of introduction to Film maker A R Kardar. Since he was very handsome and well built man, getting into the Bombay film industry was not difficult. At that time, Kardar was directing ‘Mirza Sahiban’ (1939) for Ranjit Movietone and Kardar took Zahoor Raja in the film. The film was not completed.

Within a year after that film, V Shantaram invited him to join Prabhat Films and was taken on a contract of 3 years. His association with V Shantaram was not beneficial and he did not get much work. Kardar once again came to his rescue and got him employed in National Studios and got him a role in ‘Pooja’ (1940). Thereafter, he got a role in Minerva Moveitone’s ‘Sikandar’ (1941). During the making of the film ‘Sikandar’ (1941), he fell in love with his co-star Meena (Meena Shourie) and married her. The marriage did not last long and Meena later married another handsome actor, Al Nasir.

Zahoor Raja later worked as a Hero in ‘Sewa’ (1941). During this time, while looking for a change from his acting career, he got a chance to direct the film ‘Badal’ (1942) produced under Eastern Pictures where he also acted in the lead role. Though the film failed at the box office, his direction was appreciated by the critics. In 1943, he floated his own film production company, Raja Movietone and made its maiden film ‘Mazaq’ (1943) which he also directed, acted in a negative role and composed its music. His banner produced ‘O Panchhi’ (1944), ‘Ghazal’ (1945) and ‘Dhadkan’ (1946). In most of the films in which he acted, Zahoor Raja was paired with Radha Rani. He also sang the song ‘Bhulaane waale hamen bhi na yaad aaya karo’ along with Naseem Akhthar in the Movie ‘Ghazal’ (1945) composed by Gyan Dutt. His last Movie in India before moving to Pakistan was ‘Anmol Ghadi’ (1946). He acted in 8 films, directed 5 films, sang 15 songs in 4 films, wrote lyrics in 1 film and was MD for 1 film.

After partition, Zahoor Raja migrated to Pakistan. He was active in Pakistani film industry until 1966. After 1966, he migrated to England, married an English lady and later died in 1992 in England.

The heroine Madhuri was already 30 year old in 1943 and I wonder why Raja opted for this aged lady, who was on the verge of retiring from films – that too as a Heroine ! Of course, since we do not know about the story of the film, Raja gets the benefit of doubt, in this case. Madhuri was an actress coming from the Silent Era and early Talkie films. After retirement , she disappeared for almost 50 years, till she was traced for a function. Here is how…

Like many others,Madhuri too was an Anglo Indian. Her real name was Beryl Claessen. She was born on 3-11-1913 at Delhi. Her father was a big officer in Government. Her initial schooling took place in Nainital. She learnt music too,because she wanted to become a Music Teacher. However that she never became,but on a visit to Bombay she was picked up by producer Indulal Yagnik and she started acting in silent films.

Many Heroines in those days were Anglo-Indians,Europeans or Jew girls. Since silent films did not require speaking Hindi or Urdu ( or any language,for that matter),these girls were preferred,as Indian audience loved their fair colour (Gori Mem). Additionally,these girls did not hesitate to give intimate scenes like kissing or doing stunts themselves. Most girls knew Horse riding,fencing and fighting.

In 1928,there was a Silent film Madhuri,but actress Sulochana(Ruby Myers) did this role and in 1932 there was a Talkie film Madhuri,in which also Sulochana only did the role. When Talkie films era began most of the Anglo Indian girls became jobless,since they could not speak Hindi/Urdu nor could they sing a song-the two requirements for actresses in early era Talkie films. However,few intelligent and professional actresses learnt Hindi/Urdu language speaking. Madhuri and Sabita Devi (Irene Gasper) were two such clever girls who achieved proficiency in these matters.

Madhuri was very beautiful. After doing 17 silent films,she made her debut in Talkie films with ‘ Pardesi Preetam’-1933. Jaswantlal Nandlal directed his first film here. Her Hero was Raja Sandow. She did many films for Ranjit under the direction of Jayant Desai. From 1933 to 1942,she acted in 28 films. They were (not in order) Kashmeera, Mitti ka Putla, Noor e watan, Secretary, Lehri lala, Rangeela Raja, Sitamgarh, Prithviputra, Thokar, Raj Ramni, Diwali, Matlabi Duniya, Toofani Toli, Shama parwana, College Girl, Nadira, Veer Babruvahan, Zamin ka chaand, Ban ki chidia, Toofan Mail, Mehman, Sasural, Shadi, Ikrar, Vakil Saheb, Paapi, Mazaq and Dharm-45 …her last film.

