Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Actor-Singer


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4372 Post No. : 15709

“Jawaani”(1942) was directed by Wajahat Mirza for National Studios, Bombay. The movie had Surendra, Jyoti, Husn Banu, Kayamali, Agha, Nawab, Dulari, Gulzar, A. R. Kabul, Sankata Prasad etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Three song from the movie has been covered in the blog in the past.

Today (7 July 2020) is the 106th birth anniversary of Anil Biswas (7 July 1914 – 31 May 2003).

On this occasion, here is the fourth song from “Jawaani”(1942) to appear in the blog. This song ois sung by Surendra. Aarzoo Lucknowi is the lyricist of this song. Music is composed by Anil Biswas.

Only the audio of this song is available, but it is clear that the song was picturised on Surendra himself.

The audio is not very clear and some of the lyrics noted by me do not make sense to me, so I may have erred at a few places in the lyrics. I request our knowledgeable readers to help point out the errors as applicable.


Song-Roothhe ko hai manaana (Jawaani)(1942) Singer-Surendra, Lyrics-Aarzoo Lucknowi, MD-Anil Biswas

Lyrics

Roothhe ko hai manaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana aa aa
dukh deta hai khatakta kaanta
dukh deta hai khatakta kaanta
sooli se hai banaana
sooli se hai banaana aa aa
Roothhe ko hai manaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana

humko bhi hai chupke chupke
humko bhi hai chupke chupke
prem ka bal dikhlaana aa aa
prem ka bal dikhlaana aa
thhandi saansen ae ae ae
thhandi saansen seekh rahin hain
hawa ka rukh paltaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana aa
Roothhe ko hai manaana

Ye hai badalti rut ka chakkar
is’se kya ghabraana aa aa
is’se kya ghabraana
Ye hai badalti rut ka chakkar
is’se kya ghabraana aa aa
is’se kya ghabraana
loot’ti jaati barkha tujhko
yahin hai laut ke aana aa
loot’ti jaati barkha tujhko
yahin hai laut ke aana
Roothhe ko hai manaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana aa
Roothhe ko hai manaana aa aa
dukh deta hai khatakta kaantaa
dukh deta hai khatakta kaantaa
sooli se hai banaana
sooli se hai banaana aa aa
Roothhe ko hai manaana
Roothhe ko hai manaana aa
Roothhe ko hai manaana


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4371 Post No. : 15705 Movie Count :

4329

———————————-
Hindi Songs in Bangla Films : 34
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‘Jalsaghar’ [(1958), Music Room] was Satyajit Ray’s third film (4th film in terms of the date of release). After the box office failure of his second film, ‘Aparajito’ (1957), Satyajit Ray decided to make a popular film which would cater to the taste of Bengali audience. ‘Jalsaghar’. the short story of Tarashankar Bandopadhyay was the basis for the film which had the popular subject of the declining fortunes of zamindars (landlords) who patronized arts and music. So, there would be scope for songs and dances which would attract the audience.

But how could a director of the stature of Satyajit Ray succumb to make a commercial film whose heart was attuned to making the intellectual films? So, the net result was that when ‘Jalsaghar’ (1958) shooting was completed, the popular subject of declining aristocracy became a serious subject. The popular music associated with such subject was turned into the hardcore Hindustani classical songs and a classical dance. In other words, the film took the shape of an artistic film and won the National Film Award, 1959 for the best feature film in Bengali.

It took quite a long time to search for a dilapidated palace in West Bengal for shooting the film. At last, someone from Murshidabad suggested Nimtita Rajabari in Murshidabad which suited well as a palace for a zamindar whose fortunes are on the decline. It was a great coincidence that later on, Tarashankar Bandopadhyay revealed to Satyajit Ray that his short story was inspired by landlord Upendra Narayan Chaudhury who stayed in Nimtita Rajabari. His descendants have now settled in Kolkata.

The film is available for viewing on one of the video sharing platforms in 10 parts with English sub-titles. While watching, I felt that the original film may have been edited to some extent. However, the continuity of the story seems to have been maintained. The film’s story is set in the mid 1930s and centres around Chhabi Biswas in the role of an aged music-loving landlord. He is present in almost all the frames of the film. Rest of the main actors like Padma Devi, Gangapada Bose, Tulsi Lahiri, and Kali Sarkar have subsidiary roles. The story as depicted in the film is as under:

Biswambar Roy (Chhabi Biswas) is an aged feudal landlord who lives in his dilapidated palace on the banks of a river. He has lost his wife, Mahamaya Devi (Padma Devi) and the only son, Khoka some years back when their boat capsized in the river during a storm. He has lost much of the land-holding due to the soil erosion created by the river. He has only one servant, Ananta (Kali Sarkar) and the Estate Manager (Tulsi Lahiri) to his company besides his horse and an elephant. To maintain his status as an aristocratic landlord, he indulges in lavish spending and pleasures like hosting concerts in his music room, high quality drinks etc. Much of his assets including the remaining land and jewelries have been mortgaged or sold.

While old Biswamber is resting in his room reminiscing his golden days as a wealthy landlord, Mahim Ganguly (Gangapada Bose), his neighbour and a neo-richman, visits the palace to invite him to attend his son’s thread ceremony. While Biswamber declines to attend giving an excuse that because of his old age, he has stopped going out of his palace. But this event reminds him of his son’s thread ceremony which he had conducted in pomp and show worthy of a landlord which included a grand firework in the night followed by a musical concert in his jalsaghar (music room) where all his guests were served choicest drinks. He also remembers that in the same night, his wife resented his spending on concerts too, by mortgaging her jewellery.

Biswamber also remembers that he had arranged a next musical concert on the day his wife and son were to return to the palace after the visit to her mother’s place, to celebrate the new year. This was also to show his might to his new-rich neighbour, Mahim even though for this, Biswamber had to sell some of his antique furniture and some more jewellery. While the concert was in the mid-way, he got the news that his wife and the son drowned in the river while returning on a boat.

After the death of his wife and son, Biswamber has been living in the palace alone with a servant to attend to him. His music room has remained locked for many years. He has become a recluse. He is in no mood to accept his neighbour Mahim’s personal invitation to attend his newly constructed house-warming ceremony and a dance concert. But it reminds him of his music room which has been closed for years. He orders his servant to open it at once. He spends some time inside the music room reminiscing of his glorious days.

In order to spite his neighbour, Biswamber decides to organise a dance concert of a famous kathak dancer from Banaras for which he spends his last cash reserves of Rs.500 for refurbishing his music room, arranging drinks to his guests and giving his last of the precious stones as a gift to the dancer. After the concert, though he has become almost bankrupt, a drunk Biswamber is very happy that he could effectively replicate his past glory to spite his neo-rich neighbour, Mahim.

However, as the night progresses, he observes that one by one the candles in the chandeliers of his music room are getting over, making the room dark. A frightened Biswamber linking the candle light-off to the end of his own life, calls his servant, Ananta who apprises him that the dawn is approaching. He would open the windows and the sunlight would make the room brightened. As the morning sun rises, in his last show of grandeur of his aristocracy, Biswamber mounts his favourite horse and rides at a faster pace away from the palace. But he is thrown out of the horse and dies at the banks of the river – the same river which is also responsible for the erosion of his land and the death of his wife and son.

The moral of the story is that though Biswamber knows that his fortunes are on the decline, he is not ready to adjust to the reality of the situation. Every effort is made to maintain his lavish spending even in the background of facing the adverse financial position. There is no need to compete in terms of prestige with the neo-rich, Mahim who has improved his economic condition by his business acumenship. On the other hand, Biswamber should have taken the clues from Mahim to diversify into some other business ventures. In both the cases – the decline of Zamindars and the emergence of non-Zamindar neo-rich, Satyajit Ray has very well explored human psychology of showmanship.

The highlight of the film is the superb performance by Chhabi Biswas in the role of an aged landlord. The entire film lies on his shoulder. It may be worthwhile to note that in reality, actor Chhabi Biswas belonged to an aristocratic family. He has personally witnessed the downfall of aristocracy. With this background, it comes naturally to him to perform his role of a falling aristocrat. In fact, there is so much of a genuineness in his performance that those who have watched the film would sympathise with him at the end of the film notwithstanding the fact that it is his ego and the false prestige which are responsible for his downfall.

One of the scenes in the film which I liked the most is when Biswamber enteres his jalsaghar (music room) for the first time after keeping it locked for some years. He spends about 5-6 minutes inside jalsaghar without any dialogue and the background music, observing each and every item – portraits of his forefathers, each and every chandeliers, furniture and fixtures etc. This scene reminds me of a similar scene in ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959) when an aged Guru Dutt visits his studio and glances the entire studio, reminiscing of his glorious days as a successful director. He touches the camera and sits on his director’s chair in the dark studio never to get up.

Satayjit Ray has used the camera as well as the expression and gestures of the main actors to move forward the story of the film more than the dialogues. My guess is that of 100 odd minutes of the film, the dialogues in the film would have cumulatively consumed not more than 40 minutes. Ustad Vilayat Khan has used mainly Sitar and Flute for background music which goes well with the ambience of the palace as well as the genre of the story.

Like ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959), ‘Jalsaghar’ (1958) had also the same fate of failure at the box office. The reviews of the film after its release in India were mostly adverse. It was only after a couple of years when the film was released in the US and the UK, it received a cult status. Over a period of time, the film has been one of the widely discussed classic films of Satyajit Ray like ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959). In June 2018, the film was shown in the Siri Fort Auditorium, the only Indian classic film shown at Navras Duende World Film Festival.

‘Jalsaghar’ (1958) has two songs – both rendered in Hindustani classical raags. In addition, the film also has the 8-minute of Kathak dance by Roshan Kumari, the daughter of playback singer, Zohrabai Ambalewaali. I am presenting a traditional thumri ‘bhar bhar aayi mori ankhiyaan piya bin’ rendered by Begum Akhtar. The song is picturised on Begum Akhtar herself up to say 01:45 of duration. Thereafter, the actress singing the song is different until Begum Akhtar surfaces again towards the end of the song. However, the entire duration of the song is rendered by Begum Akhtar. The Thumri was set to music by Ustad Vilayat Khan.

The background of the song is that Biswamber Roy remembers his olden days when after the thread ceremony of his son, he had arranged a concert in the night in his jalsaghar where all the guests had been served with drinks. All the money spent for the event was raised by selling his wife’s jewellery.

The director’s camera captures many other details while the singer is rendering the Thumri. The camera pans over the entire jalsaghar to show the grandeur of the music room. The camera also captures other subsidiary activities simultaneously going on, both physically and mentally. The camera focuses on Chhabi Biswas who is shown to be listening very intensely. But behind the intensity, he is also thinking something else as his eyes remain static, probably remembering many such music soirees of the past. His neighbour, Gangapada Bose is inhaling snuff but at the same time, he is embarrassed as to whether any of the guests has noticed his action. The camera also captures him in trying to control his sneeze following inhaling the snuff and thereafter searching for a glass of drink.

