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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

During the last two years or so, I have been working on a major exercise of presenting rare songs from films released in the 1940s on the Blog. In the process, I became aware of some of the productions houses (called banners), producers, directors, actors, singers, lyricists and music directors etc that were unknown to me earlier. One of the little known banners which I came to know about during the last few months was Sunrise Pictures. But I had no idea about the owner/s of this banner.

A notable feature of Sunrise Pictures was that they produced on an average 2-3 film per year during 1940s. The films under this banner were mostly directed by V M Vyas. In most of the films produced under this banner, the lead actors would be the top stars of that time. With this kind of background, I thought that the owner of Sunrise Pictures must be a wealthy man – a film financier/distributor who has now turned producer. But as I came to know later, it was not so.

The owner of Sunrise Pictures was none other than V M Vyas who had directed most of his films. I was surprised to know that V M Vyas did not have any filmy connection nor was he a wealthy man. He did not have any godfather in the film industry. His was one of those rags-to-riches stories who made a place for themselves in the Hindi film industry by hard work despite having some weak points. He had a very peculiar personality. He was a lean and fragile looking man. His friends – both personal and filmy – used to feel that he was half crank if not full. And above all, he was miser to the core. Let me unfold his interesting but inspiring life story.

Vishnukumar Maganlal Vyas (4/10/1905 -24/01/1962) was born in Ahmedabad. He did his schooling in Native High School Ahmadabad. During his schooling days, he did all sorts of odd jobs. After completion of schooling, he started working as a tabla-player and singer during the screening of silent films in theatres. Later on, he decided to become a photographer. His photography work was not generating enough money in Ahmedabad. Through his friends working with M/S J K Pathak & Co, machinery dealers in Ahmedabad, he got a job in their Bombay (Mumbai) Office which was located opposite Majestic Cinema. So the young V M Vyas commenced his journey to Mumbai some time in 1925.

Every day, V M Vyas used to see from the balcony of his office, the week-end crowd of filmgoers coming out from Majestic cinema. Perhaps, he was day dreaming that one day a much bigger crowd would come to see his films. But for his friends, V M Vyas was nothing less than half-crank. He soon managed to get a billet in terms of a job as an Assistant to Bhogilal Dave, the boss of Sharda Film Company. Here, he clandestinely learnt the film camera operation.

Soon V M Vyas left Saroj Films and joined Kohinoor Film Company as Cameraman. He was the Cinematographer for the silent movies like ‘Ulfat-e-Mohammed’ (1929), ‘Roaring Lion’ (1929), “Punya Prabhav’ (1929) and ‘Lutaru Lalna’ (1929). He was promoted to direct Kohinoor’s silent movie ‘Dukhiyari’ (1930).

With the coming of talkies in 1931, V M Vyas turned producer with setting up his own banner, Kumar Movietone. His first film under this banner was ‘Saubhagya Laxmi’ (1934) which he himself directed. He produced about 10 more films under this banner some of which were box office success some were not. When some of his pictures failed at the box office, he had problems with his financiers. So he was kept out of his own banner, Kumar Movietone.

But V M Vyas was not a man who would easily concede defeat. He formed another banner called Prince Movietone. Under this banner he produced and directed some films which were not well received at the box office. He soon found himself on a financial crunch. To come out of it, he joined Tarun Pictures and took some directorial assignments. It was a period of transition for him to evaluate himself as to what went wrong with his business strategies. As a director, films which brought him once again into the focus was ‘Kanyadaan’ (1940), ‘Niraali Duniya’ (1940) and ‘Prabhat’ (1941) which did well at the box office.

With his directorial successes, V M Vyas got bitten by bug of producing films in his third attempt. He formed his new banner called ‘Sunrise Pictures’. The first film under this banner, ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1941), directed by him was completed in less than six weeks. The film became a box office hit. With this film, V M Vyas had a long and a successful filmy career as producer and director under his new banner.

With the success of ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1943), V M Vyas became a pioneering film maker with social themes. Some of the reviews of his films which I have read in ‘Filmindia’ magazines indicate that his success formula was based on poor-rich conflicts. In such films, hero is shown as poor who loves a rich girl. And sometime, it is vice-versa. Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’ called V M Vyas’s films as ‘Vyas-Dave concotion’. Mohanlal Dave was a story, screen-play and dialogue writer in almost all the films produced and directed by V M Vyas who was associated with him since his days in Kohinoor Movietone. Mohanlal Dave always got the prominent place as M G Dave, the story writer in the advertisement of all the films.

Under Sunrise Pictures, V M Vyas produced and directed around 20 films out of which as many as 12 films were silver jubilee hits. He capitalised this factor for financing his films. He always used financiers/distributors’ money to produce the films. According to Manto, V M Vyas’s strategy was to sign only those actors whose current films have become box office success. While making his film ‘Naukar’ (1943), he signed Shobhna Samarth, Chandra Mohan and Nur Jahan who were in demand due to the box office successes of their respective films. With thse names, the financiers and distributors would come running to him to finance and distribute the films.

Normally, V M Vyas would direct his own films. But in case of ‘Naukar’ (1943), he signed Shaukat Hussain Rizvi as director knowing that he had developed a crush for Noor Jahan while directing her in ‘Khandaan’ (1942). Actually, at the time of planning ‘Naukar’ (1943), they were not on talking term. When they patched up, more monetary demands were made by both of them which V M Vyas successfully thwarted. The film failed at the box office but after the completion of the film, Noor Jahan and Shaukat Hussain Rizvi got married.

