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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘love spurned’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

At the time of the release of National Studios’ film ‘Roti’ (1942) in August 1942, the production house was sold to KM Modi, a prominent film exhibitors of that time who had no interest in producing films. At that time, three films of National Studios were under the advance stage of completion. ‘Jawaani’ (1942) was one among the three films, other two films being ‘Lala ji’ (1942) and ‘Apna Paraaya’ (1942). Anil Biswas was the music directors for all the three films.
I find from the issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazines of 1942 that the publicity given to these three films was subdued as compared with the scale of publicity which National Studios normally used to indulge for their earlier films. Probably, for the new owner, the publicity for the films was not a priority.

‘Jawaani’ (1942) had the usual star cast of National Studios which included Surendra, Husn Bano, Jyoti, AR Kabuli, Sankatha Prasad, Gulzar, Kayam Ali, Wasekar etc. The film was directed by Wajahat Mirza Changezi, his first and the last under National Studios. He did direct a few films for other production houses later.

Wajahat Mirza was a familiar name in my younger days because of his association with ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) as one of the dialogue writers for which he received the Filmfare Award. Later, as a solo dialogue writer, he got the same category of Filmfare Award for ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961). His other famous films as a dialogue writers in the 50s and thereafter was ‘Mother India’ (1957), ‘Yahudi’ (1958), ‘Kohinoor’ (1960), ‘Leader’ (1964), ‘Palki’ (1967) etc. His last film as a dialogue writer was ‘Daaku Aur Jawaan’ (1978). K Asif’s swan song – the film ‘Love and God’ (1986) for which he had written the dialogues, was in the making for a long time and got released later.

As per Wikipedia, Wajahat Mirza Hussain Changezi (known as Wajahat Mirza) was born on 20/04/1908 in Sitapur, a part of Awadh region. He did his college education in Government Jubilee College, Lucknow where he got acquainted with a cinematographer from Calcutta. He accompanied the cinematographer to Calcutta to work as his assistant.

I became aware of Wajahat Mirza’s career in the film industry as lyricist and director only when I ventured into the films of 1940s as a part of the project for the blog. Details taken from his filmography indicate that his first film was New Theatres’ ‘Yahudi Ki Ladki’ (1933) as a dialogue writer. After this work, he had a 5-year hiatus from the film industry. Probably, he may have worked in the film industry during this period in a different capacity about which no information could be found online.

Wajahat Mirza joined Sagar Movietone as a screenplay/dialogue writer and lyricist in 1938. His first film as a dialogue writer/lyricist was ‘Watan’ (1938). Baburao Patel, in his review of the film, has complimented Wajahat Mirza by saying that for the first time in a Bombay film, good Urdu dialogue was written. From this point onward, his career got mostly associated with Mehboob Khan until ‘Roti’ (1942) after which he worked for the films as a free-lancer.

During the course of his association with Sagar Movietone and National Studios, he also worked as a lyricist in films ‘Watan’ (1938), ‘Hum Tum Aur Woh’ (1938), ‘Bahen’ (1941), Jawaani’ (1942) and ‘Roti’ (1942). After leaving National Studios, Wajahat Mirza worked as a dialogue writer in the popular films like ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Shikast’ (1953) and those of 50s and 60s listed above.

During his career, Wajahat Mirza directed 5 films – ‘Jawaani’ (1942), ‘Swaminath’ (1942), Shahenshah Babar’ (1944), ‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945) and ‘Nishaana’ (1950). In his later career, he gave up direction and lyrics writing and concentrated only on story/screeplay/dialogue writing. He was regarded as an expert in writing dialogues in simple language which had the ability to create the desired impact on the scene. Because of this quality, Mehboob Khan recalled Wajahat Mirza to write the dialogue for ‘Mother India’ (1957) which had the story in rural setting. Incidentally, Wajahat Mirza had also written the dialogue for its earlier avatar ‘Aurat’ (1940).

Wajahat Mirza died on 4/08/1990 at the age of 82 in Karachi.

‘Jawaani’ (1942) was advertised as a romantic comedy film where ‘the youth triumphs over the age’. The film had 11 songs written by Wajahat Mirza (7) and Aarzoo Lucknowi (4). Two songs have been covered in the blog. Here is the 3rd song ‘Roney Se Nahi Fursat Jisko Wo Hansna Hansaana Kya Jaane’, sung by Husn Bano who was the female lead in the film. The song is written by Aarzoo Lucknowi and is set to music by Anil Biswas.