This film, in my view, is a ‘must see’ for those who believe the films as the director’s medium and also for the excellent performance of Chhabi Biswas as an aged landlord.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Bhar bhar aayi mori ankhiyaan piya bin (Jalsaghar)(Bangla)(1958) Singer-Begam Akhtar, MD-Ustaad Vilaayat Khan

Lyrics

aaaaaa
aaa aa aa aaaa
aaa aaa aaaaaa
aaaa aaa aa
aaaaaaaaa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aa aa
aa aa aa aaaa
aaaaaaaaa
aaa aaa aaa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa aa
aa aa aaaa aa aaaa
ae bhar bhar aayin mori ankhiyaan
piyaa bin
bhar bhar aayin mori ankhiyaan
piyaa bin
bhar bhar
bhar bhar aa………yin
bhar bhar aa………yin
aa aa aa aaa aaa
ae ae ae
bhar bhar aayin aa aaa
bhar bhar aayin mori ankhiyaan
piya bin
bhar bhar aayin
bhar bhar aayin
aa……yi
aa……yi mori ankhiyaan
bhar bhar aayin mori
bhar bhar aayin mori ankhiyaan
piya bin

ghir ghir aayin…een een een…… een een
ghir ghir aayin..een kaari ee ee badariya aa aa
ghir ghir aayi..ee
aa…..aa….yi
ghir ghir aayin
o o ghir ghir
ghir ghir aa..yin een kaari ee badariya
dharkan laagi mori chhatiyaan
piya bin
dharkan laagi


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4361 Post No. : 15684

Today’s song, rather a beautiful Bhajan, is from the film Bhagwat Mahima-55. Earlier 3 songs/Bhajans of this film are discussed here, so it will be the 4th Bhajan from this film to appear here.

The film was made by Filmistan. It was directed by a veteran All-rounder Vithaldas Panchotiya and the music was composed by Hemant kumar- who was famous for creating Bhajans in films.

Hemant Kumar’s associaton with Filmistan started with the film Anand math-52. Director Hemen Gupta recommended his name to S.Mukherjee at that time. Having heard Hemant’s name for his Bangla songs, Mukherjee accepted his name. Earlier C Ramchandra had left Filmistan during the making of film Shabistan-51, due to the interference of his old tormentor Bibhuti Mitra, the film Director.(He was called for the film Anarkali again, after Basant Prakash had left halfway).

Hemant did many films for Filmistan like Shart-54, Samrat-54,Nagin-54, Jagriti-54, Bhagwat Mahima-55 and Durgesh nandini-56. When Hemant was asked to make music for the film Nagin, an interesting event happened. S.Mukherjee had never worked with Master Bhagwan, but he had immense faith in Bhagwan’s Music sense. Most times Mukherjee used to ask Bhagwan’s advice on song tunes of his films. One day, C Ramchandra hosted a party at his bungalow-Sai prasad, Dadar, to celebrate Silver jubilee of film Albela. When the party was in full swing, on the IIIrd floor terrace, Mukherjee called Bhagwan aside and asked him to come with him to the ground floor. Bhagwan was surprised, but without questioning, he accompanied him to the ground floor. There he saw a young man with a Harmonium. Mukherjee said,” Dada, listen to these tunes and give me your opinion.” Then he turned to that young bespectacled man and asked him to play his song tunes. After listening to the tunes, Bhagwan looked excited and said,” My God, kya superb tunes hai ye. Sab gaane hit honge”. That was Hemant Kumar with Nagin Tunes ! Needless to say that Mukherjee passed all tunes.

The decade of 1950s, besides being a part of the “Golden Era” of Hindi film music, also was a very favourable period for Religious films. This was a decade in which maximum number of Mythological/Religious films were made – a record number of 124 films in 10 years’ time. This gave an unprecedented average of One film every month for 10 years at a stretch ! This was a period when joint families still existed and there were many senior citizens in almost every family-who were keen on seeing religious films. The TV had not yet arrived and stage dramas were relegated to the second place in entertainment for families.

During the 1960s and the 1970s, the number of Religious films dwindled, as a variety of topics were handled by films – including the New Wave films, which focused on different issues of the Middle class Indians.

Film Bhagwat Mahima-55 was based on Bhagwat Puran stories. Out of all the 18 Puranas of Hindu religion, Bhagwat Puran is the most popular and most read scripture. It contains 18000 Shlokas in 12 Cantos or Chapters and has stories about Lord Shri Krishna and his devotees. Bhagwat puran has 3 main sections, which emphasize about 1) Bhakti Yog or the Spiritual path to God, 2) Dnyaan Yog or the Wisdom Path and 3) (Nishkaam) Karm Yog or the Virtuous Action Path (without expecting fruits thereof). The entire Puran is about Krishna from his birth to his exit from this world and stories about events and people connected with him throughout his Mortal life.

Hemant Kumar (16-6-1920 to 26-9-1989) excelled in religious films, with his melodious music,often sung in his own voice. Looking at his career statistics, he was more successful as a Singer in Hindi films than as a Music Director. He sang 320 songs in 173 films, while he gave music to only 55 films, composing 423 songs, in his career. I simply love his songs, especially his duets with Lata and Geeta Dutt.

When he first came to Bombay in 1951 to score music for film Anand Math-52, he had a problem with Hindi language pronunciations. As a professional, it is to his credit that he tried hard and successfully corrected his Hindi, while retaining the characteristic Bangla sweetness in his voice. Lata had once said,” when Hemant Kumar sings, you feel a Sadhu is singing !”. Hemant Kumar usually wore a Dhoti and Kurta. His voice was typically different and by nature he was a thorough Gentleman.

The director of this film was Vithaldas Panchotiya. Except those readers, who have a knowledge of early era Hindi films, it is unlikely that other readers might have even heard this name. In the early era, when the studio system was firmly established, the artistes employed by the studio had no specific duties. Anybody and everybody had to do what was needed by the company. Due to this many capable artistes became all rounders in film making.

Vithaldas Panchotiya was certainly one such person. He has been a Producer, Director, story writer, dialogue writer, screenplay writer, lyricist, Singer, Music Director and God knows what else !

Born in October 1906 in Vadnagar in Gujarat, he followed his father’s footsteps. His father worked in stage dramas and toured with the drama company. From the age of 8 years Vithaldas started acting in dramas. Later he joined Calcutta’s Alfred Drama company, owned by Madon Theatres Limited. He worked on a salary of Rs. 35 pm. While working in dramas, he established his own Gujarat Film company and produced 12 silent films in 10 years. Vithaldas first acted in silent film ‘ Dhruv charitra’-1921. He learnt dance and music too. He acted , directed, sang songs and gave music also. He acted in Talkie film ” Muflis Ashiqe”-1932, claimed to be India’s first comedy film. He acted, sang and composed music for this film.

Being a staunch Gandhian, he used to participate in rallies etc. Some of his films were Hindustan-32, Insaf ki Tope-34, Gaibi Gola-35 ( he was the writer and the director too.He gave a break to Baby Noorjahan in this film.), Khudai Khidamadgar-37 aka Garib ki Tope, Takdir ki Tope-38 etc . As per one source, he acted in 35 films, directed 10 talkie films, sang 8 songs, gave music to 1 film and wrote Lyrics to 2 films. Additionally story, dialogues and screenplay writing were also done by him. Some of his films were, Shaikh chilli-37, Khush naseeb-46, Prabhu ki maya-55, Ghar ki numaish-49, Karmaveer-38, Raman-54, Jagriti-54, Hum sab chor hain-56, Basant 60, Bhagvat mahima etc.

I find it very difficult to know exactly how many films he did in various capacities in the 1930s, as there are conflicting claims by him and Master Fida Hussain. In a few cases the details in HFGK and what he claims, gets contradicted. Some of his films in the 40s are Ramanuj-43, Giribala-47, Grihalaxmi-48, Ghar ki Numaish-48 ( released only in 1962, with the title ‘ Jai ho muhabbat ki ‘ )

Thanks to information and statistical data provided by Shri Harish Raghuwanshi ji of Surat, we know that his Filmography consists of a total 11+ 26 films. The break up is-

11 silent films
25 Talkie films as Actor and 1 film as a writer only.
9 films as a Director
2 films as Lyricist and
2 films as Music Director
As per Muvyz data, he sang 37 songs in 8 films.

from 1951 to 1960, he did 13 films- mostly ( 9) for Filmistan. He directed 2 of them. After 1960 his work was reduced. The death of his 3 sons broke him emotionally. As a true Gandhian, it was his dream to make a film- Gandhi Sangram- on mahatma Gandhi. He had done all the spade work and the Muhurat of shooting was also done on 2-10-1987, The Government had promised finance. Even Rajiv Gandhi promised him that. However nothing came to him and he died on 30-10-1996, with his dream unfulfilled.

His daughter Shradha used to work in Gujarati films. She too died in a Train accident in 2000. Her daughter Deepshikha is an actress.

The story of the film Bhagwat Mahima-55 is……

Nagar Seth, a rich man living in one of the gayest cities of India, had everything he wanted in life with one exception. And that was his having no children. His wife, Shanta, consoled him by saying that it was better not to have a child rather than have one who would ruin the fair name of the family by his mis-deeds. She narrated to her husband the story of Sukhram who served his son for three generations in the forms of a bull, a dog and a serpent, even though he could have gone to heaven without doing this service. His son, however, ill-treated the father throughout. Anyway, the story failed to impress Nagar Seth.

One day Shri Jagat Guru Shankaracharya happened to pass through the town. Shanta, who was a disciple of his, requested him to console her husband. In doing so, Shankaracharya narrated a story from the Immortal Classic, Shrimad Bhagvat, wherein Atmadev, also placed in similar circumstances, prayed for a child. Doing penance, Atmadev had `darshan of Narad Muni who gave him a fruit saying that his wife would beget a noble son if she ate the fruit. . Atmadevs wife had no faith in miracles and, on the advice of her sister, Ganga, gave the fruit to her cow.
Ganga, who was expecting a baby, offered her child to Dhundhuli (Atmadevs wife) for some consideration. Thus, Atmadev was made to believe that Ganga’s child was his own. He was named Dhundhukari.

At the same time, the cow which had eaten the fruit, also gave birth to a son who was human in every feature except his ears which were shaped like cows. This boy was also brought up by Atmadev and named “Gokarn”.

Both the boys grew up together and, in due course, became young men. Gokarn, who led a pious and righteous life, became a learned and famous man. Dhundhukari, on the other hand, grew up in bad ways and became the terror of the town. . One day, Dhundhukaris real father, i.e.Ganga’s husband, told Atmadev about his son’s real identity. This so much upset Atmadev that he went away into the forest. There, later, he lost his life.

