Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Pathos’ Category


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4375 Post No. : 15717

“Raseeli”(1946) was directed by Hanuman Prasad Sharma for Jai Bharat Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Radharani, Sushil Kumar, Kanhaiyyalal, Ramesh Gupta, Anant Prabhu, Ranibala, Meghmala, Shanti Devi, Ramlal, Shamlal etc in it.

“Raseeli”(1946) had ten songs in it. Three rare (and special) songs from the movie have been covered in it.

Here is the fourth song from “Raseeli”(1946) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Sharma and Geeta Dutt. One commentator in the YT lin identified the male singer as Prem Narayan Sharma.

Gaafil Harnalvi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Hanuman Prasad Sharma.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.

The song ends up abruptly with a few lines yet to be sung. I request our knowledgeable readers to alert us if a longer and more complee link to the song becomes available.


Song-Neh laga mukh mod gaya (Raseeli)(1946) Singers-Prem Narayan Sharma, Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Gafil Harnalwi, MD-Hanuman Prasad Sharma
Both

Lyrics

neha laga mukh mod gaya aa aa aa aa
dukhiya ko tadapte chhod gaya
dukhiya ko tadapte chhod gaya aa aa

preet laga ker nanhe se ae ae
ek chanchal man ko tod gaya
ek chanchal man ko tod gaya aa aa
albeli ke to tiraani(?)
wo deewaani hai deewaani

har kadam pe thokar khaate hai ae ae
jab se preetam mukh mod gaya
jab se preetam mukh mod gaya aa aa

deepak ki jyoti door huyi
door huyi

ab kahe ae
ab kahe patanga ro ro kar
ro ro kar
ro ro kar r

is armaanon ki duniya mein ae ae ae
ghanghor andhera chhod gaya
ghanghor andhera chhod gaya aa aa
ab aan padi hai dukhiyaaran
is jeewan ke chauraahe par
is jeewan ke chauraahe par

wo baanh pakad kar beech dagar r r r…


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4359 Post No. : 15682

Today’s song is from the film Ismat-1944 – a Muslim Social film made by Fazli brothers. This film was directed by the younger brother Sibtain Fazli, making his Debut as a Director. This was the second film of Fazli brothers to be made in Bombay, after the earlier film Fashion-43 also made in Bombay. Prior to that, they began their film making from Calcutta. This was to avoid the possible hindrance from the Muslim fundamentalists in Bombay, who were against making films depicting Muslim social life. Their first such film was Qaidi-40, made at Calcutta. It was followed by Masoom-41 and Chauranghee-42-all at Calcutta. Then they shifted to Bombay.

Films with the Muslim background of Muslim Culture were quite common in India,right from the First ever Hindi Talkie, “Aalam Ara”-31. Not just Social but different Genres like Arabian Night stories,Historical Romance, Folk Tales, Adventure Tales, Religious stories, Common King and Queen stories, Costume dramas etc had Muslim backgrounds. Indian public audiences watched these films with interest and without any bias.

If you see the film production patterns, You will realise that the biggest film companies all over India also followed the pattern of making initial films with Muslim background. Take for example the very first year of talkie films. Out of 24 films made, 7 films were on Muslim background. After Aalam Ara, there was Abul Hasan, Shirin Farhad, Laila Majnu, Noorjehan etc in 1931. Prabhat film company made Ayodhya ka Raja in 1932, but same year, next film was Jalti Nishani-32, a Pseudo-Historical Muslim background movie.

In Calcutta, New Theatres made their first 3 Talkie films in Hindi on Muslim subjects. Mohabbat ke aansoo-a household story, Subah ka sitara-a Folk Tale and Zinda Laash- an Arabian Night story. In the 30s and 40s, most stunt and costume films were on Muslim cultures.

In the initial era, the Talkie films were dependent on Parsi Urdu and Gujarati theatre stories. Before films appeared in India, the main channel of entertainment was stage dramas. Theatres were active and popular mainly in Maharashtra, Bengal and Andhra. The regional drama companies used to have mostly Mythological topics for their dramas. They also used to tour quite a lot. But their sphere of activities was limited to their language areas. Marathi drama companies toured only in Maharashtra towns or where there was a sizable Marathi population, like Baroda, Gwalior or Indore etc. So, their audiences were limited.

Similarly, Bengal and Andhra drama companies also toured where Bangla or Telugu population was the main audience. It was only the Parsee Theatre companies, Alfred, Elphinston etc etc, which toured all over the country, performing their Urdu dramas. Many times these companies used to take whole special trains to travel with artistes and material. This earned them All India acceptance of Muslim themes, which translated into the films that were made initially. In this endeavour, major contribution was from drama writers like Agha Hashra kashmiri, Syed Yavar Ali, Munshi Nazir, Betab, kathawachak, Bekal, Ehsaan etc etc.

Some early Talkie films on Muslim subjects were, Naksh e Sulemani-33, Bahar e Sulemani-35, Naadira-34, Farz e ada-35, Mumtaz Begum-34, Rashida-35 (First Muslim Social film), Noor e yaman-35, Qismat ka shikar-34, Adil e Jahangir-34, Anarkali-35, Jahan Ara-35, Shamsheer e Arab-35 and many more.

Fazli Brothers were the pioneers in making Muslim Social films from 1940 onwards. They felt that due to certain shortcomings in Muslim community, their development is suppressed. Their attempt was to highlight these points like Lack of education, for example, in their films in the garb of entertainment. Filmmakers like the great Mehboob Khan too were keen on such films, because he earnestly wanted to help his community to improve their status in Indian society.

That is why he opted for a Muslim Social theme for his Firtst movie under his own banner,” Mehboob productions”. The film was ‘ Najma-43″. Mehboob featured A grade actors like Veena, Sitara, Ashok kumar, Kumar, Yaqub, Majid and others for his first film. Later on he made yet another Muslim social film,” Elaan”-47 which was much bolder and he expected some opposition from the Muslim Fundamentalists. That is why he had warned his actors – especially Munawwar Sultana- to be ready for any repercussions from their own people, after the film was released. He gave an option to her to quit the film for safety, but she showed total faith in him and stuck to her role in the film.

Film Ismat-44 ( the Google meaning of this word is Chastity or Modesty) was made by Fazli brothers on all this background. By now, with the experience of 4 such films behind them, they had captured the technique of making films with subtle messages to their community. In this film, the darker side of the Western Culture, particularly Divorce and Separation, was highlighted.

The story of the film was – Aslam (Nandrekar) and Ismat (Nargis) get married. They both are from good traditional Muslim families. Same day Shafi Anwar (Ghori) and Ishrat (Mehtab) too get married Both had tasted western culture and follow it merrily. in due course of time, the Eastern culture (Aslam/Ismat) couple is happy, but Western Culture couple (Anwar/Ishrat) can’t adjust or compromise and are divorced. Ishrat joins a Theatre company as a Dancer at a very good salary. Soon she becomes rich and famous.

Aslam goes to Bombay to look for a job and meets with an accident with Ishrat’s car. She takes him to her home and looks after him. In this accident, Aslam loses his memory and forgets about Ismat. One day Ismat and her brother see his photo with Ishrat in a newspaper. They learn everything about his accident and loss of memory etc.

Ismat goes to Bombay and works as a maid in Ishrat’s house. She tries to remind Aslam about his past, step by step. One day Ishrat discovers this and removes Ismat from the job. Dejected, Ismat sits down for nonstop prayer. After some time, due to its power, there is a storm, lightning and thunder. In this period, Aslam is affected and suddenly his memory comes back. He escapes from Ishrat’s home and returns to Ismat. Both get happily united again and Eatern Culture wins over Western Culture.

The Hero of this film was B. Nandrekar, whose name may not ring any bells in new generation readers. Many actors-males and females- shifted from silent films to Talkie films easily as they knew Urdu/Hindi language fluently. There was an actor who easily transitioned from silent films to talkie films. This was B Nandrekar or Baba Saheb Dada saheb Nandrekar.
Nandrekar was one of the very few really handsome actors Hindi films ever had. He was born on 15th November 1910, in Sangli district of Maharashtra, near Kolhapur. Being a Muslim, he could speak Urdu/Hindi fluently. He completed his schooling from Kolhapur and joined films. Vishnupant Damle (one of the founder partners of Prabhat Films) was making silent film ‘Maharathi Karna’ (1928) for Maharashtra Film Co. He offered Nandrekar a role. Then he worked in other films like ‘Baji Prabhu Deshpande’ (1929), ‘Lanka’ (1930), ‘Kismet’ (1931) and ‘Dushman Ki Raat’ (1931).

His first talkie film was ‘Kurukshetra’ (1933). Prabhat gave him a role in ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1936) (its Hindi version came in 1948). He worked in ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936) and became quite popular as a hero, opposite Shanta Apte. He was the hero in ‘Baghbaan’ (1938) opposite Sitara Devi.

In 1939, he became the first actor to go abroad to shoot scenes in the film ‘Africa In Hind’ – ‘हिन्द में अफ्रीका’ (1939). The shooting was done in Africa. Thus this became the first ever Hindi film to shoot in foreign country, and NOT film ‘Naaz’ (1954), as is popularly believed and also as mentioned in HFGK. Nandrekar had become very popular. The chappals he used in the film ‘Baghbaan’ became fashionable by the name ‘Nandrekar Chappals‘. This alone is enough to prove his popularity.

His lawsuit against Prabhat Film Company was a topic of discussion in the industry. There were differences between him and Prabhat over his contract with them. His lawyers were Mr. Jinnah and Mr. Setalwad, who won the case for him. He was also the first actor to work as a freelancer.

Nandrekar appeared in 23 films. His films were ‘Kurukshetra’ (1933), ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936), ‘Jaadugarin’ (1937) (UR), ‘Baghbaan’ (1938), ‘Africa In Hind’ (1939), ‘Qaidi’ (1940), ‘Hindustan Hamara’ (1940), ‘Alakh Niranjan’ (1940), ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), ‘Mamaji’ (1942), ‘Duniya Tumhari Hai’ (1942), ‘Nai Kahaani’ (1943), ‘Andhi Duniya’ (1943), ‘Swarn Bhoomi’ (1944), ‘Lady Doctor’ (1944), ‘Ismat’ (1944), ‘Bachpan’ (1945), ‘Kamla’ (1946), ‘Jeevan Sikho’ (1946), ‘Parshuram’ (1947), ‘Meri Amaanat’ (1947), ‘Khandani’ (1947), ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1948) and last film ‘Bihari’ (1948).

He passed away in 1949. No definite information is available about his demise.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari. It is composed by H P Sharma (2 songs), who was a co-MD of the film with his own elder brother Pt. Govardhan Prasad (5 songs). This is the third song from film Ismat-44 to feature on this Blog.

(Ack: Information is used, with thanks, from books – ‘ stages of life ‘ by Kathryn Hansen, ‘Muslim Cinema’ by Isak Mujawar, and ‘Forgotten movies on Muslim culture’ by Kamalakar P.)


