Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4451 Post No. : 15912

ik arz meri maan lo daftar ko jaana hai
mangal ka din hai aaj koi itwaar nahin hai

These two lines in the song “kyun garm sard hote ho takraar nahin hai” from ‘Chokori’ (1949) sung by Mohammed Rafi has made me to present this song which was not available on-line until SAREGAMA uploaded the audio clip of this rare song on one of the video sharing platforms in early 2019.

‘Chakori’ (1949) was the first film of Ravindra Dave as a producer which he produced under the banner of Ramesh Pictures. The film was directed by his younger brother, Ram Narayan Dave. The star cast included Nalini Jaywant, Bharat Bhushan, Manorama, Om Prakash, Randhir, Narbada Shankar, Uma Dutt, Cuckoo etc. The story, screen-play, dialogues and songs were written by Mulkraj Bhakri.

Ravindra Dave was the son of Karachi-based Seth Ratilal Dave who had a flourishing business of film distribution for North Indian territories under the name, Empire Talkie Distributors. This was the first film distribution company which undertook to distribute India’s first talkie ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) in Northern India. He joined his father’s film distribution company and helped his father in procuring distributions rights of films produced in Mumbai.

Dalsukh Pancholi was the uncle of Ravindra Dave who was already in film production and the owner of Pancholi Studio in Lahore. Ravindra Dave became the Production Manager in Pancholi Films. He got his first assignment as a director in Pancholi’s ‘Poonji’ (1943) along with Vishnu Pancholi. With his talent firmly established in film making, Pancholi gave him the assignment of writing the script for ‘Dhamki’ (1943) and directing it.

When Ravindra Dave was directing Pancholi’s next film, ‘Patjhad’ (1948), the partition happened and the communal riots that broke out in Lahore made him and Pancholis to come to Bombay with the completed reels of the film which was later released in 1948 after completion of the film in Mumbai. For both Pancholis and Ravindra Dave, it was like starting their filmy career afresh. Ravindra Dave directed about 30 Hindi films during 1943-69. Later, he shifted to Gujarati films producing and directing around 20 films until 1985.

Mulkhraj Bhakri, the story, screen-play, dialogue and song writer of ‘Chakori’ (1949) was born in Gujranwala in Punjab (now in Pakistan). His father, Moolchand Bhakri was the store-keeper in Indian Army Service Corps (IASC) at Pathankot. He went to school in Lyallpur (now Faisalabad in Pakistan). After completion of his Matriculation examination in 1931, he was keen to join the film industry.

Mulkraj Bhakri started his career as Cinema Manager. It took him a long time to get his first break in the film ‘Arsi’ (1947) as story and dialogue writer. After the success of the film, Mukraj Bhakri got two films – ‘Barsaat Ki Ek Raat’ (1948) and ‘Papiha Re’ (1948) for which he wrote story, dialogues, screen play and lyrics. Both these films were being produced in Lahore studios. Unfortunately, both the films became the victims of partition and were temporarily abandoned. These films were later released in some parts of India.

Mukraj Bhakri came to Bombay (Mumbai) after the partition along with his brothers, Lekhraj Bhakri, Deshraj Bhakri and Rajkumar Bhakri who were all associated with Hindi films. Mulkraj Bhakri became the rallying point for displaced film artists and technicians from Lahore. Bhakri who was the ‘de facto’ producer of the film ‘Chunariya’ (1948) gave Ravindra Dave his first assignment in post-partition India to direct the film. Next, Ravindra Dave got Prakash Pictures’ ‘Saawan Baadhon’ (1949) to direct. He also directed his uncle Pancholi’s first film in post-independent India – ‘Meena Baazar’ (1950).

Note: The profiles of Ravindra Dave and Mulkraj Bhakri up to 1949 are based on articles written by character actor, Janki Dass in film magazine ‘Sound’ – May 1949 and July 1949 issues, respectively.

So far, 7 songs (out of 11 songs) of ‘Chakori’ (1949) have been covered in the Blog. The song under presentation is the 8th song from the film to appear on the Blog. Song is written by Mulkraj Bhakri which is set to music by Hansraj Bahl.

In Hindi film songs, I had not come across the Urdu word ‘dehleez’ (threshold; may be चौखट in Hindi) until Gulzar saab used it in mudke na dekho dilbaro in ‘Raazi’ (2018). I was pleasantly surprised to note that Mulkraj Bhkari had used the word ‘dahleez’ in the song under presentation as early as 1949. Interestingly, Gulzar saab has also used the Hindi equivalent word ‘Chaukhat’ in the song, chhod aaye ham wo galiyaan in the film ‘Maachis’ (1996).

Enjoy the ‘wooing and pleading with the beloved’ song.

Audio Clip:

Song-Kyun garm sard hote ho takraar nahin hai(Chakori)(1949) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Mulkraj Bhakri, MD-Hansraj Bahl

Lyrics

kyun garm sard hote ho
takraar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai
kyun garm sard hote ho
takraar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai

baitha hoon main dehleez pe ghutnon ko thhaam ke
aji ghutnon ko thhaam ke
baitha hoon main dehleez pe ghutnon ko thhaam ke
aji ghutnon ko thhaam ke
main khali jaaun
achcha ye sarkaar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai

ye sochta hoon roz tujhe sair karaaun
tujhe main sair karaaun
ye sochta hoon roz tujhe sair karaaun
tujhe main sair karaaun
magar kya karoon
bekaar hoon saahib
mere paas car nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai

ik arz meri maan lo
daftar ko jaana hai
aji daftar ko jaana hai
ik arz meri maan lo
daftar ko jaana hai
ho maine daftar jaana hai
mangal ka din hai
aaj koi itwaar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai

teri judaai mein mujhe kyun aayen siskiyaan
haay
aayen siskiyaan
teri judaai mein mujhe kyun aayen siskiyaan
mujhe kyun aayen siskiyaan
achha bhala to hoon
koi bhukhaar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai
kyun garm sard hote ho takraar nahin hai
dil lena hai to le lo
dil lena hai to le lo
inkaar nahin hai


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4448 Post No. : 15902

Dancing has been an integral part of Indian cinema even during the era of silent films. In most of the silent films, dancing was mostly confined to courtesans which the society saw it in a negative way. It was only after sound films came in 1931, the film makers started looking for actors who could also sing and dance. So, multi-tasking was the buzz word for the main actors during the early period of sound films. Some actors like Mumtaz Ali, Sunita Devi, Shahzaadi etc were known for their dancing skills though they also acted in supporting roles. Even some lead actors like Molina Devi of New Theatres (remember her dance in ‘Kaarwaan-e-Hayat’, 1935), Radha Rani of Bombay, Mumtaz Shanti and even Leela Chitnis in the film ‘Kanchan’ (1941) were required to dance as part of their roles. By the start of 1940, Sadhana Bose from Bengal joined Hindi films as a classical dancer in the lead/supporting roles.

A few trained dancers like Sitara Devi and Auzurie joined the Hindi film industry by the middle of 1930s. While Sitara Devi was trained both in Hindustani classical and western dances, Auzurie was trained in folk and western dances. Unfortunately, many of their films of 1930s with dances are not available for viewing. While Sitara Devi graduated to heroine and side heroine’s roles in the 1940s, Auzurie continued to work in the films mainly as a dancer.

