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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4075 Post No. : 15213 Movie Count :

4182

It is a well-known fact that Shailendra wrote maximum number of songs for the music director, Shankar-Jaikishan (around 365 songs) out of about 750 songs he wrote during his life time. The second in line among music directors was Salil Chowdhury for whom Shailendra wrote around 105 songs. The third place was taken by S D Burman for whom he wrote around 70 songs. There were others music directors for whom he wrote songs albeit in comparatively lesser numbers. They were Roshan, S N Tripathi, Hemant Kumar, Anil Biswas, C Ramchandra, Ravi, Dattaram, and Kishore Kumar.

With major chunk of Shailendra’s songs (around 90% his total songs) written for the music directors listed above, I was curious to know as who were the other music directors to whom Shailendra wrote songs probably for one or two films. I traced almost all ‘other’ music directors. They were Basant Prakash (‘Badnam’ 1952), Manohar Arora (‘Chingaari’, 1955), Mukul Roy (‘Sailaab’ 1956 and ‘Detective’ 1958), Jimmy (Shrimatiji, 1952), Ninu Mazumdar (‘Bhai Saheb’, 1954), Sardul Kwatra (‘Pilpli Saheb, 1954 and ‘Tis Maar Khan’, 1955), Shivram (‘Naya Kadam’ 1958), Shailesh Mukherjee (‘Savera; 1958), Chitrgupt and Gajanan (‘Kal Hamaara Hai’ 1959), Kalyanji-Anandji (‘Satta Baazar’ (1959), Pandit Ravi Shankar (‘Anuradha’ 1960), R D Burman (‘Chhote Nawab’ 1961), Suhrid Kar (‘Kaanch Ki Gudiya’ 1961), and Sapan-Jagmohan (‘Begaana’ 1963).

But the surprise catch among ‘other’ music director to whom Shailendra wrote a song was Nachiketa Ghosh who has composed music for only one Hindi film ‘25th July’ (1951). But Shailendra was not the lyricist for this film. It transpired that Shailendra did write a Hindi song for Nachiketa Ghosh but for a Bengali film ‘Indraani’ (1958). Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen were the lead actors in the film. The film is available on YT with English sub-title.

So here is probably Shailendra’s only Hindi song for a Bengali film, ‘Indraani’ (1958). There are 7 songs in the film of which one song is in Hindi. The song is ‘sabhi kuchh lutaakar huye hum tumhaare’ which is sung by Mohammad Rafi. Nachiketa Ghosh is the music director.

The background for this song is that Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen get married despite opposition from her parents as Uttam Kumar is unemployed. On the wedding night, their feelings for each other is reflected in this song through a wayside singer playing guitar. The mood of the song appears to me the same as that of songs like ek haseen shaam ko dil mera kho gaya.

The song in the video clip is longer than the audio clip (78 RPM record version) because of the repetition in the former of mukhda part in each antara. Also, there are short dialogues in Bengali between Uttam Kumar and Suchitra Sen during the interludes of the song.

What a lovely song which I heard for the first time. I have been mesmerized by Rafi’s rendition of antara part of the song. Just note, how he goes one octave higher but keep his rendition soft on the antara lines ‘kisi ka tu ho jaa’, ‘hai khaamosh hum bhi’ and ‘ye khwaabon ki duniya’.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip :

Song-Sabhi kuchh lutaa kar huye ham tumhaare (Indraani)(Bangla)(1958) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-Nachiketa Ghosh

Lyrics(based on Video Clip)

sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

mohabbat mein kho jaa..aa
kisi ka tu ho jaa
falak se zameen tak huye ye ishaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ki hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

hai chupchaap wo bhi
hain khaamosh hum bhi
khule jaa rahe hain magar raaz saare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

wo rangeen duniya
wo khwaabon ki duniya
simat kar ke baahon mein aayi hamaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar
huye hum tumhaare
ke hai jeet uski
jo dil aaj haare
ye khoya sa chanda
ye behke se taare
to phir kyun na machlen
armaan hamaare
sabhi kuchh lutaa kar

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4066 Post No. : 15201 Movie Count :

4178

Today, September 5th is 24th Remembrance Day of Salil Chowdhury (19/11/1925 – 05/09/1995), the legendary music director who was the pioneer in fusion music – blending Indian melodies with the orchestration of western classical music. As he himself admitted during an interview on All India Radio, Salil Da was greatly influenced by the music of Beethoven and Mozart because his father used to play gramophone records of their music which he had listened during his childhood.

Salil Da’s musical legacy has been carried forward by the likes of RD Burman, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. I will come back later the organic connection of Ilaiyaraaja and A R Rahman with the music of Salil Da.  It is the irony of fate that while the followers of his musical legacy have attained the top slots in the film industry, Salil Da could not get such recognition in Hindi film industry. Perhaps, he was quite ahead of time and those who mattered in the Hindi film industry (producers and distributors) failed to realise his potentials.

Salil Da has to be a genius person in the making if I go by his various activities during his childhood and younger days. At the age of 6, he learns piano. As a student, he writes and compose songs for the school’s plays. As a teenager, he gets actively associated in the Peasants Movements in his village. In the midst of such activities, he completes his high school and later graduation from Kolkata University. He becomes a member of Communist Party of India and gets actively involved with Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA) while he is simultaneously doing his post-graduation studies. He is a playwright, song writer, composer and sometime actor in IPTA plays. Salil Da participates in the peasants’ uprising and goes underground for a couple of years. During this period, he writes and composes ‘chetonaar gaan’ (songs of awakening). He learns almost all the important musical instruments like piano, flute, esraj, sarod, sitar, guitar, percussion which is in most cases self-thought. He is the first to set up Bombay Youth Choir and later Calcutta Choir Group which he personally conducts in the 1950s. He is a poet, story writer, lyricist and music director.

With so much of his multifarious activities in around Kolkata, how did Salil Da get involved with Hindi film music in Mumbai? I quote below, in his own words during an  interviews on All India Radio:

I came to Bombay by stroke of luck. I was writing script (of my story ‘Rickshawaala’) for a Bengali film.  When Hrishikesh Mukherjee heard the story, he liked it. He said that he would narrate the story to Bimalda (Bimal Roy) who was expected to come to Kolkata from Mumbai. So, I took the appointment of Bimlada and read out the entire script to him. Bimlda did not show any reaction to the story but advised me to meet him the next morning.

When I went to meet him the next morning, I was told that he had left for Mumbai by the morning flight on some urgent work. Within a week, I got the telegram from Bimalda that he had decided to make a Hindi film based on my story and I should come to Mumbai with the script. That’s how I landed in Mumbai for ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953).

After the success of ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953), Salil Da was employed in Bimal Roy Productions as a music director. He did many films for the banner like ‘Biraj Bahu’ (1954), ‘Naukari’ (1954), ‘Amaanat’ (1955), ‘Parivaar’ (1956), ‘Aparadhi Kaun’ (1957), ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Usne Kaha Thaa’ (1960), ‘ Parakh’ (1960).‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961), and  ‘Prem Patra’ (1962). During this period, he also did many other films outside the banner of Bimal Roy Productions. Song compositions in almost all these films are outstanding. Some of the songs from Bimal Roy’s  films are evergreen and they are still remembered. For instance “Aaha Rimjhim Ke Ye Pyaare Pyaare Geet Liye” (from ‘Usne Kaha Tha’) and “O Sajnaa Barkha Bahaar Aayi” (from ‘Parakh’).

In ‘non-Bimal Roy’ films, Salil Da composed excellent songs in films like ‘Jaagte Raho’ (1956), ‘Aawaaz’ (1956), ‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’ (1957), ‘Honeymoon’ (1960), ‘Chhaaya’ (1961),  ‘Maaya’ (1961) etc. The songs like “Zindagi Khwaab Hai” (‘Jagte Raho’, Mukesh’s first song under Salida), “Dhitang Dhitang Bole” (‘Awaaz’), “Raat Ne Kya Kya Khwaab Dikhaaye” (‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’), “Mere Khwaabon Mein Khayaalon Mein” (‘Honeymoon’),  “Koi Sone Ke Dilwaala” (‘Maaya’), and “Itna Na Mujhse Tu Pyaar Badha” (‘Chhaaya’)  are some of my favourites of Salil Da.

Despite scoring beautiful songs in the films of early 50s, Salil Da was still regarded as a flop music director in the eyes of film distributors.  The box office success of‘ ‘Madhumati’ (1958) and the high popularity of its songs enabled Salil Da to shed the tag of ‘flop music director’. I remember that not a single day will pass without one or two songs from ‘Madhumati’ (1958) being played on the radio after the release of the film. Salil Da got his first Filmfare Award for the best music director for this film.

It is difficult to pin point the best song from ‘Madhumati’ as all the songs were outstanding. Because I am a trekker, I may be biased in my liking for “Suhaana Safar Aur Ye Mausam Haseen“. The sound of chirping of the birds in the prelude creates a natural atmosphere in the scene for the song. Incidentally, adding in the prelude the chirping sounds of the birds was suggested by SD Burman. Salil Da used folk-based melody from Bengal, Assam, Nepal and also from Poland for almost all the songs in the film. He requisitioned the services of Dattaram for playing dholak in all the songs (as revealed by Dattaram in his TV interview). One can hear Dattaram ‘thekas’ prominently in the song “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke“.

With the tremendous success of ‘Madhumati’ (1958), Salil Da got more film assignments such as ‘Chhaaya’ (1961), ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965), ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965), ‘Pinjre Ke Panchhi’ (1966) (which he also directed), among many others.

During his second phase of the musical career, he did some notable films like ‘Mere Apne’ (1971), ‘Anand’ (1971), ‘Annadaata (1972), ‘Rajanigandha’ (1974), ‘Chhoti Si Baat’ (1976), ‘Anand Mahal’ (1977) etc. Some of the popular as well notable songs of Salil Da of this period are “Zindagi Kaisi Hai Paheli Haaye” (‘Anand’), (note the choir singing in the interludes), “Raaton Ke Saaye Ghane” (‘Annadaata’) (song may not have become popular but it is an intricate composition which only Lata could do justice), “Kai Baar Yoon Bhi Dekha Hai” (‘Rajnigandha’) (my favourite and whenever I wish to listen to this song, I prefer to watch on the video clip) and “Na Jaane Kyun Hota Hai Ye Zindagi Ke Saath” (‘Chhoti Si Baat’) (again, I prefer to listen to the song by watching the video clip of the song).