Champa, a helpless girl and one of the many victims of Dhundhukari, conspired with some of her friends and killed Dhundhukari. Because of his manifold sins, he then became a wandering ghost. . Gokarn, who had now become a Mahatma, was at Gaya offering `Pind Dan to his deceased father when he learned about Dhundhukari’s fate. To relieve him of his ghostly existence, Gokarn offered `Pind Dan not once, but 108 times. Still, he was not successful. He then offered prayers to Suryadev on the advice of learned pandits. Suryadev, pleased with the prayers, blessed Gokarn and asked him to recite Shrimad Bhagvat for the salvation of Dhundhukari’s ghost.

Today’s Bhajan is sung by Hemant Kumar. It is a very good Bhajan rendered equally nicely by Hemant Kumar. I like it very much. You too will.


Song-Digant Nath devta anant roop sohta (Bhagwat Mahima)(1955) Singer- Hemant Kumar, Lyricist-Sarswati Kumar Deepak, MD- Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

om Japakusuma Samkaasham Kashyapeyam Mahadhyuthim
?? Tamorim Sarva Paapaghnam Pranathosmi Divakaram

Digant Nath devata
anant roop sohta
tamas kiran anek se
?? vishw paalate
Digant Nath devata
anant roop sohta
tamas kiran anek se
?? vishw paalate
Digant Nath devata

kripaalu Ravi kripa karo
kripaalu Ravi kripa karo
dayaalu Ravi daya karo
mahaan ye ?? tu
ke tum karo ??te
Digant Nath devata

suna rahe digant ke
anant ?? bhairavi
saja rahe ho tum nishaan
vishw bhar ki aarti
dukhon se ?? mukti do
ubaarne ki yukti do
sabhi ke paap taap ko
prabhu tumhi sanwaarte
Digant Nath devata
anant roop sohta
tamas kiran anek se
?? vishw paalate
Digant Nath devata
Digant Nath devata aa aa
Digant Nath devata aa aa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4354 Post No. : 15670

Today’s song is from the film Sant Tulsidas-1939. The first film on Tulsidas came in 1934, the second in 1939 and the third in 1972. In all, there were 13 films on various saints of India. Sant Dnyaneshwar (40, 64, 81), Sant Janabai-49, Sant Raghu-57, Sant Ravidas-2007, Sant Ravidas ki amar kahani–83, Sant Sakhu-41, Sant Tukaram-48 and Sant Tulsidas-34, 39, 72.

Basically, Indians are religious minded, – Indians means, of any religion, be it Hindu, Muslim or Christian or any other faith. Our common culture is like that. Most traditions are similar in all religions in India. For example, Hindus say ” Atithi Devo Bhava ” (अतिथी देवो भव ). Guest is God. All Indians, irrespective of their religions, give due respect to their guests. ” Respect the elders ” is another tradition. This too is followed by every Indian-of any religion- in India. Sometimes I feel, in India, our lives are more governed by the culture than religion. One can occasionally find an Atheist, but you can never find an Indian without following culture and traditions. This is a major difference between an Indian and the other Nationals.

If you take a look at our religion, it is not just ‘ one of the ‘ , but the only tolerant religion in the world, which is also adaptive to times. There is enough elasticity in Hinduism to make suitable changes in the implementation of Karmkand, as per the needs of the times. This has made it survive for thousands of years. For example, once Untouchability was a great ill, but due to the hard work of our saints over the years, this is eradicated. Women’s entry into temples, only Male Pujaris and several such matters are corrected and accepted. The main principle is ” different religions are different roads to reach God “. So, every road is respected. Due to this principle, with 80 % population of one religion, many other religions have happily thrived here. What’s more, in most eras, Minority rulers were accepted by the Majority.

Our culture allows opposition to its principles. It respects the ” other ” point of view too. In which other country would you find temples for its religious enemies ? Only in India, you have not just one, but several temples of villains like Ravan, Duryodhan, Shakuni etc. There is a Ravan temple one each in Bisrakh-U.P., Mandsaur-M.P., Kakinada in A.P. and in Jodhpur-Rajasthan- where Ravan is considered as their Son In Law, because Mandodari was born here.

There is a Duryodhan Temple in Kollam, Kerala and a temple for Shakuni also in the same town. There are also other temples like for Gandhari in Mysore, Karna in Uttarkashi, Hidimba in Manali-H.P., Draupadi in Bangalore and also for Jatayu in Nashik district !

The point I am trying to stress is that in India, several saints came, but none has preached hatred against other religions. They all taught us good ways of living with all and how the ultimate aim should be to be with God. Sant Tulsidas was also no different than others . His biggest work was to translate Valmiki Ramayan into an easy to understand common man’s language.

Film companies developed interest in making saint movies, when Prabhat’s Marathi film ‘ Sant Tukaram ‘-36 became successful. It won praise throughout the world, won several awards and the international Film Festival at Venis declared it as one of the 3 Greatest films of the world ! The film ran for 57 weeks at Central Talkies, Bombay and all over India, it grossed over 7 lakh rupees in those days. The acting of Vishnupant Pagnis in this film was appreciated much.

Considering all this, the commercial potential of such films was understood by Sardar Chandulal Shah of Ranjit Films. He decided to make a Bilingual film on Tulsidas, with Pagnis in the lead role. However Pagnis was on contract with Prabhat films. Chandulal met Shantaram and negotiated a deal to borrow Pagnis and story writer Shivram Vashikar for film Tulsidas.

The director of the film was Jayant Desai and MD for the Hindi version was Gyan Dutt and for Marathi it was Vishnupant himself. As against 14 songs in the Hindi version, there were 21 songs in Marathi version. Almost all songs of this film became popular. The Prabhat film Tukaram was devoid of any Miracles or trick scenes, but Chandulal decided to include as many trick scenes and Miracles, as possible in film Tulsidas.

The songs were written by P L Santoshi and Pt. Indra. For Marathi version, S A Shukla was the lyricist. Naren Mukherji was the assistant to Gyan Mukherjee for this film. The cast of the film was Vishnupant Pagnis, Leela Chitnis, Keshavrao Datey, Bandopant Sohoni, Ram Marathe, Vasanti, Kantilal and others.

Vishnupant Pagnis was born in a small place Chikodi, near Kolhapur, on 1-11-1892, in a lower middle class family. After formal education, he was assisted by Shahu Maharaj of Kolhapur state to join a Drama company at the age of 10 years. He sang naturally, without any training from an expert. He was a popular artiste doing female roles, till his entry in films. He shifted to work in various drama companies including “Lalit Kaladarsh” of Mama Varerkar- a name connected with many Marathi and Hindi films of that time. In 1913, he floated his own company ‘Jagchitradarsh’, only to wind up after two years in 1915. He continued working in dramas and doing female roles, for which he was famous in those times.

After a few years, he left drama acting. In 1920, he worked in a silent film, Surekha Haran. In this film V Shantaram had also acted. After this he worked as a Music Teacher in Municipal school at Girgaum in Bombay. After his wife died, he lived with his friend Petkar. They started a Gold Jewellery shop “Pagnis Petkar and Mandali” in Girgaon.

When Prabhat Film company planned to make Sant Tukaram, a search was undertaken for the main role and the main female role. This was in early 1936 and he was selected for the role of Tukaram, while a worker in the Prabhat company-Gauri – was selected as his wife. The Director duo of the film- Damle and Fattelal- were not happy about his selection, because his name was associated with female roles. But this became his strong point for the film in which he portrayed a soft, kind and loving Tukaram. He did the role so well that the film Sant Tukaram became an International Hit, in addition to running to full houses in Non Marathi areas like Madras Presidency, covering Andhra, Tamilnadu, Kerala and Karnataka and also in Bengal and Punjab. He became an actor in great demand for Saint films. After the film Sant Tukaram, hundreds of people used to crowd in his shop at Girgaum to pay respects and touch his feet as Tukaram. He also always dressed like Tukaram thereafter !

Vishnupant Pagnis worked in 4 more such films, namely Sant Tulsidas-39, Narsi Bhagat-43, Bhakta Raj-43 and his last film Mahatma Vidur-43. He also gave music to 2 films, Sant Janabai- 38 and Sant Tulsidas-39 (Marathi). These two and Mahatma Vidur were also made in Marathi language. His most famous film Sant Tukaram was released in Hindi only in 1948, but without his songs, because he had died on 3-10-1943. The MD- Snehal Bhatkar sang his songs in the Hindi version.

Vishnupant Pagnis did the immortal role of Tukaram in his first film and then lived the role throughout his life, though he did 4 more films in the same Genre of Saint films. His name became famous not only in India but also in other countries, when this film was hailed as “one of the 3 Best films in the world” at the Venice Film Festival, where it won accolades. Records of his Bhajans from this film created records ( we too had these records in our house in the 40s.) Even today this film is shown and discussed in the film Institutes of many countries. Many books, essays and articles are published on this film. His performance as Tukaram has become a major reference-point in debates about Indian performance idioms: e.g. Kumar Shahani’s essay The Saint Poets of Prabhat, 1981; Geeta Kapur’s Mythic Material in Indian Cinema, 1987 etc etc.

The story of Tulsidas is well known. Ranjit Studio’s big-budget miracle-laden saint film was on Tulsidas (16th C.), who rewrote Valmiki’s Ramayana in Hindi. To the despair of his teacher Narahari Guru (Sohoni), who hopes that Tulsidas (Pagnis) will make the classic text accessible to the people, the poet spends time with his beloved wife Ratnavali (Chitnis). The dramatic pivot of the story comes when Tulsidas discovers his life’s location amid howling wind and a river in spate. He becomes an ascetic and settles down in Benares where his translation threatens the Brahminical clergy, until then sole proprietors of the wisdom of the Sanskrit text. Their representative, Batteshwar Shastri (Datey), persecutes Tulsidas who is rescued through divine intervention.

Today’s song is a solo song by Vishnupant Pagnis. It is dripping with Bhakti Ras.