The success of Sitara Devi and Auzurie in Hindi films seems to have prompted the film makers to have dance song numbers in most of the Hindi films in mid-40s onward. This gave the more scope for trained dancers to join Hindi films. One of the prominent dancers to join Hindi films was Cuckoo in mid-40s. She set a trend in Hindi films by her dance numbers to have at least one dance sequence in most of the Hindi films in the second half of the 1940s and thereafter. The important of her dance numbers in Hindi films can be gauged by the fact that during 1944-50, she danced in as many as 74 films.

With Cuckoo’s popularity as a dancer, some more prominent dancers joined Hindi films like Kumkum in 1947, Mohana Cabral in 1948, Roopmala in 1949, Sheila Vaz, Helen and Padmini, all in 1951. By the middle of 1950s, Hindi film makers had a good number of dancers to choose. One of the dancers who joined Hindi films in the second half of 1950s was Minu Mumtaz. Based on the book, ‘Mehmood – A Man of Many Moods’ (2005) by Hanif Zaveri and ‘The Incredibly Beautiful Minoo Mumtaz’ in YouTube Channel, ‘Tabassum Talkies’, I have attempted a short write-up covering the life story of Minu Mumtaz below:

Minu Mumtaz (real name: Malikunnisa Ali) was born on April 26, 1942 in Mumbai. She was one of the eight siblings of Mumtaz Ali, the popular dancer, singer and supporting actor of the Bombay Talkies in the 1930s and 40s. Mehmood, the comedian was her elder brother and the actor Anwar Ali was her youngest brother.

The family which was enjoying from the money and fame of Mumtaz Ali in the 40s, drifted to poverty due to his excessive drinking. He lost all money, houses, cars and even household items just to satisfy his addiction to drinking. With this, the responsibility of looking after a large family fell on Mehmood, being the eldest son. But he was not getting enough money from his odd jobs to look after a large family. It was Minu Mumtaz who thought of working in the films. She had learnt dance from her father and used to perform dances in her father’s dance troupe, ‘Mumtaz Ali Nites’. But her mother was against any one working in the films as she felt that it was the films which made her husband, Mumtaz Ali the victim of drinking habit.

But the financial condition in the family had become extremely precarious. A time came when it was difficult to manage even two-time meals. One day Minu Mumtaz along with her elder sister, Khairunnisa met Nanubhai Vakil for work in his film who was directing ‘Sakhi Hatim’ (1955. When he came to know that she was the daughter of Mumtaz Ali, he gave her a small role in the film. This was the beginning of her filmy career. She got more films with her dance numbers. With her song in ‘CID’ (1956), she got recognition as a good dancer. Thereafter, there was no looking back for Minu Mumtaz as she got many films, enhancing her status from a dancer to character actors, side roles with the heroines and in a few films even as a heroine.

During the shooting of her film ‘Bandhan’ (1956), Meena Kumari, who had become the sister-in-law of Mehmood, having married her younger sister, Madhu in 1952, gave Malikannisa the screen name ‘Meenu’ to rhyme with Meena. Because of the efforts of Minu Mumtaz, the family got to live in a comfortable position. Mehmood used to say that Minu Mumtaz is not her younger sister but she is like an elder brother to him. Of course, after his box office hit film, ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1959), Mehmood’s luck also turned for the better in his filmy career to become a star comedian and later the producer and the director.

Minu Mumtaz married S. A. Akbar in 1963 who had directed Mehmood’s ‘Chhote Nawab’ (1961). The family first shifted to Kuwait and thereafter moved to Canada where she resides now.

I have gone through Minu Mumtaz’s filmography as well as songs picturised on her which throws some interesting information. During her active years of filmy career, Minu Mumtaz worked in around 75+ films. Almost equal numbers of songs have been picturised on her. In some films, she had more than one song to her credit. She was in the lead roles in ‘Black Cat’ (1959) and ‘Ghar Ghar Ki Baat’ (1959).

Johny Walker was like a member of the entire Mumtaz Ali family and he was consulted on important family matters. The marriage of Mehmood with Madhu was decided fixed in Johny Walker’s house. I feel that Johny Walker has been instrumental in pushing up her filmy career at least in the initial stages. This is borne out by the fact that Minu Mumtaz worked with Johny Walker in as many as 23 films of which in most of these films, she paired with him. Her brother, Mehmood had worked with her in 14 films of which 9 films pertain to the years when Mehmood had not firmly established in Hindi film industry.

As I said earlier, around 75 songs have been picturised on Minu Mumtaz. Our Blog has covered as many as 69 songs. I have given below links of a few of her popular songs for ready reference:

main hoon Johny badaa toofaani – ‘Maai Baap’ (1957)

boojh mera kya naam re – ‘C.I.D.’ (1956)

aji chale aao aji chale aao – ‘Halaaku’ (1956)

meri jaan meri jaan pyaar kisi se – ‘Yahudi’ (1958)

sitaare raah takte hain – ‘Black Cat’ (1959)

jaanu jaanu re chhupke kaun aaya – ‘Insaan Jaag Utha’ (1959)

saaqiyaa aaj mujhe neend nahin aayegi – ‘Sahib Biwi Aur Ghulam’ (1962)

thodi der ke liye mere ho jaao – ‘Akeli Mat Jaiyyo’ (1963)

On the basis of the listing of Minu Mumtaz songs on the Blog as well as the video clips of her songs available on the video sharing platforms, I have been able to identify six songs picturised on Minu Mumtaz for which video clips are available and are yet to be covered in the Blog. I present one of those six songs from the film ‘Jagga Daaku’ (1959). The song is ‘teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re’ sung by Geeta Dutt. Obviously, the song is picurised as a dance by Minu Mumtaz. Jairaj is present in the entire duration of the song. The song is written by B D Mishra which is set to music by S N Tripathi.

Unfortunately, the picture as well as audio qualities of the song on video clip are not good. At two places, there are breaks in the song. So, I have based the lyrics on the audio clip which has a better-quality audio.

As happened with me when I heard the song, I am sure that most of the senior visitors to the Blog would recall that they had heard this song long back but did not relate to the film.

This is the second song to appear in the Blog out of 6 songs in ‘Jagga Daaku’ (1959).