Song-Badali hawa luti bahar rang-e- chaman bigad gaya (Ismat)(1944) Singer- Rajkumari Dubey Banraswali, Lyricist- Shams Lucknowi, MD- H P Sharma

Lyrics

Badli hawa luti bahaar
rang-e- chaman bigad gaya
phoool hanse to yoon hanse
daagh bhi gar nikal gaya

gham se badal gayi khushi
maut bani hai zindagi
saans mili to jaise ek
saans mili to jaise ek
teer(??) ka dil machal(?) gaya
saans mili to jaise ek
teer (??) ka dil machal(?) gaya

thahri hawa ko chhaanv ne
sharmo haya ko raat bhar
aah magar ghame sahar
aah magar ghame sahar
kaam bana bigad gaya
aah magar ghame sahar
kaam bana bigad gaya
badli hawa luti bahaar
range chaman bigad gaya
phool hanse to yoon hanse
daagh bhi gar nikal gaya


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4341 Post No. : 15642 Movie Count :

4308

Today’s song is from the film Dr.Kumar-44. It was a film made by Minerva Movietone and it was directed by a multi faceted debutante, Kishore Sharma. I tried hard to find out information about Kishore Sharma and I was pleased to get a full page article, with photos, on Kishore Sharma, somewhere on the Internet. But when I started reading it, I realised that this person was a different one. Born in the mid 1950s, he was a well known Punjabi film actor. I was not only disappointed, but I also got a hearty laugh, that a person who writes on different artistes causing the ” same name confusions”, got confused himself with a same name actor ! Ha Ha !!

Film Dr. Kumar’s Kishore Sharma started directing films with this film and went on to direct 4 more films, namely Zanjeer-47, Middle Fail-48, Biwi-50 and Shisham-52. As per CITWF, he seems to have worked as an actor also, in Shriman Satyavadi-60, Ek din ka Badshah-64 and Lal Bungla-66. I also found his name as an assistant to Music Director Usha Khanna for the film Achha Bura-1983. That was the end of his information for me.

The film industry in Mumbai is truly a Maya Nagari. people from all over India flock to this city, with a hope to make a career in films. Not all succeed. In fact, most fail and few lucky ones only make it – some with struggle, some with ” useful connections” and yet some with sheer Luck. This has been going on since films started being made here. All the studios used to hire hefty, strong Pathans at their studio gates to ward off the hopefuls as well as those who wanted to have a look at their favourite stars.

While 99.99 % Film people wanted to join the film line, there were 0.01 % people who got into films without even dreaming about it. Difficult to believe ? But it is 100 % true. We will see some cases.

This is the story of a young man named Ramnarayan Venkat Sarma, from Madras. He was highly educated. He was B.A.,M.Litt in Carnatic music and Dance. He was also a research fellow for his Ph.D. He was Managing Editor of the magazine ” Natyam”. He had also learnt Fencing (sword fighting) as a hobby. He participated in some drama staged by his college. Mr. Kittoo, an employee of Gemini Studio attended that programme. Impressed with Ramnarayan, he informed director Raghavachari, the next day at the studio. They went immediately to visit his home early next day, but at a nearby Bus stop, Kittoo saw Ramnarayan in the Bus Queue. They called him and took him to the studio, where he was offered a role of Gautam Budha in a Tamil film, ” Ashok kumar’-1941. Surprised, Ramnarayan accepted it. He was billed as R.Ramani, B.A. in the film. He was given his new film name by Jiten Banerjee of Newtone Studios. And thus RANJAN became a Hero in more than 50 films !

From the late 30s to late 50s, actor singer Parshuram was a known name. He too entered films by chance. His father was very poor. He brought him to Bombay. One day his father carried him on his shoulders, while crossing the Gokhale bridge in Dadar. Parshuram, as was his habit, started singing. A person followed them for quite some time and then stopped them. After usual enquiries, that person – V.Shantaram – asked the father to leave Parshuram in his custody at Prabhat Studios to make him an actor in films. Thus Parshuram grew up in Prabhat and acted in several films there.

The original natural actor Motilal had gone to Sagar studios to watch the film shooting, with a friend. Director K P Ghosh saw him and offered him a Hero’s role in films. Motilal, having lost the chance to join the Navy due to sudden illness, was surprised to no end, but agreed and history was created.

There are other examples like Meena Shorey, or Sarvottam Badami or Ashok Kumar and a few more cases. Why I related all this was to stress the point that Fate can get you anywhere, whether you try for it, do not dream for it, or even are forced to opt for it – like actress Rajkumari Shukla. In the decade of the 40s, the name of Rajkumari Shukla, was quite well known for motherly or side roles. She did not join films by choice, but for making a living, she was forced by circumstances to join films and she made a successful career here.

Raj Kumari Shukla was born in a well-known Brahmin family in Calcutta in 1903. Her own life has been quite tragic. She had to join the film industry not so much because of personal choice, but due to tragic personal circumstances. Like most young girls from Indian families, this virtuous lady, well-versed in household chores, got married. But her family life after marriage proved to be extremely unhappy — so much so that one day her husband gave her a brutal beating and drove her from his house.

Finding no refuge anywhere, she went to Jagannath Puri (in Orissa) and lived there in an ashram. Gradually, her family history and marital problems became known to one of the priests there, and he informed her parents. Her elder sister then brought her back to her house.

One theatre actor known locally as Gujarati Baba used to live nearby. Sometimes, she would get some theatre passes from him and go to local theatres to see some plays. This not only helped her to forget her unhappy past but also kindled in her young heart the desire to act in plays. The Gujarati Baba then persuaded her to adopt acting as a profession. Accordingly, in 1933, she joined Maadan Theatre and began her career as a leading lady, Film-goers of those days can still recall her “Hilaali abroo, Tez aankhen, Kushada peshani aur siaah zulfen”. She excelled in emotional roles.

Starting her career in silent films, she came into her own with the advent of “Talkies”. Apart from Maadan Theatre, she worked for other film companies too. Her memorable films included “Intezaar”, “Zevar”, “Jagat Mohini”, “Far’yaad”, “Chaandni”, “Sharda”, “Panghat”, Tulsi”, “Swami, “Ek Raat”, “Man Ki Jeet”, “School Master”, Dulhan”, “Badalti Duniya”, “Aankh Micholi”, “Raj Nartaki”, “Jhoola” and “Najma”. She now acted more as a character artiste and vamp. Her realistic emoting in such negative roles makes the audiences shiver in revulsion. Her roles in films like “Ek Raat”, “Swami”, “Jhoola”, “Far’yaad” and “Dulhan” have been specially appreciated by film-goers.

She was only an actor and not a singer. She acted in 31 Talkie films. She also worked in few Gujarati and Bangla films. Her last recorded Hindi film was Nai Maa-46. She did sing just one song in her career. That was in the film Panghat-43. It was a duet with Baby Tara. At her times, the other more famous actress-singer Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali was also very active. In few films both acted, but the songs were only by Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali. There were two more Rajkumaris also. One was Rajkumari Calcuttewali and another was from south, T.R.Rajkumari. Their details have been described earlier and also in my book” Forgotten artists….”. (Information for the above has been taken from Urdu book,”Filmi Titlian”published in 1945, and Film Directory, with thanks.)

The cast of the film Dr. Kumar-44 mentions a name Najma. She was comparatively a newcomer into films Her real name was Naseem. Since there was already a Naseem (Bano) in Hindi films, she took the screen name of Najma. She was born in 1928, at Lahore, to Abdul Rasheed and Mariyam. Her father was a businessman. Theirs was a respectable fairly well to do family. Though she was not much educated, she was fluent in reading, writing and speaking Urdu and English. She was fond of reading books. She learnt Music and Dance.

Being a good looking girl, at the age of 14, she made a Debut in film Kunwara Baap-1942, a film made by Acharya Art productions of Director N R Acharya. Next was also a film from Acharya – Uljhan-42. She started getting films quickly and acted in Gharonda-43, Nai Zindagi-43, Dr. Kumar-44, Piya Milan-45, Naseeb-45, Chehera-46, Haqdaar-46, Kasam-47 and her last film in India-Parwana-47. Her career in India was short and she did only 11 films, but she acted in major Heroes of her times.

After Partition she migrated to Lahore. In Pakistan, she acted in its first film Teri Yaad-48, with Nasir khan and Asha Posley and the first Hit film Hichkoley-49. After this film, she got married to director Daud Chand, retired from films and raised a family. She died on 6-12-1983 at Lahore.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali. It is a good song. It is composed by the veteran composer Sarswati Devi, who left Bombay Talkies in 1942 – same time when a splinter, disgruntled group led by S.Mukherjee left Bombay Talkies to start Filmistan in 1942. Saraswati devi did not join them, she became a Freelancer. Actually, Dr. Kumar was her first film after leaving Bombay Talkies. With today’s song, film Dr. Kumar makes its Debut on the Blog.


Song-Ae kismat bata kya bigaada hai tera (Dr Kumar)(1944) Singer-Rajkumari Dubey, Lyricist- Gaafil Harnalvi, MD- Saraswati Devi

Lyrics

Ae ae ae kismat
bata aa kya aa
bigaada hai tera

ae kismat bata kya bigaada hai tera
chaman kyon kiya toone barbaad mera
ae kismat bata kya bigaada hai tera
chaman kyon kiya toone barbaad mera

ruki meri us waqt rangeen duniya aa aa
ruki meri us waqt rangeen duniya
muhabbat ka jab ho raha thha sawera
muhabbat ka jab ho raha thha sawera

tadapti hain aahen ae ae ae ae
tadapti hain aahen
ubalte hain aansoo
tadapti hain aahen
ubalte hain aansoo
kahaan jaaoon
chaaron taraf hai andhera
kahaan jaaoon
chaaron taraf hai andhera

ye mushqil hai
main aen
dil ko dil se bhulaa doon
ho o o
ye mushqil hai
main dil ko dil se bhulaa doon
ke jis dil mein hai zindagi ka basera
ke jis dil mein hai zindagi ka basera
ae kismat bata kya bigaada hai tera
chaman kya kiya toone barbaad mera
ae kismat bata
ae kismat bata
ae kismat bataa aa


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4333 Post No. : 15629 Movie Count :

4304

Regulars of this blog are aware that my family had three pets namely Nuppy (cat), Bhole (dog) and Chhote (Dog) that my wife adopted in september 2010, october 2010 and december 2010 respectively in the place where she lived. I was based at Nagpur those days, some 300 km away. They were all very young when they were brought home. I would visit my wife and daughter and bring them to Nagpur along with the pets during their holidays.

These pets and their interesting tales are covered in several of my writeups, viz. Aaye ho to dekh lo duniya zaraa (Chiraag Kahaan Roshni Kahaan), Jab koi ladki baar baar mere dil ko tadpaaye (Chattan Singh), Ye pyaari pyaari paati (Janmbhoomi), Tu hai mera yaar (Milan),Jahaan chaar yaar mil jaaye wahaan raat ho gulzaar (Sharaabi)(1984), Jaa jaldi bhaag jaa (Deshpremi)(1982), Bade miyaan to bade miyaan (Bade Milaay Chhote Miyaan)(1998) etc.