(Ack: information for this post is culled, with thanks, from books – ” A Primer of Hinduism” by D S Sarma, Santpatanchi Santwani (संतपटांची संतवाणी ) by Isak Mujawar, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema and my notes)


Song-Mujhe Raam se koi mila de (Sant Tulsidas)(1939) Singer- Vishnupant Pagnis, Lyricist- P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

Raam se koi mila de…
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
bin laathhi ka nikla andha
bin laathhi ka nikla andha
raah se koi lagaa de ae
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de

koi kahe wo basey Avadh mein
koi kahey Vrindaawan mein

koi kahe wo basey Avadh mein
koi kahey Vrindaawan mein
koi kahey teerath mandir mein
koi kahey milte ban mein

koi kahey teerath mandir mein
koi kahey milte ban mein
dekh sakoon main un ko man mein
dekh sakoon main un ko man mein
aisi jyot jagaa de ae
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
bin laathhi ka nikla andha
bin laathhi ka nikla andha
raah se koi lagaa de ae
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de
mujhe Raam se koi mila de


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4330 Post No.: 15624

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Bangla Song in Hindi Films-2
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‘Basu (Bhattacharya) used to be fired up by one-liners. He drew stories from one-line coming from his fertile mind’ thus said Rinki Roy Bhattacharya, daughter of Bimal Roy and the ex-wife of the late Basu Bhattacharya in an interview. After going through the interviews of Rinki Roy Bhattacharya and Gulzar who had been associated with Basu Bhattacharya, I have come with my own one-liner about Basu Bhattacharya. He made high quality films with low budget. His first film as a producer-director, ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) was made with a budget of Rs.one lakh only.

How did Basu Bhattacharya managed to produce and direct low budget films? Except the lead actors, he took his close friends as side actors, lyricists, music director and technicians with a tacit understanding that they will work within his low budget. And none of them seems to mind it as they kept their personal friendship above the professional relationship. He did not shoot the film in a studio but hired flats for shooting. For example, he majorly shot ‘Anubhav’ (1971) in Tanuja’s flat. ‘Aavishkar’ (1974) was majorly shot in his own flat at Khar.

Basu Bhattacharya (1934 -1997) was born in a priestly family in Kassim Bazar of Murshidabad district in West Bengal. From his teenage days, he was fond of watching films which led to his interest in film-related works. After watching Satyajit Ray’s ‘Aparajito’ (1956), he developed interest in film making. After the decline of New Theatres, some artists, technicians moved to Bombay (Mumbai) in early 1950s who were mostly accommodated either by Shashidhar Mukherjee of Filmistan or Bimal Roy. Basu Bhattacharya was so much influenced by Raj Kapoor’s films ‘Aawaara’ (1951) and ‘Shri 420’ (1956) that he came to Bombay (Mumbai) in 1956 with the sole intention of assisting Raj Kapoor. When his efforts to get entry into R K Studios failed, he joined Bimal Roy Productions as an Assistant to Bimal Roy for Madhumati (1958) and ‘Sujata’ (1959). He became the second unit Director for Bimal Roy’s film, ‘Parakh’ (1960).

During the making of ‘Parakh’ (1960), Basu Bhattacharya and Rinki Roy, Bimal Roy’s elder daughter developed liking for each other which was resented by her parents. After the completion of ‘Parakh’ (1960), Basu Bhattacharya left Bimal Roy Productions and became a free-lancer. Rinki Roy and Basu Bhattacharya got married in a court some time in 1963. Soon after the marriage, Basu Bhattachraya was entrusted with directing Shailendra’s maiden film, ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966). With this film, Basu Bhattacharya got opportunity to direct Raj Kapoor to whom 10 years back, he was keen to assist him.

Basu Bhattacharya turned producer with the film ‘Uski Kahaani’ (1966) which he also directed. Thereafter, he concentrated his three films – a trilogy of marital discords in an urban setting – ‘Anubhav’ (1971), ‘Aavishkar’ (1974) and ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1979). All these films portray the struggle of the husband and wife to protect their marriage despite a third person entering into their married life. At the end, it is mutual realization that a happy home is the platform for a happy married life. In between, Basu Bhattacharya produced and directed ‘Tumhaara Kalloo’ (1975) which dealt with the importance of education in a village setting.

Basu Bhattacharya’s next film, ‘Anand Mahal’ (1977) was based on Badal Sarkar’s popular Bangla play, ‘Ballavpurer Roopkathaa’ which he produced and directed. The film was completed but remained unreleased. Dinesh Shankar Shailendra, younger son of the late Shailendra who was assisting Basu Bhattacharya in the film, very recently revealed on his facebook page that after editing work was over, Salil Chowdhury started composing background music. After completing the background music work, Salil Chowdhury told Basu Bhattacharya that it was a bad film which was shot like a play. He said that the release of the film would harm his reputation as a director. After listening to the flaws in the film in detail, Basu Bhattacharya accepted Salil Chowdhury’s advice and decided not to release the film.

During his life time, Basu Bhattacharya produced/directed around 15 films which included, in addition to those mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, ‘Daakoo’ (1975), ‘Sangat’ (1976), ‘Madhu Malti’ (1980), ‘Sparsh’ (1980), ‘Ek Saas Zindagi’ (1991) and ‘Aastha’ (1997) which was his last film. Although some of his films were critically acclaimed, almost all of his films did not fare well at the box office. His films, ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) and ‘Anubhav’ (1971) received National Awards for Best Film and the Second-Best Film respectively.

While Basu Bhattacharya produced three films on marital discord, his own married life with Rinki Roy Bhattacharya was in doldrum for domestic violence. There are details available in the interview of his ex-wife in the public domain. I feel that Basu Bhattacharya had split personalities – as a film director and as a husband.

Basu Bhattacharya left for the heavenly abode on 27/08/1997.

‘Anubhav’ (1971) was Basu Bhattacharya’s first film of the trilogy of marital discords. The film was made with the assistance of Film Corporation of India (now National Film Development Corporation). The cast included Sanjeev Kumar and Tanuja in lead roles as married couple with Dinesh Thakur as the third person and A K Hangal as the man servant in the household of the couple.

As per Rinki Roy Bhattacharya’s interview, the film started with Pran and Tanuja in the lead role. Some scenes were already shot with Pran. However, after watching the rushes of shots, Basu Bhattacharya decided that the role of an office going husband did not suit Pran. So, he was replaced with Sanjeev Kumar.

I had watched the film many years back (probably on TV) but I failed to recall sequential progression of the story of the film especially as to how the film ended. Recently, I watched the film with HD quality DVD on one of the video sharing platforms. Wow! What a film. After ‘Pyaasa’ (1957), I have immensely enjoyed watching this film in Black and White photography. I feel that the film would not have looked cinematically great if it was made in colour.

‘Anubhav’ (1971) is the story of Meeta (Tanuja), the lonely wife of the workaholic Amar (Sanjeev Kumar) who is the editor of a newspaper. There is not much time for Meeta for the companionship of her husband as he leaves for office early morning and returns late in the night fully exhausted. The one dialogue of Meeta in the film sums up her position in the house when she says to Amar that she felt as if she has been staying in a hotel with all the comforts but nothing for her to do.

She starts rediscovering herself. The first thing she does is that she removes all her servants except Hari (A K Hangal) so that she can keep herself busy with her household work. Now, she is the real in charge of her home. She is able to persuade Amar to spend more time in the house. He hosts parties in the house. Thus, Meeta is able to make him understand the joy of marital bliss.

When things were moving in the right direction for Amar and Meeta, one day, Shashi Bhushan (Dinesh Thakur) comes to meet Meeta without any prior intimation. He was Meeta’s first lover to whom she has forgotten after her marriage. In fact, he has come to get her recommendation for a job at Amar’s office where he has given an interview. He has no intention of reviving his love interest when Meeta seems to be very happy with her married life. She refuses to recommend his case by telling him that she does not interfere in Amar’s office matters. However, Shashi Bhushan does get a job at Amar’s office and in due course of time, he becomes his right- hand man.

When Amar comes to know about the past of Shashi being a lover of Meeta, his male ego creates a storm in their married life. Some time the discord in their married life is open in the presence of Shashi who often visits Amar in his house for office related work. At last, Amar in the fists of anger asks Shashi to resign from the job. But Shashi has already decided to leave the job when he comes to know that he has become the reason for marital discord between Amar and Meeta. When Amar reads the resignation letter of Shashi, he has change of heart. He rejects his resignation letter and ask him to continue the work.

After the resignation drama, there is an apt dialogue between Shashi and Amar. Shashi says ‘mujhe pataa nahin, beeta huwa kal aaj hamaare beech kaisa aa gaya.’ (I don’t know how our bygone days have come between us in our present-day life). To which Amar says ‘beeta huwa kal aaj hamaare beech tab hi aata hai jab hum aaj ko puri tarah se jee nahi paate’. (Bygone days between us comes only when we are not able to enjoy fully our present-day life). The film ends with a positive note clearing all the misunderstanding between Amar, Meeta and Shashi and Meeta giving news to Amar of her pregnancy.

The film has been nicely produced with excellence in almost all the major aspects of the film – direction, acting, dialogues, photography, music etc. The background music in the film has been innovatively done with signature tune of Aakashvani and songs being played in the radio etc. I could faintly hear a Bangla song and a Hindi film song, taash ke baawan patte as part of background music.

Another highlight of the film is the excellent picturization of 4 melodious songs set to music by Kanu Roy with a minimal orchestration. I liked the picturization of one of the film’s songs, meri jaan mujhe jaan na kaho. It is to the credit of Basu Bhattacharya that such a romantic song has been picturised just at one place – at one of the closed windows of the house with the background of heavy rains outside the house. With this song, he has proved that an intense romantic mood in the song can be picturised without going to outdoor shooting or even to Switzerland as Yash Chopra may have done with similar situation. And what a play of words by Gulzar! The words ‘jaan’ has been used both as ‘love’ as well as ‘life’.

All the 4 songs of ‘Anubhav’ (1971) have been covered in the Blog. But there is one more song, a Bangla song ‘sedin dujone dulechhinu bone’, a Tagore song which is rendered by and picturised on Subir Sen. The occasion is a party hosted by Amar in his house in which Subir Sen, (in the role of Subir Sen, the singer) is also invited. The lyrics and the tune are by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore which he composed in 1922. In this song, no orchestration has been used except the harmonium.

I have taken the lyrics, Hindi poetic translation and English translation of the song from http://www.geetbatin.com. I was surprised to note that the Hindi poetic translation was composed in the same metre as Tagore Song. So one can sing Hindi translated song in the tune used for Bangla song.

S D Burman has used the tune of this Tagore song in naina deewaane ek nahin maane from the film ‘Afsar’ (1950).

Acknowledgements for the sources of information on Basu Bhattacharya: (1) Interview of Rinki Roy Bhattacharya by Sonal Pandya published in ‘Cinestan’, Feb 04, 2018 and (2) Interview of Gulzar published in a old issue of ‘Filmfare’, republished in https://tanqeed.com/

Video Clip:

Song-Sedin dujone dulechhinu bone (Anubhav)(1971) Singer-Subir Sen, Lyrics-Rabindranath Tagore, MD-Rabindranath Tagore

Lyrics (Sourced from http://www.geetbitan.com)
———————————–

sedin dujone dulechhinu bone
phulodore bandhaa jhulonaa
sei sritituku kobhu khone khone
jeno jaage mone bhulo na
bhulo na
bhulo na..aa
sedin dujone dulechhinu bone
phulodore baandhaa jhulonaa
se din baatase chhilo tumi jaano
aamari monero prolapo joraano,
se din baatase chhilo tumi jaano
aamari monero prolapo joraano,
aakashe aakashe aachhilo chhoraano
tomaro haasiro tulona
bhulo na
bhulo na
bhulo na
sedin dujone dulechhinu bone
phulodore baandhaa jhulonaa

jete jete paathe poornima raate
chaand uthechhilo gaagone
dekha hoyechhilo tomaate aamate
ki jaani ki mahalagone
ekhon aamar bela naahi aar….