Audio Clip:

Video Clip:


Song-Teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re (Jagga Daaku)(1959) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-B D Mishra, MD-S N Tripathi

Lyrics

teri kasam
teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re
teri mohabbat ne bekraar kiya re
bekraar kiya re
haay
teri kasam

tu jo muskuraaya
tu jo muskuraaya
halka sa nasha chhaaya
madhosh hoke maine tujh pe apna dil lutaaya
tu jo muskuraaya
halka sa nasha chhaaya
madhosh hoke maine tujh pe apna dil lutaaya
tujh pe apna dil lutaaya
haay
teri kasam
teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re
teri mohabbat ne bekaraar kiya re
bekaraar kiya re
haay
teri kasam

pyaar pehla pehla
pyaar pehla pehla
ikraar pehla pehla
ye pehli pehli haar ka izhaar pehla pehla
pyaar pehla pehla
ikraar pehla pehla
ye pehli pehli haar ka
izhaar pehla pehla
izhaar pehla pehla
haay
teri kasam
teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re
teri mohabbat ne bekaraar kiya re
bekaraar kiya re
haay
teri kasam

naaz mera tu hai
naaz mera tu hai
andaaz mera tu hai
tu raaz zindagi hai
mere dil ki aarzoo hai
naaz mera tu hai
andaaz mera tu hai
tu raaz zindagi hai
mere dil ki aarzoo hai
mere dil ki aarzoo hai
haay
teri kasam
teri kasam tujhko sanam pyaar kiya re
teri mohabbat ne bekaraar kiya re
bekaraar kiya re
haay
teri kasam


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4443 Post No. : 15891

In my last post on the Blog, I had written about Mohana Cabral, the dancer who had ruled Hindi film industry during 1949-55. After writing this post, I thought that I should do, more or less, a similar exercise on another well- known dancer who was one of the much sought-after dancers during 1955-60, now almost forgotten. She had worked in the films of big banners like R.K. Films, Navketan Films Guru Dutt Films, Filmistan etc. The dancer is Sheila Vaz. And what a coincidence! Both Mohana and Sheila Vaz had Goan background. When Mohana ‘vacated her seat’ from Hindi films in 1955, Sheila Vaz stepped in to fill the vacant seat in 1955.

While Mohana came from theatre background and became dancer in Hindi films, Sheila Vaz came from a dancing background having learnt dancing, especially folk dancing during her teenage days in Mumbai. But unlike Mohana, Sheila Vaz had tough competitions from reigning dancers like Cuckoo, Roopmala and the emerging dancers like Helen, Kumkum, Minoo Mumtaz etc. But Sheila Vaz created a niche for herself among her contemporary dancers in Hindi films. Like Mohana who bid adieu to Hindi films in 1955 after her marriage, Sheila Vaz too left Hindi films in 1960 after her marriage and remained in Mumbai as a housewife keeping aloof from the Hindi film industry.

I could not get much information about Sheila Vaz on the internet or articles in the newspapers/film magazines as to her background, upbringing and as to how she got associated with Hindi films. Some bare information about Sheila was available in an article ‘Dances with Sheila’ written by Karan Bali which appeared in upperstall.com. The article was based on an interview of Sheila Vaz conducted by him in 2009. Since he had interviewed her for his project on the golden age of Hindi cinema, he shared only some background information and her dance songs in the article.

Sheila Vaz’s family hailed from Goa. She was born on October 18, 1934 in Dadar, Mumbai. Her schooling was completed in Mumbai. Simultaneously, she learnt dances especially Indian folk dances. Initially, she had to face some resistance from the family who were against her joining films but eventually she got permission to dance in Hindi films. She began her filmy career with Kishore Sahu’s ‘Mayur Pankh’ (1954) as dancer though Kidar Sharma’s ‘Gunaah’ (1953) was released first. [According to me, she seems to have acted as a chorus dancer in Kidar Sharma’s ‘Shokhiyaan’ (1951) followed by a full-pledged dancer in ‘Maa’ (1952)]. In the interview, Sheila Vaz had said that she was extremely fortunate enough to have worked with legends like Kidar Sharma, Raj Kapoor and Guru Dutt. Her active years in Hindi film industry was during 1955-60. She got married sometime in 1960 after which she quit her filmy career. After marriage, she became Rama Lakhanpal.

Since Sheila Vaz could neither read or understand Hindi, she was given the songs in Roman script and explained their meaning so that she would know what expressions to give. One of many interesting anecdotes revealed during the interview was the shooting of the song ‘leke pehla pehla pyaar’ from CID, which was choreographed by Zohra Sehgal. The song was shot at Worli Sea face and was completed in two days.

I have been working on the filmography of Sheila Vaz and on the songs picturised on her in Hindi films. But I found collating her filmography somewhat a hard task. The reasons were that in some films, she was not accredited. And if accredited, her name appeared as ‘Sheila Vaz’, ‘Sheela Vaz’. ‘Shela Vaz’, ‘Shila Vaz’ or simply ‘Sheela’. In this context, Sudhir ji helped me by sending a list of her films by culling out information from HFGK which has listed 61 films between 1955 to 1961. I compared the HFGK list with my list which I had compiled from checking on the internet with different spellings of Sheila Vaz and also from our Blog which has tagged her songs under the category ‘Sheila Vaz Dance Songs’. With these, my revised list merging with HFGK list provided by Sudhir ji came to a whooping 70 films in about 6 years of her Hindi film career.

Year-wise details of Sheila Vaz’s 70 films are as under:

1952 (1): Maa

1954 (1): Mayur Pankh

1955 (4): House No.44, Sardaar, Shree 420, Tees Maar Khan.

1956 (8): Anokha Jungle, Basre Ki Hoor, CID, Durgesh Nandini, Jallad, Kaarwaan. Patraani, Shatranj.

1957 (23): Abhimaan, Agra Road, Bade Sarkaar, Bansari Bala, Begunaah, Ek Saal, Hill Station, Johny Walker, Maya Nagri, Mirza Sahibaan, Miss India, Mr. X, Nausehrwaan-e-Adil, Pawan Putra Hanuman, Ram Hanuman Yudha, Sant Raghu, Sati Pareeksha, Shaahi Baazar, Sharada, Silver King, Tumsa Nahi Dekha, Ustaad, Yahudi Ki Ladki.

1958 (9):Chaubees Ghante, Hathkadi, Light House, Mr. Qartoon MA, Paravrish, Raj Sinhaasan, Sawera, Solva Saal, Taqdeer.

1959 (11): Bus Conductor, Chaand, Chhoti Bahen, Guesh House, Jagga Daaku, Jaagir, Kaagaz Ke Phool, Madaari, Madhu, Naya Sansaar, Samraat Prithviraj Chauhan.

1960 (8): Bade Ghar Ki Bahu, Bahaana, Duniya Jhukti Hai, Kala Aadmi, Laal Quila, Manzil, Miyan Biwi Razi, Superman.

1961 (5): Batwaara, Chhote Nawab, Modern Girl, Ramlila, Ramu Dada.

Our Blog have listed 33 songs picturised on Sheila Vaz under the category Sheila Vaz dance songs for which video clips are available to watch. There would have been more of her dance songs if the VCDs/DVDs of her other films were available on video sharing platforms. I have listed some of her popular dance songs with links below:

sach keh den gar bura na maano – ‘Maa’ (1952)

tandaana tandaana tandaana – ‘Mayur Pankh’ (1954)

ramaiyya vastavaiyya – ‘Shree 420’ (1955)

leke pahla pahla pyaar – ‘CID’ (1956)

thandi thandi hawa pooche unka pataa – ‘Johny Walker’ (1957)

jaane kaisa jaadoo kiya re – ‘Parvarish’ (1958)

akeli mujhe chhod na jaana – Madaari’ (1959)

suna hai jab se mausam hai pyaar ke kaabil – ‘Ramu Dada’ (1960)

With 70 films to her credit in a short filmy career of 6 years, Sheila Vaz was in great demand for her dance songs. I have watched almost all of her dance songs for which video clips are available. One thing comes out clearly from her dance songs is that she has an electrifying presence in almost all her dance songs. For example, in dil ka haal sune dilwaala, though Sheila Vaz presence in the song is less than one minute out of 5 minutes of song, when she dances with Raj Kapoor, the attention of the audience would be more on her rather than on Raj Kapoor. Similarly, in the song, thandi thandi hawa pooche unka pataa, in my view, Sheila Vaz outperformed Shyama. When the old timers listen to the songs like leke pahla pahla pyaar, they are likely to remember more of Sheila Vaz though Dev Anand and Shakila were also present in the song sequence.