In 1943,Madhuri got married and after completing films on hand, retired from Film line. After this, she simply disappeared for next 50 years without a trace,till the organisers of a programme located her. Bombay’s ” Amrut” and ” Cine Society of Bombay ” held a felicitation programme on 7-2-1999, for “Stars from the Silent Era”. For Madhuri it was a surprise,that the organisers found her out after living in oblivion for over 50 years. She was simply overwhelmed with the people’s affection and love. She and Jairaj were felicitated on that day.

The Hero,Pahadi Sanyal – an actor with a strange name, was a rare actor, who, in spite of being simultaneously in Bangla films, was a leading and singing Hero in Bombay’s Hindi films. Later on, few more Bangla actors did some Hindi films, but none were as prolific as Sanyal. He acted in 53 Hindi films and did Hero and side Hero roles, as well as character roles too. Pahadi Sanyal (22 February 1906–10 February 1974) was born in the midst of the serene beauty of hilly tract of Darjeeling. As he was born in the hills, thus his nickname became Pahadi .His real name was Nagendra Nath. He had completed his schooling from Lucknow but later joined Benaras Hindu University for Engineering studies. But he was never interested in studies and he chose a different path for himself .

He started taking lessons of Hindustani Classical Music from Morris College in Lucknow. He had learnt music under the tutelage of Ustad Md.Hussain, Chote Munna Khan, Nasir Khan . Ahmad Khan. Not only that, he was equally interested in instrumental music. Thus , he had also taken lessons of tabla from Rashbehari Sil and Abid Khan. He was deeply inclined to learn different types of songs. During his stay in Lucknow , he was in close contact with the Atul Prasad Sen and had hugely contributed to his songs.

Pahadi Sanyal was also fluent in Hindi and Urdu. In the personal front , he got married twice. He first tied his knot with the Vice Principal of Moradabad School. But unfortunately on 10th March , 1930 she died while giving birth to their child. Later , Pahadi got married to actress Meera Devi and had one daughter.

Pahadi was introduced to Director Devki kumar Basu by one of his friends. Devki kumar Basu took him to B.N. Sarkar of Star Theatre who helped him to make his debut with Rs.150 in the world of acting. In 1933, he got his first break in the film “Meerabai”. The movie “Vidyasagar” was a landmark in his career which made him a living legend of that time. Some of his notable movies are “Bhagyachakra”(1935), “Bidyapati” (1938), “Mahakobi Girishchandra” (1953), “Jomaloye Jobonto Manush”(1958), Aranyer dinratri (1970). He had even sung in some of his movies. In 1942, he went to Bombay for working in Bollywood films.

He acted in 53 Hindi films. His first Hindi film at Calcutta was Yahudi ki Ladki-1933 and the last Hindi film was Dharati-1970. During his career, he sang 45 Hindi songs in 19 films – first song being in film Chandidas-1934 and the last song was in film Milan-1946. The Door Darshan English News Reader Luku Sanyal was his daughter. This great legend passed away on 10th February, 1974.

Here is a duet from this film-Mazaq-43. The names of singers are not available, but my guess is that it is sung by Zahoor Raja and Radha Rani (Bombaywali). With this song, film Mazaq-43 makes its Debut on the Blog.

PS-The song is sung by Miss Tara, Pahadi Sanyal and Zahoor Raja. Thanks are due to Mr Sadanand Kamath for helping identify the singers.


Song-Chalti hain mast hawaayen kuchh gaayen laharaayen bahlaayen mohe (Mazaaq)(1943) Singers-Miss Tara, Pahadi Sanyal, Zahoor Raja, Lyrics-Abid Gulrej, D- Zahoor Raja
Miss Tara + Pahadi Sanyal