I know, I have missed some more of popular songs composed by Salil Da . I will end with  one more song from the stable of Salil Da which did not become as popular as it should have been. The song is  “Koi Hota Jisko Apna” from ‘Mere Apne’ (1971).  It is a complex composition which Kishore Kumar has ably rendered. The mukhda tune was inspired from the background score of ‘Anand’(1970).

After about 1975, his Hindi film assignments came down that too was limited to small banners. On the other hand, his assignments in Bengali and South Indian films were on the rise. Also, he had shifted his base to Kolkata in mid 1970s as he had planned for setting up of a modern recording studio in Kolkata. During about 25 years of his active association with Mumbai, he composed about 300 songs in about 65 Hindi films.

Discussion on Salil Chowdhury’s musical career in films will not be complete unless we take into account his sojourn to South Indian films especially the Malayalam films. He was introduced to Malayalam films  by Ramu Khairat, the Malayalam film director who was a part of IPTA delegation along with Salil Da to an East European country in 1960. Their IPTA background and the common interest in films made them friends. When Ramu Khairat finalised the making of Malayalam film, ‘Chemmeen’ (1965), he selected Salil Da as the music director. The film received tremendous response from the cinegoers. This film is regarded as the first successful ‘arty’ film in South India.

The highlight of the film was the popularity of its four songs. The extra-ordinary success of the songs changed the complexion of the South Indian film music. Salil Da set his firm footing in the South Indian film industries. He did 25 Malayalam films and 10 films in Tamil, Telugu and Kannada. In addition, he was also associated with about 40 Bengali films as a lyricist and music director.

One of the innovative ideas Salil Da experimented with his music was that he composed new songs based on his earlier songs as well as from the background score by giving a different structure to the new songs. For instance, in an interview, Salil Da gave an interesting example of his song “Aaja Re Pardesi Main To Kab Se Khadi Iss Paar”  from ‘Madhumati’ (1958). The mukhda tune was based on the melodic background music of ‘Jaagte Raho’(1956). This background music is played whenever Raj Kapoor is about to drink water to quench his thirst but the circumstances makes him to run away from the scene without drinking water. In the same song, Salil Da has used the mukhda tune of “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke” as the interlude music.

Another example I had noted many years back and worth mentioning is the comparison of the song “Baag Mein Kali Khili Bagiya Mehki” from ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965) with “Saathi Re Tujh Bin Jiya Udaas” from ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965). Salil Da has used more or less the same tune for the antaras of both the songs. Salil Da’s different melodic and orchestration structures makes these two songs sounding different. Hence, first song sounds like that for a growing up girl waiting for her fiance and the other one as a haunting song. Also note in the latter song how the mukhda tune of the former song converted into the interlude music and gets merges with the antara tune.

I had mentioned earlier that there is some organic connection between Salil Da, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. During his assignments in the South Indian films, especially in Malayalam films as a music director, Salil Da had in his orchestra, Ilaiyaraaja as a lead guitarist and RK Sekhar (father of AR Rahman) as his Assistant and Arranger. AR Rahman joined Ilaiyaraaja’s troup as Keyboard player. Incidentally, Salil Da had predicted that one day Ilaiyaraaja would become the top most music director of India. His prophecy has come true.

A music analyst in his article in The Hindu has opined that in his early years of music direction, Ilaiyaraaja seemed to have been influenced by Salil Da in using fusion music which he improvised a lot in his later years. The same music analyst also felt that Salil Da was influenced by the music of Ilaiyaraaja in composing Bengali songs in his later years.

On the occasion of 24th Remembrance Day of the legendary music director, Salil Da, I have chosen a rarely heard Sanskrit song  ‘tava virahe vanamaali’ from the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The music for the song has been composed by Salil Da in a classical raaga, Yaman. The song is written by the famous Sanskrit poet of the 12th century AD – Jaidev. It is rendered by Kavita Krishnamurthy. It is a classical dance song which is picturised on Shobna (Pillai), a well-known Malayalam and Tamil film  actress and a Bharatnatyam dancer. She is the niece of Padmini and Ragini.

I took the song’s lyrics from Geet Govind. English translation of the lyrics is embedded on the audio clip of the song. This is the song I liked best out of 8 songs in the film.

There is long history about the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The film was directed by GV Iyer  a khadi-clad barefoot Gandhian who has been known for  making films based on spiritual themes. He was the first to make a feature film in Sanskrit, ‘Adi Shankaracharya’ (1983) which won 4 National Film Awards including the award for the Best Film. This was followed by ‘Madhvacharya’ (1986) in Kannada, ‘Ramanujacharya’ (1989) in Tamil, ‘Bhagvad Geeta – The Song of the Lord’ (1993) in Sanskrit.  In addition, he has acted in and directed many Kannada films since 1954.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was GV Iyer’s first foray into Hindi film which also falls under the spiritual theme.  The film was produced by T Subbarami Reddy, a parliamentarian and a well-known Telugu and Bollywood film producer. The main characters in the film, Swami Vivekanand was played by Sarvadaman Banerjee and that of Ramkrishan Paramhans by Mithun Chakraborty. Tanuja, Pradeep Kumar, Debashree Roy were some of the other actors in the film. Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Hema Malini, Rakhee, Jaya Prada, Manmooty, Meenakshi Seshadari and Anupam Kher did some minor roles as guest actors.

The film took about 5 years to complete and further about 3 years to get released for public viewing. Naseeruddin Shah who was selected to play the role of Ramkrishna Paramhans had to be dropped due to pressure from right-wing activists. The role went to Mithun Chakraborty despite having an image of disco dancer at that time. There were many objections from various quarters including Ramkrishna Mission. When issues were being addressed by the director, someone filed a suit in the high court which after sometime, cleared the film with about 20 cuts. The film was premiered on National Channel of Doordarshan on August 15, 1998 and thereafter it was released in the theatres. The film was a disaster at the box office.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was  Salil Da’s last Hindi film. Salil Da was regarded as an expert in background music but this was the only his Hindi film for which he could not give background music due to his sudden death on September 5, 1995.

Audio

Video

 

Song – Tava Virahe Vanamaali Sakhi Seedati  (Swami Vivekanand) (1994) Singer – Kavita Krishnamurthy, Lyrics – Jaidev (Traditional), MD – Salil Chaudhry

Lyrics

tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
vikalataroti
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
aa aa aaa aa
aa aa aaa aa
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati

vasati vipin-vitaane

tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam
vasati vipin-vitaane
tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam aa
tava naam
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virah..ae
vanamaali..ee

———————————-
Devnagari script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

[Ed Note: The complete text of the original song (song no. 10 in the book) consists of 8 verses, which appear in the 5th chapter of this epic poem, placed between the 34th and the 35th shloks in the book. For the purpose of the film, only the first four have been adapted. There is a lead in verse which is a part of this song. It reads as,
वहति मलयसमीरे मदनमुपनिधाय ।
स्फुटति कुसुमनिकरे विरहिहृदयदलनाय ॥  ]

तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति ॥ १॥
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति ।
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति ॥ २॥
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ
दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति ।
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति ॥ ३॥
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति

वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम ।
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम ॥ ४॥
वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम
तव नाम
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे॰॰ए
वनमाली॰॰ई

 


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4056 Post No. : 15188

I am an ardent admirer of Ruskin Bond’s short stories. I do not remember as to when I started bonding with Ruskin Bond’s books. It could be sometime early 1990s when I read his first book titled ‘Beautiful Garhwal – Heaven in Himalayas’ (1988). Surprisingly, this book is not listed under the list of his published books. It is a ‘coffee-table book’ with 15 of his articles on the Garhwal Himalayas – from the village life, rivers, valleys, pilgrimage to trees and flowers, etc. It is an excellent and lavishly printed book in art paper with a lot of illustrations and beautiful pictures. This book was printed for Garhwal Mandal Vikas Nigam (GMVL) as a part of promotion of tourism in the Garhwal Himalayas.

Since then, I had ready many of his short stories which are in my collections of books like ‘Rain in the Mountains – Notes from the Himalaya’ (1993), ‘The Lamp is Lit’ (1998), The Room on the Roof’, ‘The Night Train to Deoli & Other Stories’ etc. Very recently, I have read his latest book ‘The Beauty of All My Days’ – A Memoir ( 2018). A few of his books of short story collections which I have read, seems to have been missing from my collections. Probably, I may have given to some ones to read but they did not return.

Ruskin Bond has spent much of his life at the foothills of the Garhwal Himalayas. His last 5 decades have been spent in Landour, a cantonment area of Mussoorie. He has widely travelled in Garhwal Himalayas. Hence, much of his writings is the reflections of the hills and the village life of the Garhwal Himalayas and his nostalgic experiences. His lucid writing style takes the readers to the virtual trip to the Himalayas.

I have been very much influenced by the writings of Ruskin Bond and his nostalgia of the Garhwal Himalayas. Of all the Himalaya treks I have undertaken during the last 35 years, I have done the maximum number of treks in the Garhwal Himalaya. His description of the village life prompted me to prefer home stays in village houses for the overnight stays rather than in the tents whenever I trekked in the Himalayas. I could, therefore, get the first hand experiences of Ruskin Bond’s descriptions of the Garhwal villages and the psyche of the simple villagers.

Recently, I have written an article in the Blog on Gulzar saab on the occasion of his 85th Birthday. When I was going through the profile of Ruskin Bond, I found it interesting to note that there were many similarities in the events in the lives of Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab. Both were born in 1934, with Gulzar saab being younger by exactly 3 months. Both had a lonely childhood. Gulzar saab lost his mother when he was a child. Ruskin Bond had grown up without the support of his mother as his parents had divorced when he was a child. His mother got remarried and he lived with his father. Circumstances deprived both of them of their fathers’ company when it was most needed. Gulzar saab was sent to Mumbai to stay with his elder step brother, while Ruskin Bond missed his father most of the time because he was in the Royal Air Force and later died from Malaria at an early age.