On the basis of my searches, I think only 3 dance songs of Sheila Vaz for which video clips are available are remained to be covered in the Blog. Of the three songs, I present one of her dance songs, ‘sasuraal mein hogi tu akeli’ from the film, ‘Mirza Saahibaan’ (1957). The song is sung by Shamshad Begum and picturised on Sheila Vaz. The song is written by Verma Malik which is set to music by Sardul Singh Kwatra. The audio clip has a shorter version of the song without the second stanza of the video clip.

This song ia probably based on a Punjabi traditional pre-wedding song. And what a guidance to the ‘would be bride’ from her friends!

ban jayiyo na saas ki cheli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

Enjoy the dance song.

Video Clip (Longer)

Audio Clip:

Song-Sasuraal mein hogi tu akeli (Mirza Saahibaan)(1957) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Verma Malik, MD-Sardul Kwatra
Chorus

Lyrics(Based on Video Clip)

akadi to akadi leke aaya kakdi
gupchup khaane laga saari
Razia Saeeda aur Fatima ko chhod kar
aayi hai Julekha sarkaari

sasuraal mein tu hogi akeli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
sasuraal mein tu hogi akeli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

ban jayiyo na
ho ban jayiyo na saas ki cheli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

har raat nayi
har baat nayi
har raat nayi ji har baat nayi
ik baat mein sau sau baat nayi ji
ik baat mein sau sau baat nayi
wo raat bhi hogi paheli
haay
wo raat bhi hogi paheli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

dildaar mila
tujhe pyaar mila
dildaar mila ji tujhe pyaar mila
gharbaar mila sansaar mila ji
gharbaar mila sansaar mila
mili balam ki oonchi haveli
haay mili balam ki oonchi haveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

phoolon mein pali
naazuk si kali
phoolon mein pali naazuk si kali
lekar khushiyaan ban thhan ke chali ji
lekar khushiyaan ban thhan ke chali
maa baap ko chhod akeli
haay maa baap ko chhod akeli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo

ban jayiyo na saas ki cheli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo
teri ulfat hai nayi naveli
saheli zara dat ke rahiyo


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4438 Post No. : 15879

Some years back, I recall having seen for the first time on the internet the photo features of Hindi film stars such as Madhubala, Nalini Jaywant and Begum Para in ‘Life’ magazine. These photographs were taken by the magazine’s well known photographer, James Burke in 1951 who was posted in India.  From the standard of 1951, these photographs would have ranked as bold. But one more actress also featured in that magazine – the featured photos were bolder than those of the stars I mentioned earlier. Subsequently, I had also seen her images appearing in ‘Filmindia’ magazines of 1948 and 1949. The actress in the photoshoot of 1951 was Mohana Cabral.

Today, September 11th is the 30th Remembrance Day of Mohana Cabral who died of heart attack this day of the year 1990 in France where she had been staying with her husband and daughter since 1986.

Mohana Cabral (03/02/1929 – 11/09/1990) whose real name was Mona Cabral, was born in Socorro in Bardez taluqa of North Goa in Konkani speaking Christian family. In early 1930s, the family shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) when her father changed his job to Bombay-based Hindustan Construction Company. Mohana did her initial schooling at Victoria High School in Mahim. Later. she was put in a boarding school in Pune where she completed her high school.  In Pune, she joined as a telephone operator in a telephone company. It is through connecting the long distance telephone calls that Mohana got acquainted with some of the film stars of that time including Nargis, Begum Para and Pratima Dasgupta.

Mohana got introduced to Kishore Sahu who offered her a role in his film ‘Saawan Aaya Re’ (1949) which was her debut film though ‘Aag’ (1948) was released first without her name being accredited in the film.  Kishore Sahu changed her name from Mona to screen name, Mohana which got attached with her during the rest of her life not only in films but also in the Konkani plays and singing career.

Sometime in 1948, Mohana got involved with Konkani ‘Tiatr’ in Mumbai. (‘Tiatr’ is a Portuguese word used in Goa for ‘theatre’ for the Konkani dramas encompassing music, dance, and singing. In a way, it is akin to Marathi ‘Sangeet Natak or musical dramas). Her debut Konkani drama was ‘Cortub Avoichem’ (1948) which was directed by the pioneer of Goan Konkani Tiatr, C Alvares, the producer, director, actor, song writer and the singer. In fact, Alvares was instrumental in encouraging girls to play the female roles in his dramas and introduced Mohana and her younger sister, Ophelia. In 1952, Mohana got actively involved with Konkani tiatr in Mumbai, mostly collaborating with C Alvares as an actor-singer and worked in about a dozen plays. Both the sisters were actor-singers in Konkani Tiatr in Mumbai and later in Goa. In fact, in Goa, Mohana is known more as a tiatrist than the Hindi film actress.

In 1951, Mohana met Edward Downing, a Royal Indian Air Force pilot in a hotel where the shooting of her film ‘Sansaar’ (1951) was in progress. They got married in 1951 and had a son, Mark. Unfortunately, her husband died in a plane accident in less than two years of their marriage. In 1955, Mohana got married for the second time with John D’frates who was working for the United Nations and got posted at Beirut.  With this posting, Mohana bid adieu to Hindi film industry. Her last shoot was for the film, ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955).

In Beirut, Mohana learnt Arabic and began producing dance programmes for Television. She also acted in a couple of dramas on Television. After spending many years in Beirut, her husband got posting in Vienna from where he retired in 1986. Post retirement, Mohana and her family settled in France. Mohana was very much interested in Goan Konkani Tiatr. She would regularly visit India on holidays and act in Konkani dramas in Goa. During the period of her visits, she had also cut a few discs of her non-filmy Konkani songs, some with her mentor, C Alvares.

Mohana died of a heart-attack in France on September 11, 1990 when she was 61. [Thanks for the inputs from Shishir Sharma’s Blog, ‘Beete Hue Din’ on Mohana posted on May 13, 2015 and an article in ‘The Navhind Times, Panaji, Goa dated April 6, 2020].

It is interesting to note from her filmography that how quickly Mohana established herself in Hindi film industry. In ‘Aag’ (1948), she had one song role though her first debut film was ‘Saawan Aaya Re’ (1949). In 1949, she had acted in as many as 6 films. 1950 was a blank year for her as probably she got associated with Konkani plays in Mumbai. In 1951 and 1952 she did 5 films each. 1953 and 1954 was again lean years for her. In 1955, she did 4 films before quitting the film industry. In all, she acted in 26 films in her short span of 6 years in the film industry. The full filmography of Mohana is given below:

1948: Aag.
1949: Chaar Din, Jagriti, Kamal, Patanga, Rimjhim, Saawan Aaya Re.
1951: Adaa, Naadaan, Nageena, Sagaai, Sansaar.
1952: Aashiana, Chham Chhama Chham, Najaria, Saloni, Saaqi.
1953: Shole.
1954: Danka, Dost, Shart.
1955: Insaaniyat, Marine Drive, Sau Ka Note, Teerandaz.
1956: Taksaal.