Lyrics

Chalti hain mast hawaayen
aa haa ha ha ha aa
Chalti hain mast hawaayen
kuchh gaayen
lahraayen
bahlaayen mohe
ho o o
Chalti hain mast hawaayen
kuchh gaayen
lahraayen
bahlaayen mohe
ho o o

laayi paighaam khushi ka
khushboo ek prem sandesa
aa ha ha aa
laayi
haan haan
laayi
haan haan
laayi paighaam khushi ka
kuchh ?? prem sandesa
hahaha ha

nikhra kaliyon pe joban
nikhra kaliyon pe joban
bahlaaye mohe ho o
Chalti hain mast hawaayen
kuchh gaayen
lahraayen
bahlaayen mohe
ho o o

koi unse kahde jaake
aa hahahahaha
koi unse kahde jaake
na chhedo
na chhedo
na chhedo mohe
ho o o
mera mera
mera mera
mera matwaala joban
naajon ka paala joban
na chhedo mohe
ho o

tu mere motor ka engine
main teri bagiyaa ka phool
tu mere motor ka engine
main teri bagiyaa ka phool
arre aaj to ghabra ke keh do
kar liya mujhko qabool
na chhedo
na chhedo
na chhedo mujhe
ho o o

Chalti hain mast hawaayen
kuchh gaayen
lahraayen
bahlaayen mohe
ho o o


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4176 Post No. : 15350

Today’s song is from the film “Aankh ki sharm (1943). This bhajan is sung by one ‘Pande ji’. I am neither aware who this singer is, nor aware of any information on him. The Music Director of this film was Vasant Desai, who was known to be a Talent Hunter ( He had discovered MD S.Purushottam and singers Desai sisters – Pramodini and Vinodini ). May be Pande ji was also his discovery. However in later films of Vasant Desai I failed to find his name again. Possibly he was a ‘one film wonder’, like many others.

The film was made by Wadia Movietone. In 1942, the Wadia brothers – Homi and J B H Wadia separated, when the elder brother J B H Wadia proposed that the company should start making Social films, instead of only Stunt films. Homi Wadia established his own company Basant Pictures and continued making stunt films with Fearless Nadia – who sided with him, obviously, in the separation. Much later, Nadia married Homi Wadia and she thus became Nadia Wadia !

This was the second Social film ( after film Shobha-42) that Wadia Movietone made after the split. It was directed by Balwant Bhatt – elder brother of Nanabhai Bhatt who was a veteran in directing B and C grade films.

All the 11 songs of the film were written by Pt. Indra Chandra. The cast of the film was Prithwiraj Kapoor, Kaushalya, Trilok Kapoor, Nayampalli, Nalini Gupte, Moti, Gulab, Himalayawala, Agha, Dalpat, Indira etc etc. This must be one of the very few films (or was it the only movie ?) in which Prithwiraj and Trilok Kapoor were acting together in one film.

An interesting name in the cast was that of NALINI Gupte. I said interesting, because, in Hindi films, as many as 12 NALINIs acted/ sang in films at slightly different times. Add to this list the name of a Male actor ‘ Nalini Ranjan Roy ‘, who, thankfully, acceded to the suggestion to change his name to ‘Kanu’ Roy. ( It is another matter that even this name clashed with another Kanu Roy, who was MD, in the same period…causing serious ” Same Name Confusion”. ) The different NALINIs were…

Nalini Tarkhud…..many films

Nalini Jayawant…many films

Baby Nalini…Mera ladka-43

Nalini Nagpurkar…Krishnarjun yuddha-34, Chacha Chaudhari-53

Nalini Chonkar… many films

Nalini Borkar…singer

Nalini Dhere… Nagad Narayan-43

Nalini Gupte…Ankh ki sharm-43

Nalini Mulgaonkar…Didi-48, nakli Baap-49

Nalini Rao…Talash-43

Nalini Saraf (later Seema Deo)… Anand-70

Nalini korgaonkar… singer

Additionally, there were actresses called SuNALINI and MriNALINI too.

These Nalinis did not cause any Same name Confusion, because, being Marathi artistes, they wrote their names with Surnames, so their names remained different always. Easily, this name is the most ‘appeared’ name in the Hindi Film History !

Another interesting name ‘ Nayampalli’ always reminded me of the ” Nampalli” Railway station… which is another name for Hyderabad Railway station. This actor Nayampalli was leading a silent life of a middle class gentleman, doing a 10 to 5 job and raising a family, when he was invited to the glamorous world of Films.

S.B. Nayampally (or Nayampalli) was working at the firm of Killick, Nixon and Company in Bombay, when he was discovered by film director P.Y. Altekar at a gym where Nayampally regularly exercised. Altekar felt that Nayampally very much resembled the famous French boxer Georges Carpenter and would be perfect for the stunt films that had become popular at the time. At Director Altekar’s urging, Nayampally joined Imperial Studios and was quickly cast in his first film, Wedding Night(1929), opposite the popular actress Jilloo.