V M Vyas was known for not only about his cranky behaviour, he was also known to be miser to the core. During the shooting, he would advise his actors to rehearse well before the actual shot because he would like to complete the shot in a single take to save cost on raw film stocks and also to save time. Even the lighting on the sets would be low while taking the shot as this would save cost. Being a cinematographer himself, he knew the technique of taking shots in low light.

V M Vyas was a Vaishnavist Brahmin and as such he would offer simple vegetarian lunch to his actors and technicians during the lunch break. For additional items and for non-vegetarian, actors were required to bear the cost on their own account. And this was applicable even to the stars like Noor Jahan, Veena, Nazir, Chandra Mohan, Yakub, Raj Kapoor, Nargis, Premnath etc.

During his talkie filmy career, V M Vyas had produced/directed around 40 Hindi films. Some of his notable films were ‘Prabhat’ (1941), ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1941), ‘Ghar Sansar’ (1942), ’Apna Ghar’ (1942) ‘Maa Baap’ (1944), ‘Ghar’ (1945), ‘Dhanwaan’ (1946). ‘Pyaar’ (1950). ‘Sanskaar’ (1952), ‘Ghar Sansaar’ (1958), ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1960), ‘Maa Baap’ (1960). ‘Apsara’ (1961) was his last Hindi film which he directed. From 1958 onward, V M Vyas did not produce any films under his banner but took directorial assignments.

V M Vyas was also involved with Gujarati films. His first Gujarati film was ‘Raanakdevi’ (1946) in which he introduced Nirupa Roy. In all, he directed 12 Gujarati films which included ‘Bhaabi Na Het’ (1948), ‘Guniyal Gujaraatan’ (1949) and ‘Naag Devata’ (1955) etc. His last Gujarati film was ‘Narsaiya Ni Hundi’ (1961).

At the time of making his second film ‘Maalan’ (1942) under ‘Sunrise Pictures’, he was the owner of at least 10 buildings in Mumbai city. Being a man of simple habit and thrift, he had saved a lot of money. When the life had become good for V M Vyas to relax and enjoy the fruits of his hard work, an Income Tax raid in his house sometime in 1961 shocked him to such an extent that he was hospitalised. He never recovered from the shock and left this world on January 24, 1962.

V M Vyas produced and directed “Maalan’ (1942), his second film under the banner of Sunrise Pictures. The star cast included Shanta Hublikar, Balwant Singh, Ratan Bai, Jagdish Sethi, Mirza Musharaf, Kalyani Bai, But Kashar, Alaknanda etc.

The film had 9 songs, all written by Ehsan Rizvi which were set to music by Shyam Babu Pathak. I am presenting the first song ‘haan saajan aaye shobhe rain sukh chhaaye’ from the film to appear on the Blog. The song is rendered by Ratan Bai. Since the name of Ratan Bai appears in the cast, it is apparent that she sang the song for herself in the film.

I like this song for having a poignant touch on a happy occasion. And because of this attribute, I remember a song of similar mood tum aaye to aaya mujhe yaad gali mein aaj chaand nikla which is also my favourite. How aptly the lyricists have used metaphors of ‘Deewaali’ and ‘Chaand’ respectively for the arrival of beloved/husband.

With this song, the film ‘Maalan’ (1942) makes its debut in the Blog.

——————————————————————————————————————————

Sources of information for the article:

1. The relevant information on Sunrise Films and V M Vyas gathered from the various issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazines of 1937-49 including a short write-up on V M Vyas which appeared in December 1941 issue.

2. Sadat Hasan Manto’s book ‘Stars from another sky’ (2014) – Chapter on ‘Noor Jahan’ in which the author discusses the making of V M Vyas’s film ‘Naukar’ (1943).

3. I am grateful to Harish Raghuwanshi ji, the film historian who provided me with a copy of his article on V M Vyas written in Gujarati andpublished on April 24, 2009. His article enabled me to provide some missing links to the filmy career of V M Vyas.


Song-Haan saajan aaye (Maalan)(1942) Singer-Ratan Bai, Lyrics-Ehsan Rizvi, MD-Shyam Babu Pathak

Lyrics

haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e ae
sohe rain sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi
aashaaon ne deep jalaaye
aashaaon ne deep jalaaye
haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

man darpan hai ab ujiyaara
man darpan hai ab ujiyaara
preetam bin kyaa roop hamaara
preetam bin kyaa roop hamaara
haan preetam jeewan laaye
haan preetam jeewan laaye
shobhe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

roothhe huye ko main ghar laayi
roothhe huye ko main ghar laayi
man ki jeet huyi hai aaj
man ki jeet huyi hai aaj
haan aaye
saajan aaye..e ae
haan
aaye saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi
haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

In my previous article on the song “Kat Gayi Waadon Mein“, I have talked about Mulkhraj Bhakri, writer, producer and lyricist from the Lahore film industry, who became one of the many victims of the country’s partition in 1947 . In Bombay (Mumbai), due to his hard work, he regained his position in the Hindi film industry.  In this article, I propose to talk about one more victim of partition who was born with a silver spoon in a Gujarati family settled in Karachi and actively connected with the Lahore film industry in the 1940s. I am not talking about Dalsukh M Pancholi but director, Ravindra Dave who happened to be his nephew. Let me unfold Ravindra Dave’s story.