I had noticed in the advertisements of films for which she worked in 1949-50 that  her name was written either in bold or capital letters. That shows that Mohana was popular among the audience of that time and her name mattered for the success of the films. In most of her films, she got roles of a ‘side kick’ to the comedians like Gope, Agha and as a singer-dancer.  Her popularity can be gauged from the fact that in most of her films, Mohana will have at least one song picturised on her. Some of the songs picturised on her for which video clips are available for watching are listed below:

Raat ko ji haay raat ko ji chamke taare – ‘Aag’ (1948)

Pyaar ke jahaan ki niraali sarkaar hai – ‘Patanga’ (1949)

My my my my my dear – ‘Nageena’ (1951)

O baabu kaise dil karoon qaaboo – ‘Sagaai’ (1951)

Lucknow chalo ab raani – ‘Sansaar’ (1951)

Haseena sambhal sambhal ke chal – ‘Saaqi’ (1952)

O madam do se ho gaye ek ham – ‘Aashiana’ (1952)

Dil mera hai deewaana – ‘Shart’ (1954)

Mohana has also rendered two songs on herself in the film ‘Rimjhim’ (1949).

On the occasion of Mohana’s 30th Remembrance Day, I present a song “Aisi Nainwa Ki Laagi Kataar” from ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955) rendered by Mohammed Rafi and Asha Bhosle. The song is written by Rajinder Krishan which is set to music by C Ramchandra. The song is picturised on Mohana as a part of a ploy to wood wink a soldier to stripe out his uniform to be used for disguising Mangal (Dilip Kumar) as soldier to gain access to the prison to facilitate the release of Bhanupratap (Dev Anand).

In the video clip, there are only two stanzas where as the audio clip contains the full song of four stanzas. This is the 10th song to appear on the Blog out of 17 songs in ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955).

Video (Partial)

Audio (Complete)

Song – Aisi Nainwaa Ki Laagi Kataar (Insaaniyat) (1955) Singer – Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Rajendra Krishan, MD – C Ramchandra
Mohammed Rafi + Asha Bhosle

Lyrics (Based on Audio Clip)

aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
na marodo kalaiya hamaar
kangan mora churar murar
haan haan kare churar murar
na marodo kalaiya hamaar
kangan mora churar murar
haan haan kare churar murar
 
nainon mein lagaaun tohe kajara banaay ke
manwa ki dibiya mein rakh loon chhupaay ke
nainon mein lagaaun tohe
nainon mein lagaaun tohe kajara banaay ke
manwa ki dibiya mein rakh loon chaupaay ke
jataao na itna pyaar
ke mann mora surar surar
haan haan kare surar surar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
 
dekho na dekho mohe tirchi nazar se
darr mohe laage tori patli kamar se
dekho na dekho mohe
dekho na dekho mohe tirchi nazar se
darr mohe laage tori patli kamar se
dekhi jab ke suratiya tohaar
kamar mori ghumar ghumar
haan haan kare ghumar ghumar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
 
main tori bulbul tu mora kaaga
kaage se bulbul ka taanka hai laaga
main tori bulbul
main tori bulbul tu mora kaaga
kaage se bulbul ka taanka hai laaga
aa ja chalen ghataaon ke paar
udd jaayen furar furar
haan haan jaayen purur purur
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar
aisi nainwa ki laagi kataar
jiya kare khusar fusar
haan haan kare khusar fusar

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर
ना मरोड़ो कलइयाँ हमार
कंगन मोरा चुरर मुरर
हाँ हाँ करे चुरर मुरर
ना मरोड़ो कलइयाँ हमार
कंगन मोरा चुरर मुरर
हाँ हाँ करे चुरर मुरर

नैनों में लगाऊँ तोहे कजरा बनाय के
मनवा की डिबिया में रख लूँ छुपाय के
नैनों में लगाऊँ तोहे
नैनों में लगाऊँ तोहे कजरा बनाय के
मनवा की डिबिया में रख लूँ छुपाय के
जताओ ना इतना प्यार
के मन मोरा सुरर सुरर
हाँ हाँ करे सुरर सुरर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर

देखो ना देखो मोहे तिरछी नज़र से
डर मोहे लागे तोरी पतली कमर से
देखो ना देखो मोहे
देखो ना देखो मोहे तिरछी नज़र से
डर मोहे लागे तोरी पतली कमर से
देखी जबसे सुरतिया तोहार
कमर मोरी घुमर घुमर
हाँ हाँ करे घुमर घुमर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर

मैं तोरी बुलबुल तू मोरा कागा
कागे से बुलबुल का टांका है लागा
मैं तोरी बुलबुल
मैं तोरी बुलबुल तू मोरा कागा
कागे से बुलबुल का टांका है लागा
आ जा चलें घटाओं के पार
उड़ जाएँ फुरर फुरर
हाँ हाँ जाएँ फुरर फुरर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर
ऐसी नैनवा की लागी कटार
जिया करे खुसर फुसर
हाँ हाँ करे खुसर फुसर



This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4424 Post No. : 15841

While collecting information for writing articles on Hindi songs in Bangla films, I have often come across discussions and references about the beauty and the elegance of Suchitra Sen, Supriya Devi, Sandhya Roy and Sabitri Chatterjee in the golden period of Bangla film industry. In fact, during this period, all the four actresses ‘cornered’ a majority of Bangla films. In a way, they had partly contributed to the revival of Bangla film industry after a slump arising out of the partition of Bengal in 1947.

During this period, there was one more actress who was equally beautiful and had given outstanding performances in both Bangla and Hindi films who seems to have been almost forgotten now. The said actress is Sumitra Devi.

It is said that Sumitra Devi’s presence in the Calcutta (Kolkata) studios was so mesmersing that her co-stars Pradeep Kumar and Uttam Kumar used to visit the studios to watch her shootings even though they did not have their shooting schedule for those days. Shammi Kapoor who acted with her in ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954) had remarked that she was not only a beautiful actress but her etiquette and politeness brightened her beauty.

Today, August 28th is the 30th Remembrance Day of Sumitra Devi (22/07/1923 – 28/08/1990). She was born as Nileema (Lily) Chattopadhya in Shiuri (Bhirbum district), presently in West Bengal in a conservative brahmin family. Her father was a lawyer in Muzzafarpur in Bihar who was a nephew of Digambar Chatterjee, the then Chief Justice of the Calcutta High Court. After the Bihar earthquake, the family shifted to Kolkata where she completed her schooling with some interruptions in her education. In 1944, the family once again shifted out of Kolkata to Bankura due to the threat of Japanese bombing. After the end of World War II, the family shifted back to Kolkata.