When he arrived at Imperial to begin his first day of filming he was amused to find that the building now used for the studio had formerly housed the school he attended as a child.“Wedding Night was a stunt film of the Robin Hood type,” Nayampally explained in a 1964 interview. “It had a little more of a plot to it than many films of the same class. My next film, Hell’s Paradise (1929), I remember for three reasons. One, it was based on a real-life episode involving an Indian prince and a foreign girl, described as an adventuress. Two, Mama Warerekar, the noted writer, did the story. Three, the film had a kissing scene, probably the first ever in an Indian film.”

Nayampalli was cast in Imperial’s Noorjehan (1931), which was initially to be a silent picture, but because of the success of their film Alam Ara (1931), which was India’s first talkie, the studio decided to make Noorjehan partly with sound. Nayampally was not originally cast in Noorjehan, but a chance meeting with the film’s director, Ezra Mir, got him the role of Prince Salim in the film.Nayampally then played Karna in Imperial’s next sound film, the mythological Draupadi (1931), but the actor considered his best mythological role to be that of the wily Shakuni in Mahatma Vidur (1943), a part that was appreciated by critics and the public, alike.

As sound films came in, silent actors were being discarded in favor of those with stage backgrounds, so Nayampalli joined the Grant Anderson Theatrical Company which specialized in Shakespearean plays. After gaining some experience he tried to rejoin films, but without much luck. His previous roles had been leads, so he decided if he wanted to work regularly, maybe he should take a different approach and he offered himself up for character parts.

His break came in the role of a hunchback in love with the heroine in Ezra Mir’s Zarina which starred Jal Merchant and Zubeida. The dentures he wore for the role were created specially by a dentist named Jimmy Gheista who had trained abroad with the dentist who had made similar dentures for Lon Chaney.

Nayampally had learned early on how to apply make-up for his roles and, in fact, he became so good at it he eventually came to specialize in horror make-up, which earned him the nickname “The Indian Lon Chaney.” Indeed, Chaney, Erich von Stroheim, Emil Jannings, and John Barrymore were the actors that Nayampally most tried to emulate. Boris Karloff was another of his role models. He was able to put his make-up expertise to good use for the film Sair-e-Paristan (1934), where he was a vampire-like devil, and in Zingaro(1935), in which he played a monster created by a mad scientist, and then as a the hairy “missing link” in Zambo (1937) and its sequel Zambo Ka Beta (1938). For Kalkoot (1935) he created a make-up to resemble the wrinkled effect that Karloff had used in The Mummy(1932).

Nayampally continued working in films throughout the 1940s and 50s, particularly in mythologicals and costume pictures including Raj Nartaki (1941), Nagad Narayan (1943), Vishwas 1943), Taramati(1945), Urvashi (1946), Jhansi-Ki-Rani (1953), Durgesh Nandini (1956), Basant Bahar (1956) and Shiv Parvati (1962) His last credited film appearance was in 1970’s Priya.

After his career in films ended, he started making Documentaries. He made about 35 documentaries. He won ‘ Silver Dolphin’ award for his documentary in the International Film Festival at Teheran in 1970.

He died on 7-5-1994, in Mumbai.

In the cast, there is another name which, apart from being very unusual, belongs to an actor, who earned considerably infamy in his private life. He is Himalayawala. His name was Mohd Afzaluddin. He was born in March 1916, at Dehradun. After school education he joined his brother, Mohd Misaluddin’s firm – The Himalaya Drug Company, a leading Pharma company of repute (even today). He worked there for 10 years and after a dispute with his brother, left the company. He came to Bombay to join films.

First he had thought of starting a company, but looking at the situation, he decided to do acting only. His first film was ‘Kiski Biwi’ (1942), directed by MA Mirza. His name was changed from Afzal to A Himalaywala (since he came from the Himalayan town of Dehradun, like Kashmiri from Kashmir), by Shaukat Hussain, husband of Noorjehan. However in many films he was credited as Afzal only. He worked in few films like, ‘Vishwaas’ (1943), ‘Ankh Ki Sharm’ (1943), ‘Dost’ (1944), ‘Kismatwaala’ (1944), ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Humayun’ (1945), ‘Nal Damayanti’ (1945), ‘Jagbeeti’ (1946), ‘Samrat Ashok’ (1947) and ‘Elaan’ (1947).