Lines not covered in the song

bohibo ekaaki birohero bhaar –
Bnaadhinu je raakhi porane tomar se
raakhi khulo na khulo na

——————————–
Hindi Poetic Translation
(Sourced from http://www.geetbitan.com)
———————————–
वो दिन सुहाना-फुलडोर-बंधे
झूले थे हम वन में झूलना ॥
छोटी-मोटी वो यादें मन में जो जागे
पल वो हम कभी भूले-ना, भूलें-ना ॥

उस दिन हवा में, तुमने भी माना
पागल-वन मेरे, मन का सामाना ।
नीले नीले नभ ने, हरष छा जाता,
तेरे ही हँसी की तुलना ।
भूलो ना, भूलो ना, भूलो ना ॥

राह पे हमराही रात पूनम थी,
चांद चमका नभ में
न जाने वो कौन सी महालगन में
हम ओर तुम थे मिले

(जब) चांद चमकता नभ पे
अब वो बेला बीत चली
बार विरह के सहुं अकेले ।
जो राखी बांधे मैंने प्राण संग तेरे
वो राखी खुले ना, खुले ना, भुले ना ॥

——————————
English Translation (Sourced from http://www.geetbitan.com)
——————————

We had had a swing in the forest on the other day,
It was a swing adorned with garlands.
Wish we do not lose that tiny remembrance which looms about every now and then.

The air was filled with, you know, the meaningless words of my mind,
The sky (was) sprinkled with samples of your smile.
The moon was seen to rise in the sky on the full-moon day while strolling.
Just have no idea of the divine moment on which we had had met each other.

Now I have no time left, and will bear the feeling of solitude alone in myself-

(Please be kind enough) Not to shed the friendship band that (I had) tied with your soul.


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4330 Post No.: 15623

Today’s song is from film Aagey Kadam-43. This is an obscure movie, in the sense that no information about its story etc is available anywhere on the Net or Film India magazine issues. However, from the lyrics of its various songs, one can say that the film is about a love story set amidst Patriotic atmosphere. Of course, being British times, such films had to be careful, lest their raw material quota of Raw Film would get into problem, during the wartime controls. Further the tablet of patriotism has to be sugar coated, so as not to get into legal tangle like perhaps”Kismet” of Bombay Talkies !

Among the wartime films, from 1939 to 1945, I feel that the year 1943 was quite significant as many musical, noteworthy and successful films came up during this year. Taking a look at the films of 1943, we find that a total of 105 Hindi films were made in this year. For the 7 year period of 39 to 45, this was the highest number – the lowest being 1945 with just 74 films.

Films like Aabroo, Bhakta Raj, Hamaari baat, Hospital, Hunterwali ki beti, Ishara, Kanoon, Kashinath, Kismet, Mahatma Vidur, Manchali, Mazaq, Nadaan, Nagad Narayan (a remake of Marathi film-‘ पैसा बोलतो आहे ), Nai Kahani (one of the best songs of Hindi film history-” neend hamari, khwaab tumhare ” was from this film), Najma (first film of Mehboob productions), Namaste,, Pagli, Panghat (film Chitchor-76 had the same story), Paapi, Paraya Dhan (The only song by Deena Sanghvi Pathak), Poonji, Prithvi Vallabh (debut in a Bombay film by Meena Shorey), Ram Rajya (super duper Hit film), Sanjog (Suraiya’s playback to Mehtab), Shahenshah Akbar, Shakuntala (First film of Rajkamal Kalamandir of V Shantaram), Tansen (last film of Nagendra Majumdar-father of Ninu Majumdar,MD), Vishwas, Wapas, and Zamin (debut of Khurshid Jr.), made 1943 an year full of content, Music, Acting and entertainment.

Amongst these films, a movie like Aagey kadam-43 was nowhere to be noticed or remembered. The film was made by Acharya Art Production, owned by its director, N R Acharya. This is what Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about Acharya….N R Acharya,Hindi director (1909-1993) born in Karachi. Was a government contractor when he joined East India film Company in Calcutta (1934). Later worked as production manager at Bombay Talkies, where he directed the first examples of S. Mukherjee’s new regime, e.g. Bandhan and the Abbas script Naya Sansar. Became producer with KISHORE SAHU’s Kunwara Baap (1942). Continued producing under the Acharya Arts Prod. banner until 1950. Also made Gujarati films, e.g. Lagna Mandap.

FILMOGRAPHY-1940: Bandhan; Azad; 1941: Naya Sansar; 1942: Uljhan; 1943: Aage Kadam; 1949: Parivartan; Shohrat (with K. Amarnath); 1950: Lagna Mandap; 1956: Dhola Maru.

There were two MDs for this film- old timer Madholal Damodar Master and Ramchandra Pal- who was in Bombay Talkies, with Acharya. The cast of the film was Motilal, Anjali Devi, Mubarak, Rajkumari Shukla, Leela Pawar, Narbada Shankar and others. There were 8 songs, but in the absence of individual credit we do not know which song was composed by whom. Lyricist was Kailash Matwala. Out of these 8 songs, I have heard 7 songs and find them good songs with tune and rendition. One song of Motilal is already on the Blog.

The name Anjali Devi, which appears in the cast is not of the famous south actress Anjali Devi ( 8-12-1927 to 13-1-2014 ), who acted in films like Ek the Raja-51( dubbed film), Shuk Rambha-53,Ladki-53, Devta-56, Suvarn Sundari-57 etc etc. This Anjali Devi of the 40s was different. As usual, I find that the filmography of south Anjali devi includes films done by Anjali Devi of the 40s. This is what I call Same Name Confusion.

Miss Anjali Devi’s real name was Durgesh Kumari. She was born at Benaras in 1926 in a respectable Brahmin family. Her education was not much but she was fluent in Hindi, Urdu, English and Sanskrit. At the age of 14 years, she came to Bombay, to fulfil her desire of becoming an actress.

She joined Ranjit Films and worked in film Pardesi in the year 1940. The film was released in 1941. She was credited as Durgesh in this film. She was called to Bombay Talkies to work in film ‘ Punarmilan’-40, directed by Najam Naqvi. When a section of artistes, led by S.Mukherjee, left Bombay Talkies to start Filmistan in 42, one of the BT directors N.R.Acharya also left and started his own company Acharya Art Productions. Anjali Devi also left to join Acharya.

She acted in 3 films of Acharya, Kunwara Baap-42, Uljhan-42 and Aage Kadam-43. She later on acted in Paristan-44, and Parivartan-49. She then got married to N.R.Acharya and settled as a Housewife.

There is one more name-Rajkumari Shukla. There is scant information available on the net about her. Recently, I got her more information from an Urdu book ” Filmi Titlian” 1945, written by Bijli Jampuri from Hyderabad Deccan (that is my hometown). So here is her latest information for our readers…

Raj Kumari Shukla, She was born in a well-known Brahmin family in Calcutta in 1903. Her own life has been quite tragic. She had to join the film industry not so much because of personal choice, but due to tragic personal circumstances. Like most young girls from Indian families, this virtuous lady, well-versed in household chores, got married. But her family life after marriage proved to be extremely unhappy — so much so that one day her husband gave her a brutal beating and drove her from his house.

Finding no refuge anywhere, she went to Jagannath Puri (in Orissa) and lived there in an ashram. Gradually, her family history and marital problems became known to one of the priests there, and he informed her parents. Her elder sister then brought her back to her house.

One theatre actor known locally as Gujarati Baba used to live nearby. Sometimes, she would get some theatre passes from him and go to local theatres to see some plays. This not only helped her to forget her unhappy past but also kindled in her young heart the desire to act in plays. The Gujarati Baba then persuaded her to adopt acting as a profession. Accordingly, in 1933, she joined Maadan Theatre and began her career as a leading lady, Film-goers of those days can still recall her “hilaali abroo, tez aankhen, kushaada peshaani aur siaah zulfen”. She excelled in emotional roles.

Starting her career in silent films, she came into her own with the advent of “Talkies”. Apart from Maadan Theatre, she worked for other film companies too. Her memorable films included “Intezaar”, “Zevar”, “Jagat Mohini”, “Far’yaad”, “Chaandni”, “Sharda”, “Panghat”, Tulsi”, “Swami, “Ek Raat”, “Man Ki Jeet”, “School Master”, Dulhan”, “Badalti Duniya”, “Aankh Micholi”, “Raj Nartaki”, “Jhoola” and “Najma”. She now acted more as a character artiste and vamp. Her realistic emoting in such negative roles makes the audiences shiver in revulsion. Her roles in films like “Ek Raat”, “Swami”, “Jhoola”, “Far’yaad” and “Dulhan” have been specially appreciated by film-goers.

She was only an actor and not a singer. She acted in 31 Talkie films. She also worked in few Gujarati and Bangla films. Her last recorded Hindi film was Nai Maa-46. She did sing just one song in her career. That was in film Panghat-43. It was a duet with Baby Tara. At her times, the other more famous actress-singer Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali was also very active. In few films both acted, but the songs were only by Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali. There were two more Rajkumaris also. One was Rajkumari Calcuttewali and another was from south, T.R.Rajkumari. Their details have been described earlier and also in my book” Forgotten artists….”. (Information for the above has been taken from Urdu book,”Filmi Titlian”published in 1945, and Film Directory, with thanks.)

Today’s song is a duet by Anjali Devi and Motilal, with Chorus. This is also a sort of Patriotic song, exhorting friends to be ready for a sacrifice for the country.


Song-Aage kadam badhaana hoga (Aage Kadam)(1943) Singers- Motilal, Anjali Devi (Durgesh Kumari), Lyricist- Kailash Matwala, MDs- Master Madholal and Ramchandra Pal
Both

Lyrics

Doston
naya sabak sikhlaana hoga
naya sabak sikhlaana hoga
dhang zamaane ka badla hai
dhang zamaane ka badla hai
kuchh kar ke
kuchh kar ke dikhlaana hoga
haahaakaar uthha hai jag mein
haahaakaar uthha hai jag mein
peena hai to aaj
peena hai to aaj jagat mein
peena hai to aaj

aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage

baadhaaon ko door hataana hoga
soyon ko phir aaj jagaana hoga
apne ko apnaanaa hoga
phoolon ko samjhaana hoga
?? nahin hai
?? nahin hai
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga

aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage

aafaten jo sar pe aayen
unse na daro
shaan se jiyo
shaan se maro
aafaten jo sar pe aayen
unse na daro
shaan se jiyo
shaan se maro
yahi sandesa ?? chali hai
yahi sandesa ?? chali hai
aaj hamen pahunchaana hoga
aaj hamen pahunchaana hoga
aao

aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage
aage


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4325 Post No. : 15615

“Veer Ghatotkach”(1949) was directed by Nanubhai Bhatt. The movie had Shahu Modak, Meena Kumari, Sumiti Gupte, Vasant Pahelwan, Naranjan Sharma, S N Tripathi, Sona Chatterjee, Leela Kumari, Shanta Patel, H Prakash etc in it.