Ravindra Dave (also known as Ravin Dave, Ravinder Dave) was born on April 16, 1919 at Karachi in an affluent family. His father Seth Ratilal Dave had a flourishing business of film distribution for North Indian territories. Later, it became a well-known film distribution company, Empire Talkie Distributors, which specialised in importing American films for distribution in Northern India. This was the first film distribution company which undertook to distribute India’s first talkie ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) in Northern India. (I have found in some references on the internet which say that Pancholi’s were also connected with Empire Film Distribution).

Ravindra’s heart was already in the film distribution work and wanted to be like  his father. So he left school half way and joined his father’s company. His first assignment was to get the distribution of Prabhat’s films. He successfully concluded distribution deals for ‘Mahatma’ (1935), ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936), and ‘Duniya Na Maane’ (1937).

With the success of the film distribution work, Ravindra became interested in film making. He persuaded his uncle Dalsukh Pancholi to make him Production Manager for his film ‘Chaudhary’ (1941). In his next film ‘Poonji’ (1943), Pancholi gave him the chance to co-direct the film along with Vishnu Pancholi. With his talent firmly established in film making, Pancholi gave him the assignment of writing the script for ‘Dhamki’ (1943) and directing it.

When Ravindra Dave was directing Pancholi’s next film, ‘Patjhad’ (1948), the partition happened and the communal riots that broke out in Lahore made him and Pancholis to come to Bombay with the completed reels of the film which was later released in 1948 after completion of the film in Bombay (Mumbai). For both Pancholis and Ravindra Dave, it was like starting their filmy career afresh.

As I had mentioned in my last article, Mulkhraj Bhakri was  also a victim of partition and had come to Bombay (Mumbai) after the partition along with his brothers. He became the rallying point for displaced film artists and technicians from Lahore. Bhakri who was the ‘de facto’ producer of the film ‘Chunariya’ gave Ravindra Dave his first assignment in post-partition India to direct the film. Next, Dave got Prakash Pictures’ ‘Saawan Baadhon’ (1949) to direct.

With the business acumenship which was in his blood, Dave produced his first film ‘Chakori’ (1949) which was directed by his brother, Ramnarayan Dave. In the meanwhile, his uncle Dalsukh Pancholi who was producing his first film ‘Meena Baazar’ (1950) in post-partition India, assigned the film to Ravindra Dave to direct it.

During his Hindi film career, Ravindra Dave directed about 30 films between 1943 and 1969 which include ‘Nagina’ (1951), ‘Moti Mahal’ (1952), ‘Bhai Saheb’ (1954), ‘Shikar’ (1955), ‘Chaar Minaar’ (1956), ‘Agra Road’ (1957), ‘Post Box 999’ (1958), ‘Guest House’ (1959), ‘Girls’ Hostel’ (1962), ‘Punar Milan’ (1964),‘Dulha Dulhan’ (1964), and Raaz’ (1967). The last Hindi film which he directed was ‘Road to Sikkim’ (1969). Most of the Hindi films which he directed  were those where  either Dalsukh Pancholi or Mulkhraj Bhakri was the producer / writer / lyricist etc.

From 1970 onward, Ravindra Dave got himself completely associated with Gujarati films with his debut film ‘Jesal Toral’ (1971) which was his home production. The film was made in Eastman colour and was one of the biggest hits in Gujarati cinema. Thereafter, he was exclusively with the Gujarati films directing  20-25 films until 1985.

Ravindra Dave breathed his last on July 21, 1992.

‘Chunariya’ (1948) was a box office hit film which helped  the career revival of some of the displaced persons from the Lahore film industry. The film was produced under the banner of Kuldeep Pictures of Kuldeep Sehgal from Lahore who seems to me to be more  a financier than the producer of the film. It was directed by Ravindra Dave. The story, dialogues, screen-play and lyrics were written by Mulkhraj Bhakri, and the production controller was his brother Lekhraj Bhakri, both from Lahore.

For music director Hansraj Bahl, the success of the film was a blessing  after continuous flops of his prior 4 to 5 films. The success of the film ensured that he was kept busy in his work for the next 5 years which became the busiest period of his career. Mohammed Rafi and Lata Mangeshkar who were yet to firmly establish themselves as playback singers, gave one of their best renditions of 1940s in this film with their hit solo songs, “Sab Kuchh Lutaayaa Hum Ne Aa Kar Teri Gali Mein” and “Dil e Naashaad Ko Jeene Ki Hasrat Ho Gayi Tum Se“, respectively.

‘Chunariya’ had 10 songs out of which 6 songs have already been covered in the Blog. Here is the 7th song “Hansi Le Ke Aaye Thhe Ro Kar Chale’ sung by SD Batish. The song is written by Mulkhraj Bhakri.

[Note: The above bio-sketch on the early life of Ravindra Dave is based on a short article written by character actor Janki Dass which appeared in May 1949 issue of ‘Sound’ magazine.]