Most of these writeups were happy tales describing the amusing antics of the pets. The first and so far the only sad writeup appeared on 29 june 2012, where I broke the news that the cat nuppy was no more.

There have been no detailed posts in the blog about my pets since 2015 though I had a collection of many new interesting stories about them.

I have finally decided to pen another writeup on my pets. This is unfortunately another obituary. It is Chhote, the youngest pet who passed away on 27 may 2020.

When we got the medical cards of our pets made in Nagpur in January 2011, the three of us were the owners of the three pets. Chhote was shown as owned by my wife, Bhole by me and Nuppy by our daughter.

The three pets have brought us countless hours of joy as long as they lived and left fond memories after two of them left us.

Chhote was the centre of attraction of our household. Not just the humans in the house, even the other two pets of the house were very fond of him. He had a natural knack of winning over strangers (animals as well as human beings). He was the youngest pet, and the other two pets were very protective of him. In the winter season of 2010-11, the three of them would sleep snuggled up with each other. The two senior pets would keep Chhote between them, protecting him from both sides.

My wife never pampered our daughter (despite she being our only child), but Chhote was pampered by her, to the extent that she began to give step motherly treatment to Bhhole. Later she realised the error of her ways and made amends. Chhote began to assert proprietary claims over my wife and would prevent Bhole form coming close to her. When I came visiting from Nagpur, Bhole paid Chhote in the same coin. He staked a proprietary claim over me and prevented Chhote from coming close to me, much to our amusement. Till the last moment, this ownership claim was not given up. But to our credit, we tried to treat both dogs fairly even if he was not the owner. 🙂

Chhote had such smooth silky coat. In Nagpur, I would hear the door bell. At the door, I would find the padosan living upstairs holding Chhote and telling me that he was going to the busy main road. I would thank her and take hold of Chhote. People loved to hold Chhote in their arms, just to feel the texture of his smooth silky coat.

Cat was allowed to go out and come in but the dogs were not. But Chhote, always looking for challenges and adventures would often escape out of the home. Bhhole would then seek to escape so that he could go out and protect Chhote.

While Bhole and nuppy knew their way back home, Chhote did not and he would lose his way. Then my wife would order nuppy to go and bring Chhote back. Amazingly, nuppy understood the command. She would go and bring Chhote home. This happened more than once and so it could not be just a coincidence.

Even street dogs began to know him. Once a street dog brought him back to the home! As a reward, my wife gave that dog some foodstuff to eat.

Chhote gave respect to his senior pets, just like humans do.

While Chhote had the temperament of being a dog seeking to socialise with everyone, Bhhole was an athletic dog, with strong jaws and good running speed. My daughter appointed him her sprint coach. The two would begin their sprint together. Bhhole would easily outrun her and then stop to allow her to catch up with him before resuming his sprint. Bhhole’s coaching was quite useful seeing that my daughter was the 100 metre sprinting champion of her class among girls and once she even won a District level sprint.

Bhhole would also play football with my daughter while being dressed properly in football shorts. Bhhole, proudly sporting his footballing short looking like Scoobie Doo, would be seriously tackling the daughter for ball possession when he would suddenly find his shorts being pulled down. It was Chhote (looking like Scrapy Doo) entering the arena wondering what happened to the tail of Bhhole. Bhhole would snarl at him, asking him to leave him alone. 🙂

Once, Chhote for some reason began to whine and whimper and got into the nerves of my wife. It is said by wise men, and morning message to this effect regularly gets circulated in whatsapp groups that “One should not take imortant decisions when angry and one should not make promises when happy”. It is a wise saying that my wife does not practice. She got annoyed with Chhote and decided to give away the trouble making Chhote to someone else. She convinced a lady to take Chhote and handed Chhote to her.

That was a saturday. When the daughter came back home from school and found Chhote missing, she started crying and insisted that Chhote be brought back. Even the other two pets were silent and sad. Next morning, wife and daughter went to that lady. They found Chhote, who roamed around freely inside his earlier home, tied by a chain in that household. Chhote was very happy to see them. My wife asked Chhote back. Much to their relief, the lady agreed to hand Chhote back. While they were bringing Chhote back, a cow who had recently given birth to a calf though that her calf was being taken away. she gave a chase. My wife went to the cow and showed her Chhote and convinced her that it was a pup and not her calf. 🙂 When Chhote was brought back home, the other pets, silent since morning, became happy and cheerful. The raunaq of the household had returned. The voice of Chhote which my wife was finding annoying till the previous day began to sound like music to her ears.

Chhote was quite intelligent and smart. Unlike most humans, he could think out of the box and outsmart humans. A human would chain him and think that Chhote cannot get away. Chhote would pull his head out of the neck collar and the human would be left holding the chain with the collar. Chhote had used this trick on many unsuspecting humans. In the early days, we tied him with chain made of fibre. He would bite off the rope and free himself. Then we bought metal chains to tie him and Bhole.

In Nagpur, we had a garden adjacent to my residence. The garden is closed from all sides. I would leave the dogs in the garden every morning for an hour before bringing them inside the home. I was secure in my knowledge that there was no way the dogs can go out of the garden. But as I mentioned before, Chhote outwitted me. He laid a detailed long term plan. This plan was carried out so well that I could notice nothing. One week later, when I went to the garden to bring the two pets back, they were nowhere to be found. They had escaped !

What Chhote had done was an example of a lateral thinking at its best. He found out that the mud under the gate was soft. So every day, he got Bhhole (the athletic dog) to dig some mud from under the gate. Bhhole dug some mud everyday for seven days. On the seventh day, enough gap got created under the gap and the two escaped through that gap.

Where did they go ? There was a children’s part nearby. The board said-“only for Children of Railway employees”. The two dogs were playing there, considering themselves as children of a Railway employee.

Both dogs had different natures and different qualities. Chhote, the brainy one, had the ability to analyse things and work out ingenious solutions, which is unusual for most other dogs. For instance Bhole could never do these things. When it came to opening doors, Bhhole only knew how to open door by pushing. If the door needed to be pulled then Bhole was all at sea. But Chhote could easily pull a door. He even worked out the way to go through spring loaded doors by pulling it safely.

Bhole was good in barking whereas Chhote was not. When Bhole barked, his bark was so furious that people thought that many dogs were barking. Chhote accompanied him in barking but he in reality would only be only lip syncing in Bhole’s voice.

Chhote had some superhuman abilities in him. For instance he could tell by smell if the foodstuff was edible. We often used to buy milk packets when running short of Milkman supplied milk. Once we bought one such milk packet and offered this milk to the pets. Pets, who would dring milkman supplied milk without a fuss, refused t drink it despite being hungry. Later they drank milkman supplied milk. That is how we realised that the milk suppled in milk packets was not safe.

Chhote’s hearing ability was truly superhuman. The car that we have is one of millions such cars built to the same specifications, but Chhote could tell this car apart by the sound of its engine. He could do it when the car was at least a kilometer away. The person driving the car could barely listen to the sound of the engine, whereas Chhote, located one kilometer away could tell that this car belonging to the family was arriving back home in five minutes.

Chhote was very fond of being driven around in that car. He would take the passenger seat and look around, soaking in the scenario. He has traveled a lot between Maharashtra and MP, seated on the passenger seat.

When visitors came home, they were afraid of Bhole and they would request that Bhole be tied down by chain. No one was afraid of Chhote. Chhote would remain free and join in watching the visitors (plumbers/ electricians etc) do their stuff. If luggage was being moved from one place to another (for instance during transfers) Chhote would sit on the furnitures and would get carried along with the furniture. If the school friends of the daughter drop in and had their discussion while seated on chairs, Chhote too would hop on a chair and give them company.

From Nagpur, I got transferred to Bilaspur during end of 2011 and shifted the luggage in February 2012. All six of us travelled from Nagpur to Bilaspur in that car.

Bilaspur residence had a sprawling premise. The wall was broken at places. Initially I was worried that the dogs would escape through the gaps and would be lost. But after nearly one year of tussle between the pets and me, I realised that the pets could go out and come in safely. There were many occasions when I felt that the dogs (one or both) were lost, but fortunately they came back safely every time. In due course, the premise became a safe haven for pups and their mothers. The two pets would repel any male dogs from entering the premise, but pups and their mothers were welcome to reside in the premise. There was a time when the premise housed, apart from Bhhole and Chhote, two female dogs and nearly a dozen pups.

Bhole and Chhote had their meals in their earmarked pots. Bhole was very possessive about his meal and would not share it with any other dogs. Chhote on the other hand was quite accommodating and shared the meal of his pot with any pup who approached him. The pups adored him. I had taken photographs (that I shared on facebook) that show Chhote walking around with nearly a dozen pups following him.

We also had some temporary pets there that lasted for just a few months before being lost for one reason or the other. My wife had given them interesting names. One of these temporary pets was a pup named Kabra Singh. Both Bhole and Chhote were quite friendly with Kabra Singh and they would teach him tricks of dogfight. I have a photograph where Kabra Singh is seen trying to apply those tricks on his own gurus. 🙂 Kabra Singh tried to copy the mannerisms of Chhote. If Chhote was seated on a chair then he would get seated on a small stool striking the same pose as Chhote.

When I was transferred from Bilaspur to Izatnagar in UP in 2015 then bringing the two pets offered challenges because of the distance involved. Finally I worked out an elegant solution (first suggested by the daughter). She suggested that we needed to bring them by train. Initially I told her that it was not possible. Then on checking up the rules I found that dogs could be brought in guards van or in AC first (if other passengers do not object). No self respecting pet dog would ever travel in the guard van with the guard (without the owner) so that option was ruled out. The dogs had to be taken only by AC first. The best and fail safe way to ensure that there was no objection from other fellow passengers was to ensure that we got the cabin of two berths instead of four berth cabin. I requested for it. I was ensured that I would get that provided no VIPs traveled that day by that train. I prayed and my prayers were answered. VIPs kept away and we were allotted two berth cabin. The dogs, duly certified fit to travel (certificate issued by a government vet), with their documents and tickets were with us. THe TTE saw the tickets and raised no alarms (I had already ensured that the TTE was briefed beforehand). Chhote occupied the lower berth and watched eagerly out of the window like a wide eyed kid. Bhole, not interested , made himself comfortable at the floor of the cabin. Chhote let my wife share the lower berth with him. 🙂

Early morning, we arrived at Agra cantt. From there, we reached Izatnagar by road.

Izatnagar in UP was different from Bilaspur in Chattisgarh. The premise of the residence was just as porous as was the case with Bilaspur residence but I realised that allowing the dogs to roam free like they did at Bilaspur was not safe. So after a few close shaves, it was made sure that the two dogs were taken out of the residence only while chained. Of course then escaped from the chain many a times and those who ran behind to bring them back aften had harrowing time cornering them and bringing them back.