He was an outspoken and straightforward person, fond of hunting, football and travelling by car. He toured all of India twice in his car. In 1943, he married actress singer Amirbai Karnataki. After marriage he banned her from acting in films. Within 2-3 years, on this and other issues, they could not get along. He used to hit her and take all her money. At last, it was rumoured that he gave her talaaq after taking 2 lakh rupees and her car. Even after this he was stalking her. She stayed with her elder sister Ahilya Bai. Then one day, she was kidnapped by Himalaywala, from the recording room. She was kept locked in a room and beaten daily. She somehow managed to inform this to her sister.

Ahilyabai then got in touch with her acquaintance Mr Rasiklal Vyas and his brother Chhailabhai Vyas – one of the best criminal lawyers of Bombay. With their political and social connections, they forced the police to register an FIR, which was refused due to Himalaywala’s bribe. Meanwhile Himalaywala was alerted by his cronies. Within few hours Amirbai was escorted back to her sister’s place, by Himalaywala. All this episode is described in full details in the book ‘Aap Ki Parchhaiyaan’, by Rajnikumar Pandya ji. Amirbai later married Gujarati Journalist Badri Kaanchwala.

After partition, Himalaywala migrated to Pakistan. There the lady luck smiled on him and he did very well. Urdu film Shahida (1949) was his first film in Pakistan, which celebrated silver jubilees in Delhi and Lucknow.

Hamaliawala was in leading role in Pakistan’s first silver jubilee Urdu film Do Aansoo in 1950. He was main villain actor in the most of 1950s movies. He played the Akbar The Great role in musical film Anar Kali in 1958. His other famous moves were Kundan (1950) Chan Way(1951), Ghulam (1953), Gumnam, Ruhi (1954), Shoni(1955),Qatil (1955), Sarfarosh (1956), Saat Lakh (1957), Gumrah, Naghma-e-Dil (1959), Farishta (1961), Watan(1960) and Azra (1962).

He was seen in 33 movies, only two of them were in Punjabi language. His last film was Yahudi Ki Larki in 1963.

Mohd Afzuluddin Himalaywala married Begum Perveen, in Pakistan. He died on 1st January 1984 in Lahore. (Thanks to Film directory-46, http://www.pak.mag.com, Shishir krishna Sharma ji, book Aap ki parchhaiyan by Rajnikumar Pandya ji and my notes, for information used herein.)

Now let us see the video of today’s song. The singer on screen is probably Pande ji himself. This is my guess. I find this song scene funny. Prithwiraj is seen, obviously in sick condition. The singer is singing before him and telling him that ” tu do din ka mehmaan” ! What must be the sick man’s condition, hearing this ! But, after all, there must be some background also for this situation in the film, I am sure. With this song, Pande ji makes his Debut on this Blog, as a singer.


Song- Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan (Aankh Ki Sharm)(1943) Singer- Vasant Desai, Lyricist- Pt. Indra, MD- Vasant Desai

Lyrics

Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan
tu do din ka mehmaan
tu do din ka mehmaan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan
kal aayaa thha
kal jaayegaa
kal aayaa thha
kal jaayegaa
aaj ko soch vichaar
aaj ko soch vichaar
chhod ke bande
tu tu main main
chhod ke bande
tu tu main main
apna kaaj sudhaar
dhar murlidhar ka dhyaan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan

kya lena hai
kya dena hai
kya lena hai
kya dena hai
kyon jhoothha janjaal
kyon jhoothha janjaal
bair birodh bisaar ke bande
bair birodh bisaar ke bande
bhaj Giridhar Gopal
bhaj Giridhar Gopal
bhaj Giridhar Gopal
nar kar jag ka kalyaan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan
Bhai bhaj le shri Bhagwan


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4174 Post No. : 15348

Today’s song is from a forgotten film Bhool-1948. The film was produced by Cinematographer and V.Shantaram’s brother V.Avadhoot – who also directed this film, as per the credits.The lyricist for all the 8 songs was Firoz Jallundhari and the Music Director was Debutant Purushottam or S. Purushottam or Purushottam Solankurkar. The banner was Rajkamal Kala Mandir. The cast of the film was Umesh Sharma, Suman, Dewan Sharar, Parshuram, k.Datey, Leela, Sunderabai, Aruna Devi and 5 child actresses called Baby Rajashree, Baby Madhura, Baby Sadhna, Baby Charusheela and Baby Sheela. Amongst these, Rajashree, Madhura and Charusheela were Shantaram’s daughters.