Both Ruskin Bond and Gulzar Saab developed their writing skills and got their poems/short story published when they were teens. Both got associated with Hindi films albeit with a gap – Gulzar saab in ‘Bandini’ (1963) as a lyricist and Ruskin Bond as a story writer in ‘Junoon’ (1978) based on his novel, ‘A Flight of Pigeons’ (1970s). Both wrote and published a good number of books of children’s literature. Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab were conferred with Sahitya Akademy Awards in 1992 and 2002 respectively and with Padma Bhushan in 2014 and 2004 respectively.

While the lives of Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab was moving parallelly, they got merged for the first time when Vishal Bhardwaj decided to make a children’s film in Hindi, ‘The Blue Umbrella’ (Neeli Chhatri, 2005) based on the novella of the same title written by Ruskin Bond. He also wrote screen-play for the film jointly with Vishal Bhardwaj. Gulzar saab got associated with this film as a lyricist.

After a gap of about 5 years, Ruskin Bond and Gulzar saab worked together in Vishal Bhardwaj’s film ‘7 Khoon Maaf’ (2011) which was based on his novel ‘Sussanna’s Seven Husbands’. Ruskin Bond wrote screen-play along with Vishal Bhardwaj and also played a cameo role of a priest in the film. Gulzar saab wrote the lyrics. Collaboration between them for the third film is in the offing. Incidentally, Vishal Bhardwaj has become a neighbour of Ruskin Bond in Landour as revealed by the latter.

As I mentioned earlier, ‘The Blue Umbrella’ (2005) was a children’s film based on Ruskin Bond’s novella by the same name. The film was directed by Vishal Bhardwaj. Except for Pankaj Kapoor and Deepak Dobriyal, rest of the actors in the film are unfamiliar to me. The lead actors in the film is Pankaj Kapoor and 10-year girl, Shreya Sharma. The film was critically acclaimed and it got the National Film Award for the best children’s film in 2008. But the film was a box office disaster.

The film is not available for viewing in any video uploading platforms like YT. I saw the movie on Netflix. There are some minor differences in the story outlined in the film from the story in the book. The story in the book is based in some remote village in Garhwal whereas in the film, the story is based on a remote village in Himachal Pradesh. The end in the film also differ from the book which I will discuss later. The story in the film is as under:

In a remote Himalayan village, 10-year old girl, Biniya (Shreya Sharma) stays with her widowed mother and elder brother. The family has a small terraced field and a couple of cows sufficient to take care of their sustenance.

One day when Biniya goes to graze the cows, she comes across a group of Japanese tourists. Biniya’s eyes fall on a beautiful blue umbrella which is lying open on the meadow. She likes the umbrella and wants to have it but she has no means to get it. The lady tourist sees a necklace with a pedant of bear’s claws in Biniya’s neck and she likes it. Despite the bear’s claws being regarded as a lucky charm, Biniya exchanges for the blue umbrella. From now onward, Biniya and her blue umbrella are inseparable.

Most of the people in her village are envious of her blue umbrella as no one in the village possessed such a beautiful umbrella. The village teacher’s wife pesters her husband to get a similar umbrella for her. But the children in the village are full of praise for Biniya’s blue umbrella.

In the village, Nandkishore (Pankaj Kapoor), the owner of the village’s only tea shop, also becomes envious of Biniya’s blue umbrella as she has become the centre of attention in the village. Even tourists coming in buses for going towards a hill station nearby take a tea break for photographing her with blue umbrella.

Nandkishore tries all tricks of attractive offers to make her sell to him the blue umbrella but she refuses to sell. The blue umbrella causes restlessness in the mind of Nandkishore. He must have that blue umbrella. He tries to get one from the nearby town but it is not available. A similar type of umbrella which may be available in Delhi would cost him a lot. He feels that his attraction to the blue umbrella may have to do with his last birth.

One day, Biniya while grazing the cows on a meadow, finds her umbrella missing. She suspects Nandkishore to be the one who stole her blue umbrella. Police searches the Nadkishore’s shop but does not find the umbrella. Humiliated by the police investigation, Nandkishore buys a colourful red umbrella which, he says, he got from Delhi. He now becomes the centre of attraction in the village.

Biniya’s own investigation on her missing blue umbrella continues which takes her to a nearby town where one umbrella was recently dyed. In the meanwhile, with his status in the village gone up due to owning a red umbrella, Nandkishore is invited as a chief guest for a wrestling competition in the village. During the competition, it starts raining and his red umbrella turns blue as red colour on the umbrella get washed out. It becomes clear that Nandkishore had stolen Biniya’s blue umbrella and got it dyed with red colour. The village panchayat held him guilty and pass a judgement that that the entire village should boycott Nandkishore and his shop.

With the boycott, Nandkishore business is almost stopped. He is not even invited for the marriage of the village chief’s son. Barber’s shop refuses him as a customer. Biniya watches all the happenings to Nandkishore. She feels sorry for him. One day, she visits his shop after a long gap to buy biscuits and forgets her umbrella in his shop. When Nandkishore notices this, he runs after her with the umbrella in snowy conditions and returns to her the umbrella. Biniya refuses to accept the umbrella by telling him that it is not her umbrella and walks away. The village boycott of Nandkishore is lifted and his business in the shop returns to normal.

I found the ending in Ruskin Bond’s book more touching than in the film. In the book, after few days of boycott of Nandkishore’s shop, Biniya feels that she is the cause for all the problems Nandkishore has been facing due to boycott. After many days of boycott, she visits his shop to buy toffees. Nandkishore thinks that Biniya has come to his shop to make fun of his situation or she has come with a counterfeit coin to buy toffees. But none of his presumptions comes out true. She buys the toffee but forget her blue umbrella in the shop. Nandkishore runs after her to give her back the umbrella. However, she tells him that she left the umbrella for him.

After few days of this event, Nandkishore calls Biniya while she is passing by his shop. He shows her his newly made locket of bear’s claws with silver chain. She likes it but she says she has no money to buy. Nandkishore says that it does not matter as she has given him her umbrella and he is giving her a locket of bear’s claws. He places the pedant on her and says that it looks very beautiful on her. She is very much pleased as bear’s claws are regarded luckier than leopard’s claws. For Nandkishore, the smile that she gave him upon receiving the pendant was more rewarding than owning the pendant.

Vishal Bhardwaj, the producer-director of the film had said at the time of the release of the film that it was a children’s film with a message to adults. How true it is! Firstly, how an alien thing like an attractive blue umbrella can disturb the peaceful life of a village. Second, the intense desire to possess something can lead to irrational behaviour and its resultant adverse consequences. Third, forgiveness is the key to normalisation of a relationship. In ‘The Blue Umbrella’ Ruskin Bond has shown that there is always a soft corner in the hearts of individuals. In the end, Biniya gives up her possessiveness and Nandkishore shades his greediness. And the village comes back to its peaceful life.

The film has 3 beautiful songs, all written by Gulzar. One of them has been represented on the Blog.

I have selected for presentation the song ‘neeli aasmaani chhatri’ because this is the only song in which the blue umbrella is on display most of the duration of the song. Like Biniya and Nandkishore in the film, I am also tempted to this beautiful blue umbrella, my temptation being limited to watching it to my heart’s content. The song is sung by Upagna Pandya under the music direction of Vishal Bhardwaj.

It is a lovely song with western symphony music used for interludes.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip :

Song-Neeli Aasmaani chhatri (Blue Umbrella)(2005) Singers-Upagna Pandya, unknown female voice, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Vishal Bhardwaj

Lyrics(Based on the Audio Clip)

ku ku ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
arre he….ey

(ku ku kudi ku ku )
hey hey
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
neeli aasmaani chhatri
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku,
ku ku kudi ku ku

he…..ey
hey ae
neeli aasmaani chhatri
chhatri ka udan khatola
dole to laage hindola
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa aa
dole to laage hindola
ude kabhi bhaage kabhi
bhaage kabhi daude kabhi
samajh na maane chhatri..ee
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku ku ku
ku ku ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku

ambar ka tukda toda
lakdi ka hattha joda
haath mein apna asmaan hai re
chhatri le ke chalti ho
memon jaisi lagti ho
goron ka dil beimaan hai re
khunti kabhi laathi kabhi
laathi kabhi chhadi kabhi
khunti kabhi laathi kabhi
laathi kabhi chhadi kabhi
paaji shaitaani chhatri..ee

baarish se jo rishta hai
paani pe mann khinchta hai
bijli ko ye pehchaan hai re
shaayad phir ud na jaaye
ambar se jud na chaahe
bholi hai anjaan hai
hai re
doobe kabhi taire kabhi
gote khaati jaaye kabhi
doobe kabhi taire kabhi
gote khaati jaaye kabhi
karein naadaani chhatri..ee
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku
ku ku kudi ku ku

hey ae hey ae
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
hey re
(ku ku kudi ku ku)
neeli asmaani chhatri
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa
dole to laage hindola aa aa
chhatri ka udan khatola..aa aa
dole to laage hindola
ude kabhi bhaage kabhi
bhaage kabhi daude kabhi
samajh na maane chhatri


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4050 Post No. : 15179

shaam-e-gham ki kasam aaj ghamgeen hain ham

The evening in the first line turned into a night of sadness when I came to know from ASAD Group that Khayyam saab is no more with us. His popular songs started ringing in my ears. Those were the songs with which I have grown up from a teenager to a senior citizen. I had a disturbed sleep last night as some of his songs resonated intermittently in my mind. In the morning, I thought that the best way to get out of such feeling is to write a tributary article for Khayyam saab.

With his death, we have lost the last icon among the music directors of the golden period of Hindi film music He created his own ‘gharana’ of Hindi film music and very rarely deviated from it. The melodious songs he composed were mainly based on Hindustani classical raagas.