Every morning I would take the dogs on walk, one dog at a time. It was alweays Chhote first, because it was he who insisted on being taken for a walk first thing in the morning, come rain or snow. Thanks to him, I became the most disciplined officer in Izatnagar who would regularly go on a walk at 6 AM and even earlier while others were still sleeping. Even during torrential rain, Chhote would insist on having his daily morning walk. He was that kind of outgoing dog.

The street dogs in Izatnagar were quite big built and fearsome. They would try to bully Chhote and Chhote would get nervous. I , armed with a stick, assured him that he was under Z category security and he was well protected. I would manage to keep the gang of street dogs at bay. When it was the turn of Bhole to go on his morning walk, the tables were turned. For some reason, the appearance of Bhole unnerved even those big built hardened street dogs assembled in a gang and they would quickly disperse at the sight of Bhole. Bhole walked the street like a dabang dog.

Like at Bilaspur, even at Izatnagar, pups and their mothers were allowed to stay in the premises of the residence. As at Bilaspur, even here the pups were fond of the pets. Even Bhole was admired by pets. When they went on their morning walk, these pups also accompanied them. Pups accompanying Bhole would take advantage of Bhole’s appearance to bully even big looking street dogs and chase them away. 🙂

Izatnagar has an IVRI (Indian Vetenary Research Institute) nearby. The two dogs would often go there for their medical check ups and there they would combine to bully other dogs.

When I was transferred from Izatnagar to Gorakhpur in August 2018, I and my wife travelled by our car with our pets. The residence at Gorakhpur had proper walls so the pets could not go out. So for the first time in years, we could leave the dogs in the premise without worrying about them going out of premises. On three occasions, during heavy rains, I found parts of wall falling down and the premise getinmg exposed to public. Those were harowing days, because it meant dogs could escape to busy main road and from then onwars there was no hope for seeing them again. On all these occasions, I managed to somehow keep the dogs restrained while the wall got repaired (first temporarity and then permanently). On those days, I would take them out of residence while chained. Otherwise the dogs had forgotten the experience of being chained after coming to Bilaspur.

After one year of stay at Gorakhpur, Chhote suddenly developed the desire to go on a walk out of the residence every morning and afternoon, like how it was in Izatnagar. It was from december 2019 onwards. Chhote continued to go on his walks till march 2020,

It was during the last months of 2019 that Chhote started suffering from a medical problem that initially went unnoticed. My wife feels that he had developed a tiny swelling inside his mouth on the right side. Later, on being checked, it turned out to be malignant cancer. My wife took him to a vet for treatment in early march 2020, hoping that it would help. Next date of treatment was 25 march 2020, which turned out to be the date when lockdown started in India. It was in the second week of april that the Vet clinic finally opened. When Chhote was taken to the vet, he had become quite weak and thin by then because he was not able to eat properly. He was given driops and some injections, which helped a bit, and his appetite returned a bit. He has stopped eating his normal food. My daughter suggested that he be fed soft chicken pieces. She ordered chicken biryaani online every afternoon. I would feed Chhote soft pieces morsel by morsel which he would struggle to eat. He would then drink lots of water in a bid to wash it down.

The cancerous growth was becoming bigger. It led to continuous secretion that Chhote would try to wipe on his forelimbs. So his shiny white coat wou;d get dirty and discolored. I began to give him baths every second day which gave him relief for some time before his body would once again be covered with that secretion.

Chhote was suffering. Inability to take in nourishment was telling on him. An erstwhile burly looking Chhote was getting shrunk in size which was sad to see. When I showed his video to my daughter she began to cry at his plight.

When Chhote was taken to the vet again one week later, this time he stated that it was a hopeless case. The swelling is solid swelling. Nothing can be done to reduce it- the vet stated.

So I came back and informed this fact tyo my wife on phone.

To the credit of Chhote, he endured this pain stoically. He had realised that his last time was approaching. He seemed to be reconciled to it, secure in the knowledge that we tried everything we could for him. In his prime, he would bother us for many things, but this time he had decided that he would try and be as less of a problem on us as he could help. He did not whimper once throughout his suffering.

On my part, I made sure that Chhote did not feel unwanted, unloved and uncared for because of his medical condition. He was given the same freedom as before. No quarantine, no restrictions, no stigmas. He in fact was given special attention as far as feeding him and bathing him was concerned.

When my wife and daughter first became aware of the worsening condition of Chhote, they opined that he should not be made to suffer like this and he should be given euthanasia. I opposed the idea telling them that he was eating chicken and so he was getting nourishment.

By 25th may, his condition took a turn for the worse. He stopped taking even the little nourishment he was able to take earlier. And he had become so weak that he struggled to stand on his feet.

On 26th may, I phoned my wife and informed her of Chhote’s situation. I told her that I could no see Chhote holding on for much longer. It was now I, instead of she, who broached the subject of euthanasia. My wife, from her location in MP tried to get things arranged by talking to people concerned. The feedback was that no doctor was prepared. So be it. But we needed to be ready since the end was near.

On 26th of night, Chhote struggled to move around in the hall. He tried to sit in one place, and then another, then at yet another place and so on. He did not eat anything. with some effort, he drank water.

At night, he was sleeping in the hall. Late at night, when I woke up and looked at the hall, he was not there. It meant that he had gone to some other room where he liked to stay.

Every night, I am woken up by Bhhole a few times who wants to go out to relieve himself. And I take his out. Every time I do that, more often than not, Chhote too joins in. On this night, Chhote did not come out.

Next morning, when I hardly got any sleep, I took Bhole out of residence. At about 5 AM, I mustered enough courage to venture in the direction where Chhote had gone at night. There he was, lying stone cold at the floor. He had expired, after bravely fighting off this killer disease for several weeks.

As instructed by my wife the previous day, I kept the body on Chhote’s bed, which my daughter had ordered for him online the previous year. Then I covered him with a dupatta of my wife.

My wife had phoned the concerned people. An area was located in one corner of the premise adjacent to the boudary wall. A grave was dug. Chhote along with his bed and my wife’s dupatta covering him was laid to rest in that grave. Flowers, plucked from the plants in the premise were laid on the grave. Agarbattis were lit.

When nuppy had died, it came as a sudden shock because Nuppy was young and without any ailments. Chhote’s death on the other hand was not unexpected. It had become nevitable after cancer was detected inside his mouth and it was diagnosed as incurable. The pain of losing Chhote was tempered by other feelings, viz, feeling of relief that Chhote was finally put out of the terrible misery he was going through.

Then there was the feeling that I was spared a moral dilemma of subjecting my pet to euthanasia. No doubt I wanted that in order to save the pet from further pain, but that would have still amounted to murder. I was mightily relived that I could now could keep a clear conscious. I also felt morally upright knowing that I did not lt my pet down, I did not betray him and I did not hurt his feelings while he was undergoing his suffering. He was in need of support and comfort and I tried to provide that. When I realised that his end was near then I decided not to leave him alone.I took leave from office and stayed at home in the second half of 26 may 2020. So I was at home when the end came sometime in the night of 26 may-27 may.

My daughter asked me, did Chhote sport his collar while being buried ? I replied in the affirmative. Then I realised how wise it was on my part to fit Chhote’s favourite collar around his neck. Pet dogs wear this collar proudly as a badge of honour for being a pet of a household. Chhote departed from the world, secure in the knowledge that he was sporting his favourite collar at that time.

How did Bhole react to the demise of Chhote ? In the morning of 27 may 2020. Bhole must have gone to the room where Chhote was lying dead. He must have seen that Chhote was no more alive. Bhole kept a sombre silence throughout the morning. He saw Chhote, with his bed and dupatta cover being carried out. So he knew that Chhote would no longer be around.

Chhote got a decent honorable burial with eight human beings present. If there is something like soul which watches from above, then the soul of Chhote would have felt that he was treated well in his life and also while bidding him a final farewell.

There is this concept of “Shaapit gandarv” and “shaapit dev”. In ancient mythology, some gods would anger some rishis/ munis and the rishis / munis woud curse them to get born in the Mrityulok. On request, the sentence would be reduced a bit. Like for instance, in Mahabharat, eight vasus were cursed by Rishi Vashisht that they would e born as humans. On request, it was stated by Rishi that they would hav to spend just a few moments as human, as their mother would kill them immediately and then they could be back as Vasus. Some acquaintances, who are familiar with our pets have suggested that our pets too were like such devas who were cursed by some munis that they would be born as dogs on earth. On being requested, their sentence was softened. It was ordained that they would be brought up by a kind human family that would bring them up with care and affection. It is a theory that I agree with. Chhote and Bhole, and also nuppy seem to be very special pets who possessed qualities that seem unreal in a normal cat/ dog.

So, nuppy and Chhote are back to being the devas that they were before they came into our lives. Bhole is the only one left now. He perhaps needed to serve the longest sentence of them all. Like the humans, Bhole too is remarkable well composed and is coping well with the loss. Hopefully, we will get over the loss soon. The font memories of Chhote will ofcourse linger for many years. We have not forgotten nuppy who left us eight years ago, and I am sure same will be the case with Chhote as well.

I am sad but also relieved, and philosophical about this loss. Two days have already passed. I thought that I would keep this news to myself. But then I decided that it would be a burden on my chest if I kept this fact to myself. So this writeup, the longest in the blog for some time is my effort to get the load off my chest and then resume my normal life.

I searched for a suitable somh to go with the occasion. The search led me to a song from “Pyaas”(1982).

“Pyaasa”(1982) was produced and directed by O P Ralhan for Ralhan Productions Bombay. It had Kanwaljeet, Zeenat Aman, Tanuja, Anju Mahendroo, Madan Puri, Kamini Kaushal, A K Hangal, Dheeraj Kumar, Manmohan Krishna, Ram Mohan, Brahmchaari, Kamaldeep, Jagdish Raj, Devyani Thakkar, Shivraj, R S Chopra, Asha Sharma, Gauri Verma, Sunil Dhawan, Dhanraj, Maqbool, Hakeem, Ashok, Rafiq, Anil Ahuja, Rani Gill, Surjit Kaur, Shwini Kumar, Zeenat, Satyarani, Ramlal , Jimmy, Gopal Ralhan, Vinod Talwar, Ashok, Ratan Gaurang, Harendra, Kumud Tripathi, Ramesh Kumar, V K Chopra, Renu Kumar, Tarana, G Ansari, Ameer, Raj Kishore, Master Chhotu, Debut-Aaloka, Guest appearances by McMohan and Om Shivpuri.

This forgotten movie had eight songs by three lyricists. This song from “Pyaasa”(1982) is a song that seems tailormade for the sombre occasion. The song is sung by Kishore Kumar. Shiv Kumar Saro is the lyricist. Music is composed by Bappi Lahiri.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.

With this song, “Pyaas”(1982) makes its debut in the blog.