When I was finding information on this film, I stumbled upon the film’s review in the December 1948 issue of Film India Magazine. I started reading it. From the writing , I got a feeling that the film was Ghost-Directed by V.Shantaram himself. But that is not the point. What I was shocked to read was that in a comment on IMPPA meeting on pages 13 to 15, Baburao Patel referred Shantaram as ” V Shantaram brother of V Kashinath, brother of V Avadhoot”, in almost every paragraph. Now, this was a bouncer for me. Nowhere, till now, had I known that Shantaram had one more brother called Kashinath. I knew only V Avadhoot as his brother, for all these years.

For further information, I checked V Shantaram’s biography on wiki, other Internet sites and articles on Shantaram in all my books, but still, no mention of Kashinath anywhere. I was astonished. As a true student of Old Hindi films and songs, I did not lose hopes and continued my search. My hard work and wait of one month bore fruits and on one unknown Internet site – http://www.geni.com – I got the family tree of V.Shantaram.

Shantaram’s mother Kamlabai was the younger sister of Radhabai, who bore two children Baburao and Bhalji Pendharkar, when she was with Dr. Gopal Pendharkar of Kolhapur, before she married father of Master Vinayak karnataki. Kamlabai married Shantaram’s father Rajaram Vankudre. The site shows that there were 4 brothers of Shantaram. They are named as Kashinath, Keshav, Ramkrishna and Avadhoot. Except V Shantaram and V Avadhoot, other brothers were not only not known, none of them was connected with the film industry-Hindi or Marathi. Whatever the reality, all these facts are available for anyone to check oneself.

The story and dialogues of the film Bhool-48 were by Dewan Sharar. The story, Baburao claimed, was taken from the theme of Thomas Hardy’s novel
” Tess of the Urbervilles “. This novel was first serialised in Britain’s ” The Graphic” in 1891 and was published as a single volume in 1892. The film was released on 7-10-1948 at New West End Theatre in Bombay. The story can be summed up as…

An honest and respected villager – Shiv Dayal (Dewan Sharar), with 6 daughters, is living in a village. His daughter Sheela (Suman) meets an Air Force officer on vacation- Mohan Chandra (Umesh Sharma). After few love songs, they indulge in pre-marital sex and soon Sheela becomes pregnant. Mohan returns and joins the War duty. News comes that he is killed. Shivdayal takes Sheela to Mohan’s father to request that they accept her as their daughter in law, but he refuses. Shivdayal comes back. Sheela delivers a baby boy. They lead a shameful life in their own village. In the meantime, Mohan, who is not dead, arrives and accepts Sheela and the child. They get married and all is well.

There was lot of hue and cry as to how the filmed was passed by Censors. The obvious conclusion was that Shantaram must have used pressure on the Censors. Film India also criticised it wholesomely. Shantaram’s reply was, if Shaknutala’s similar act is acceptable, then what is wrong in this ‘Bhool’ ?

Hindi film industry has seen uneducated, educated and talented artistes in various fields like acting, direction,production, cinematography, story and dialogue writing, Lyricists,composers etc etc. It has also seen successful artistes leaving films and shining somewhere else on their merits like, Shashi kapoor-sr, S D Batish, Lyricist Moti, B.A. etc etc. However , there is only one example where the artiste had an extraordinary success in totally unrelated fields, was a distinguished author and an acknowledged scholar BEFORE joining the film industry . He is Dewan Sharar. Not much has been written about him so far. Here is some updated information about him.

Dewan was not his first name. It was a Title used as a prefix. He came from a family which had served as Dewans in many states traditionally in few generations. His name was Atmanand Sharar. He was born (28-8-1897 to 1969) in Multan in erstwhile Punjab. From 1929 to 1942, he travelled in many countries. He is credited with editing the Magazine, ” Shabistan “, the first Urdu cinema paper in India. He worked as a Publicist for the League of Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. He edited a leading weekly ” Great Britain and the East ” for 3 years He regularly contributed to British and American press. He was the first Indian whose 4 plays were broadcast over BBC. From 1937 to 1940, he was in charge of the cataloguing of Urdu books and Manuscripts in India House at London. He published many books like’ Indian Folklore’, ‘ In the garden of Peacocks’, ‘ East meets West’ and ‘ Gong of Shiva’. The last one was translated in many languages of Europe. Hindi film ‘ Ishara’-43 was based on this novel. He also wrote the story of Himanshu Roy’s film ” Karma”-33- first English film by an Indian. The film credits start with his name First.