As I said, some of his songs were often coming to my mind. The emotional support song tum apna ranz-o-gham apni pareshaani mujhe de do was the one which gave me goosebumps. Not only Khayyam saab and Jagjit Kaur were creators of this melody, I felt that the latter was actually the emotional support system for the former. I identify wo subah kabhi to aayegi as optimistic in the midst of pessimism. I remember Khayyam saab in bahaaron mera jeevan bhi sanwaaron for its a long prelude of nearly 100 seconds of santoor, sitar and flute which created the right ambiance for Raag Pahadi based melody. Among other songs, how can I forget ye kya jagah hai doston and the ‘haunted feel’ song with pauses, ae dei-e-nadaan arzoo kya hai?

Khayyam saab who was so much committed to the quality of his musical compositions, selected only films with good story line. His musical compositions had the benefit of poetry rather than the lyrics. This is reflected in his working mostly with poets of repute like Sahir Ludhianvi, Kaifi Azmi, Jaan Nisar Akhtar, Raja Mehdi Ali Khan, Nida Fazli, Shahryar etc.

There was something for his young listeners and audiences too. Like hai kali kali ke lab par from ‘Lala Rukh’ (1958), a teasing song, jis pyaar mein ye haal ho us pyaar ki tauba from ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958), a jazzy number rut jawaan jawaan raat meherbaan from ‘Aakhri Khat’ (1966), an aspiring love song, aankhon mein hamne aapke sapne sajaaye hain from ‘Thhodi Si Bewafaayi’(1980) and many more.

Coming from a highly educated family from Jalandhar, Khayyam saab could not complete even his high school studies as he was smitten by his idol, K L Saigal and Hindi films. His wish was to become an actor-singer like K L Saigal. Expelled by his father from his house for neglecting his studies, Khayyam saab came to Delhi and stayed with his uncle. Realising his nephew’s interest in music, his uncle arranged his musical training under Pandit Amarnath and his brothers, Husnlal and Bhagatram.

A filmy career which spanned over 7 decades, Khayyam saab started as an apprentice to music Director, G A Chishti in Lahore in 1945. He came to Mumbai in January 1947 with Rahman Verma who was also assisting G A Chishti. Khayyam saab sang his first song ‘dono jahaan teri mohabat mein haar ke’ a duet with Zohrabai Ambalewali under Husnlal-Bhagatram for the film ‘Romeo & Juliet’ (1947). His first film as a music director in partnership with Rehman Verma was ‘Heer Ranjha’ (1948) under the pseudo name Sharmaji-Vermaji.

The song which brought Khayyam saab into limelight was akele mein wo ghabraate to honge from ‘Biwi’ (1950), his third film. This did not help him much in his career path. ‘Footpath’ (1953) was his first film in which he gave the music under his real name, Khayyam on the advice of the film’s director, Zia Sarahadi. shaam-e-gham ki kasam aaj ghamheen hain hum from this film became very popular as a ‘blue mood’ song. Khayyam saab had revealed that he had used western symphony based interlude in this song, especially the first interlude.

The high points in musical compositions of Khayyam saab were reflected in all the songs of ‘Lala Rukh’ (1958), ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958), ‘Shola Aur Shabnam (1961), ‘Shagoon’ (1964), ‘Mohabbat Isko Kehte Hai,’ (1965) and ‘Aakhri Khat’ (1966). Still the success in terms of recognition and box office alluded him. By this time, he had already spent about 2 decades in Hindi film industry but was not in the reckoning in the list of top music directors.

Sometime in the latter half of 1960s, Khayyam saab decided to take a sabbatical from Hindi film industry when he felt that the films he was being offered were not his worth. The sabbatical continued for nearly 8 years. During this period, he devoted his time and energy to compose some of his finest non-film songs among 200 odd songs. Here also he did with the top playback singers like Talat Mehmood and Mohammed Rafi. Begum Akhtar who was very close to Madan Mohan, chose Khayyam saab for composing ghazals for her LP Ghazal album in 1974.

Generally, it is said that once a film artist remains out of film industry for a long time, it is difficult for that artist to make a comeback. I think, Khayyam saab is the only among music directors who made a grand come back with the success of ‘Kabhie Kabhie’ (1976) for which he got Filmfare Award. The next feather in his cap was the outstanding music in ‘Umrao Jaan’ (1981). He was bestowed with National Award for music in this film. In his second coming, he remained active for about 10 years.

It was interesting to know that some of his best music compositions had come from films like ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958), ‘Kabhie Kabhie‘(1976), Umrao Jaan’ (1981) and ‘Razia Sultan’ (1983) where he was not the first choice as a music director. How much efforts and pain he must have taken to prove his credentials to the respective producers/directors to make the music of these film extraordinaire to justify their faith in him.

I have always felt that God has been unkind to Khayyam saab. At every stage of his life – from his childhood time onward, he had to struggle for survival. It took nearly 3 decades to come under the category of a successful music director when ‘Kabhie Kabhie’ (1976) became successful. He got recognition from the film industry as well as from the Government. But his success gave him company for less than 10 years. When he had everything for his modest living, he lost his only son, Pradeep in March 2012. But Khayyam saab had no complaint against God. In almost all his interviews I had read and watched, he had always said ‘Allah ki meharbaani hai, waah Guruji ki kripa hai, Ishawar ki kripa hai’.

Khayyam saab had also composed songs for about dozen unreleased films, one of which was ‘Anjuman’ (1986). As a tribute to Khayyam saab, I am presenting one of songs from this film, ‘kab yaad mein tera saath nahin kab tera haath mein haath nahin’ which is close to my heart. This ‘Faiz Ahmed Faiz’s song is rendered by Khayyam saab and his wife, Jagjit Kaur. I think, this is the only film song which they have sung together.

I offer my condolences to the bereaved family and his friends.

Khayyam saab, you will always be with us through your melodious music.

Video Clip :

Audio Clip:

Song-Kab yaad mein tera saath nahin (Anjuman)(UR)(1986) Singers-Khayyam, Jagjit Kaur, Lyrics-Faiz Ahmad Faiz, MD-Khayyam
Both

Lyrics

kab yaad mein tera saath nahin
kab yaad mein tera saath nahin
kab haath mein tera haath nahin
kab yaad mein tera saath nahin
kab haath mein tera haath nahin
tab shukr ke apni raaton mein
tab shukr ke apni raaton mein
ab hijr ki koi raat nahin
tab shukr ke apni raaton mein
ab hijr ki koi raat nahin

maidaan-e-wafa darbaar nahin
jaana munsab ki poochh kahaan

maidaan-e-wafa darbaar nahin
yahaan munsab ki poochh kahaan
aashiq to kisi ka naam nahin
aashiq to kisi ka naam nahin
kuchh ishq kisi ki jaat nahin
aashiq to kisi ka naam nahin
kuchh ishq kisi ki jaat nahin
kab yaad mein tera sath nahin
kab haath mein tera haath nahin

jis dhaj se koi maqtal mein gaya
wo shaan salaamat rahti hai
jis dhaj se koi maqtal mein gaya
wo shaan salamat rahti hai

ye jaan to aani jaani hai
ye jaan to aani jaani hai
is jaan ki to koi baat nahin
ye jaan to aani jaani hai
is jaan ki to koi baat nahin
kab yaad mein tera saath nahin
kab haath mein tera haath nahin

gar baazi ishq ki baazi hai
jo chaaho laga do dar kaisa
gar baazi ishq ki baazi hai
jo chaho laga do dar kaisa
gar jeet gaye to kya kahna
gar jeet gaye to kya kahna
haare bhi to baazi maat nahin
gar jeet gaye to kya kahna
haare bhi to baazi maat nahin
kab yaad mein tera saath nahin
kab haath mein tera haath nahin
tab shukr ke apni raaton mein
ab hizr ki koi raat nahin


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4048 Post No. : 15177

Clad in starched white kurta and pyjama with an unshaven face, his appearance gives an impression of a Bengali intellectual. His early association with Bimal Roy, Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Hemant Kumar and Salil Chowdhary supported that impression of mine until one day I came to know that he was born in a Sikh family in pre-partition Punjab.

Yes, he is Sampooran Singh Kalra, better known by his pen name, Gulzar (born on 18/08/1934) who turns 85 today and is still active in pursuit of his first love – writing poems and short stories. He continues to be associated with Hindi films with occasional indulgence as a lyricist. His association with Hindi films started, first as a lyricist followed by screen-play/dialogue writer and finally as a producer/director. He has already spent nearly 6 decades in Hindi film industry and this association is continuing.

Gulzar saab had spent nearly a decade (1950s) in the company of some of the writers/poets of Progressive Writers Association such as Krishan Chandra, Khwaza Ahmed Abbas, Shailendra, Sahir Ludhianvi, Sagar Sarhadi etc, who were associated with Hindi film industry. But he was not attracted towards making a career in Hindi film industry. His interest was to become a poet/writer like Mirza Ghalib and Rabindranath Tagore.

Gulzar saab was destined to be associated with Hindi films and Shailendra became a catalyst in introducing him to the Hindi films. When he advised him to meet Bimal Roy for writing songs for ‘Bandini’ (1963), Gulzar saab’s first reaction was ‘I do not want to be a lyricist’. It was only when Shailendra reprimanded him for losing the opportunity to work with a great film-maker, Bimal Roy and the music director, S D Burman, Gulzar saab relented and wrote his first song mora gora ang lai le mohe shyaam rang dai de for the film.

By the way, this was the only song Gulzar saab wrote for ‘Bandini’ (1963) and for S D Burman. But this song opened up his association with Bimal Roy as Assistant Director in Bimal Roy Productions and became his grooming ground to learn the art of screen-play/dialogue writing and the film direction.

Gulzar saab is one among a few film lyricists of the golden period of Hindi film music about whom much has been documented through articles, memoirs and scores of his interviews both to print as well as electronic medias. I had also covered his journey into the Hindi film industry in my article while covering the song shaam se aankh mein nami si hai. So, I will skip the details about his celluloid journey. Broadly, Gulzar saab’s filmy career can be divided into three main phases.