Song – Roney Se Nahin Fursat Jisko (Jawaani) (1942) Singer – Husn Banu, Lyrics – Aarzoo Lakhnawi, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

rone se nahin fursat jisko
wo hansna hansaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
kya dard mein dil par banti hai
kya dard mein dil par banti hai
bedard zamaana kya jaane
bedard zamaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko

jo dil ki tamanna ban ke rahe
wo dil kaa lagaana kya jaane
jo dil ki tamanna ban ke rahe
wo dil kaa lagaana kya jaane
dil aap hi naazon kaa hai pala
dil aap hi naazon kaa hai pala
wo naaz uthhaana kya jaane
wo naaz uthhaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko

jis par bhi bharosa hamne kiya
jis par bhi bharosa hamne kiya
ki milke usi zaalim ne daga
ki milke usi zaalim ne daga
patthar ko jo phool samajhta ho
patthar ko jo phool samajhta ho
wo chot bachaana kya jaane
wo chot bachaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
wo hansna hansaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
वो हँसना हँसाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
क्या दर्द में दिल पर बनती है
क्या दर्द में दिल पर बनती है
बेदर्द ज़माना क्या जाने
बेदर्द ज़माना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको

जो दिल की तमन्ना बन के रहे
वो दिल का लगाना क्या जाने
जो दिल की तमन्ना बन के रहे
वो दिल का लगाना क्या जाने
दिल आप ही नाज़ों का है पला
दिल आप ही नाज़ों का है पला
वो नाज़ उठाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको

जिस पर भी भरोसा हमने किया
जिस पर भी भरोसा हमने किया
की मिलके उसी ज़ालिम ने दग़ा
की मिलके उसी ज़ालिम ने दग़ा
पत्थर को जो फूल समझता हो
पत्थर को जो फूल समझता हो
वो चोट बचाना क्या जाने
वो चोट बचाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
वो हँसना हँसाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको

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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mention of the name Mohammed Shafi brings to mind some timeless and peerless classics.  The immortal lorie song “Koi Pukare Dhire Se Tujhe” from ‘Mangu’ (1954), is a composition that is difficult to forget.

Remembering music director Mohammed Shafi on the anniversary of his passing away today (30 April).
Read more on this topic…


I have discussed as many as six songs from this movie. Despite discussing so many songs from this movie, not much was known about it. But now we know the detailed story of this movie.
Read more on this topic…


“Pugree” (1948) is a movie that had Amar, Wasti, Kamini Kaushal, Dikshit,Shashikala, Gope, Pratima Devi, Ram Avtaar etc in it.

This movie had some nice songs in it which were sung by Mukesh, Sitara Kanpuri and Shamshad Begam. I have so far discussed three songs from this movie.
Read more on this topic…


I have often mentioned that the Hindi that one got to listen to in Hindi movies is not the same that I studied in my Hindi classes during my school days. The Hindi taught in the school was chaste Hindi whose vocabulary was mainly derived from Sanskrit. The Hindi, as used by Government of India is also of the same nature. On the other hand, the Hindi spoken in Hindi movies contained words that were not familiar to Hindi speakers. For instance, the language used in expressing the feelings of heart in Hindi movies is different from the language used in textbook Hindi.
Read more on this topic…


Hindi movies have several songs of the genre where the hero has a broken heart aften being betrayed in love. This genre of songs often tend to become repetitive after a while as far as their lyrics are concerned. The phrase “Toota huaa dil” viz “broken heart” often figures mandatorily in these songs.If one has heard one broken heart song, one may have heard them all- that is what often appears to music lovers.
Read more on this topic…


When I was growing up as a kid in late 1960s and early 1970s, I noticed that old movie makers tended to give their movies the same title as the titles of new movies. 🙂 When radio announcer announced songs from “Andaaz”, “Aankhen”,”Aarzoo”,”Adaalat”, “Parwarish” etc, I expected to listen to songs from the newer movies of 1960s and 1970s and I was very upset when the songs played were from old movies of 1940s and 1950s, which were boring by my definition.
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“Shair” (1949) is a treasure trove of nice songs.I have so far discussed five songs from this movie. There are man more songs in this movie that need to be discussed in these pages.
Read more on this topic…


The farmaish of this song from “Aadmi” (1968) was given by Lalitha today.This is a kind of song where getting the lyrics right is a straightforward task without much challenge and so here is the song, in double quick time.
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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor of articles to this blog

Do Badan (1966) may not be the best-known movie of its times but at least in the songs department it could hold its head up with pride. A lively Asha solo, a typical Lata solo and three Rafi solo songs, all of which are heart-wrenching. Yes, the songs of this movie, written by Shakeel Badayuni and composed by Ravi, were certainly the highlights of this movie.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than eight years. This blog has over 13300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3200 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13351

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Movies with all their songs covered =1012
Total Number of movies covered =3703

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008 Active for 3000 days.
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