Song – Hansi Le Ke Aaye The, Ro Kar Chale (Chunariya) (1947) Singer – SD Batish, Lyrics – Mulkhraj Bhakri, MD – Hansraj Behl

Lyrics

hansi le ke aaye thhe
ro kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale
hansi le ke aaye thhe
ro kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale ae
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale

huyi duniya meri andher hai
huyi duniya meri andher hai
ho ye kismet meri ka koi khel hai
huyi duniya meri andher hai
huyi duniya meri andher hai
muqaddar ki kha kar thokar chale ae
hansi le ke aaye thhe
ro kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale

kiya kis liye hamko qadamon se door
kiya kis liye hamko qadamon se door
o bataayaa to hotaa hamaara qasoor
kiya kis liye hamko qadamon se door
kiya kis liye hamko qadamon se door
chalen hain magar tere ho kar chale ae
hansi leke aaye thhe
ro kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale

tamannaayen dil ki..ee
to dil mein rahi hain. . .
meri hasraten. . .
ban ke aansoo baheen hain
milaa thha jo mushkil se
kho kar chale
hansi le ke aaye thhe
ro kar chale
hum ashkon se daaman
bhigo kar chale ae. . .

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हंसी ले के आए थे
रो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले
हंसी ले के आए थे
रो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले

हुई मेरी दुनिया मेरी अंधेर है
हुई मेरी दुनिया मेरी अंधेर है
हो ये किस्मत मेरी का कोई खेल है
हुई मेरी दुनिया मेरी अंधेर है
हुई मेरी दुनिया मेरी अंधेर है
मुकद्दर की खा कर ठोकर चले
हंसी ले के आए थे
रो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले

किया किस लिए हमको कदमों से दूर
किया किस लिए हमको कदमों से दूर
ओ बताया तो होता हमारा कसूर
किया किस लिए हमको कदमों से दूर
किया किस लिए हमको कदमों से दूर
चलें हैं मगर तेरे हो कर चले
हंसी ले के आए थे
रो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले

तमन्नाएँ दिल की॰॰ई
तो दिल में रही हैं॰॰॰
मेरी हसरतें॰॰॰
बन के आंसू बही हैं
मिला था जो मुश्किल से
खो कर चले
हंसी ले के आए थे
रो कर चले
हम अशकों से दामन
भिगो कर चले॰॰॰


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

What is common among Sulochana (real name: Ruby Mayer), Rose (Rose Musleah), Pramila (Easther Victoria Abraham), Sabita Devi (Iris Gasper) and Ramola Devi (Rachel Cohen)?

They all were Jews (almost all of them being Baghdadi Jews) hailing from Calcutta (Kolkata) and were star actresses in Hindi films during 1930s and 40s. Barring Ramola Devi, all of them started their filmy career with silent films. It is surprising that those days when oriental women were mostly relegated to the four walls of their homes, how these Baghdadi Jew actresses found their way to the film industry which was not regarded as a respectable profession even in their Middle-East culture. To understand this, it is necessary to go into the genesis of Baghdadi Jews in India.

Some Baghdadi Jews migrated to India sometime in the beginning of 18th century from Iraq and other Middle-East countries to escape religious persecution and for better business opportunity. Once in India, they quickly adapted to the British culture. The children were educated in convent schools run by Christian missionaries. Over a period of time, they switched over from Arabic to English as language of communication within the families. By virtue of education and a good command over English, Baghdadi Jews got the employment opportunity with British companies and Government organisations. The woman folks mostly worked as teacher, nurse, telephone operators and secretaries.

During the early stage of film industry in India, the producers found it hard to get female actors as those days joining film industry was not regarded as a respectable profession by most of the Hindus and Muslim families. On the other hand, the Baghdadi Jews families living in Calcutta were liberal in this respect. Moreover, the Indian audiences’ weakness for the fair skin was a favourable proposition for film producers to get the Baghdadi Jews and Anglo-Indians as actress for their films.

In this article, I am discussing one of star actresses belonging to Baghdadi Jew family of Calcutta. And the star actress is Rose Musleah, who was known as Rose or Miss Rose in the film industry.

I had given a short profile of Miss Rose in my article hamen kyaa ab khizaan jaaye na jaaye. Arun ji had also given a short profile of her in his article aayenge saajna aayenge. Sometime back, I had read a detailed interview of Rose taken by Susheela Rani Patel in November 1941 issue of ‘Filmindia’ Magazine. But the thought of writing an article on her came to my mind now only as I have mp3 clips of a couple of her rare songs.

I also used information on Rose that was available in the other featured sections of ‘Filmindia’ in its various issues from 1937 to 1945. For Baghdadi Jews in India, some of the information has been taken from the articles appearing on the internet in connection with production of a documentary film ‘Shalome Bollywood – The Untold Story of Indian Cinema’ in which the contributions of Indian Jewish artists would be covered. The documentary is yet to be released.

Rose was born on June 19, 1911 in a wealthy Baghdadi Jew family in Calcutta (Kolkata). Her father was the private secretary to Sir B B Banerjee, the Consul General of Costa Rica who was the son-in-law of Maharaja Jatindra Mohan Tagore. At the age of 15, Rose passed Senior Cambridge examination and was set to become a doctor. However, her father was not in favour of her further studies and instead at the age of 16, he got her married to a boy from Ezra family. The marriage ended in a divorce by which time she had two daughters from him.

Like father, Rose became a private secretary in a British company. Side by side, she also became an instructor for Ball Room dancing. Because of her flair for dancing and acting apart from being an attractive looking girl, her friends suggested her to take up the acting career. This prompted her to join the stage under Agha Hashr Kashmiri, the famous poet and playwright of that time. Under his tutelage, Rose learnt to speak fluent Hindustani and improved her acting skill.