Song=Saath mera chhod kar (Pyaas)(1982) Singer-Kishore Kumar, Lyrics-Shiv Kumar Saroj, MD-Bappi Lahiri
Chorus

Lyrics

hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

saath mera chhod kar
saath mera chhod kar
chal diya tu kahaan
dil mera tod kar
dil mera tod kar
saath mera chhod kar
saath mera chhod kar
chal diya tu kahaan
dil mera tod kar
dil mera tod kar

aaa aa aa aa
aaa aaa aa aaa aaa

gham se bhara hoon main
aur mujhe gham na do
phool maange thhe maine
mujhko khaar na do
saath mera chhod kar
saath mera chhod kar
chal diya tu kahaan
dil mera tod kar
dil mera tod kar

hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm

yaaden thhin kitni haseen roye aasmaan roye zameen
sahar ka ham kya karen yaar apna saath nahin
saath mera chhod kar
saath mera chhod kar
chal diya tu kahaan
dil mera tod kar
dil mera tod kar

aa aa aa aa
har dil mein zinda hai tu
insaan nahin farishta hai tu
gareebon ki hai jaan tu
insaan par ehsaan tu
saath mera chhod kar
saath mera chhod kar
chal diya tu kahaan
dil mera tod kar
dil mera tod kar
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4332 Post No.: 15627

Today’s song is from a film ‘Dharti ke Lal’-46, made by Indian People Theatre Association – formed on 25th May 1943. The film was directed by K.A.Abbas. The music was by Ravishankar. For 10 songs, written by a team of 4 Lyricists, music was composed by Ravi Shankar. Ravi Shankar (7-4-1920 to 11-12-2012) gave music only to 5 Hindi films, composing 48 songs – Neecha Nagar-46, Dharati ke lal-46, Anuradha-60, Godan-63 and Meera-79. Few songs from films Anuradha and Godan were good and popular, otherwise, in my opinion, his music was absolutely average. It never impressed me.

The film’s cast was Shombhu Mitra, Usha Dutt, Balraj Sahni, Damayanti Sahni, Anwar Mirza, Tripti Bhaduri Mitra, David, K N Singh etc etc. This was the first and the only directly produced film by IPTA. Later on, it supported many films in Hindi, Bangla and other languages. IPTA was an association of like minded people of socialistic thinking, influenced by and tilting towards Communism.

After the Great Russian Revolution in 1917, the Communist Cult philosophy started attracting people in the world, but within next 75 years,i.e. by 1992, the Russian Communism came to a close with President Gorbachev’s Peristroika and Glassnost. In India, in the early years after the Independence, Communists had some states under their control and with Nehru’s blessings, they prospered too. However, as on today, Communism in not only the world, but even in India is thriving only in remote pockets and Naxalite activities. IPTA has been the Cultural wing of CPI in India.

It had become an established way to project India’s poverty, illiteracy, poor people and the miseries of the ‘Have Nots’, through films and such ‘realistic’ films were decorated with medals. Films made on the famous Bengal Famine of 1943 and Appu Triology did this job faithfully and received accolades.

In Indian film industry there were stalwarts, who swore by Nehru’s Socialism. Big guns like Mehboob Khan, A R Kardar and B R Chopra were few examples. Socialism dripped from the films they made- Roti, Mother India, Son of India, Naya Daur etc. can be quoted in this context.

Amongst the actors, Balraj Sahni was one actor who tilted to this philosophy. Most writers, directors actors etc from Bangla film industry were sympathetic towards this philosophy, if not actively participating openly into it. Out of the important and active members of Bombay from IPTA was K A Abbas. It was his idea to make a film on 1943 Bengal famine. Abbas not only made Dharti ke lal in 1946, but also made its sequel Munna in 1954. This is what Encyclopedia of indian Cinema says about film Dharti ke lal-46….Based on Bijon Bhattacharya’s plays Nabanna and Jabanbandi; Krishen Chander’s short story Annadata. Abbas’s directorial debut launched a major trend of ‘realist’ cinema. The film is set during WW2 and the 1943 Bengal famine (a traumatic event often used as source material by left cultural movements) and a growing ‘nation-building’ ideology. Made during the war, the novice cast and crew were accorded a special licence for a war-effort contribution.
The only film actually produced by the IPTA (although it later informally supported several other films), the film is based partly on Sombhu Mitra’s landmark production of Bhattacharya’s play Nabanna for the IPTA. It narrates the story of a family of sharecroppers in Bengal: the patriarch Samaddar, his elder son Niranjan and his wife Binodini, and the younger son Ramu with his wife Radhika. Despite a good harvest and rising grain prices during the war, Samaddar loses his property to a crooked graindealing zamindar. Ramu, his wife and their newborn baby go to Calcutta followed soon after by the rest of the family along with thousands of similarly dispossessed peasants. The film intercuts Ramu’s frantic search for work with his wife’s descent into prostitution. Before dying, the patriarch enjoins his family to return to their native soil where the farmers get together and, in a stridently celebratory socialist-realist ending, opt for Soviet-style collective farming. Ramu is excluded from their world.

The film’s highly stylised and symbol-laden realism proved extremely influential. It appears to have found a way of narrativising the 1943 famine which set the pattern for many films moving from depictions of deprivation in the country to suffering in the city, e.g. Nemai Ghosh’s Chinnamul (1950) and Bimal Roy’s Do Bigha Zameen (1953). It also initiated a new type of melodrama able to marry actuality to psychoanalytic and political anxieties and desires, as in Abbas’s scripts for Raj Kapoor.

Presented By: Indian Peoples Theatre Association (IPTA); Associate Producer: V.P. Sathe; Associate Director: Sambhu Mitra, Balraj Sahni, P.A. Gupte; Assistant Director: Srinivas Sastri, Narendra Trivedi; Story: Bijon Bhattacharya, Krishen Chander; Screenplay: K.A. Abbas; Dialogue: K.A. Abbas; Adaptation: Bijon Bhattacharya’s “Navana” and “Jiban Maran”, Krishen Chander’s “I cannot die”. Music Director: Ravi Shankar.
K A Abbas was an important name in Hindi film industry. He was close to many heavyweight actors, producers and other directors. He belonged to a highly cultured and educaqted family from Panipat (present Haryana). Khwaja Ahmad Abbas was born in Panipat, Haryana, on 7-6-1916. He was born in the home of celebrated Urdu poet, ‘Khwaja Altaf Husain Hali’, a student of Mirza Ghalib. His grandfather Khwaja Gulam Abbas was one of the chief rebels of the 1857 Rebellion movement, and the first martyr of Panipat to be blown from the mouth of a cannon. Abbas’s father Ghulam-Us-Sibtain graduated from Aligarh Muslim University, was a tutor of a prince and a prosperous businessman, who modernised the preparation of Unani medicines. Abbas’s mother, ‘Masroor Khatoon’, was the daughter of Sajjad Husain, an enlightened educationist.

Abbas took his early education in ‘Hali Muslim High School’, which was established by his great grand father Hali. He had his early education till 7th in Panipat. He was instructed to read the Arabic text of the Quran and his childhood dreams swung at the compulsive behest of his father. Abbas completed his matriculation at the age of fifteen. He did his B.A. with English literature in 1933 and LL.B. in 1935 from Aligarh Muslim University

Worked on National Call, a New Delhi paper (1933); started Aligarh Opinion when studying law (1934); obtained law degree in 1935; political correspondent and later film critic for nationalist Bombay Chronicle, Bombay (1935- 47) praising Dieterle, Capra and esp. Shantaram. Wrote Indian journalism’s longest- running weekly political column, Last Page (1941-86), in Chronicle and Blitz. Best-known fiction (Zafran Ke Phool situated in Kashmir, Inquilab on communal violence) places him in younger generation of Urdu and Hindi writers with Ali Sardar Jafri and Ismat Chughtai, whose work followed the PWA? and drew sustenance from Nehruite socialism’s pre- Independence, anti-Fascist and anti-communal commitments.

Founder member of IPTA’s all- India front (1943), to which he contributed two seminal plays: Yeh Amrit Hai and Zubeida. Entered film as publicist for Bombay Talkies (1936) to whom he sold his first screenplay, Naya Sansar (1941). First film, Dharti Ke Lal, made under IPTA’s banner and drew on Bijon Bhattacharya’s classic play Nabanna (1944), dealing with the Bengal famine of 1943.

Set up production company Naya Sansar (1951), providing India’s most consistent representation of socialist-realist film (cf. Thoppil Bhasi and Utpal Dutt). Best work is in the scripts for his own films and for those of Raj Kapoor (Awara 1951); Shri 420 (1955), 1955, both co-written with V.P. Sathe; Jagte Raho, 1956; Bobby, 1973) and Shantaram’s Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani (1946; adapted from his own book, And One Did Not Come Back), which combined aspects of Soviet cinema (Pudovkin) and of Hollywood (e.g. Capra and Upton Sinclair), influencing a new generation of Hindi cineastes (Kapoor, Chetan Anand) and sparking new realist performance idioms (BALRAJ SAHNI). His Munna, without songs or dances, and Shaher Aur Sapna, cheaply made on location in slums, were described as being influenced by neo-realism.

Pardesi is the first Indian-Soviet co-production, co- directed by Vassili M. Pronin. The landmark Supreme Court censorship judgement about his Char Shaher Ek Kahani (aka A Tale of Four Cities) curtailed ‘arbitrary’ governmental pre- censorship powers on the grounds that the Indian Constitution guarantees the right to free speech. His constitutional challenge of the Cinematograph Act led to the famous Supreme Court decision upholding the validity of precensorship of cinema. Interestingly in Interestingly in 1939, K A Abbas had written a letter to Gandhi urging him to reconsider his opinion on the idea of the evil of cinema. He writes
“Today I bring for your scrutiny – and approval -a new toy my generation has learned to play with, the CINEMA! – You include cinema among evils like gambling, sutta, horse racing etc… Now if these statements had come from any other person, it was not necessary to be worried about them… But your case is different. In view of the great position you hold in this country, and I may say in the world, even the slightest expression of your opinion carries much weight with millions of people. And one of the world’s most useful inventions would be allowed to be discarded or what is worse, left alone to be abused by unscrupulous people. You are a great soul, Bapu. In your heart there is no room for prejudice. Give this little toy of ours, the cinema, which is not so useless as it looks, a little of your attention and bless it with a smile of toleration”.

Published many books including I Am Not An Island and Mad Mad World of Indian Films (both 1977). Other important scripts: Neecha Nagar (1946); Mera Naam Joker (1970); Zindagi Zindagi (1972); Henna (1991). Abbas also brought a number of new talents into the film industry, such as Amitabh Bachchan in Saat Hindustani . K.A.Abbas died on 1-6-1987 at Bombay. ( adapted, with thanks, from The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema).

One of the main female leads in the film was Tripti Mitra, who was not at all a known face in Hindi films that time. Her name first became known to Hindi audience when, as the main Heroine, Tripti Mitra gave a remarkable performance in film Gopinath-1948.
Tripti Mitra was a big name in Bangla films and stage movement. She acted in only 3 Hindi movies. Gopinath-48, Dharati ke Lal-46 and Munna-54. Munna was a sequel to Dharati Ke Lal- both films directed by K.A.Abbas.