The mythological movie, based on a character of Mahabharat, had nine songs in it. One song has been covered in the past.

Here is the second song from “Veer Ghatotkach”(1949) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by a singer who is uncredited in HFGK. The song is lip synced by Shahu Modak while Meena Kumari looks on.

Saraswati Kumar Deepak is the lyricist. Music is composed by S N Tripathi.

I request our knowledgeable readers to help identify the singer of this song.
PS-Mr Sadanand Kamath believes that it is Shahu Modak himself singing the song.


Song-Jag mein karman ki gati nyaari (Veer Ghatotkach)(1949) Singer-Shahu Modak, Lyrics-Saraswati Kumar Deepak, MD-S N Tripathi

Lyrics

jag mein aen karman ki gati nyaari
jag mein aen karman ki gati nyaari
jag mein karman ki gati nyaari
murjha kar bhi khil jaati hai aasha ki phulwaari ee ee
murjha kar bhi khil jaati hai aasha ki phulwaari ee ee
karman ki gati nyaari
jag mein aen karman ki gati nyaari

hansna rona paana khona
sab is gati ki leela aa aa
sab is gati ki leela aa aa
rang birange sapnon ka hai ye sansaar rangeela
bandhe huye hai karm dor mein
bandhe huye hai karm dor mein saare hi nar naari ee ee
karman ki gati nyaari jag mein
karman ki gati nyaari
karam bhoomi par kaanton ke sang
phoolon ki sej suhani
phoolon ki sej suhani
dukh sukh donon saath saath hai
jag ki yahi kahaani
mat niraash ho khil jaayegi
mat nirash ho khil jaayegi
man ki kesar kyaari ee ee
karman ki gati nyaari
jag mein karman ki gati nyaari

jaisi karni waisi bharni
yahi yahaan ka lekha aa aa
yahi yahaan ka lekha
nahin mitaaye mit sakti jo khhinchi bhaagy ki rekha
saras savera aaya dekho
saras savera aaya dekho
rain gayi andhiyaari ee ee
karman ki gati nyaari
jag mein karman ki gati nyaari


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4309 Post No. : 15584

————————————-
Regional language songs in Hindi movies- 1
————————————–

I had heard of ‘Rabindra Sangeet’ many years back in the context of our national anthem. Without knowing much about Rabindra Sangeet, in my younger days, I used to think that like Hindustani classical music, Carnatic classical music, folk music, Western classical music etc, Rabindra Sangeet was a different genre of music. (Now that I know it, I was not off the mark then). When I got associated with our Blog about 10 years back, I started looking at the Hindi film songs in a wider perspective encompassing, among other things, the genres of and the artists behind the Hindi film music. It was during the course of writing articles for the Blog covering songs of the golden period of Hindi film music, singers, lyricists and music directors that I came to know much about Rabindra Sangeet and its influence in Hindi film songs.

Rabindra Sangeet (Tagore songs) refers to over 2000 Bangla songs which were penned and set to music by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. During the course of my search on Rabindra Sangeet, I had come across a very informative website, http://www.geetabitan.com, dedicated to Rabindra Sangeet. The website is the repository of around 2200 songs written and composed by Gurudev during his life time. The website gives the main features of each of song with lyrics in Bangla and English with English translations wherever available. The songs are also classified in 6 main themes – Devotion, Patriotic, Love, Nature, Ceremonial and Amazement. In addition, other features of the songs such as raag, taal, and background history etc are also given. I also found that Rabindra Sangeet is complete with swarlipi (notations) which indicates that the system of notations in Indian music may have started with Rabindra Sangeet.

With the help of the lyrics in English, I have listened to many songs on the video sharing platform with the support of English translations. I am aware of the limitation of translation in English of the original Bangla songs or for that matter of any language. But for a non-Bengali like me, translation serves the purpose of understanding something about the song rather than not knowing at all. In a nutshell, Rabindra Sangeet is the amalgam of Hindustani classical music, Bangla folk music, and Western classical music. What attracts a non-Bengali like me to listen to Rabindra Sangeet is the unique sounding melody embedded in the song even though the full understanding of the meaning of the song would have enhanced the listening pleasure. Nevertheless, I feel like listening to Tagore songs again and again. They are soothing to my ears and they sounds like prayers.

It is well known fact that some of Mirza Ghalib’s ghazals can be interpreted differently by different persons. Based on the English translation of Tagore songs, I feel that some of these songs may have multiple interpretations. Probably, the interpretation of Tagore songs could be one of the debating issues for ‘bhadralok’ in the poetic soirees or even in the Coffee House. Hence, like Mirza Ghalib’s ghazals, Rabindra Sangeet would always remain one of the topics for discussion among the musicians. It is because of such interests and the spirituality in Tagore songs that Rabindra Sangeet retains its popularilty even after nearly hundred years when the songs were written and composed.

It is believed that Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore started writing and composing songs since 1875. But his songs were rendered mostly in the confines of Shantiniketan by his students of music and his plays. The credit for making Rabindra Sangeet popular among the masses goes to Pankaj Mullick. ‘Mukti’ (1937) was the film in which Tagore songs featured for the first time.

During the making of the film ‘Mukti” (1937), Pankaj Mullick, the music director for the film, had gone to meet Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore to seek his permission to use the song ‘diner sheshey ghumer deshey’ in the film. Pankaj Mullick was not sure whether he could get the nod from Gurdev as till then, Tagore songs were not used in the films. Moreover, Gurudev had not yet set the music for the song under consideration. Pankaj Mullick rendered the song which was set to music by him, in the presence of Gurudev who was so much impressed by his rendering of the song that he not only allowed Pankaj Mullick to use the song with his music in the film but also allowed him to set to music those Tagore songs which Gurudev had not find time to set to the tune. In the event, Pankaj Mullick got a rare distinction of being the only composer allowed by Gurudev to set tunes to his songs. [Based on http://www.pankajmullickfoundation.org/%5D. Later on, Pankaj Mullick devoted his efforts to make the Rabindra Sangeet popular by singing them on All India Radio and in the concerts.

On the basis of the number of song clips of Rabindra Sangeet available on the video sharing platforms, I feel that among the old stalwarts, Hemant Kumar, Debabrata Biswas, Dwijen Mukherjee, Kanika Banerjee, Suchitra Mitra, Sroboni Sen etc have immensely contributed to to make Rabindra Sangeet popular among the masses.

The popularity of Rabindra Sangeet influenced some of the music directors, especially of Bangla and Hindi films. Just like we say that a song is based on folk music, similarly, it has become common to say that song is influenced by Rabindra Sangeet. There are instances where Hindi films songs have been inspired from Rabindra Sangeet especially under the music direction of Pankaj Mullick, Anil Biswas, Salil Chowdhury. Hemant Kumar, S D Burman, R D Burman etc who hail from Bengal. There are many Hindi film songs inspired from Rabindra Sangeet but here, I will give only few examples:

Anil Biswas: Raahi matwaale (Rabindra Sangeet: ore grihobashi khol dwaar khol)

S D Burman: naina deewaane ek nahin maane (Rabindra Sangeet: shedin dujone dulechhune bone)

Hemant Kumar: mann mera udta jaaye (Rabindra Sangeet: man mor meghe sangi)

Salil Chowdhury: saawan ki raaton mein aisa bhi hota hai (Rabindra Sangeet: jete jete akla pothe)

Kishore Kumar: panthhi hoon us path kaa (Rabindra Sangeet: pather shesh kothay)

Rajesh Roshan: bandan khula panchhi udaa (Rabindra Sangeet: pagla hawaar baadol dine)

Some of the music directors seems to have used some parts of the tunes from Rabindra Sangeet which for a lay man it is difficult to pin point. I can only get some feel of Rabindra Sangeet in some of the songs composed by Anil Biswas like in ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) and ‘Aaraam’ (1951). Some songs of R D Burman’s last film ‘1942 – A Love Story (1994) gives the shades of Rabindra Sangeet. Some of the other songs composed by S D Burman have some traces of Rabindra Sangeet. I found an interesting trivia about a small part of the tune taken from Rabindra Sangeet in jaane wo kaise log thhe jinko pyaar se pyaar mila :

In a conversation between S D Burman and Pulak Bandhyopadhyay, the Bangla film lyricist, S D Burman had revealed that the second verse of the mukhda of the song i.e., hamne to jab kaliyaan maangi kaanthon kaa haar mila’ was inspired from the second verse of our national anthem ‘Punjab Sind Gujarat Maratha Dravid Utkal Banga’. [Source: S D Burman – The Prince Musician – Anirudha Bhattacharjee and Balaji Vittal (2018).]

Rabindra Sangeet has a special place in ‘Hamraahi’ (1945) which had two Tagore songs in Bangla. One Tagore song, jan gan man adhinaayak jaya he has been covered in the Blog. The second Tagore song is ‘modhu gandhe bhara mridu snigdho chhaaya’ which are rendered by Binota Bose (Roy) and Hemant Kumar. The song was written and composed by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore.

‘Hamraahi’ (1945) was a Hindi remake of Bangla film ‘Udayare Pathe’ (1944). It was a debut Bangla feature film for Bimal Roy as a director who also directed its Hindi remake. Both the versions of the film had, more or less the same star cast which consisted of Radhamohan Bhattacharya, Binota Bose (Roy), Rekha Mallik (Mitra), Maya Basu, Tulsi Chakraborty, Dev Bala, Parul Kar, Manorama etc. Interestingly, the Tagore song under reference was not there in the Bangla version of the film.

Since the song under discussion is in Bangla, I have taken the lyrics in English as well as the English translation from http://www.geetabitan.com. I know that the feelings expressed in Bangla in Tagore songs are difficult to replicate in English translation. The words are in Sanskritised Bangla. The song seems to convey the emotion through nature.

Anil Biswas used the complete tune of this Tagore song for mere chanchal naina madhur ras ke bhare in ‘Angulimaal’ (1960).