After getting experience of acting on the stage, Rose met J F Madan of Madan Theatre with a letter of recommendation from the owner of Tollywood Studio and joined the banner. [I, however, find her first film to be the silent film ‘The Culprit’ aka ‘Apraadhi’ (1931) produced under the banner of Barua Film Unit]. Her first talky film with Madan Theatre was ‘Pati Bhakti’ (1932). Thereafter she worked in ‘Hindustan’ (1932), ‘Alladin Aur Jaadui Chiraag’ (1933), ‘Turki Sher’ (1933) and other 5-6 films.

In 1935, Rose shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) and joined Imperial Film Company for a two-year contract. ‘Hamaari Betiyaan’ aka ‘Our Darling Daughters’ (1936) was her first film with Imperial in which she shared the star cast with her cousin Pramila. This was followed by ‘Ghulam Daaku’ (1936) and ‘Do Auraten’ aka ‘Two Women’ (1937).

After the end of the contract, Rose joined Saroj Movietone and worked in their films ‘Kal Ki Baat’ (1937) and ‘Rifle Girl’ (1938). After her stint with Saroj Movietone, Rose seems to have become a freelancer as she did Sagar Movietone’s ‘Hum Tum Aur Who’ (1938), Saraswati Cinetone’s ‘Sach Hai’ (1939), National Studios’ ‘Sanskaar’ (1940), ‘Kasauti’ (1941) and ‘Garib’ (1942), Ranjit Moveitone’s ‘Adhuri Kahaani’ (1939) and ‘Aaj Kaa Hindustan’ (1940), Kishore Sahu’s ‘Bahurani’ (1940), Prakash Pictures’ ‘Maala’ (1941) and Prabaht’s ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943).

In the interview, Rose had said that since she had two growing daughters, she wanted to have the flexibility of working in the films according to her convenience and as a freelancer she could get that freedom. However, it would appear that in trying to balance her career with family responsibilities, she missed her career in the later years as I find that in 1944, she did not have any films for release. In 1945, she had only one film ‘Ramayani’ (1945). Her filmy career ended with ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946).

Rose worked in 28 films during 1931 to 1946. Unfortunately, only one of her film, ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943) is available for viewing. From the reviews of some of her films of 1940 and thereafter, it appears that she had done mostly the role of an educated and sophisticated girl.

I could not get the information as to how Rose spent her life after her ‘retirement’ from the films. All I know is that during 1940s, she was staying in Keval Mahal at Marine Drive. And those days, it was a status symbol for successful film stars to stay in Marine Drive in buildings like, Keval Mahal, Kapur Mahal, Zaver Mahal, Krishna Mahal (all these buildings are adjunct to each other).

Rose had two daughters – Marjorie and Cynthia. Cynthia was 87 when her interview was taken in her apartments in Las Angles (USA) sometime in 2015 in connection with the documentary film I referred to above. I guess Marjorie remained in Mumbai until her death if I go by a comment of her daughter Rachel Reuben, the super model and now a film editor, in an article which appeared in ‘Outlook’, July 2006.

Coming to the song, I have selected a rare song ‘qismat mein koi sukh nahin’ rendered by Rose from an obscure film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946). The film was produced under the banner of Star Productions (Ratanbai’s film production company) and was directed by Ramnik Desai. The star cast included Rose, Shahu Modak, Durga Khote, Shantarin, Chandabai, Majeed, Zillo etc. The film had 9 songs written by Wahid Qureshi which were set to music by Mustaq Hussain (Ustad Mustaq Hussain Khan of Bareilly), probably based on Raag Malkauns.

With this song, the film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’(1946) makes its debut in the Blog.


Song-Qismat mein koi sukh nahin (Daasi Ya Maa)(1946) Singer-Miss Rose, Lyrics-Wahid Qureshi, MD-Mushtaq Hussain

Lyrics

qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin

hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin

maut ki aur baat hai
maut ki aur baat hai
maut kathin sahi magar
maut kathin sahi magar
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
क़िस्मत में कोई सुख नहीं
दिल में कोई खुशी नहीं
क़िस्मत में कोई सुख नहीं
दिल में कोई खुशी नहीं
मेरे लिए तो ज़िन्दगी
मौत है ज़िन्दगी नहीं
मेरे लिए तो ज़िन्दगी
मौत है ज़िन्दगी नहीं

हँसना भी चाहूँ मैं अगर
आँसू निकाल पड़ें अभी
हँसना भी चाहूँ मैं अगर
आँसू निकाल पड़ें अभी
होठों पे आए क्यों हंसी
क़िस्मत में जब हंसी नहीं
होठों पे आए क्यों हंसी
क़िस्मत में जब हंसी नहीं

मौत की और बात है
मौत की और बात है
मौत कठिन सही मगर
मौत कठिन सही मगर
जब के ना कोई आस हो
जीना भी दिल्लगी नहीं
जब के ना कोई आस हो
जीना भी दिल्लगी नहीं



This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This article is a tribute to an actor whom I started admiring for his acting calibre only a couple of years back. He became a star actor without having any godfather in Hindi film industry. During his filmy career of less than 15 years (1934-48), he donned the different kind of roles, mostly in negative shades, in around 30 films most of which became box office hits. Had there been a concept of super star in his days, he would have been the one among K L Saigal, Motilal, Surendra etc. The actor is Chandra Mohan and today, July 24, 2017 happens to be his 111th birth anniversary.