During the first phase (1960-1970), Gulzar saab mostly worked as lyricist with his music directors like Salil Chowdhury and Hemant Kumar who were his colleagues in Bimal Roy Productions. Out of 16 films he was associated as lyricist in this phase, as many as 10 films were with music directors Salil Chowdhury and Hemant Kumar. He also worked with Hrishikesh Mukherjee as a screen-play/dialogue writer for films like ‘Aashirwad’ (1968), and ‘Anand’ (1970).

In the second phase (1971-1999) Gulzar saab’s career was the most active as a screen-play/dialogue/song writer and producing/directing the films. He was associated with 60 Hindi films of which he directed 19 films. Almost all of his films which he directed come in the definition of ‘middle of the road’ films which included ‘Mere Apne’ (1971), Aandhi’ (1975), ‘Mausam’ (1976), ‘Angoor’ (1982), ‘Lekin’ (1991), ‘Maachis’ (1996). Though none of the films he directed created ripple in the box office front, these films are regarded as classic in the history of Hindi films.

Gulzar saab’s association with Sanjeev Kumar and R D Burman was the highlights of his second phase in Hindi film industry. Sanjeev Kumar acted in Gulzaar saab’s films, ‘Koshish’ (1972), ‘Aandhi’ (1975), ‘Mausam’ (1976), ‘Angoor’(1982),and ‘Namkeen’ (1982). With R D Burman, Gulzar saab worked for 23 films writing 101 songs. The association would have continued but for the untimely death of Sanjeev Kumar in 1985 and of R D Burman in 1993.

The third phase of Gulzar saab’s filmy career started in the new millennium and is continuing. After the release of his film ‘Hu Tu Tu’ (1999), he had taken a decision to give up producing and directing films as he wanted to devote a considerable time in writing. In this phase, he has confined himself mostly as a lyricist and occasionally script/dialogue writing.

During this phase, Gulzar saab has been associated with the third generation of music directors like A R Rahman, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy, Vishal Bhardwaj. He has already written lyrics for Vishal Bhardwaj in 19 films so far and perhaps he may break his own record of the highest number of films with R D Burman(23 films). He seems to be as comfortable with the new generation as he was with the older ones.

In the 1960s, he wrote songs like hawaaon pe likh do hawaaon ke naam for Hemant Kumar. Almost 5 decades later, he also wrote a rustic song ‘beedi jalaayi le jigar se piya’ for Vishal Bhardwaj. Both these songs have unusual imageries. The first one is about the nature giving the ‘feel good’ factor. The second song, though sounds rustic, has not prevented Gulzar saab sharing his thought on the real side of the world in two lines:

Dhuaan na nikaari o lab se piya
Je duniya badi dhaank hai

[O beloved, do not exhale smoke from your lips (from beedi)
The realities in this world are already masked].

Once, A R Rahman after getting explanations from Gulzar saab on his song, jiya jale jaan jale commented ‘Gulzar saab, you are a poet of imageries. I will amend his comment to say that Gulzar saab is a poet of unusual imageries. His six songs which I have covered during the last two weeks for the Blog would give the readers the taste of his unusual imageries/metaphors, choice of words and vocabularies.

I have been following Gulzar saab’s songs for many years. For me, he is an extension of what Sahir Ludhianvi did in 1950s to 1970s – to make the song lyrics an important part of Hindi film music. Though Gulzar saab belongs to the old generation of lyricist, he still gels well with the new generation. From the year 2000 until now, Gulzar saab has written lyrics for about 60 films. ‘I am going with the flow, but making sure that my aesthetics are in place,’ he had said in a recent interview.

There is another side of Gulzar saab’s personality. He has been active in writing short stories and poems side by side with his filmy career. Many of his short stories and poems have been published. He has received Sahitya Akademy Award for his Urdu book ‘Dhuaan’ in 2002. He has been associated with the children’s poems -both in films/TV and in prints. His most popular among jingles, ‘jungle jungle pata chala hai’ for ‘Jungle Book’ (1993) in Hindi which was telecast on Doordarshan, has become synonymous more with his name than its creator, Rudyard Kipling. Gulzar saab has done such a vast work of writing short stories and poems that they require a separate article which I intend to write some other time.

Gulzar saab’s association with R D Burman in 23 films has been one of the important segments in the history of Hindi film music. I regard Gulzar saab’s collaboration with A R Rahman, the continuation of that process. In fact, I feel that after the untimely death of R D Burman in 1993, A R Rahman has carried forward ‘Pancham’s legacy’ with refinements as new techniques and new types of musical instruments have emerged.

Hence, on the occasion of Gulzar saab’s 85th Birthday, I have chosen one of the songs born out of Gulzar-Rahman collaboration, ‘ae hairat-e-ashiqui jagaa mat’ from the film ‘Guru’ (2007). The song is mainly a duet sung by Hariharan and Alka Yagnik with Mohammed Aslam singing Sufi chants in the prelude and the first interlude with chorus singing in the second interlude and at the end of the song.

A R Rahman, in an interview published in the book ‘A R Rahman, The Spirit of Music’ (2012) by Nasreen Munni Kabir has revealed that whenever he gets stuck in composing tune for a given situation in the film, he has relied on the melodies of Amir Khusrau, Bulleh Shah and Subramania Bharati. The song under discussion was one of such songs for which A R Rahman relied on the melody of Amir Khusrau’s composition, ‘ae sharbat-e-aashiqui’. Rahman has based the tune on Raag Yaman Kalyan. Gulzar wrote the lyrics to the tune as per the song situation in the film.

I wish Gulzar saab a very happy and a healthy 85th Birthday. I remember his song ‘dil to bachcha hai jee’ from ‘Ishqiya’ (2010). I hope that the ‘bachcha’ (child) in his heart will inspire him to write many more poems of unusual imageries and metaphors in the years to come.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Ae hairat-e-ashiqui jagaa mat (Guru)(2007) Singers-Hariharan, Alka Yagnik, Mohammed Aslam, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-A R Rahman
Chorus,
Alka Yagnik & Chorus

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena

ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena

kyun Urdu Faarsi bolte ho o o
kyun Urdu Faarsi bolte ho
dus kehte ho do tolte ho
jhoothhon ke shanshahaa bolo na

kabhi jhaankon meri aankh….en
kabhi jhaankon meri aankhen
sunaayen ik daastaan
jo honthhon se ae kholo na
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
o o o
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara
dum dara dum dara

do chaar maheene se lamhon mein
do chaar maheene se lamhon mein
umron ke hisaab bhi hote hain
jinhen dekha nahin kal tak
jinhen dekha nahin kal tak
kahin bhi ab kok mein
woh chehre bote hain

ae hairat-e-ashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui
jagaa mat
pairon se zameen
zameen lagaa mat
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

ae hairat-e-aashiqui
o o
ae hairat-e-aashiqui

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena
o o o

dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
dum dara dum dara jashn jashn dum
sun mere humdum
hamesha ishq mein hi jeena


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4043 Post No. : 15168 Movie Count :

4167

I had not heard of a film named ‘Chatran’ (1988) until recently. The title of the film was unusual. I was wondering as to why the film in which Gulzar and R D Burman were associated, has remained obscure. After a search on the Google, I got the answer.

There was a Japanese film ‘Koneko Monogatari’ (1986) which became the most popular film in Japan in 1986 and continues to get earnings from this even now. Due to the film’s popularity, Columbia Pictures Industries (now Sony Pictures) dubbed the film in English under the title ‘The Adventures of Milo and Otis’ (1989). The English version film also became a box office hit.

But, before the English version of the film was released, the Indian film producer, Gul Anand got it dubbed in Hindi, titled ‘Chatran’ (1988). The film’s cast consisted of only the animals who did the live actions in the film. It is the story of a friendship between Chatran (the kitten) and Poosky (the pug-nosed puppy). So there were no dialogues in in all the versions of the film. The dubbing part is only of the narrators in the films. I watched the Hindi version of the film on the internet. The film is of 70-minute duration. The gist of the story is as under:

On a farm, a cat gives birth to seven kittens of which one of the male kittens, Chatran is naughty and is curious about its surroundings which sometime lands him in trouble. Chatran becomes friendly with mild-mannered Poosky and they become inseparable. They play ‘hide and seek’ game in the court yard of the farm in which Poosky is always a seeker and Chatran, a hider. But in this game, sometime Chatran gets in to trouble due to his curiosity. For instance, Chatran gets trapped in a chimney and with great difficulties, comes out of it with an ashen face.

One day, both Chatran and Poosky go towards the shore of a stream. Out of curiosity, Chatran enters into a wooden box lying in the stream water at the shore. Because of Chatran’s playful nature, the wooden box gets drifted to flowing stream. Poosky tries to save him by jumping into the stream but the wooden box gets drifted away from him. Poosky keeps trailing Chatran from the shores of the stream. From here onward, Chatran’s adventure starts.

Rest of the film is about how Chatran faces the problems and escapes on each occasion. He faces a bear but in nick of the time, Poosky comes to his rescue and fights with bear. Once Chatran comes out of the stream, he wanders in the forest and gets into trouble with snakes, bear and seagulls etc but successfully escapes. The positive side of his adventure is that during his wandering in the forest, he is sheltered by a deer and a pig with her piglets.

Finally, Chatran and Poosky unite in a vast meadow. They come back to their farm. They find their own mates and leave separately. They raise their own kittens and puppies. The film ends with Chatran and Poosky meeting each other with their extended family in the old farm house.

There were charges levelled against the original Japanese and English version films by Animal Rights Activists that there were cruelties to animals used in the filming. For example, there was a scene in which kitten plunges from a cliff and falls in the sea. Also, there was fight between the puppy and the bear. But the charges were never substantiated. However, I did not find any such problem for the Hindi version of the film from animal rights activists like PETA in India. Incidentally, the original Japanese film was of the duration of about 90 miniutes. But both the English and Hindi versions were of the duration of about 70 minutes. It is quite likely that some scenes which might have invited the wrath of Animal Rights Activists may have been deleted.