Audio Clip:

Song-Modhu gandhe bhara mridu snigdho chaaya (Humraahi)(1945) Singers-Binota Bose, Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Rabindranath Tagore, MD-Rabindranath Tagore

Lyrics
(Sourced from http://www.geetabitan.com)

modhu gandhe bhaara
mridu snigdho chhaaya
nipo kunjo tale
shyamo kaantimoyi kon swapnomaaya
phire brishti jale
ae ae ae ae
gandhe bhaara
phire rakto aloktako dhouto paaye
dhaara sikto baaye
ae ae ae ae
phire rakto aloktako dhouto paaye
dhaara sikto baaye
ae ae ae ae ae ae
megho mukto sahasyo shashanko kaala
snithi praante jwaale
megho mukto sahasyo shashanko kaala
snithi praante jwaale
ae ae ae ae
gandhe bhara
mridu snigdho chhaaya
nipo kunjotale
shyamo kaantimoyi kon swapnomaaya
phire brishti jale
ae ae ae ae
gandhe bhara

piye uchchhalo tarol prolayo modira
un mukhoro tarongini dhaay adhira
piye uchchhalo tarol prolayo modira
un mukhoro tarongini dhaay adhira
kaar nirbhiko murti tarongo dole
kalo mandro role
kaar nirbhiko murti tarongo dole
kalo mandro role
ae taarahaara nihsimo andho kare
ae ae ae ae
kaar taroni chole
ae taarahaara nihsimo andho kare
ae ae ae ae
kaar taroni chole
modhu gandhe bhara
mridu snigdho chhaaya
nipo kunjotale
shyamo kaantimoyi kon swapnomaaya
phire brishti jale
ae ae ae ae
gandhe bhara…aa

————————————-
English translation (source: http://www.geetabitan.com)
———————————————-

Passionate is languor,
That roam about in the dripping wetness,
Like a dark silhouette of a veiled maid
Under the arbour of kadam trees,
Delightfully fragrant and sombre.
Treading on red-alta washed feet,
Heading the gentle breeze, moist;
Sporadic flashes on forehead,
Smiling crescent peeping through clouds.
She swirls amuck, gurgling,
Having taken elixir of catastrophe.
Emerges from the roaring streams
A face of a valour, unknown.
In this star-less darkness of the night
Who sails his raft all alone.
_____________


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4309 Post No. : 15583

Today’s song is from an old film Duniya kya hai-1938.

Silent films era started from 1912, when 2 silent films were made and exhibited. However, they were not feature films made completely by Indians. The cinematographer was British and the films were processed in England. Thus Dadasaheb Phalke’s totally indigenously produced feature film ‘ Raja Harshchandra’-1913 became the first fully Indian Silent film and it was hailed as the beginning of the Silent film era. In that year one more film ” Mohini Bhasmasur” was also made.

One would think that after this, the silent films were made rapidly by ambitious people. However, the fact is that it took a while to get the momentum in silent film making, for whatever and for various reasons. The following table will show the progress and the ultimate decline of silent films, after Talkie films came.

Year Silent films
1912 2
1913 2
1914 1
1915 2
1916 1
1917 5
1918 4
1919 8
1920 16
1921 45
1922 67
1923 52
1924 63
1925 87
1926 96
1927 93
1928 115
1929 146
1930 201
1931 211
1932 68
1933 42
1934 8

(information from Film Index by Hamraz ji)

Harish Raghuwanshi ji informs that the last silent film was ” Shareef Badmash”, made by Shri Ganesh film company.
Censor Certificate No. B-13975 dated 2-11-1934.

There were hundreds of actors, directors, producers, companies and allied artistes involved in making silent films. The cost of making a silent film was around 20000 rupees only. After the Talkie films started, except the actors, almost all other artistes came over to the Talkie films. However, the actors and actresses now needed a good knowledge of speaking Hindi/Urdu and a reasonable singing (for lead actors). In this test, most Anglo-Indians, Jews, European etc actresses failed miserably. Some actors like Master Vithal too had difficulties. Only a handful of the actresses survived, as they quickly learnt this language and singing. Artistes like Ruby Meyers (Sulochana), Beryl Claessen (Madhuri) and Iris Gasper (Sabita Devi) are such examples, from among others.

Some silent actors spilled over the Talkie era and survived for another 10 to 15 years- a few upto upto the 70s, like Wazir Mohammed khan, for example, ( his first Talkie was Alam Ara -31 and the last film was also Alam Ara-1973 !). As I can remember, P.Jairaj and Lalita Pawar were the notable long survivors in Talkie films, coming from the silent era. Both died 2 years apart in the years 2000 and 1998.

Today’s film Duniya Kya Hai-1938 was produced by Lalita Pawar and directed by her husband G P Pawar. The film was based on Count Leo Tolstoy’s famous novel, ” Resurrection”, published in 1900. The cast of the film was Lalita pawar, Madhav Kale, Indira Wadkar, Begum Fatma, Bipin Mehta and many others. The MDs – Annasaheb mainkar and Kikubhai Yadnik composed songs written by Munshi Aziz.

In the film industry, there were 3 people only, who were called Annasaheb. Incidentally, all were Music Directors. They were Annasaheb Mainkar
(Shankar Vinayak Mainkar), K. Datta (Datta korgaonkar) and C.Ramchandra ( Ramchandra Narhari Chitalkar). Even the prefix ” Masterji’ was used with only 3 MDs, if I remember right.

The composer of this film, Annasaheb Mainkar is not a name known to many people. Born in 1904 at Sangli, Maharashtra, he was trained in classical music at Poona,Baroda,Indore, Mysore and Lucknow. Before joining the film line, he had cut many discs of his songs.

His first film was AWARA SHEHZADA-1933.Incidentally,this was also India’s first film having a double role. Shahu Modak had done the roles of a Rajkumar and a commoner Bholaram in it. It was also the first film of Master Vithal as a Director. He himself was the first to do a double role in a silent film in 1928.

Annasaheb worked for Saraswati cinetone, Imperial, Venus, Huns, Atre and Sunrise films. He gave music to 21 Hindi films, composing 187 songs. His singers were,Master Vinayak, Vanmala, Shahu Modak, Shanta Hublikar, kalyanibai, Sarla Devi, Vatsala Kumathekar etc. His last film was Ashirwad-1943. He died young at 41 yrs.in 1944.

Kikubhai Yagnik was a small time composer from 1933 to 1938 and was not very popular. He had given music to 10 films, composing for 86 songs.

The film Heroine Lalita Pawar was one of a kind artiste. One of the major actors who succeeded in both Silent and Talkie films equally,that too for 70 active years,was LALITA PAWAR.
Today’s generation probably knows Lalita Pawar only as an actress doing crooked Mother in law’s roles only, but in her hay days she was called a ‘ SEX BOMB ‘ !
Born Ambika Laxmanrao Sagun on 18-4-1916, at Indore, her father was a rich person.She started acting very early when she was 10-12 years.Her first silent film was ‘Patitodhar’-1928.

She became a heroine soon and acted in as many as 30 silent films. In the silent and early Talkie era,she did adventurous and stunt films,just like Fearless Nadia did. Because of her boldness she did sexy and romantic roles.I have seen some of her costumes from her early films and those will match any sex-siren of today,I can guarantee !

She was a Heroine till 1942,when while shooting a scene for “Netaji Palkar”-1942, her co-star slapped her during a shot, so hard that she suffered from facial paralysis and damage to her eye.
Inspite of 3 years’ treatment she became unfit for heroine’s roles and at the age of just 25-26,she switched over to character and supporting roles.
She acted in some 7oo Hindi and Marathi films.Some of her roles like the Kelewali in Shri 420,mrs.D’sa in Anari(she won Filmfare award for this role) and Manthara in Ramayana,are quite memorable,though mainly she is known for her wicked roles.
In case of marriage,she competed with Noorjahan(4 marriages) and Meena Shorey(5 marriages).Lalita Pawar’s first husband was Hanuman More,second was G.P.Pawar,her director for stunt films.This marriage went sour when he had an affair with Lalita’s younger sister. Then she married a film producer Rajprakash Gupta, who established Ambika Studios in Bombay.

Her death was tragic. She was found dead-for 2 days-when her husband, son and daughter in law had gone to Mumbai. She was staying alone in her bungalow in Aundh, a suburb of Pune.
She died on 24-2-1998 and it was known on 26th February 1998.

I reproduce here, an obituary as appeared in a Marathi Newspaper of Pune, after her death…(Freeway translation from Marathi)

” Lalita, an actress and a gentlewoman !

Lalita Pawar, the renowned actress of yesteryear who passed away in Pune early this week, enjoyed a most chequered career on the silver screen.

In her seven decades on screen, she has played roles of all variety — from a heroine of the silent era to the squint-eyed mother-in-law of the talkies.

Born as Ambika Laxman Sagun on April 18, 1916 at village Yeole in Nashik district, she made her debut as a child artist in the film Patittodhar. Arya mahila was her first film as a teenaged heroine.

In a career spanning 72 years, she acted in more than 800 Hindi, Marathi, Gujarathi and Bhojpuri films. She was the leading lady of the silent era and, later, a character artiste till she retired from the celluoid.

Her classic silent films include Thugsen Rajputra and Chatursundari. She also tried her hand at the production of Himmat-e-marda and Duniya kya hai. But the films did not do well. Lalita acted as heroine to Baburao Pendarkar’s Netaji Palkar and Jai Malhar. An accident on the sets abruptly ended her career as a leading lady. During the shooting of Jung-e-azadi, Master Bhagwan had to slap her. Her left ear started bleeding profusely. The left part of her face was paralysed and she developed a squint in the left eye.

Talk about courage and turning what would have been a fatal blow to her career into a distinct advantage. That squint alone possibly made her into a famous woman in all her mother/mother-in-law roles.

The Bombay film industry mourned the death of this ‘actress par excellence’ and ‘fine human being’. Shammi Kapoor, with whom she worked in evergreen classics Junglee and Professor said she was a thorough professional. “It is sad that age catches up with people,” Dev Anand said, “We have losta tremendous artist.”

Jairaj, a veteran actor from the silent era, described Lalita Pawar as a capable actress who had a mind of her own. “She expressed herself very well,” he said, “We acted together in Kirtiwhich was remade as Sharda starring Raj Kapoor and Meena Kumari many years later. She also acted as the leading artiste in my home production Mohar.”

The Marathi film Sasurvashin, where Lalitha played the role of a wicked mother-in-law, earned her much popularity. In the Gujarati Mehndi rang laee, which was remade in various languages, Lalitha acted in all the remakes.

In Raj Kapoor’s Shri 420, Lalita was a banana vendor which earned her the Filmfare award. She had this to say about the film: Raj Kapoor gave her a clean and ironed Maharashtrian nine yard saree and dialogues with neat Hindi diction and accent. She told the showman she was prepared to do the role, but would rather do it her way. She improvised the dialogues into the typical Maharashtrian colloquial Hindi and got a very old and shabby saree. Accordingly, she performed the role and won rave reviews.”