During my younger days, the only information I knew from words of mouth about Chandra Mohan was that he was the most handsome actor of his time. Even until a couple of years back, my awareness about him was restricted to his being from a Kashmiri Pandit family, about his filmography, watching him in VCD of films like ‘Pukaar’ (1939), ‘Roti’ (1942), ‘Humayun’ (1945) and ‘Shaheed’ (1948). Each of his roles in these films impressed me of his acting skill, the dialogue delivery and the expressions.

Chandra Mohan rarely got opportunity to work as hero in a conventional sense in his 30 odd films. Even in the films like ‘Bharosa’ (1940) and ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942) in which he was in the lead roles, he had some shades of negative characters like a seducer of his best friend’s wife and an autocratic husband, respectively. It is said that his facial features and cat eyes always created the shades of villain in him. His eyes were so powerful that even his innocuous smiles gave an impression of villainous smiles.

During the last two years or so when I was more into songs of the films of 1940s, I became aware of some of the important film personalities of that era and one of them was Chandra Mohan. I had read an interview of him taken by Hyacinth, a name under which Susheela Rani Patel wrote articles in ‘Filmindia’ magazines (November 1941). The interview was taken on the eve of the release of his film ‘Roti’ (1942). This was also a period when his career was at its peak. The interview gave me an impression of Chandra Mohan being a short tempered person, a self-centred egoistic man and a man of strong likes and dislikes.

Recently, I came across a moving obituary on Chandra Mohan written by Khorshed Dhondy, a film journalist who knew Chandra Mohan personally. The article appeared in April 1949 issue of SOUND Magazine, (Courtesy: Professor Surjit Singh’s Website). After reading the article, I had a different impression of Chandra Mohan – a kind hearted man, helped needy persons anonymously, a spend thrift during financially good times but accepted the life as it came in bad times. He was not arrogant but his frank talks may have given that impression.

Chandra Mohan Wattal (24/07/1906 – 02/04/1949) was born in Narsinghpur (presently in MP) in a Kashmiri Pandit family. His grandfather was the Diwan of Karauli State (now in Rajasthan) and his father was a member of the darbaar of Maharaja of Gwalior. Chandra Mohan lost his mother when he was a child. He was brought up by his maternal grandmother at Narsinghpur. His grandmother pampered him so much that he had become a spoilt child. It is not known whether he completed his high school.

Sometime in the 1930, after his father’s death, Chandra Mohan realised that his views and his grandparents views were poles apart. So he ran away from his house and reached Delhi. After changing job many times, he joined a film distribution company at Delhi at a monthly salary of Rs.35/-. The job entailed travelling for meeting film producers for negotiating terms for their film distributions.

On one such assignment, Chandra Mohan travelled to Kolhapur to discuss with the owners of Prabhat Film Company for negotiating the terms for distribution of their film ‘Sairandri’ (1933). V Shantaram saw in him the artistic potential – a handsome young man with his blue-greenish eyes which spoke more than his voice. He offered him a contract for the film which he refused. However, when Baburao Pendharkar left Prabhat, Chandra Mohan was asked to reconsider his decision. This time, Chandra Mohan met V Shantaram in Poona (Pune) and accepted the offer at a monthly salary of Rs.75/-. Thus he got his first role of a fanatic priest in Prabhat’s ‘Amrit Manthan (1934).

Chandra Mohan’s role in ‘Amrit Manthan’ (1934) was very much appreciated by both the cinegoers and the film critics. With his very first film, he had become a star. Thereafter, he worked for Prabhat’s ‘Dharmatma’ (1935) as an evil priest, in ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936) as a tyrannical minister, and in ‘Wahan’ (1937) as autocratic Aryan king. Sometime in 1936, Chandra Mohan had differences with Shantaram over his remuneration which had remained the same despite the box office successes of his three films in a row. So he left Prabhat and joined Huns Pictures of Master Vinayak in 1937 on profit sharing basis.

After completing ‘Jwaala’ (1938), he quit Huns Pictures and joined Sohrab Modi’s Minerva Movietone. He got the role of Mughal Emperor Jehangir in ‘Pukaar’ (1939). His role had created so much impression that Maharaja of Kashmir, Hari Singh who was a close friend of Chandra Mohan, used to receive him personally at his royal palace and address him as Jehangir. In Minerva’s ‘Bharosa’ (1940), his role as a seducer of his friend’s wife was critically appreciated in the film’s review in ‘Filmindia’.

Keeping with his temperament, Chandra Mohan left Minerva Movietone too after doing just two films and became a free-lancer. During his free-lancing phase, he had done a double role in negative character in ‘Geeta’ (1940) – as Durga Khote’s husband and her son. His role of a ruthless businessman in ‘Roti’ (1942) and an autocratic husband in ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942) who ‘conveys more from his actions than the words’ were well appreciated. In ‘Shakuntala’ (1943), his portrayal of role as King Dushyant had many shades of emotions.

The World War II period (1939-45) brought significant speculative gains for businessmen. Some of them channelled the money in film productions. During this time, the remunerations of the star actors went up significantly. Chandra Mohan was one of the major beneficiaries of this trend as he did nearly 20 films during this period. According to a film journalist I referred to earlier, Chandra Mohan earned as much as Rs.18 lakhs during this period which was a big sum at that time.

However, Chandra Mohan’s good earnings came at a cost which was reflected in his career later. During the boom, he had accepted roles in the films of all sorts, some of which flopped at the box offices. During this period, he tried his hand in producing a film ‘Jhankar’ (1942) in partnership with his close friend M Kumar. This film too flopped at the box office.