Smt. TRIPTI MITRA, née Tripti Bhaduri (Born 25 October 1925 – Died 24 May 1989), popular Indian Actress of Bengali Theatre and Films. She was the wife of Sombhu Mitra, noted Theatre & Film Director, with whom she co-founded pioneering theatre group Bohurupee in 1948. She has acted in films like Jukti Takko Aar Gappo and Dharti Ke Lal.

She was awarded Padma Shri and the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award, the highest Indian recognition given to practicing artists, given by Sangeet Natak Akademi, India’s National Academy for Music, Dance and Drama.

Tripti Mitra was born in Dinajpur (British India) on 25 October 1925. Her father was Ashutosh Bhaduri and mother was Shailabala Debi. In Dinajpur Minor School she studied up to class six, then she came to Kolkata and got admission in Pyaricharan School. After passing Higher Secondary Examination from that school, she got admission in Ashutosh College. But she could not complete her studies since she got a job. She married Sombhu Mitra in December, 1945. She has a daughter Shaoli Mitra, who is also an actress and director.

Tripti Mitra had been acting in theatre since her teens. She first acted in her cousin Bijon Bhattacharya’s play Agun (Fire) in 1943. After watching her stage performance in noted IPTA play, Nabanna (Harvest) based on Bengal famine of 1943, director Khwaja Ahmad Abbas took her to Bombay to act in Gana Natya Sangha’s film Dharti Ke Lal in 1943, partly based on the play. Her first Bengali film was Pathik in 1953, the film was directed by Debaki Kumar Basu. She also acted in Ritwik Ghatak’s last film, Jukti Takko Aar Gappo (1974).

In 1948, Shombhu and Tripti Mitra founded their own theatre group named Bohurupee. She acted in innumerable plays mostly along with her husband Sombhu Mitra,a colossus in the field of theatre, to become one of the most legendary beings of Bengali theatre, most famous for her role as Nandini, the protagonist of Rabindranath Tagore’s Rakta Karabi. She also acted in Jago Hua Savera, a 1959 Urdu movie produced in Dhaka, East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), based on a Manik Bandopadhya’s classic novel Padma Nadir Majhi.

Tripti Mitra died on 24 May 1989.

Out of the 10 songs of the film, today’s song is the 3rd song to be presented here. The song is slightly short of 3 minutes. In the film , even a much shorter version is used. Thanks to Sadanand Kamath ji for uploading this rare song which was not available so far on You Tube.


Song- Beete ho sukh ke din aayee dukh ki ratiya (Dharti Ke Laal)(1946) Singer- Lakshmi Shankar, Lyricist- Unknown, MD- Pt. Ravi Shankar

Lyrics

Beete ho sukh ke din
aayee dukh ki ratiyaa
ho raama
Beete ho o sukh ke din
aayeen dukh ki ratiyaa
ho raama
ho raama aa
tadpat hai mora jiyara
tadpat hai mora jiyara
piya bina beete ??
ho raama
piya bina beete ??
ho raama
piya gailo bideswa ho raama
piya gailo bideswa ho raama
piya gailo bideswa ho raama

kaa se kahoon oon ab main aen aen
dukhi man ki batiyaan aan aan
ho raama aa
taras rahin mori ankhiyaan aan
kahaan gailo balamwa ho
kahaan gailo balamwa ho
ho raama
ho raama
kaa se kahoon ab main
dukhi man ki batiyaan
ho ho
ho ho
raama
beete ho ho
sukh ke din
aayeen dukh ki ratiyaan aan
ho o raama


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4328 Post No.: 15619

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 32
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“Insaaniyat”(1955) was produced and directed by S S Wasan for Gemini Pictures, Madras. This movie had Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand, Bina Rai, Vijaylaxmi, Jayant, Jairaj, Shobhana Samarth, Badr Prasad, Kumar, Agha, Mohana, Zippy (Chimpanzee), T Mukherjee, Ishwar Lala, G v Sharma, Vijay Rao, G Bhatt etc in it.

The movie had a whopping 17 songs in it. How can a movie have so many songs and still have some time left for story ! I also wonder how the music team of the movie had the stamina and drive to create so many songs in a movie !

Eight of these songs have been covered so far.

No. Blog Song number

Songs Posted on
1. 1619 Tere sang sang sang piyaa khel ke main rang 15 July 2009
2. 1790 Chup chup chup hone lagaa kuchh 23 Aug 2009
3. 2381 Aayi jhoom ke bahaar 3 Apr 2010
4. 2487 Main bandar hoon shahar kaa tu banmaanush junglee 24 May 2010
5. 8436 Apni chhaaya mein bhagwaan bithhaa le mujhe 31 July 2013
6. 15013 Raja beta bada hoke jaayega school 30 Apr 2019
7. 15335 Gori kar le tu aaj singaar 11 Dec 2019
8. 15513 Haseenon ka manzoor kar lo salaam 3 Apr 2020

This movie offered one blog Ten year challenge opportunity on 3 april 2020 which was used. Today, seven weeks later, another Blog Ten year challenge opportunity presents itself for this song.

On this occasion, here is the ninth song from “Insaaniyat”(1955) to appear in the blog. his song is sung by Lata and Chorus. Rajinder Krishan is the lyricist. Music is composed by C Ramchandra.

Only the audio of the song is available. It is clear that the song was lip synced by Bina Roy on screen.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.
Audio link:

Song-Chala gaya hai maaanjhi (Insaaniyat)(1955) singer-Lata, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-C Ramchandra
Lata + Female chorus
Lata + Female chorus + Male chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

chalaa gaya hai maanjhi
naiyyaa chhod beech manjhdhaar
tere haath hai maalik meri
qismat ki patwaar
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj

aaj chalaa mere sar ka saayee
meri nazar se door
aaj chalaa mere sar ka saayee
meri nazar se door
maange hain vardaan ye tujhse
birhan kaa sindoor
jaissey jaayein waissey aaye
ghar mera sartaaj prabhu teri
charan padi main aaj
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj

thodi si prabhu de do apne
charan kamal ki dhool
de do charan kamal ki dhool
de do charan kamal ki dhool

teri dayaa se bann jaayega
ek ek kaantaa phool
de do charan kamal ki dhool
de do charan kamal ki dhool

tu hai jisska saathi
usske kaun bigaade kaaj
prabhu teri
charan padi main aaj
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj
rakhiyo mori laaj
prabhu teri charan padi main aaj

rakhiyo mori laaj


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This is his 600th writeup in the blog.

Blog Day:

4327 Post No. : 15618

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 31
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Agha Jaani Kashmiri (16/10/1908 – 27/03/1998) was perhaps the first story/screen-play/dialogue writer who was the ‘king maker’ in the Hindi film industry. Some of the producers/directors like Mehboob Khan, Shashidhar Mukherjee, Sunil Dutt used to consult him while taking up their new film projects. It is said that though he would be officially engaged for writing screen-play and dialogues, in realities, he would be their adviser in almost all the aspects of the film-making. Some of the actors themselves used to get trained from him about the correct pronunciations of their dialogues in Hindustani. Ashok Kumar, Devika Rani, Nargis, Joy Mukherjee, Sadhna, Saira Bano were some of the actors who sought his advice on their Urdu diction.

During his nearly 4 decades of filmy career in Hindi film industry, Aghajaani Kashmiri directed only one film, ‘Tohfaa’ (1947). The star cast included Nawab Kashmiri, Veera, Rehman, Anuradha, Shah Nawaz Shakuntala, Agha Miraz, Kanta, T N Charlie etc. There were 6 lyricists for 10 songs which were set to music by M A Rauf Osmania, the ghazal singer at the court of Nizam of Hyderabad and on Nizam Radio. Rafique Ghaznavi provided the background music. The theme of the film was Hindu-Muslim unity.

Nawab Kashmiri. a favourite actor of New Theater’s Boss, B N Sarkar, was a cousin of Agha Jaani Kashmiri and was the same actor who removed all his teeth for the realism of his role in ‘Yahudi Ki Ladki’(1933).[Ref: ‘Stars From Another Sky’ (2010)]. In ‘Tohfaa’ (1947), he probably did the role of an Ustad whose daughter (Veera) is in one-sided love with Ustad’s disciple (Rehman). The disciple takes it to be a sisterly love of her devotion. The daughter is devasted when the disciple falls in love with a city-bread damsel (probably, Anuradha) whom he introduces to his ‘sister’ to fulfil his long overdue promise to present her with a gift (tohfaa). It is a tragic story of misinterpretation of love between the Ustad’s daughter and his disciple and also of the misinterpretation of the gift (tohfaa) the daughter was expecting. [I have interpreted the story of the film based on the review of the film in May 1948 issue of ‘Filmindia’].

The review in ‘Filmindia’ had blamed the inapt handling of the direction by Agha Jaani Kashmiri. The film flopped miserably at the box office. My guess for one of the reasons for the failure of the film is its timing of the release. This film was due for release at a time when the partition of the country was to take place. Hindu-Muslim riots on the eve of the partition forced the film to be released post-partition. The film was released in April 1948 by which time the prospective audience had already seen the impact of the partition. Probably, they were not in a mood to watch the serious film with the rhetoric of Hindu-Muslim unity theme. But most of the songs in the film became popular.

Exactly 10 years ago, i.e. on May 23, 2010, our Blog had covered 3 songs of which one song, kahaan tak jafaa husn waalon ke sahte, was from ‘Tohfaa’ (1947).

So far, 7 out of 10 songs from ‘Tohfaa’ (1947) have been covered in the Blog as under:

No. Songs Posted on
1. kahaan tak jaffa husn waalon ke sahte 23/05/2010
2. jeene ki soorat ho gayee 28/07/2012
3. kisne chheda man ka taar 14/10/2012
4. ik aisa geet sunaavo 23/06/2013
5. hamne tumne kiyaa thha jo aabaad 03/07/2013
6. mohabbat kar mohabbat kar 07/07/2013
7. bhole sajan tujhe kaise bataaun 01/02/2015
8. wo dil gaya wo dil ke sahaare chale gaye Being covered in this writeup
9. gunche sharminda na ho Yet to be covered
10. kabhi tarsi huyi aankhon ki hasrat Yet to be covered

It would be observed that out of 10 songs, 3 songs are yet to be covered. There has been no addition to the song already covered in the Blog for the last 5 years. I checked on the video sharing platforms on the internet and found that out of these 3 songs only one song, wo dil gaya wo dil ke sahaare chale gaye is available as of date which I am presenting here. The song is rendered by Geeta Dutt. The song is written by Rafique Ghaznavi which is set to music by M A Rauf Osmania.