After watching the film, I personally felt that the scene in which the Chatran (the kitten) meows in pain when bitten by a crab (or scorpion?), looked to me real. Also, Chatran appeared stressful when he was drifting in the wooden box in the stream. And it is one of the longest scenes in the film. I do not know whether an animal put into such a stressful situation by a person, comes under the definition of ‘cruelty to the animal’.

As in the case of the Japanese and English versions of the film, the Hindi version,’Chatran’ (1988) has a ‘Sutradhaar’ (Narrator) and that function was superbly handled by Gulzar. At some places, he appears to have deviated from the original version. For example, in the beginning of the film, his narratives have unusual imageries which are not in the original Japanese version as well as in English version of the film:

Do bade bade sansaar hain ye, pariwaar hain ye.
Aakash aur dharti achche rishtedhaar hain ye.
Raat aakaash ki beti hai.
Kuchh kaali hai.
Aakaash ne gore chaand ki bindi de kar
isko chunmun karke taaron ke gahane pehanaayen hain.
Aur din aakaash ka beta hai.
Gora bhi hai magroor bhi hai.
Dharti par uski fazaa bhi hai.
Fazaa ke laakhon aur karodon chehare hain.
In cheharon se dharti par rounak rehti hai.
In sab mein zindagi behti hai.
In sab mein zindagi behti hai

The film has only one song of 4 stanzas, each stanza being played on 4 different occasion in the film. The last stanza is played with the montages of the film as credit titles roll. Asha Bhosle sings the words of Gulzar. The song is set to music by R D Burman.

With this song, ‘Chatran’ (1988) makes its debut in the Blog and also gets ‘yippied’ at the same time.

Video Clip(All the 4 parts)


Audio Clip(All the 4 parts)

Song-Zindagi zindagi zindagi (Chatran)(1988) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics

————————–
Part-1
————————–

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

khoobsoorat hai tu janm leti huyi
khoobsoorat hai tu janm deti huyi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

chhoo ke gujri hawa ke bahaane kabhi
aur shabnam mein utri nahaane kabhi
chhoo ke gujri hawa ke bahaane kabhi,
aur shabnam mein utri nahaane kabhi
ek mausum si gudgudi zindagi
zindagi

———————————-
Part-2
———————————-
na to dariya ruka na kinaara mila
door hota gaya jo sahaara mila
na to dariya ruka na kinaara mila
door hota gaya jo sahaara mila
dagmagaati huyi chal padi zindagi
dagmagati huyi chal padi zindagi
zindagi

————————————
Part-3
————————————-
dhoop chhaaon mein aisi buni zindagi
zindagi ne ye kaisi chuni zindagi
hans rahi thhi abhi ro padi zindagi
hans rahi thhi abhi ro padi zindagi
zindagi

————————————-
Part-4
————————————-
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

khoobsoorat hai tu janm leti huyi
khoobsoorat hai tu janm deti huyi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

pyaar hi pyaar hai kho gayi zindagi
ek se phir anek ho gayi zindagi
pyaar hi pyaar hai kho gayi zindagi
ek se phir anek ho gayi zindagi
ho gayi hai ye kitni badi zindagi
ho gayi hai ye kitni badi zindagi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4041 Post No. : 15166 Movie Count :

4166

‘Dil Se’ (1998) was produced by Mani Ratnam along with Ram Gopal Varma and Shekhar Kapoor and was directed by Mani Ratnam. The film was a part of Mani Ratnam’s trilogy of human relationship in the backdrop of politics and terrorism. In this series, his earlier two films were ‘Roja’ (1992) and ‘Bombay’ (1995).

The film’s main actors consisted of Shahrukh Khan who, on a reporting assignment to North-East India, falls in love with a mysterious girl (Manisha Koirala) who is a part of a terrorist group. As a result, she remains elusive to him. His love for her becomes his obsession. He searches for her, meets her during his many assignments but she gives him a slip on each occasion. Preity Zinta is another girl with whom Shahrukh Khan’s marriage has been fixed by his family.

At the end, Shahrukh Khan finds Manisha Koirala in Delhi but comes to know about her group’s plan of exploding explosives, carried in her vest, at the venue of gathering for the celebration of 50th Independent Day. He tries hard to persuade her to give up the terrorist activities and marry him. But it was too late for her. The bomb explodes accidentally and both die before she reaches the planned target.

The film had 6 songs which were written by Gulzar and were set to music by A R Rahman. None of the song has yet been represented on the Blog. The song ‘chhaiya chhaiya’ became the most popular song of the film. However, I have preferred to present ‘jiya jale jaan jale nainon tale dhuaan chale’ sung by Lata Mangeshkar. The reason is that I liked the idea of incorporating in the song, the Malayalam lyrics written by Girish Puthencheri and sung by M G Sreekumar and Chorus as interlude music. The other reason is that the song has been picturised in Kerala at Athirappilly Falls, Periyar Lake and Alappuzha backwaters among others – the places I had visited in 2008.

This was the first song Lata Mangeshkar sang under the music direction of A R Rahman. Generally, she does not visit outside Mumbai to record the song. But she made an exception by flying to Chennai to record the song in A R Rahman’s recording studio. The song was recorded in one take. However, it took about 10 days for Rahman to give a final shape to the song by improvising the background music and incorporating interludes in the song.

During this period, A R Rahman came with an idea to incorporate a short clip of Malayalam song as interludes in the song. He wanted Gulzar to translate the Malayalam lyrics into Hindi. To get an idea, he played the Malayalam song over the phone to Gulzar. After listening to the clip, Gulzar advised Rahman to retain the Malayalam lyrics in the clip for the song as it sounded beautiful in the background giving a feel of the atmosphere of Kerala. Rahman agreed with Gulzar’s suggestion. The song turned out to be an unique composition. (Note: The trivia are based on Gulzar’s interviews with Nasreen Munni Kabir in 2012).

From the lyrics as well as the picturization of the song, it would appear that the song conveys the imagination of the bride (Preity Zinta) about her wedding night. The eroticism in the lyrics is nicely camouflaged in imageries. Example:

masle phoolon ki mahak mein titliyon ki kyaariyaan
raat bhar bechaari mehndi pisti hai pairon tale

I got the Malayalam lyrics and the English translation thereof from a blog post of Maithily Menon on the internet. The beauty of Malayalam lyrics may have been diluted in English translation. The translation appears to me more a literal than the underlying deeper meaning envisaged by the lyricist. Corrections, if any, in Malayalam lyrics and the English translation, from readers knowing Malayalam are welcome.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Jiya jale jiya jale (dil Se)(1998) Singers-Lata Mangeshker, M G Sreekumar, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-A R Rahman
Hindi Chorus
Malayalam Chorus

Lyrics (Based on audio clip)

jiya jale jaan jale
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
punchiri thanu konchiko
munthiri mutham chinthiko
manchani varna chundari vaave
thanakinaka
thakadhimi aadum thankanilaave hoi
punchiri thanu konchiko
munthiri mutham chinthiko
manchani varna chundari vaave
thanakinaka
thakadhimi aadum thankani laave hoi

thanka kolusalle
kurukum kuyilalle
maaran mayilalley
thanga kolusalle
koorukum kuyilalle
maaran mayilalley

jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
raat bhar dhuaan chale
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
raat bhar dhuaan chale
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya jale
jaan jale

dekhte hain tan mera
mann mein chubhti hai nazar
dekhte hain tan mera
mann mein chubhti hai nazar
hontth sil jaate unke
narm honthon se magar
ginti rahti hoon main apni
karwaton ke silsile
kya karoon
kaise kahoon
raat kab kaise dhale
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
raat bhar dhuaan chale
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
raat bhar dhuaan chale
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya jale
jaan jale
kuruvanikiliye
kuruvanikiliye
kukuru koorukuru kooki kuruki
kunnimarathil uyal adi
kodum orikki kootu vilikunne
maran nine kooki kuruki kotu vilikunne
kukuru koorukuru kooki kuruki
kunnimarathil uyal adi
kodum orikki kootu villikunne
maran nine kooki kuruki kotu vilikunne

thanka kolusallae
kurukum kuyilallae
maaran mayilallae hoi
thanka kolusallae
kurukum kuyilallae
maaran mayilallae

ang ang mein jalti hai
dard ki chingaariyaan
masle phoolon ki mahak mein
titliyon ki kyaariyaan
raat bhar bechaari mehndi
pisti hai pairon tale
kya karoon
kaise kahoon
raat kab kaise dhale
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale
dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale

dhuaan chale
dhuaan chale
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya jale jaan jale
nainon tale dhuaan chale

(jiya……..aa jale….ae)
dhuaan chale
raat bhar dhuaan chale

(jiya………aa jale…ae)
jaanu na jaanu na jaanu na sakhi ri
jiya……..aa jale………ae jaan jale…ae
jiya jale

——————————————
Malayalam lyrics translated in English
——————————————
First Malayalam Stanza
————————————
Give me a smile and lisp
Of kisses as sweet as grapes
O sweet and beautiful girl
Dance in the golden light
Like the golden anklets
Like the cooing cuckoo
Like the dancing peacock.
——————————–
Second Malayalam Stanza
——————————–
O kuruvani bird
Making noise(like kukuru kurukuru)
Swinging on the kunni tree
Is calling you after making the nest
Your lover is calling you again and again
Dance in the golden light
Like the golden anklets
Like the cooing cuckoo
Like the dancing peacock


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4038 Post No. : 15163 Movie Count :

4166

Naseeruddin Shah, in a chat with a newspaper journalist sometime in early 2014, had revealed that there were about 35 Hindi which have been completed in all respect but remained unreleased till that day. If the numbers are correct, it could be some sort of a dubious record for a Hindi film actor. But I am not surprised. Naseeruddin Shah has been mostly associated with the ‘parallel’ and the ‘middle of the road cinemas. And for such types of films, it is very difficult to get distributors to release the films.