This is what South Asian Cinema Faculty of U.K.said about him, “Film and stage actor, writer of English novels, short stories, stage and radio plays, “Eastern Adviser” to British-Gaumont films in London and Urdu poet. He also contributed prominently to Indian cinema as a producer, character actor and a story and dialogue writer. Born in Multan, Dewan Atmanand Sharar (1899-1969) came from a family that had served as Dewans or Ministers in Indian princely states. After graduating from Punjab’s prestigious Government College, Lahore, he established an impressive repertory company in 1919 and presented several Hindustani plays and mushairas in various urban centres. In 1929, he set up a film-producing and distribution company and began to edit Shabistan,reputedly the first Urdu cinema paper in India.
In 1933, Dewan Sharar moved to London for the completion and launch of Himansu Rai’s Indo-British film, Karma (1933) ofwhich he was the storywriter. It was completed in England by Indian & British Film Productions with J.L. Freer Hunt as the director and Thorold Dickinson as editor. Sharar also produced and acted in Nagin ki Rani, the Hindustani version of Karma. While in London, many of his English short stories on Indian life appeared in mainstream newspapers in the UK and overseas. A major London publishing firm, George G. Harrap & Co., published two of his English works: The Gong of Shiva(1935) and Hindu Fairy Tales(1936). His short stories were also published as part of an anthology which included contributions from other famous contemporary writers. He also contributed a number of English radio plays for the BBC.

After returning to India in 1939 just before World War II, he worked for All India Radio Bombay and Delhi. He then joined filmmaker, V. Shantaram and adapted Kalidasa’s Sanskrit classic, Shakuntala for the silver screen in Hindustani. The film was a runaway success and the Sharar-Shantaram combine lasted over a decade winning laurels for both Sharar and Shantaram’s banner, Rajkamal.

In 1943, Ishaara (1943), a film based on Sharar’s English novel The Gong of Shiva catapulted actor Prithviraj Kapoor to stardom. Besides becoming an important pillar of popular Indian cinema, he also started Dewan Sharar Publications in 1963. His descendants include famous Bombay-based Indian film actor Akash Khurana and Nagpur-based businessman turned playwright and theatre actor Vikash Khurana. ”

Sharar had adapted the story from the original ” ???????? ??????? by Mahakavi Kalidas ” written in the 3rd century. He wrote the story, dialogues and Lyrics also. Shakuntala-43 was Sharar’s first film with Shantaram . Their association continued for some more films like, Parbat pe apna dera-44, Dr. Kotnis ki amar kahani-46, Apna Desh-49, Teen batti char Raasta-53 and J.J. Payal baje-55.

Dewan Sharar also acted in 8 films, namely Karma-33, Dr. Kotnis ki amar Kahani-46, Bhool-48, Apna Desh-49, Hindustan Hamara-50, Do Raha-52, Teen batti char rasta-53 and Dil E Nadaan-53. He wrote 62 songs as a Lyricist in 12 films, namely Shakuntala-43, Shaenshah Akbar-43, Parbat pe apna Dera-44, Mali-44, Panna Dai-45, Jeevan yatra-46, Dr. Kotnis ki amar kahani-46, Andhon ki duniya-47, Apna Desh-49, Hindustan hamara-50,Subah ka tara-54 and Jhanak Jhanak Payal baaje-55.

Today’s song is a duet by Sulochana kadam and Motisagar. MOTI SAGAR was one person who came to the industry to become a Hero,but ended up doing sundry roles,singing songs,writing stories and scripts and producing films. He ,however, could not get great success in any of these and ended up being ‘Jack of all trades,Master of None’.

MOTI SAGAR was born in New Delhi on 16-4-1925, but graduated from Lahore. In Lahore he got interested in acting in films.Then he met Inayat Hussain and G.A.Chishti-the composers and he loved singing.He came to Bombay in 1946. His cousins Motilal, Mukesh and Tara Harish were already there in films. Harish and Motilal were established,and Mukesh was trying very hard.
Moti Sagar did a second hero’s role in MALHAR-1951.
He sang his first song under Bulo C.Rani in GUL SANOBER-53 with Kalyani. Then came Pamposh, Shikar, Deewali ki raat, Makhichoos, Meri Behen and Flying Horse.
When he stopped getting songs and roles, he switched over to writing. He wrote stories for Badal, Lalkaar, Charas, Ram Bharose,
When this stopped he produced 2 films Hum Tere Ashiq hai and Badal.
After 1985, he retired till he died on 14-3-1999.