Audio Clip:

Song-Wo dil gaya wo dil ke sahaare chale gaye (Tohfa)(1947) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Rafiq Ghaznavi, MD-M A Rauf Osmania

Lyrics

wo dil gaya wo dil ke
wo dil gaya wo dil ke
sahaare chale gaye
sahaare chale gaye
sahaare chale gaye
wo dil gaya wo dil ke
sahaare chale gaye
jinse thha hamko pyaar
jinse thha hamko pyaar
jinse thha hamko pyaar
wo pyaare chale gaye
jinse thha hamko pyaar

tum the har ek cheez thhi ee ee ee
mere naseeb mein aen aen
tum kya gaye naseeb
tum kya gaye naseeb
hamaare chale gaye
jinse thha hamko pyaar
wo pyaare chale gaye

raushan thha jinke dam se mera
aa aa aa aa
dil mera khayaal
wo chaand bhi gaya
wo sitaare chale gaye
sitaare chale gaye
sitaare chale gaye
jinse thha hamko pyaar
wo pyaare chale gaye

jab band aankh karte hain
aen aen aen aen
ye dekhte hain hum m m m m
jaise ki hum bhi saath
jaise ki hum bhi saath
tumhaare chale gaye
jaise ki hum bhi saath
tumhaare chale gaye
jaise ki hum bhi saath
tummhaare chale gaye
chale gaye


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4319 Post No. : 15604

“Surajmukhi”(1950) was directed by O P Dutta for Madhuban, Bombay. This “social” movie had Rehana, Shyam, Gope, Yashodhara Katju, Hafeez Khan, Randheer, Mukri, Cuckoo, Durga Khote etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Three of these songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the fourth song from “Surajmukhi”(1950) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Geeta Dutt. Music is composed by Husnlal Bhagatram.

The movie had three lyricists (Rajinder Krishan, Aabid Gulrez and Gulshan Jalalabadi) but no lyricists have been mentioned against eight of the songs in HFGK. However, the uploader of this song on YT has mentioned Rajinder Krishan as the lyricist. so I have gone with that.

Geeta Dutt had sung seven songs in the movie. This movie also had two songs by Lata and one by Shamshad Begam. So it would seem that Geeta Dutt had sung for the leading lady viz Rehana. However, only the audio of the song is available and so we can only guess about the picturisation. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this rare song.


Song-Aabaad rahe tera ghar munshi…karen kya bata o bhula dene waale (Surajmukhi)(1950) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-Husnlal Bhagatram

Lyrics

aabaad rahe tera ghar munshi
khat likh saajan ke naam
pardes mein jaane waale piya
nahin tere bina aaraam
karen kya bata o bhula dene waale
karen kya bata o bhula dene waale
hamen apna keh kar mita dene waale
karen kya bata o bhula dene waale
karen kya bata

hai ro ro ke lut jaana aa aa aa
kismat hamaari
kismat hamaari
tujhe kya kahen o bhula dene waale
tujhe kya kahen o bhula dene waale
hamen apna keh kar mita dene waale
karen kya bata o bhula dene waale
karen kya bata

rula kar to aa jaa aa aa
mita kar to aa jaa
mita kar to aa jaa
tujhe dhoondte hain dua dene waale
tujhe dhoondte hain dua dene waale
hamen apna keh kar mita dene waale
karen kya bata o bhula dene waale
karen kya bata


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day : 4316 Post No. : 15601

“Dulhan Wahi Jo Piya Man Bhaaye”(1977) was directed by Lekh Tandon for Rajshree Productions, Bombay. The movie had Prem Kishan, Rameshwari (new find), Shyamali, Madan Puri, Ifthikhar, Shivraj, Sundar, Viju Khote, Rajan Kapoor, Madhup Sharma, Nandlal Sharma, Pardesi, Ratan Gauraang, Chandu Allahabadi, Jagdeep, Leela Mishra, Savita Bajaj, Piloo Wadia, Rashmi, Veena Kapoor, Shashikala, Suresh Rokde, Deepak Puri, Tajendra Gupta etc in it.

The movie had eight songs in it. Seven songs have been covered in the past.

Details of the seven songs covered in the blog are :-

S N Song Song number in blog Date of posting
1 Le to aaye ho hamen sapno ke gaaon me 1118 18-April-2009
2 Khushiyaan hi khushiyaan ho daaman me jiske 1268 12-May-2009
3 Anchra mein phulwa lai ke 10650 6-Jan-2015
4 Purwaiyya ke jhonke aaye 11460 10-Oct-2015
5 Mangal bhawan amangalhaari 14766 27-Nov-2018
6 Jahaan prem ka paawan diyara jare 15266 23-Oct-2019
7 Ab ranjish e khushi se bahaar o khizaan se kya 15429 11-Feb-2020

The chronology of the posting of the songs makes for an interesting reading. After the start of this blog, I have been to five different places viz Jabalpur, Nagpur, Bilaspur, Izatnagar (Bareilly) and Gorakhpur, in that order. First two songs were covered during 2009 when I was in Jabalpur. The next two songs wwere covered in 2015. First of them was discussed when I was at Bilaspur. Next was discussed when I had gone to Izatnagar (Bareilly). The last three songs from the movie have been discussed while I am based at Gorakhpur. So my stay at Nagpur was the only period for the blog that did not see any song from the movie getting discussed.

I have fond memories of misusing my newfound freedom, using that to bunk college classes and watching movies. I watched this movie five times, that is how much I liked the movie. I was not alone. This movie had a longer run in Ranchi (where I was based those days ) than Sholay.

The heroine Rameshwari was the star attraction of the movie. nfortunately she could not capitalise on this dream beginning to her career and she fell by the wayside soon thereafter.

The music of the movie served as the Pied Piper that attracted me to the movie hall repeatedly.

As noted earlier, the movie had eight songs in it. All songs were nice to listen to. The songs that were discussed in the earlier days of the blog were the most popular songs from the movie.

Here is the eighth and final song from “Dulhan Wahi Jo Piya Man Bhaaye”(1977) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Hemlata. Ravondra Jain is the lyricist as well as music director. Only the audio of the song seems to be available online. I had watched the movie and I recall this dukhiyaari song being lip synced by Rameshwari in the movie. So this song was very much there in the movie.

With this song, “Dulhan Wahi Jo Piya Man Bhaaye”(1977) joins the list of movies that have all their songs covered in the blog. The movie thus gets YIPPEED in the blog.


Song-Shyama ho Shyama (Dulhan Wahi Jo Piya Man Bhaaye)(1977) Singer-Hemlata, Lyrics-Ravindra Jain, MD-Ravindra Jain

Lyrics

shyaama ho shyaama
raama ho raama
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin
chhupi to nahin shyaam
chhupi to nahin
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin ee
chhod ke tera dwaar kabhi main
kahin dukh rone gayi to nahin
shyaama ho shyaama
rama ho raama
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin

maine kab chaaha banoon mehlon ki raani
ban ke rahi re main to daras deewaani
maine kab chaaha banoon mehlon ki raani
ban ke rahi re main to daras deewaani
kisi sukh ki khaatir
o mere daata
koi hathh maine kari to nahin
kari to nahin re
hathh kari to nahin
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin ee
shyaama ho shyaama
raama ho raama
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin

maine to hamesha prabhu bas yahi maanga
ban ke rahoon main teri maala ka dhaaga
maine to hamesha prabhu bas yahi maanga
ban ke rahoon main teri maala ka dhaaga
dukh to yahi hai
toone bhi mujhse
kabhi ye na poochha
dukhi to nahin
dukhi to nahin
ari dukhi to nahin
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin een
shyaama ho shyaama
raama ho raama
meri peer tose
meri peer tose chhupi to nahin


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4315 Post No. : 15597

Today’s song is from Dolti Naiya-1950. This film was made by Shaan E Hind Pictures, Bombay. It had music by Pt.Ram Prasad Sharma. The film’s 10 songs were written by a record number of 8 Lyricists and were sung also by 8 singers. In those days, it must have been a record, I guess. The cast of the film was Amarnath, Nigar Sultana, Shyama Dulari, Veena Kohli, Cuckoo, Bhudo Advani, Mukri, Mirza Musharraf, Munshi Munakka and others.

When I was in school, every year a “Self Governance Day” used to be celebrated in our school. I do not know whether this was a practice elsewhere. On this day selected senior students of class 12th standard used to run the school. Head Master, Supervisor, Sports teacher, Teachers and even Peons’ roles were done by the students themselves. When I reached 12th standard, I was very eager to become a Teacher on this day. I was made a teacher of English language of 7th standard and was given a lesson to be taken on that day. All students looked forward to run the school and become teachers on this day.

I think, this feeling of ruling or being in authority is in every field as a dormant wish. A Clerk looks forward becoming a Manager and a Manager wants to become General Manager. An MLA wants to become an MP and MP wants to become a Minister. Film industry is not too different. Every actress wants to become a Heroine, and actors dream of becoming Director some day. There are several examples when all this has actually happened.

Many successful and famous actors have tried their hand at being a Director of a film ( conversely, many directors also were eager to act in a film. Even such examples are there). Few examples of some actors directing films are Dev Anand-19 films ( he takes the cake), Shammi Kapoor-2 films, Balraj Sahni-1 film, Rajesh Khanna-1 film. Even Comedians like Asrani-5 films and Deven verma-4 films are into this. The case of comedian Radha kishen, who produced a film and when it flopped due to delay and loans mounted, committed suicide.

Some examples of old time actors are Prem Adib-1 film, M.Kumar-2 films, Shahu Modak-1 film. Among actresses, from Fatma Begum-8 films to Hema Malini-4 films, examples are less. Surprisingly, leading actors like Amitabh Bachhan, Dilip kumar, Sanjeev kumar etc never went this way. I wish Dilip kumar had become a Director openly rather than making his directors’ lives miserable by interfering in their work, as a nasty habit.

Mirza Musharraf was a comedian of old times. Though he was successful as an actor, he too wanted to become a Director. Today’s film Dolti naiya-50 is his attempt at directing a movie.

In my quest for information on old time actors and other artistes, I came across many good and some not so good experiences. When I first interviewed Ramesh ji, Bhudo Advani’s son, he told me that their family friend Mirza Musharraf’s daughter also stayed nearby. I took her address and reached her house. Her husband did not allow me to meet her, as they were Muslims, and perhaps because it was my first visit to them. When I explained what I wanted, he expected some money. I told him that this is my hobby and I do not do this for money, he was very skeptic. However, after my persistent visits to him,he relented. Her husband, Mr. Muneer Khan,( now deceased) ex production manager of Firoze Khan, gave me some information.

The name of MIRZA MUSHARRAF AGHA may not ring any bells in the newer generation, as he was a comedian in the 30s and 40s-till the late 60s.
During the 30s and 40s there were quite a few real comedians, who regaled the audiences with their humour. Comedians like V.H.Desai, Ghory and Dikshit (the jodi like Laurel and Hardy),Mirza Musharraf, Bhudo Advani, Noor Mohd.Charlie, Yakub (he had travelled to 15 countries including UK and USA,before joining films) and Gope, Fatty Prasad and Durga Mota were much in demand for comic roles in the films.With the times,one by one,all went behind the curtains, giving way to newer set of comedians like Bhagwan, Sunder, Radhkishen, Mukri, I.S.Johar, Majnu,etc. Nowadays, of course, Comedians have disappeared from films, because almost everyone in a film does Comedy, these days.