During her school days, Sumitra Devi participated in dramas and also in amateur dramas after she finished her schooling. She was influenced by the acting of Kanan Devi and Chandrabati Devi. While watching a Bangla film ‘Samadhan’ (1943), she felt that she can act better than the lead actress in the film. She was so obsessed with working in the film that one day she gate-crashed into New Theatres Studio, met Debaki Bose and said that she would like to work in a film. Debaki Bose was surprised to see a young girl asking for a film role. But at the same time, he was so struck by her beauty that he immediately offered her the heroine’s role in his next Bangla film ‘Sandhi’ (1944). She was asked to come to the studio the next day after getting the permission from her father. However, her father would not give her permission to join films. It was through the intervention of New Theatre’s boss, B N Sircar whose father was known to Sumitra’s father that finally she got permission to join films.

Even though Sumitra Devi was taken for the Bangla film, ‘Sandhi’ (1944), she also got a role in ‘My Sister’ (1944) opposite K L Saigal. ‘Sandhi’ (1944) was released first followed by ‘My Sister’ (1944). Both films were instant hits making Sumitra Devi a star overnight. She won the best actress award from Bengal Film Journalists Association for her very first film. ‘Wasiyatnama’ (1945) was her second Hindi film.

However, Sumitra Devi’s becoming a star had an opposite effect on her domestic front. She had to face non-co-operation from the family of her first marriage at Bhagalpur which ended in divorce. Later on, she worked in successful Bangla films like ‘Pather Dabi’ (1947), Abhijog (1947) and ‘Joyjatra’ (1948). In all these films, she worked opposite Debi Mukherjee with whom she got married on 21/10/1946. A son was born to her on 01/12/1947. However, after 10 days, Debi Mukherjee died on December 11, 1947. It was speculated that he committed suicide.

Sumitra Devi took a sabbatical from films for a year. However, it was imperative that she kept herself busy with the work. With her parents looking after her son, she resumed shooting in 1949 and did ‘Swami’ (1949) and ‘Devi Chaudharani’ (1949) among others which became hits. In 1950, she shifted to Mumbai with her parents when she was offered a lead role in Bombay Talkies’ ‘Mashaal’ (1950) opposite Ashok Kumar. Her performance in the film was appreciated and she got more Hindi films such as ‘Ghunguroo (1952), ‘Deewaana’ (1952) and ‘Mamta’ (1952) in which she got the varied roles from dancer, queen and a single mother, respectively. She did the lead role opposite Kishore Sahu in ‘Mayurpankh’ (1954), in ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954) opposite Shammi Kapoor and a neglected wife in ‘Jaagte Raho’ (1956) and its Bangla version, ‘Ekdin Ratre’ (1956).

In between, Sumitra Devi continued to get Bangla films in the 1950s and 60s, the prominent films being ‘Dasyu Mohan’ (1955) in which Pradeep Kumar was her lead actor. and ‘Saheb Bibi Golam (1956), in which she played the role of the wife of the younger landlord (Uttam Kumar). Her role was subsequently done by Meena Kumari in the Hindi version, ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). In the national award-winning film ‘Andhare Alo’ (1957), she played the role of a courtesan. (Note:The above biography of Sumitra Devi is mainly based on ‘Sumitra Devi – Interview of 1952 in Cineplot and ‘Sumitra Devi’ by Jyoti Prakash Guha on IDMb).

From the second half of 1950s, most of Sumitra Devi’s films – both Hindi and Bangla did not fare well on the box office. In Mumbai, she started getting roles mostly in B grade films. In Kolkata, with the successful arrival of the new actresses like Suchitra Sen, Supriya Devi, Sandhya Roy etc, Sumitra Devi was relegated to the background. Her active years as an actress in Hindi and Bangla films virtually ended by the middle of 1960s. Her acting career comprised of 23 Hindi films and about 12 Bangla films.

It is said that in her later life, Sumitra Devi got married to a Mumbai-based businessman. She got some minor character roles to play in a few Hindi films in 1970s and 80s. Sumitra Devi died in Mumbai on August 28, 1990 at the age of 67.

‘Raja Harishchandra’ (1952) was one of Sumitra Devi’s early Hindi films which she had done in Mumbai. The film was produced by C M Trivedi and was directed by Raman B Desai. The star cast included Prem Adib and Sumitra Devi in the lead roles supported by Moni Chatterjee, Bipin Gupta, Lalita Pawar, Gope, Tiwari, Kammo etc. The film had 6 songs written by four lyricists – Bharat Vyas, Ramesh Gupta, Gulshan Jalalabadi and Qamar Jalalabadi. The songs were set to music by Husnlal-Bhagatram. Four songs have been covered in the Blog.

On the occasion of the 30th Remembrance Day of Sumitra Devi today, I present the 5th song from the film, ‘gori gori chaandni aur poonam ki raat re’. The song is sung by Lata Mangeshkar and picturised on Sumitra Devi in the role of Rani Taramati. This song is accredited to Bharat Vyas.

Video Clip (Longer)

Audio Clip:

Song-Gori gori chaandni ho aur poonam ki raat re (Raaja Harishchandra)(1952) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas MD-Husnlal Bhagatram

Lyrics(Based on video version)

gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

aaj ki hai raat hai
o o
aaj ki hai raat piya paas mere aayange
roothhoongi main unse
wo aa ke manaayenge
aa ke manaayenge
o o o
aa ke manaayenge
gaayenge khushi ke geet
gaayege khushi ke geet
hilmil saath re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

thandi thandi pawan saloni man bhaaye re….ae..ae ae ae
thandi thandi pawan saloni man bhaaye re…ae ae..ae ae ae
bindiya hamaari dekho gir gir jaaye re
gir gir jaaye re
bindiya hamaari dekho gir gir jaaye re
o o o
gir gir jaaye re
rimjhim rimjhim
rimjhim rimjhim
pade barsaat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

kar ke singaar ho o o
kar ke singaar aaj unko rijhaaungi
odh ke chunariya sajan ghar jaaungi
sajan ghar jaaungi
o o o sajan ghar jaaungi
mehndi se laal laal
mehndi se laal laal
honge mere haath re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4421 Post No. : 15832

Today, August 25th is 51st Remembrance Day of Shaayar-e-Inquilaab, Makhdoom Mohiuddin, an Urdu poet, a dramatist and a politician whose name may not ring bell for many of the lovers of Hindi film songs. They may, however, be aware of a couple of his popular Hindi film songs such as ek chameli ke mandve tale from’Chaa Chaa Chaa’ (1964) and aapki yaad aati rahi raat bhar from ‘Gaman’ (1979).

Makhdoom Mohiuddin (04/02/1908 – 25/08/1969) was born in Medak in the then Hyderabad state (present day Telangana). He belonged to the family of religious teachers and preachers. He lost his father, when he was 6. Subsequently, his mother remarried and went away in her separate way making Makhdoom Mohiuddin almost like an orphan. He was brought up by his paternal uncle. It is said that Makhdoom was influenced by his uncle’s leaning towards the leftist ideology.

After completion of his school in the various villages in Hyderbabd State, Makhdoom moved to Hyderabad in 1929 and completed graduation and post-graduation from Osmania University by 1936. During this period in Osmania University, he wrote dramas in which he also acted in them. He got employed as an Urdu lecturer in the City College of Hyderabad. Later on, Hyderabad was to become his residence from where he got involved in the fight against British Rule for which he was jailed. He founded the Communist Party of India (CPI) in Hyderabad State and became the union leader for Electricity, Railways and Municipal workers under AITUC (the union wing of CPI). He was instrumental in creating the Hyderabad chapter of the Progressive Writers Association. In 1946-47, he joined the Telangana Agitation against the Nizam of the then Hyderabad State. After the police action against the Nizam of Hyderabad and its merger with India in 1948, Makhdoom Mohiuddin led the Teleangana Peasants’ Movements for land reforms. He successfully went on hunger strike for making available rice at a fair price for the lower strata of the population. Before that Makhdoom had led an arm rebellion against the Government for which he went underground for nearly 5 years.