The Hero was Madhav Kale. Madhav Kale was born in Nashik in 1903. After his school education at Nashik, he joined Deccan college at Poona and passed Intermediate course. He was interested in playing in dramas, which was opposed by his mother. But he used to take part in dramas while in college. He was a good singer too. Wanting to join films, he sent applications to many companies. Saroj and sharda companies responded. He acted in several silent films like Mukti sangram, kanak kesari etc. He entered the Talkie films with Vikram Charitra-32, Mera Imaan-34 and Vishnu Bhakti-34. During this period, he got married in 1934.

He acted in 21 films. His last film was Gokul ka chor-59. He even directed one film, Sacha Sapna-42. He sang 13 songs in 7 films till 1942.
There is no information about him after this.

After writing this biography of Madhav Kale, I came to know that after the films, Madhav went back to Nashik, where he was active in local politics. He became a Municipal Councillor, but lost Assembly elections, which he was very hopeful of. He died somewhere in 1980.

In the cast there is one more name Indira Wadkar. Hansa Wadkar’s father had three sisters, Kesharbai, Indirabai and Sushilabai. Sushila was married to Master Vinayak, a renowned actor-director of the early era of Indian cinema. The elder sister as well as Indira Wadkar were acting in films and Indira was a classical singer as well. Indira acted in several films including Duniya Kya Hai (Resurrection) (1937) and in Vinayak’s production company “Hans Films” like Devata (1939) in Marathi. Indira used the surname Wadkar to avoid using the family name Salgaokar, for fear of reprisal from society against women acting in films. Her older sister, Kesharbai, was working in a film made by M.G. Rangnekar and suggested that Wadkar work in films to sustain her family. She acted in 11 Hindi films. She was popular mother in law in Marathi films.

Today’s song is sung by Lalita Pawar herself. I have got it confirmed from Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji. Lalita Pawar sang 10 songs in 3 films. Today’s song is her last song in her career, as a singer.


Song-Yauwan mein rut basant aayi (Duniya Kya Hai)(1938) Singer-Lalita Pawar, Lyrics-Munshi Aziz, MD-Annasahab Mainkar

Lyrics

Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
prem badariya chhaayi
prem badariya chhaayi

priytam aawan ka sandesa
priytam aawan ka sandesa
koyal kook sunaaye

koyal kook sunaaye
sajni basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
ankhiyaan tarasen tumhre daras ko
ankhiyaan tarasen tumhre daras ko
?? kyun na bhaawe
?? kyun na bhaawe
man ko chain na aaye
man ko chain na aaye
sajani basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
Yauvan mein rut basant


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4282 Post No. : 15528

—————————————————————————
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 18
—————————————————————————

‘Do Jaasoos-1975’ was directed by Naresh Kumar for ‘Dimple Films, Bombay’. He was also the producer of this movie. It had Raj Kapoor, Rajendra Kumar, Prem Chopra, Aruna Irani, Kamal Kapoor, Manmohan Krishan, Ram Mohan, Asit Sen, Randhir, Jagdish Raj, Appi Umrani, Dulari, V. Gopal, Madhu Apte, Ratna, Moolchand, Ratan Gaurang, Bachan Singh and others.

This movie introduced Shailendra Singh and Bhavna Bhatt as an actor and it was mentioned in titles as ‘introducing Bobby singer…’ and ‘Teenager’ for Bhavna Bhatt respectively.

Farida Jalal, Alka, Sanjana, Sundar, Ram Avtaar made friendly appearance in this movie.

Story of this movie was written by K.A. Narayan. Dialogues were written by Irshad and editing was done by Govind Dalwadi.

This movie had total seven songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri (five songs), Rajkavi Tulsi (one song) and one song was uncredited (as per HFGK Vol V 1971-1980).

Music for this movie was composed by Ravindra Jain.

This movie was passed by Censor Board on 29.05.1975.

Lata Mangeshkar, Mohd Rafi, Mukesh, Asha Bhonsle and Shailendra Singh had given their voices to the songs in this movie.

“Do Jaasoos-1975” made its debut on the blog exactly ten years ago on this day (8 april 2010) and thus this movie completes its ten-year run on the blog and this movie is not yet YIPPEED till now despite getting introduced in the blog one decade ago :).

Total three songs were represented on the blog on 08.04.2010 including a song from this movie;

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Purvaiyya leke chali meri naiyya Do Jaasoos-1975 04 of 07 songs posted
Meri jaan meri jaan kehna maano Do Chor-1972 All songs posted
Koyi nazraanaa le kar aaya hoon main Aan Milo Sajana-1970 All songs posted

I remember to have watched this movie ‘Do Jaasoos’ in my childhood with elders in the family but have forgotten it now. Two songs from this movie i.e. ‘Purvaiyya leke chali meri naiyya’ and ‘Do jaasoos karen mahsoos’ have remained imprinted in my memory and I have a big nostalgia for them. Later, when I grew up and started my collection of songs, I was on the look out for these songs, and my search for these songs ended much later.

The only other song from this movie that I vaguely remember was ‘chadh gayi chadh gayi angoor ki beti chadh gayi’ and I had decided to present it today and had also sought permission 🙂 from Mahesh ji (Mukesh ji’s greatest fan) but when I browsed through other songs of this movie I selected this one another cheerful, refreshing and pleasant song sung by Shailendra Singh and Lata Mangeshkar. This song is picturized on Shailendra Singh himself and on Bhavna Bhatt.

I don’t remember to have heard this song in the recent years, or even I feel I like I have not heard it earlier or may have forgotten it over the years.

(Note: – In the details of this movie in HFGK Vol-V (1971-1980), HFGK mentions Ravindra Jain as co-lyricist for all songs written by Hasrat Jaipuri. However, no details/reason has been mentioned for this in the addendum/corrigendum in HFGK.
I would request knowledgeable readers to throw more light on this.
Also, HFGK doesn’t mention lyricist name for the song ‘Happy new year’.)

Following songs from “Do Jaasoos-1975” have been posted on the blog till now :-

Song Posted On
Purvaiyya leke chali meri naiyya 08.04.2010
Saal mubaarak sahib jee 01.01.2012
Happy new year to you 01.01.2013
Do jaasoos karen mehsoos 02.06.2018

let us now enjoy this lovely duet song from “Do Jaasoos”(1975). Incidentally exactly the same singers and actors sing and lip sync this song who figured in the debut song of the movie ten years ago on the same day ! Needless to say that the lyricists and Music director also remain the same. 🙂


Song-Main bijli hoon titli hoon hirni hoon (Do Jaasoos)(1975) Shailendra Singh, Lata, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri + Ravindra Jain, MD-Ravindra Jain

Lyrics

aa jaa
un hunh
aa jaa aa jaa
nahin nahin nahin
main bijli hoon
titli hoon
hirni hoon
main bijli hoon
titli hoon
hirni hoon
tere haath naa aaungi
din raat sataaungi
main chhup chhup jaaungi ee

arey arey
main baadal hoon
bhanwraa hoon
jharnaa hoon
main shor machaaungaa
gaa gaa ke bulaaungaa aa
peechhaa naa chhodungaa
arey arey
main bijli hoon
titli hoon
hirni hoon

main jo patang banoon
tum kya karoge
main jo patang banoon
tum kya karoge
baadal ke paar udoon
phir kya karoge
bolo
bolo
bolo
bolo
phir kya karoge

ae he
o ho
aa haa
dhaaga ban jaaungaa
tujhe kheench ke laaunga aa
peechhaa naa chhodungaa aa
arey arey
main bijli hoon
titli hoon
hirni hoon

main jo gulaab banoon
tum kya karogi
main jo gulaab banoon
tum kya karogi
auron ka khwaab banoon
phir kya karogi
kaho
kaho
kaho
kaho
phir kya karogi
ae he
o ho
aa haa
kaantaa ban jaaungi
gairon se bachaaungi ee
joode mein sajaaungi

arey arey
main baadal hoon
bhanwraa hoon
jharnaa hoon

ulfat ki raah mein jo
toofaan aaye
ulfat ki raah mein jo
toofaan aaye
toofaan aake meri kashti dubaaye
suno
suno
suno
suno
phir kya karoge

ae he
o ho
aa haa
maanjhi ban jaaunga
patwaar uthhaaunga aa
saahil se laaungaa
main saath nibhaaungi
ab door naa jaaungi ee
teri ban jaaungi
teri ban jaaungi
ho o
teri ban jaaungi

——————————————-
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
——————————————–
आ जा
हुंह हुंह
आजा आजा
नहीं नहीं नहीं
मैं बिजली हूँ
तितली हूँ
हिरनी हूँ
मैं बिजली हूँ
तितली हूँ
हिरनी हूँ
तेरे हाथ ना आऊँगी
दिन रात सताऊँगी
मैं छुप छुप जाऊँगी ई

अरे अरे
मैं बादल हूँ
भंवरा हूँ
झरना हूँ
मैं शोर मचाऊँगा
गा गा के बुलाऊँगा आ
पीछा ना छोडूंगा
अरे अरे
मैं बिजली हूँ
तितली हूँ
हिरनी हूँ

मैं जो पतंग बनूं
तुम क्या करोगे
मैं जो पतंग बनूं
तुम क्या करोगे
बादल के पार उडूं
फिर क्या करोगे
बोलो
बोलो
बोलो
बोलो
फिर क्या करोगे

ए हे
ओ हो
आ हा
धागा बन जाऊँगा
तुझे खीच के लाऊँगा आ
पीछा ना छोडूंगा आ
अरे अरे
मैं बिजली हूँ
तितली हूँ
हिरनी हूँ

मैं जो गुलाब बनूं
तुम क्या करोगी
मैं जो गुलाब बनूं
तुम क्या करोगी
औरों का ख्वाब बनूं
फिर क्या करोगी
कहो
कहो
कहो
कहो
फिर क्या करोगी
ए हे
ओ हो
आ हा
काँटा बन जाऊँगी
गैरों से बचाऊँगी ई
जूड़े में सजाऊँगी

अरे अरे
मैं बादल हूँ
भंवरा हूँ
झरना हूँ

उल्फत की राह में जो
तूफ़ान आये
उल्फत की राह में जो
तूफ़ान आये
तूफ़ान आके मेरी
कश्ती डूबाये
सुनो
सुनो
सुनो
सुनो
फिर क्या करोगे

ए हे
ओ हो
आ हा
माँझी बन जाऊँगा
पतवार उठाऊंगा आ
साहिल से लाऊंगा
मैं साथ निभाउंगी
अब दूर ना जाऊँगी ई
तेरी बन जाऊँगी
तेरी बन जाऊँगी
हो ओ
तेरी बन जाऊँगी


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15700 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15715

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1211
Total Number of movies covered =4326

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