Out of curiosity, I searched for the list of Naseeruddin Shah’s unreleased films on the internet but drew a blank. I could trace out names of his few unreleased films which included one untitled film directed by Mrinal Sen some time in 1970s, ‘Musaafir’ (1986) ‘Libaas’ (1988) directed by Gulzar, ‘Time Machine’ (1992) directed by Shekhar Kapoor, ‘Eelctric Moon’ (1992, English), ‘101 Days (1992), ‘Private Detective : Two Plus Two Plus One’ (1997), ‘The Coffin Maker’ (2013) ‘Chambal Safari’ (2014), ‘Company Ustaad’ (2014), ‘Mastaan’ (2014), ‘Thaak Jhaank’ (2016) etc.

From the above list, I found the film ‘Musaafir’ (1986) an interesting one for more than one reason. First, the film was directed by Dr. Jabbar Patel, an imminent Marathi theatre and film personality known for producing and directing classic Marathi dramas and ‘middle of the road’ Marathi films. This was Dr. Jabbar Patel’s first association with Hindi film as a director. Second, the film’s star cast included Rekha besides Naseeruddin Shah, Moon Moon Sen, Mohan Agashe, Usha Nadkarni and Pankaj Kapoor. Lastly, the songs were written by Gulzar which were set to music by R D Burman.

The film was based on a Marathi play ‘Ashi Pakhre Yeti’ (Aise Aaten Hain Panchhi or Here Comes the Birds) written by Vijay Tendulkar who wrote the film’s screen-play. Gulzar wrote the dialogues. The film was certified by the Censor Board sometime in 1984 but it could not get a theatrical release.

I searched for the film on the net but could not locate the DVD of the full film. Finally, I located the film which has been uploaded on YT in parts. From the quality of the video, I guess, the uploader has uploaded the video clips of the film ripping off from VHS tape. I also noticed that some parts of the film got repeated in the clips. So it was difficult for me to know as to the proper sequence of the story in the film. With these limitations, I give below a gist of the story of the film:

The story of the film can broadly be divided into two parts. In the first part, the story revolves around Naseeruddin Shah and Moon Moon Sen who have recently married and have been staying in a posh locality in Mumbai. While Naseeruddin Shah is a reserved type of man, Moon Moon Sen is an extrovert and tomboyish. She likes to spend the free time with her male friends. Being a daughter of a wealthy parents and convent educated, she has been brought up in a liberal environment.

Naseeruddin Shah resents his wife’s association with her male friends. But he is unable to tell so to his wife. He feels that if they start a family, perhaps she will have more time to spend with him than with her male friends. But his wife is afraid of child birth because of her earlier trauma of mis-carriage. His resentment inside him about his wife’s behaviour get worsen day by day. He has now become so paranoid that he starts suspecting his wife having an affair with one of her male friends (Benjamin Gilani) and fears that one day she would leave him. With these kinds of paranoid thoughts, he kills his wife by poisoning her and gets her admitted to a hospital in an unconscious state. After few hours of her admission, she dies. The doctors and police are waiting for the post-mortem report. Naseeruddin Shah decides to run away.

The second part of the story starts in a village in Kerala where after wandering all over India, Naseeruddin Shah decides to settle in a village in Kerala. Impulsively, he visits a house of a middle class family and introduces himself as one of the past students of a local school where he had studied during his childhood and where the patriarch of the family was a teacher. He gets this idea to introduce himself from the photographs displayed in the varandah of the house. With this, a comfort level between the family consisting of father (Mohan Agashe), mother (Usha Nadkarni), daughter (Rekha) and son (Pankaj Kapoor) and himself have been established. The family allows him to stay with them for few days.

During his stays, Naseeruddin Shah comes to know that all four of them suffer from different problems arising from lack of confidence. With his wits and persuasion, he changes their lives to make them confident. In the meanwhile, the parents are scouting for a groom for their daughter (Rekha). She is presented to the prospective groom who has come to see her with his family. The groom’s family approves of her but she rejects the groom as she has fallen in love with Naseeruddin Shah who has taken shelter in her house.

Naseeruddin Shah tries to bring the rejected groom and the bride together to discuss as to the reason for her rejection of him. In this process, Naseeruddin Shah comes to know that the Rekha has developed a soft corner for him. He decides to leave the house without the knowledge of the family. But Rekha comes to know of his plans and confronts him as to why he leaving the village. Naseeruddin Shah gives many excuses but Rekha is not convinced. Finally, he reveals that he is a murderer and the police forces are looking for him. Rekha still thinks that he is lying just to justify his leaving the village. Knowing that he is determined to leave, she tells him that she would not now stop him for leaving the village.

Naseeruddin Shah returns to his apartment in Mumbai where he used to stay with his wife. He is overwhelmed with the nostalgia. While standing in front of a mirror in his bedroom watching his own reflection, images of his wife and Rekha come. The faster interchanges of images in the mirror of Moon Moon Sen and Rekha make him emotionally unstable. He commits suicide by a gun shot at his own head.

The film has three melodious songs of which I have chosen to present the song ‘thhak gaya hoon mujhe sone do’ sung by Kishore Kumar. This song is played as a background song which comes in the film at a crucial stage. Naseeruddin Shah is running away from Mumbai after killing his wife. The song symbolises the transition from his Mumbai story to the next story in a Kerala village to start his life afresh.

The song is also available in studio recording version with somewhat different orchestrations with an additional antara. I like this version more than the film’s sound track version for its orchestration. From the studio version, one can notice that before Kishore Kumar starts singing, there is a faint voice (probably of R D Burman) saying ‘1, 2, 1, 2, ‘start’. After the second antara of singing, Kishore Kumar makes a mistake by repeating the second antara. There is a faint voice saying ‘cut’ and he stops singing. Some instructions to Kishore Kumar, probably from R D Burman in faint voice can be heard after which R D Burman repeats his part of singing and Kishore Kumar takes over his singing of third antara. In the lyrics given below, I have omitted the repeat portion.

It is a melancholic song in keeping with the situation in the film. Gulzar saab’s lyrics are simple but conveys the depressing situation in his trade-mark style. The tune is melodious and the orchestration is good in the context of the song.

Audio (Studio recording version)

Video

Song-O bahut raat huyi (Musaafir)(1986)(UR) Singers-Kishore Kumar, R D Burman, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics(Based on the studio recording version)

o bahut raat huyi
thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi
o chaand se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
chaand se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

zindagi ke sabhi raaste sard hain
zindagi ke sabhi raaste sard hain
ajnabi raat ke ajnabi dard hain
yaad se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
yaad se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

aashiyaan ke liye chaar tinke bhi thhe
aasre raat ke aur din ke bhi thhe
dhoondhte thhe jise wo zara si zameen
aasmaan ke tale kho gayi hai kahin
dhoop se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
dhoop se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

o maloya….aa
chalo dheere dheere
o maloya….aa
chalo dheere dheere

yaad aata nahin ab koi naam se
yaad aata nahin ab koi naam se
sab gharon ke diye bujh gaye shaam se
waqt se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
waqt se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
(o maloya….aa)
main thhak gaya hoon
(chalo dheere dheere)
main thhak gaya hoon
(o maloya….aa)
mujhe sone do
(chalo dheere dheere)


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4036 Post No. : 15160

With the advent of social media platforms like Twitter, Instagram, Facebook etc, many celebrities including the film fraternity have been using them them to be in touch with their admirers and fans. But the very same platforms are used for cyber bullying, infringement of privacy, fake news and trolling.

Most of the celebrated public figures especially from sports and film industry have been trolled some time or the other, I find that Abhishek Bachchan is one of the most trolled among the Hindi film actors. In the initial stages, most of the trolling was about his acting caliber. He was even trolled for the box office failures of some of his later films for his ‘useless acting’ or ‘acting like a rock’ even though to my mind, he had acted better than his initial films.

In the recent period, his trolls have become personal to the extent that even his wife and daughter have not been spared. He has been mocked for staying with his parents. He has been questioned as to how he had financed his vacation abroad when he had not worked in the films for a long time. This was in the context of his 2-year sabbatical from the films to concentrate on his sports teams of kabbadi and football. Netizens have also trolled him that whatever films he got was because of his father. Some trolls have been directed towards him in a most uncivilized manner and in bad tastes, almost like short hate speeches.

There may be some psychological reasons as to why netizens troll the celebrities. In the case of Abhishek Bachchan, I think, the trolls mainly emanated from the people’s high expectations from him as an actor considering that he was the son of megastar Amitabh Bachchan and one of the finest actresses, Jaya Bahaduri. It was very unfortunate for him to be compared with his father for his acting when he commenced his career as an actor in 2000. In a way, he was competing with his father to find a slot for himself as a successful actor when his father continued to be in demand from the film producers.

It is quite possible that in the initial stages of his acting career, Abhishek Bachchan might have got the benefit of his father’s recommendation. But an actor cannot sustain his acting career for a long time on recommendations. If it was so, actors like Rajiv Kapoor, Kunal Kapoor, Kunal Goswami and some more would not have been dumped by Hindi film industry as actors. During his 18 years of filmy career, Abhishek Bachchan has acted in 54 films, most of them under big banners.

Abhishek Bachchan may not be as charismatic and crowd puller as compared with some of his counterparts and his father. But in my view, he is as good an actor as Khans, Hrithik Roshan and Akhshya Kumar. Among his films I had watched, he has done quite well in ‘Yuva” (2004), ‘Bunty Aur Babli’ (2005), ‘Guru’ (2007) and ‘Dostana’ (2008). I also liked him in ‘Raavan’(2010) based on the picturization of songs. He did the same mistake as Shashi Kapoor did in the 1970s – working in films with multi-stars. In this process, he diluted his image as a solo hero in the film.

‘Jhoom Baraabar Jhoom’ (2007) was one of those multi-starrer film in which beside himself, the main actors included Preity Zinta, Bobby Deol, Lara Dutta and Amitabh Bachchan in a guest role. The film flopped at the box office. When the film fails, it is the director who should get the blame as he failed to connect the film with the audience. But our netizens got one more opportunity to troll their favourite bait, Abhishek Bachchan.