In 1952, when the first general elections were announced, Communits Party decided to give up the arm rebellion and instead decided to participate in the election. Makhdoom Mohiuddin successfully contested the first general election as a candidate of CPI from Huzurnagar for Hyderabad State assembly and became the leader of the opposition. From 1956 until his death in 1969, he was the member of legislature council of Andhra Pradesh.

In his youth, Makhdoom was influenced by Munshi Premchand’s writings as also of Urdu poets like Daagh Dehlvi, Amir Minai and later Akhtar Sheerani and Hasrat Mohani. With the success of his play ’Murhsid’, during his university days, Makdhoom became a known personality among the circle of artists and intellectuals. During this time, he came into contact with Sarojini Naidu and though her with some of the top political leaders of that time including Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru.

In the pre-independent India, Makhdoom found time to write poetry in jails and during the period he was underground. Post-independence, he had an active literary life by reciting his poetry in political rallies and mushairas. During this period, he published his second collections of poems called ‘Gul-e-Tar’ (1961), the first being ‘Surkh Savera’ (1944). His poems are mostly in the genre of revolutionary and romance.

Makhdoom Mohiuddin died of heart-attack in Delhi on August 25, 1969. He was buried in Hyderabad. At the time of his death, he did not have a house of his own. The Communist Party raised money to buy a small house for Makhdoom’s family in Hyderabad. As a tribute to Makhdoom, Faiz Ahmed Faiz wrote a ghazal, taking the refrain from Makhdoom’s ghazal ‘aap ki yaad aati rahi raat bhar’ and in the same metre with a title ‘Makhdoom Ki Yaad Mein’:

आपकी याद आती रही रात-भर
चाँदनी दिल दुखाती रही रात-भर

गाह जलती हुई, गाह बुझती हुई
शम-ए-ग़म झिलमिलाती रही रात-भर

कोई ख़ुशबू बदलती रही पैरहन
कोई तस्वीर गाती रही रात-भर

फिर सबा सायः-ए-शाख़े-गुल के तले
कोई क़िस्सा सुनाती रही रात-भर

जो न आया उसे कोई ज़ंजीरे-दर
हर सदा पर बुलाती रही रात-भर

एक उमीद से दिल बहलता रहा
इक तमन्ना सताती रही रात-भर

After going through the chronicles of Makhdoom’s life, especially during the pre-independent India, it is admirable that he could find time to write both romantic as well as revolutionary poems in the midst of a very active political life. Makhdoom Mohiuddin’s personality has been best summed up by Khwaja Ahmed Abbas as under:

He was a glowing flame as also cool drops of dew. He was the call of revolution as also the soft tinkling of anklet. He was knowledge, he was action, he was wisdom. He was the gun of the revolutionary guerrilla and also the sitar of musician. He was the odour of gun powder and the fragrance of jasmine.

Makhdoom Mohiuddin did not specifically write lyrics for any Hindi films. However, his published poems were used in the films in ‘Usne Kaha Thha’ (1960), ‘Chaa Chaa Chaa’ (1964), ‘Insaaf Kahaan Hai’ (UR, 1978), ‘Gaman’ (1979), ‘Baazar’ (1982) and ‘Mandi’ (1983).

On the occasion of 51st Remembrance Day of Makhdoom Mohiuddin, I am presenting his ghazal ‘ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate’ which was used in the film ‘Mandi’ (1983). The ghazal is rendered by Asha Bhosle which is set to music by Vanraj Bhatia. In the film, the song is picturised on Smita Patil who sings for about one minute of duration in tune but without the accompanying music. The audio version contains the full ghazal with orchestration. unfortunately, video clip is not separately available online.

Acknowledgement: The biography of Makhdoom Mohiuddin in the article is based on T V Serial ‘Kahkashan – Makhdoom Mohiuddin (1991) and a Ph.D thesis, ‘Makhdoom Mohiuddin – Life, Works and Times’ by Afrose Fatima Ahmed (May 2011).

Audio Clip:

Song-Ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate(Mandi)(1983) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Makhdoom Mohiuddin, MD-Vanraj Bhatia

Lyrics

aa aa aa aaaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa

ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae ae
raat kate ae
dil ke angaare ko dahkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao

koī jalta hī nahin
koi pighalta hi nahin
mom ban jaao
pighal jaao
pighal jaao
ki kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao…o

hijr mein milne shab-e-maah ke ġham aaye hain
chaarasaazon ko bhi bulwaao
bulwaao
ke kuchh raat kate
raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao…o

chashm-o-ruḳhsaar ke aazkaar ko jaari rakkho
pyaar ke naghmen ko dohraao
dohraao
ke kuchh raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
dil ke angaare ko dahkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao…o

aaj ho jaane do har ek ko badmast-o-kharaab
aaj ho jaane do har ek ko badmast-o-kharaab
aaj har ek ko pilwaaao
pilwaao
pilwaao
ke kuchh raat kate
koh-e-ġham aur giraan aur giraan aur giraan
ġhamzadon teshe ko chamkaao ki kuchh raat kate
kuchh raat kate
kuchh raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao…o
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaaao………o


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4421 Post No. : 15831

‘Teesri Gali’ (1958) was produced by C D Sadarangani under the banner of Radiant Movies and was directed by Kundan Kumar. The film’s actors included Shyama and Abhi Bhattacharya in the lead role with Prem Adib, Gope, Kammo, Leela Mishra, Bhagwan Sinha, Neeru, C S Dubey, Ramlal, Panchotiya, Mohan Choti etc in subsidiary roles. I have no idea about the story of the film. However, going by a few lobby photographs, the film appears to belong to a mixed genre of crime and romance. It also appears that contrary to the general expectation, Abhi Bhattacharya had a played a different type of the role in the film.

It was director Kundan Kumar’s second film as a director, his debut film in the same capacity being ‘Neel Mani’ (1957). However, he became a prominent director of Bhojpuri films in the 1960s when he was roped in by Nazir Hussain to direct the first Bhojpuri film, ‘Ganga Maiya Tohre Piyari Chandhaibo’ (1962) which became a blockbuster on the box office collections. Thereafter, he directed other Bhojpuri films like ‘Laagi Naahi Chhute Rama’ (1963), ‘Ganga’ (1965), “Bhouji’ (1965). ‘Loha Singh’ (1966) etc.

By the end of 1960s, when Bhojpuri films industry experienced a slump, Kundan Kumar reverted to Hindi films and became producer-director of the films like ‘Aulaad (1968), ‘Pardesi’ (1970), ‘Anokhi Ada’ (1973) and ‘Aaj Ka Mahatma’ (1976). His life was cut short by the untimely death on February 28, 1979.