Once the war was over, there was a slump in business activities which also got reflected in the film industry. However, keeping with his temperament, Chandra Mohan would not lower his remuneration nor would he approach film production banners for roles. The result was that he did not get any films during 1946 and 1947. During this period, whatever he had earned was majorly lost in gambling like horse races which he was very fond of. Also his lavish life style and partying with his close friends continued until all his earnings were exhausted. He had to sell his personal belongings like cars, race horses etc to maintain his routine expenses.

It was during this period that Chandra Mohan was afflicted with some kind of mental illness (probably depression) resulting in losing his mental balance. It is said that during this period, he used to get hallucinations quite often. It is during this time, he became extremely religious person as against the atheist earlier. He spent whatever little money he had for going on pilgrimage all over India and visiting places of all faiths.

In the film industry, when the chips are down for an artist, even his close friends desert him. Chandra Mohan was lucky that he had some close friends like Motilal, M Kumar, Ulhas, Ranjan Haksar who were genuinely attached to him irrespective of his financial conditions. They used to visit his house in Churchgate periodically to inquire about his well being.

I guess that the moral support (perhaps, discreetly financial too) which Chandra Mohan got from his close friends during his difficult times might have brought him to normalcy. After about 2 years of hiatus, he got an important role in Filmistan’s ‘Shaheed’ (1948). His stunning performance as a duty bound Deputy Commissioner whose son (Dilip Kumar) has become a revolutionary, was as memorable as that of Dilip Kumar in ‘Shakti’ (1982). His monologue in a court scene where, for the first time, he supports his son for his actions, is unforgettable. He also acted in Prakash Picutres’ ‘Raam Baan’ (1948) in the role of Ravan and ‘Dukhiyaari’ (1948) etc.

Unfortunately, Chandra Mohan’s second innings was short lived. On the morning of April 2, 1949, he breathed his last due to heart attack after a short illness of about 15 days. Baburao Patel, editor of ‘Filmindia’ wrote in his tribute to Chandra Mohan – ‘the lambs of the day can never reach the stature of the lion that died’.

Chandra Mohan’s untimely death was one of the main reasons for further delay of K Asif’s magnum opus, ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) in which he was playing the role of Emperor Akbar. Some reels of the film was already shot.

Coming to the song for the occasion, from the VCDs of his films I have watched, I could not find any song which Chandra Mohan had lip synced on the screen. At last, I have settled for a background song picturised on him. The song is ‘Na Jaane Kahaan Ka Ye Jaadu Kiya Hai’ from the film ‘Shakuntala’ (1943). The singer of the song is not identified. My guess is that the singer is Khan Mastana.

There were 13 songs in the film written by Deewan Sharar and Ratan Piya. However, the song under discussion has not been identified as to which of the two lyricists had written the song. My take is that the song may have been written by Deewan Sharar as I find that 8 songs for which Ratan Piya have been accredited, have pure Hindi lyrics whereas the song under discussion have words like ‘adaayen’ ‘nighaayen’, ‘jahaan’ ‘jaam’ which a purist Hindi poet would generally avoid. Vasant Desai composed music for all the songs. Six songs from the film have been covered in the Blog.

‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was the first film produced and directed by V Shantaram after he left Prabhat films and set up Rajkamal Kala Mandir . The star cast included Jaishree, Chandra Mohan, Nimbalkar, Zohra, Ameena, Raja Pandit, Nana Palsikar, Shantarin etc. The film was a box office hit. It ran for 104 weeks in Swastik theatre in Bombay (Mumbai).

Interestingly, for his first film under his own banner, V Shantaram chose Chandra Mohan for the role of King Dushyant in the film despite their earlier disagreement in 1937 because of which Chandra Mohan had left Prabhat Films in 1937. Chandra Mohan had acknowledged in his interview that V Shantaram was the best director among the directors he worked with.


Song – Na Jaane Kahaan Ka Ye Jaadu Kiya Hai (Shakuntala) (1943) Singer – Unidentified Male Voice, Lyrics – [Unattributed], MD – Vasant Desai

Lyrics

na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai
na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

wo baanki adaayen
wo meethi nighaahen aen
wo baanki adaayen
wo meethi nighaahen
chale…en
chale phir wahaan par
jahaan dil diyaa hai
jahaan dil diyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

inhin ne kiyaa aa mast
saare jahaan ko o
inhin ne kiyaa aa mast
saare jahaan ko o
jin aankhon kaa..aa
jin aankhon kaa
ik jaam hamne piya hai
hamne piya hai
kisi ne
mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai
na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ना जाने कहाँ का ये जादू किया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है

वो बाँकी अदाएं
मीठी निगाहें
वो बाँकी अदाएं
मीठी निगाहें
चले॰॰एन
चलें फिर वहाँ पर
जहां दिल दिया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है

इन्हीं ने किया मस्त सारे जहां को॰॰
इन्हीं ने किया मस्त सारे जहां को॰॰
जिन आँखों का॰॰
जिन आँखों का इक जाम हमने पिया है
हमने पिया है
किसी ने
मेरे दिल में
घर कर लिया है
ना जाने कहाँ का ये जादू किया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

‘Ladies Only’ (1939) was produced under the banner of Sagar Movietone and it was directed by Sarvottam Badami. The star cast included Surendra, Bibbo, Sabita Devi, Prabha, Harish, Budho Advani, Sunalini Devi, Kaushalya etc. The film was released on 16th February 1939 and Moraraji Desai, the Revenue Minister of the then Bombay State was the chief guest.