The Music Director was an unknown person,who made his Debut with this film. PURUSHOTTAM SOLANKURKAR or S. Purushottam ( 9-4-1919 to 30-1-1958 ) was from Kolhapur district. Born in a poor family, he was the youngest in three brothers. The eldest brother was a good singer under Abdul Kareem khan. The middle one had his ” Yashwant Sangeet Vidyalaya” in Kolhapur. Purushottam was a student of Vidyapeeth School. Bereft of higher education, Purushottam started learning to play various instruments, Violin, Sarangi, Harmonium and Tabla.
When he was 21 years of age, he started playing in the concerts of Kumar Gandharva or Shivputra Siddhramaiah komkali- as an accompanist. Vasant Desai-who was a ‘de facto’ Talent Hunter for V.Shantaram ( he had already discovered Promodini and Vinodini Desai and Vatsala Kumthekar) spotted him in one Mehfil and called him to Bombay. Shantaram gave him his brother’s film ” Bhool”-48 and Maharashtra Chitravani’s film Mere Laal-48 as a Music Director.

He was an excellent singer himself and had a very good voice. Noted composer Sudhir Phadke, who was his classmate in school, used to praise his singing, but Purushottam never sang any film song in his career. He believed that his job was to compose music and not singing.

Impressed with his style, Shantaram gave him his revolutionary film ‘Apna Desh’-49. True to his salt, Purushottam presented 2 Ghazals of Ghalib,’ Koi ummeed nahi hain” and Dil e naadan in a totally non-traditional tune and style. The Tamil and Telugu versions of this film were also done by Purushittam. Vasant kumari sang Tamil songs and Telugu songs were sung by Beauty Queen Surya Kumari. Later Shantaram gave ‘ Dahej’-50 to Vasant Desai and Purushottam.

Discarded, without reason, as was his habit, by Shantaram, Purushottam did Devyani-52 and Durga Khote’s Sandesh-52. In all he did 6 Hindi films and 2 Marathi films, as Music Director. Realising that he had no scope in films anymore, Purushottam returned to Kumar Gandharva once again ,as his accompanist. Thus he disappeared from the film line and there was no trace of him afterwards. One more name was added to less known and forgotten composers’ list ! (Some information used herein is from Marathi Sangeetkar kosh, with thanks.)

Let us now enjoy the duet from this film.


Song-Likhi hai do dilon ki kismet ne ye kahaani (Bhool)(1948) Singers- Sulochana Kadam, Moti Sagar, Lyrics-Firoz Jallundari, MD-S Purushottam
Both

Lyrics

Likkhi hai
do dilon ki kismat ne ye kahaani
Likkhi hai
do dilon ki kismat ne ye kahaani
har din hai pyaara pyaara
har raat hai suhaani
har raat hai suhaani
likhi hai
do dilo ki kismat ne ye kahani
phoolon se ban sanwar kar
dharti ne geet gaaya
shabanam ke motiyon ko
aakash ne lutaaya
shabnam ke motiyon ko
aakash ne lutaaya
ye bhed kisne samjha
ye baat kisne jaani
ye baat kisne jaani
o o o
aa aa aa
aa aa
ye roop ye jawaani ee ee
ye roop ye jawaani
ye mastiyon ke saaye
jab dil hi mil chuke hon
phir pyaar kyun na aaye
jab dil hi mil chuke hon
phir pyaar kyun na aaye
main tujh pe hoon nichhaawar
tu meri zindgaani
tu meri zindgaani
aa aa aa

aa aa aa
aa aa
phoola phala chaman hai
baadal khushi ke chhaaye
masti bhari pavan hai
kyun naachti na jaaye
masti bhari pavan hai
kyun naachti na jaaye
jharnon ke geet sun kar
hansti hai ban ki raani
hansti hai ban ki raani
o o o
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
main phool hoon oon
tu khushbu
main phool hoon
tu khushbu
main deep hoon tu jyoti
tu chaand hai main dariya
main seep hoon tu moti
tu chaand hai main dariya
main seep hoon tu moti
main tera hoon tu meri
phir kya kahoon jubaani
phir kya kahoon jubaani

likhi hai
don dilo ki kismat ne ye kahaani
likhi hai
do dilon ki kismat ne ye kahaani
aa aa aa


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15410

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1184
Total Number of movies covered =4246

Total visits so far

  • 12,952,355 hits

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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