Anyway, the redeeming part of the film is the excellent songs composed by music director, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. There are 4 songs of which one multi-version song has been covered in the Blog. Here is the second song from the film – my favourite ‘dhaage tod laao chaandni se noor ke’ rendered by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Mahalakshmi Iyer. Gulzar saab’s unusual imageries are evident in the mukhda of the song.

It is a romantic song from the film of the new millennium with a soul of the golden period of Hindi film music.

Video Clip :

Audio Clip:

Song-Dhaage tod laao chaandni se noor ke (Jhoom Baraabar Jhoom)(2007) Singers-Rahat Fateh Ali Khan, Mahalakshmi Iyer, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Shankar Ehsan Loy
Both,
metallic sound

Lyrics

dhaage tod laao chaandni se noor ke
ghoonghat hi bana lo raushni se noor ke
ho o o o
dhaage tod laao chaandni se noor ke
ghoonghat hi bana lo raushni se noor ke
sharma gayi to
aagosh mein lo
ho saanson se uljhi
rahe meri saansein

bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke
bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke

aa neend kaa sauda karein
ik khwaab den ik khwaab n
ek khwaab to aankhon mein hai
ek chaand ke takiye tale

kitne dino se
yeh aasmaan bhi
soya nahin hai
isko sula den
bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke

bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke

ma pa ni sa ga ma re
ga ma re
pa ni pa da
ga ma ga pa

re ga re ga re ga re ga …….re ga
sa re re sa re re …………….
ni sa ni sa sa sa ………
pa……..da………ma……..pa

umrein lagi kehte huye
do lafz thhe ek baat thhi
woh ek din sau saal ka
sau saal ki wo raat thhin

kaise lage jo chupchaap dono
o pal pal mein poori
sadiyan beeta dein

bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
honth se halke

o dhaage tod laao chaandni se noor ke
o o o
ghoonghat hi bana lo raushni se noor ke

sharma gai to
aagosh mein lo
ho saanson se uljhi
rahi meri saansein
bol na halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke
bol na
halke halke
bol na halke halke
hontth se halke halke
bol na halke


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4033 Post No. : 15156 Movie Count :

4161

In my last article, I had discussed Nagesh Kukunoor, a NRI and a Chemical Engineer from USA, who left his lucrative job there to become a film-maker. Somnath Sen was another NRI who, after working as a Software Engineer in the U.S., decided to become a film-maker. Armed with a Master’s in film-making from the University of Southern California, he returned to India to begin his passion for film making.

Initially based in Delhi, Somnath Sen started his work in the visual media with television serials. Later, he moved to Mumbai, where he began his apprenticeship in the various fields of film-making viz, direction, screen-play, cinematography, production-coordinator etc by associating himself with films like ‘Rangeela’ (1995), ‘Raja Hindustani’ (1996), ‘Judwaa’(1997), ‘Kachche Dhaage’ (1999), and ‘Jaanam Samjha Karo’ (1999). He was also associated with documentaries, music videos, corporate films and commercials. In around 2000, Somnath Sen moved back to Los Angeles and became the Creative Head of Lemon Tree Films, a Hollywood film banner floated by two American-Indians who were in the entertainment business.

‘Leela’ (2002) was Lemon Tree Films’ first full length feature film in English which was produced in Hollywood and directed by Somnath Sen. I was neither aware of this film nor was I aware of songs in it. It was only when I was browsing through the filmography of Gulzar saab I came across this film. Luckily, the DVD of the full film is available on the internet. I watched the film and came to know that it was a Hollywood film in English, shot mostly in around Los Angeles with most of the American crew.

The film in DVD is about 100 minutes’ duration. Some of the dialogues are muted probably on the suggestions of CBFC. There are three old Hindi film songs – one each from ‘Junglee’, ‘Jaanwar’ and Kohra’ played in the films (got the names from the credit titles) during some occasions but these are also muted either partly or fully probably on copyright issues.

The theme of the film is broadly the same as that of Nagesh Kukunoor’s ‘Hyderabad Blues’ (1998). However, there is subtle difference in the sense that while ‘Hyderabad Blues’ (1998) highlights the identity crisis faced by a returning NRI in India, ‘Leela’ (2002) is about the identity crisis experienced by an American-Indian teenage son of a NRI couple settled in the USA and a visiting professor from India to the USA. The film also portrays as to how the rules of moral conduct in India get diluted once NRIs spend long period of stay in the USA yet they remain engraved to some extent in them.

The story of ‘Leela’ (2002) revolves around two couples – one the Mumbai-based and the other the Los Angeles based. Leela (Dimple Kapadia) is a professor at the University of Bombay. Her husband, Nashaad (Vinod Khanna) is a poet-singer. Leela is not happy with marital life as her husband is a womaniser. However, separation from her husband is not in her mind as she still loves him.

The film starts with a funeral of Leela’s mother shot in Madh Island (This, with Leela travelling to Mumbai airport are the only scene from the film shot in India). Leela is depressed because of her mother’s death. Additionally, she also feels that she has lost her identity to her husband as she is more known as the wife of the poet Nashaad than a professor. She gets a timely offer from University of Southern California as a visiting professor on the subject of heritage of South Asian countries in a college. She accepts the offer and departs to her new abode to find her own space leaving her husband behind.

Once in the U.S., Leela meets Krishna who is known as Kris (Amol Mhatre, an American-Indian actor) among his friends. He is one of the students in her class. This 18-year boy comes from a broken family and is torn between two cultures, as he was born in the States to parents who immigrated from India. He has been brought up by single mother, Chaitali (Deepti Naval) a divorcee whose ex-husband, Jai (Gulshan Grover) stays with his American girl friend. When Leela befriends Kris’s mother, Chaitali, another professor in the same college, Leela comes to realise that there is much that she can learn about herself from Chaitali. She finds herself exploring the real meaning of freedom.

After some initial hesitation, Kris becomes close to Leela. He starts visiting Leela’s house to learnt more about Indian heritage. He also gets to know about Hindustani classical music and learns to play Sarod. Over a period of time, Kris’s constant meeting with Leela turns into his infatuation of her. Leela discovers herself in a way that would not have fit in the Indian moral code. She starts spending time with Kris. Despite the age difference, it is a meaningful relationship for the two – Leela looking for freedom and Kris getting to know about his Indian heritage.

The story takes a dramatic turn when Kris comes to know that her mother has an affair with an American man. It was a great shock to him. He leaves the house and his father arranges for him a separate house to stay. Around the same time, Leela on a telephonic talk with Nashaad, comes to know that he has a woman in his house. In a fit of anger, she bangs the telephone and remove the cord as she is in no mood to listen to Nashaad’s excuses. At this point, Kris visits Leela’s house and finds her in very bad mood. Both Kris and Leela are emotionally at the venerable situations. Both need each other for solace. At this juncture, both finds in each other’s arms and inevitable happens.

This incidence stains the relationship between Leela and Chaitali. She develops contempt for Leela. In the meanwhile, Nashaad who is worried about the strange behaviour of Leela, decides to accept an offer for his concert tour in the USA. He visits Leela’s house who shares her guilt with Nashaad of her ‘one-night stand’ with Kris. Nashaad is not perturbed by this news. On the contrary, he consoles Leela and at the same time chats with Kris. They became friends. In one of Nashaad’s private concerts, Kris even plays guitar as accompanying musician. After the end of his concert tour, Leela decides to return to India with Nashaad. The film ends with Kris at the departure gate of Los Angeles airport giving his cap to Nashaad as a memento. In return, Nashaad puts his folded shawl on the shoulder of Kris.

As told by director, Somnath Sen in one of his interviews, ‘Leela’ (2002) is a Hollywood film with a soul of a Bollywood. The elements of Bollywood are represented by Hindi songs of different genres – classical, Gujarati garba, Punjabi folk, ghazals and light music. More importantly, the film has a happy ending.

The film was a box office disaster. As per the Box Office India report, the film was made at a total cost of around Rs.2.25 crore. But world-wide, the film could garner about half of the cost of the film. The film was critically acclaimed in the US reviews but Indian reviews were not kind to the film.

The highlight of the film is the brilliant music given by Jagjit Singh (5 songs) and Shantanu Moitra (2 songs). I am presenting one of the songs ‘khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain’ which is a ghazal composed and sung by Jagjit Singh. The ghazal is written by Gulzar. All the she’rs of the ghazal sum up the relationship between Nashaad and Leela.

A video clip of the song made from short clips of the various scenes from the film is available on the internet, I feel that this is not the original video clip because I have seen these scenes in the film in the different context. My gut feeling says that this song was picturized on Nashaad (Vinod Khanna) during a get together with his fans in the USA. There is a scene in the film of get-together in which Nashaad’s fans request him to sing a ghazal. But the next scene jumps to Leela’s house. Probably, this song must have been deleted from film’s DVD which was released in 2006.

This lovely ghazal of Gulzar in the silken voice of Jagjit Singh fits very well to what English poet P B Shelly had said – ‘our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought’.

Video Clip :

Audio Clip :

Song-Khumaar e gham hai mahakti fizaa mein jeete hain(Leela)(2002) Singer-Jagjit singh, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Jagjit Singh

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain

bade ittefaaq se milte hain milne waale mujhe
bade ittefaaq se milte hain milne waale mujhe
wo mere dost hain teri wafa mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain

firaaq-e-yaar mein saanson ko roke rakhte hain
firaaq-e-yaar mein saanson ko roke rakhte hain
har ek lamha guzarti qaza mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain

na baat poori huyi thhi ke raat toot gayi
na baat poori huyi thhi ke raat toot gayi
adhoore khwaab ki aadhi saza mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain

tumhaari baaton mein koi maseeha basta hai
tumhaari baaton mein koi maseeha basta hai
haseen labon se barasti shaba mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain
khumaar-e-gham hai mahekti fiza mein jeete hain
tere khayaal ki aab-o-hawa mein jeete hain


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15221

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1178
Total Number of movies covered =4183

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