The film was a satirical comedy with an unusual end. In this film, Surendra was not a conventional hero in the sense that he did not get any of three main actresses at the end. I have made a synopsis of the story of the film based on the review published in April 1939 issue of ‘Filmindia’ which is given below:

Three girls from three different states, Bengal, Gujarat and Punjab viz Chhaaya (Prabha, Bengali), Sarojini (Sabita Devi, Gujarati) and Asha (Bibbo, Punjabi), meet at a railway station in Bombay (Mumbai). They decide to stay together for their boarding and lodging for which they rent a flat. Satish (Surendra) also meets these girls who come to know that he is passionate about music and stays opposite their rented flat.

The girls staying together for sometime now know each other’s nature. Asha, the Punjabi girl is crude, greedy, music lover, lazy, comfort seeker etc. Chhaaya, the Bengali girl is miser, coy, primitive, and childish. Sarojini, the Gujarati girl, is educated, resourceful and has a great organisational capacity but these are all at the expenses of other two girls. They also display one-upmanship about their respective states.

All the three girls not only live together, they also aim at the same man, Satish who spend much of his time with these girls either on outings or in their rented flat. One day, girls decide to visit his house across the street without notice and find a stout woman welcoming the girls. The stout woman turns out to be Satish’s wife. It is shocking for the girls. The girls walk out of the house muttering something derogatory about the men folk in general.

For Sagar Movietone, ‘Ladies Only’ (1939) gave them a good start for the year 1939 with a box office hit. This was followed by another box office success viz ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (1939). The banner had also planned for their ambitious films like ‘Alibaba’ (1940) in Hindi and Punjabi and ‘Kumkum the Dancer’ (1940) in Hindi and Bengali. But before these films could be released, Sagar Movietone found themselves in a dire financial crunch. By the end of 1939, the banner was amalgamated with General Films to form National Studios.

‘Ladies Only’ (1939) had 11 songs written by Pandit Indra and Zia Sarhadi but the name of the specific lyricist for each song is not available. All the songs were set to music by Anupam Ghatak.

Here is the first song ‘chamke poonam ko poonam ko chaand’ from the film to appear in the Blog. The song is sung by Surendra and Bibbo. It can be observed that the structure of lyrics are not in usual form and the song is composed for Surendra and Bibbo on different notes and tempos. The song is probably picturised on them separately.

With this song, ‘Ladies Only’ (1939) makes its debut in the Blog.


Song-Chamke poonam ke poonam ko chaand (Ladies Only)(1939) Surendra, Bibbo, MD-Anupam Ghatak

Lyrics

chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein
haan
chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein

aadhi raat ko paayal baaje
aadhi raat ko paayal baaje
aadhi raat ko paayal baaje
aadhi raat ko paayal baaje
aadhi raat ko paayal baaje
oonchi atariya mein
oonchi atariya mein

chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein
haan
chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein

tan man kaa itihaas chhipa hai
tirchi najariya mein
tan man kaa itihaas chhipa hai
tirchi najariya mein
chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein

badi bedhab nainon ki maar
badi bedhab nainon ki maar
shikaari
khud ho gaya shikaar
shikaari
khud ho gaya shikaar
badi bedhab nainon ki maar
shikaari khud ho gaya shikaar
bik gayi main be-mol tol
is prem nagariya mein
bik gayi main be-mol tol
is prem nagariya mein
chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand
chundariya mein
chundariya mein
haan
chamke poonam ke
poonam ko chaand


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

‘Shehzaadi’ (1947) is a film about which not much information is available online except that it was produced under the banner of Shalimar Pictures owned by WZ Ahmed and the film belonged to the costume drama genre. I had searched extensively on the internet about the star cast and the director but drew a blank. Earlier, I had even a doubt whether the film was actually released.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, July 7, 2017 is the 103rd birth anniversary of Anil Biswas (07/07/1914 – 31/05/2003) who defined the Hindi film music at its incipient stage in Bombay film industry. It is a double celebration for him as the song to be discussed today will be his 300th song on the Blog.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

I did not have much idea about the film ‘Mehmaan’ (1953) except its star cast. But I have been mesmerised by its 8 melodious songs, two of which have so far been covered in the Blog. The film was directed by Ramanand Sagar, his first film as a director. The star cast included Premnath, Nimmi, Sajjan, Purnima, Radhakishan, Bikram Kapoor, Harish, Mumtaz Begum etc. With Nimmi in the lead role, one would expect a lot of melodrama, sufferings, unexpected twists in the love story etc.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, I am writing about one of the prominent actors of 1930s and 40s who started his film career in the silent film era and became producer-director during the second half of 1940s. His name – Mazhar Khan, a forgotten name not only for the current generation but also for many in my generation as well.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

At the time of the release of National Studios’ film ‘Roti’ (1942) in August 1942, the production house was sold to KM Modi, a prominent film exhibitors of that time who had no interest in producing films. At that time, three films of National Studios were under the advance stage of completion. ‘Jawaani’ (1942) was one among the three films, other two films being ‘Lala ji’ (1942) and ‘Apna Paraaya’ (1942). Anil Biswas was the music directors for all the three films.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3300 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13529

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1015
Total Number of movies covered =3712

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

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