Artistes fading away is a natural phenomena, but out of the above comedians, the end of Durga Mota was very pathetic and touching.
Durga Mota or Durga Prasad was very fat and this fatness which fetched him name and fame in the industry also became the cause of his death. In 1947,there were riots everywhere. Durga was in Lahore. He wanted to come back to India like other thousands.He came to Lahore station and boarded the train. Just then a frenzied mob came to the station and started killing the passengers. People ran helter skelter and saved themselves, but due to his fatness Durga Mota could not run and he was slaughtered on the station of Lahore itself.

Mirza Musharraf was born in a sophisticated educated family, on 12-6-1912, at Shujanabad-Punjab. His father was an inspector of Police and claimed to be a scion of the Royal Mughal family. He matriculated from Lahore in 1930. He was keen on becoming a Journalist, so he worked in Daily Zamindar, Tariyaq and Shahid. He was a Nationalist, joined Congress and became Secretary of Lahore Congress committee. He was imprisoned but father got him released. He decided to change profession to films.

He got a small role of a party guest in film ” Qazak ki beti-37′, which was being made by one of his acquaintances in Lahore. His second film was Prem Yatra-37. These were uncredited and insignificant roles, but they gave his clever mind a good idea of film line and acting.

A R Kardar who was into films was known to him in Lahore. Kardar took Mirza to Calcutta. There he acted in film Milap-37. The Hero was Gul Hamid,who died in between and was replaced by Prithviraj Kapoor. Mirza also acted in film Mandir-37. When Kardar shifted to Bombay, he too shifted.

He was very fond of writing Lyrics.He came to Bombay to write film songs and was employed by General films.Those days educated persons were eagerly employed by film studios. He first wrote Lyrics for A.R.Kardar’s film “Baghbaan”-1938. This was the film in which K N Singh did his first role as a villain. In this period, Mirza got married also.

During shootings Kardar required an artist and Mirza was called to fill up the slot, as per the studio norms. Mirza had no dialogues, but he exhibited excellent use of facial expressions and comic timing.This actually killed his dream of becoming a lyrics writer, because after that he was made a comedian and got several films. As a comedian,Mirza worked from 1938 to 1972,working in over 400 films. His last film was Roop tera Mastana-1972, where he was credited. Later he made appearance in films like Pathar se takkar-80 and Anjaam khuda jaane-89 uncredited.

When he was on the peak of his career,a happy producer gave his Bungalow at Versova free to him for living.Though Versova was then quite far off and sparsely populated, Mirza lived there like a king.The marriages of both of his daughters took place there.

Mr.Sanjeet Narwekar-the famous Film historian/journalist writes in his book, The story of Hindi Film comedy,about Mirza”. His specialty was interspersing his Hindi dialogues with English words-quite a curiosity in the pre-independence days. He was almost a permanent with V.M.Vyas and played cameo roles in a fairly long career.” According to Saadat Hasan Manto in his book,stars of another sky, -whichever film he acted, he used to be the darling of the Heroes. He was particularly liked by Kardar, K.Asif and Rafiq Ghaznavi. In many films Mirza lip synched songs, but only in ONE film,he got to sing himself. That was the film Gharib ka laal-1939, in a duet. He also sung few lines in film Piya Milan-45 and CAPTAIN KISHORE-1957. He sang along with Mohd.Rafi and Tun Tun.

In one of the interviews Mirza gave to magazine Shama, in August 1981, he described some of his experiences in the film world. This interview is a part of the book ” Ye un dinon ki baat hai” written by my friend Yasir Abbasi. Here are few of his stories. In Bombay, he got to know Nazir-actor, director, producer and owner of Hind Pictures studios, and his nephew K.Asif (Mughal-E-Azam fame). Asif did no work, so Nazir opened a Tailor’s shop for him, but still he did nothing. His interests were different.

Mirza also came closer to director S M Yousuf. Mirza was present in his marriage to actress Nigar Sultana. Mirza describes how K.Asif eloped with Nazir’s wife (and his Mami- aunt) Sitara Devi. Asif later married Yousuf’s wife Nigar Sultana also. Still later Asif married Dilip kumar’s sister too. Asif was notorious in such matters.

Mirza knew Mohd. Rafi since Lahore days. When Rafi came to Bombay, Mirza introduced Rafi to many film people. Mirza claims that Rafi’s first Hindi recorded song was from film Kul Kalank-45, ” Topiwale Babu’ – a duet with Amirbai Karnataki. This song was shot on Mirza and Amirbai on screen. Rafi, it seems, got Rs. 75 for this song. Mirza acted in film Grihasthi-48, which became a Hit film, running for 105 weeks in Bombay. In a public poll, Mirza got a second prize for acting in this film (first was Yaqub) and he got a Gold medal of 3 Tolas. In his difficult days, Mirza sold it, says he.
There are many more anecdotes he describes, but may be some other time.

Mirza Musharraf died in 1991.

Film Industry is one industry which grew very fast. Firstly, there was no competition (except from AIR for entertainment) and secondly, joining this industry needed no special qualifications. Moreover, from the beginning, the ROI (Returns On the Investment) ratio was quite high,once you took care of few parameters like, good actors, good songs and a mix of Romance and Comedy !

Thousands of aspirants, the Good looking, the Bad looking and the Ugly looking rushed to Bombay, Lahore and Calcutta to try their luck. Tawaifs and stage artists had an easy entry, so was for the Handsome and Muscular bodied males.

The studio system took care of grooming its employees. Most people were hired without any specific job description. When needed, the script writer or the Lyricist had to act in the film, and Choreographer-Dance Master in those days-had to take up Direction- if needed. Artists graduated from menial jobs to important positions.That is how Choreographer Guru Dutt became a Director and a Hero, Lyricist and writer J.S.Casshyap became actor/singer, or Amiya Chakrawarty became famous Director from being the Canteen Manager in Bombay Talkies, Ashok kumar became Hero from being a Technician in Camera Department and an Extra working as one of the 40 thieves in ” Alibaba and 40 Thieves”-1929, became the Movie Mughal, Director Mehboob Khan.

Those times were different.Industry needed people in all departments. Heads of Studios were like expert jewellers. They knew how to nurture talents. Successful strugglers had empathy towards existing strugglers and gave them opportunity to showcase their skills. Studios got right persons for right jobs. Real Talents survived, rest disappeared.

There were many One timers, who acted in only 1-2 films, directed just 1 film, produced 1 movie, sung only few songs or gave music to only 1 or 2 films. Luck also played an important role. Artists seeking opportunities in Music Departments like singing and composing were many. Most got chances,few prospered.

But it is important to note that every One timer was contributing towards Industry’s growth. Like every drop makes an ocean, these one timers or short distance runners also gave their might to the industry. Those who disappeared after a short performance remained alive through their contribution on record. Hundreds of aspirants came to become Music Directors, only few made the grade, survived and the rest simply vanished.These short time passengers or composers had their time of glory too. Their songs were cherished but their names were forgotten.

Before I proceed further, can you tell me what is the common link in the following names ?

Pyarelal-Ganesh-Naresh-Mahesh-Anand-Gorakh

They are all brothers and sons of Pandit RAMPRASAD SHARMA. He is the Music Director of today’s film Dolti Naiya-1950.
.
Pt.Ramprasad Sharma, born in 1900, belonged to Gorakhpur in United provinces(today’s U.P.). Seeing his love for music, he was brought to Bharatpur State by the king’s bandmaster. He played Trumpet here, then played in Agra Military Band and ended up joining a Circus as a Band Master himself. He toured Delhi, Lahore and Calcutta ,where he settled for some time.He married a local Post Master’s daughter and also worked for Columbia and New Theatres. By now he was an expert in 10 instruments and knew all Ragas.

He came to Bombay in 1938 and played in many studios. His first film as MD was Nayi Baat-1947, then Taqdeerwale-48, Shakti-48, Bedard-49, Banu- 49, Anyay-49, Dolti Naiyya-50 and finally Magic Carpet-64.

His knowledge of Music was so deep that many Composers like,Kalyan ji, Roshan, Uttamsingh, Hridaynath Mangeshkar etc came to him to learn notations in which he was a master. Probably, having played as a Band Master helped him.Those days, very few musicians knew how to write music in Notations. This art was carried further by his another son Ganesh.

Despite his knowledge of music, he failed as a composer himself and worked/played for other Music Directors like Naushad, K.Dutta, C. Ramchandra etc. His trumpet playing in the famous song of Rafi ” Suhani raat dhal chuki” (film Dulari-1949) is unforgettable.

Pt.Ramprasad will be remembered by many composers as their teacher. His music was melodious, his Luck was not too kind on him, though.

His two sons Pyarelal and Ganesh became famous composers.

Pt.Ramprasad died on 22-8-1995 at Mumbai.

Today’s song is a very melodious one – as such, I like Durrani as a singer. He has sung one of the best songs of Hindi films, in my opinion (Neend hamari, khwaab tumhare-Nai kahani-1943). Pt. Ramprasad’s tune and music is just superb. To give such a music in 1950 was in itself an achievement. When I hear today’s song, I feel a similarity to Talat’s song ‘ Meri yaad mein na aansoo bahana” from film Madhosh-51. I may be wrong also. Alas, Film industry does not go by quality, it goes by measurable success in terms of popularity of songs. Whom to blame, music lovers or the industry ?
Enjoy the song.


Song- Meri zindgi bhi koi zindagi hai (Dolti Naiyya)(1950) Singer- G M Durrani, Lyricist- Zafar Malihabadi, MD- Pt. Ram Prasad

Lyrics

meri zindagi bhi koi zindagi hai
na dil mein umangen na lab par hansi hai
meri zindagi bhi

kiya hai muqaddar ne barbaad aisa
kiya hai muqaddar ne barbaad aisa
jidhar dekhta hoon nahin koi apna
jidhar dekhta hoon nahin koi apna
nahin koi apna
nazar ik zamaane se badle huye hain
meri zindagi bhi

mere dil ko hardam dukhaati hai duniya
mere dil ko hardam dukhaati hai duniya
tadapta hoon main muskuraati hai duniya
tadapta hoon mai muskuraati hai duniya
muskurati hai duniya
mujhe kis khata par saza mil rahi hai
meri zindagi bhi

sunaata raha laakh ghamon ka fasaana
sunaata raha laakh ghamon ka fasaana
kisi ne magar dard dil ka na jaana
kisi ne magar dard dil ka na jaana
dil ka na jaana
zamaane ne kab bekason ki suni hai
meri zindagi bhi koi zindagi hai
na dil mein umangen na lab par hansi hai
meri zindagi bhi


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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