As the years passed, ‘Teesri Gali’ (1958) seems to have become an obscure film. I would have loved to watch this film after viewing the photographs of Abhi Bhattacharya’s unusual appearance in the film and Kammo’s dances. Unfortunately, the VCD/DVD of the film is not available. This film will, however, be remembered for an unusual incidence while in the making which was described by Tabassum in T V Programme ‘Tabassum Talkies’ as under:

There was a scene in the film ‘Teesri Gali’ (1958) in which Gope was to enact a scene in which he gets a heart attack and dies. His acting of getting a heart attack and dying looked so real that when the scene was over, all the members of the unit of the film clapped. When Gope did not get up after the end of the clapping, some unit members went near him and were shocked to find that he had really died of a heart attack.

‘Teesri Gali’ (1958) had 6 songs of which 5 songs were available on a video sharing platform. I could trace the mp3 clip of the missing 6th song of the film and had uploaded the video of the same last year. I was under the impression that I had already covered the ‘missing’ song in the Blog. When I found that of the 3 songs of the film covered in the Blog, the ‘missing’ song not one of them. So, here is that song, ‘jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima’ from the film which is rendered by Geeta Dutt. The song is written by Anjum Jaipuri which is set to music by Chitragupt.

In the absence of the video clip, I can only make a guess based on the lyrics of the song as well as some photographs of the scenes from the film that are available on the internet. And my guess is that it is a club song picturised on Kammo whose singing is directed towards Abhi Bhattachraya. Kammo has been known to be a good dancer and fits well for a club song.

Enjoy this foot tapping fun song. By the way, the remaining two songs of the film yet to be covered in the Blog are also fun songs rendered by Geeta Dutt.

I feel very sorry for Chitragupt that despite all the six songs in the film being very melodious, the film failed in the box office. The resultant impact was that all these songs remained obscure until the video sharing platforms came into prominence.

Audio Clip:

Song-Jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalimaa (Teesri Gali)(1958) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Anjum Jaipuri, MD-Chitragupta

Lyrics

jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima
dil ko churaane tum aate ho yahaan aan
jaan gaye chori
jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima
dil ko churaane tum aate ho yahaan aan
jaan gaye chori

bade wo ho jee ke bhaage dil leke
loot liya raste mein dhokha hamen deke
bade wo ho jee ke bhaage dil leke
loot liya raste mein dhokha hamen deke
chaal ye tumhaari
jaanegi duniya saari
dil hai ye dil ko chupaaoge kahaan
jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima
dil ko churaane tum aate ho yahaan aan
jaan gaye chori

dekh chuke ham kisi pe aji mar ke
rahne lage duniya se ab to zara dar ke
dekh chuke ham kisi pe aji mar ke
rahne lage duniya se ab to zara dar ke
naaz bhi uthhaayen
jigar pe teer khaayen
baaki hai abhi tak un teeron ka nishaan
jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima
dil ko churaane tum aate ho yahaan aan
jaan gaye chori

zulfen udin to dil lahraaya
aaankhen milin unse to dil nahin paaya
zulfen udin to dil lahraaya
aaankhen milin unse to dil nahin paayaa
aag si lagi hai
ye kaisi dillagi hai
loot ke chala hai koi eene ka saamaan
jaan gaye chori tumhaari zaalima
dil ko churaane tum aate ho yahaan aan
jaan gaye chori


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4414 Post No. : 15814

Today, August 18th 2020 is 86th Birth Day of the poet, lyricist, story, screen-play and dialogue writer, producer and director, Gulzar. His presence in Hindi film industries is an assurance that lovers of Hindi films and Hindi film songs would continue to get the opportunity to watch and listen to the meaningful films and songs. I regard Gulzar Saab as an extension of what Sahir Ludhianvi left in October 1980 – a legacy of poetry in Hindi film songs.

I have already covered a substantive information about the filmy career of Gulzar saab in my articles ae hairat-e-aashiqui jagaa mat on the occasion of his 85th birth day last year and in shaam se aankh mein nami si hai, abut 5 years back. Also, there is no dearth of information on Gulzar Saab on the internet, in the print media and his website. So, I would skip this part.

What a great journey Gulzar saab has with Hindi film industry which began in early 1960s as a lyricist. He became an assistant to Bimal Roy and eventually became a director with ‘Mere Apne’ (1971). During his almost six decades in Hindi film industry, he wrote nearly 700 songs, wrote screen-play/dialogues for nearly 50 films and directed 19 films. In addition, he wrote and directed a few TV serials like ‘Mirza Ghalib’(1988), ‘Noopur’ (1990), ‘Potli Baba Ki’ (1991), ‘Tehreer Munshi Premchand Ki’ (2004) etc. He published many novels, short stories and collections of his poems. Of late, Gulzar saab has been busy with translating in Hindi, poems in regional languages from all over India for their wider dessimination.

On the occasion of 86th birth day of Gulzar Saab, I have chosen a song of a rare combination – Gulzar-Suman Kalyanpur-Shankar-Jaikishan. The song is ‘ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina’ from the film ‘Seema’ (1971). Probably, Gulzar saab got involved in writing the lyrics of a couple of songs in this film as he was the story-screen-play-dialogue writer for the film. Surendra Mohan made his debut as a director in this film. The film was produced by Sohanlal Kanwar. The story of the film is summarised below:

Seema (Simi Garewal) has lost her parents in her childhood and she has been brought up by her caring uncle (Abhi Bhattacharya). In her grown-up years, Seema develops a superstition that whoever loved her would get the same fate as her parents. She spends her time mostly alone except with a friend, Rajni (Kanchan) who tries to erase her superstition by saying that she is still alive despite Seema loving her but of no avail.

Seema’s life gets a change when she come across a charming Sunil (Kabir Bedi). But her superstition will not allow her to reciprocate his love. He convinces her to overcome her fear and they get married in a temple. Unfortunately, after few days, Sunil dies in an accident and the fear of superstition returns to Seema as she is pregnant with his child in the womb. She gives birth to Banke (Rakesh Roshan) in secrecy as the society does not know of her marriage to Sunil. The child is brought up by her maid (Chand Usmani) who is kept away from Seema’s home out of fear of losing her child. However, Seema keeps the tab over her son’s activities from a distance.

Banke grows up cosying with Chamki (Bharathi) and also trying to discover as to who his parents are. After a lot of poignant moments in the film, it is Rajni who eventually reveals to Banke that Seema is his mother and his father had died of accident. Seema embraces Banke thus giving up her superstitions.

The song under discussion is a lori which have been picturised in the film on two occasions. First, Suman Kalyanpur sings for Simi on piano. The second, Sushma Shreshta sings for the boy which is taken over by Suman Kalyanpur singing for Chand Usmani as a continuation of the lori. In the audio clip, the entire lori is sung by Suman Kalyanpur.

‘Seema’ (1971) was Jaikishan’s last film. He died while the film was in the making.

Video Clip:

Suman Kalyanpur solo
Video

Audio

Suman Kalyanpur- Sushma Shreshtha duet
Video

Song-Ek thhi nindiyaa do thhe nainaa (Seema)(1971) Singer-Suman Kalyanpur/ Sushma Shreshtha, Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Shankar Jaikishan

Lyrics

———————————
Suman Kalyanpur Solo (based on Audio)
———————————
ek thhi nindiya
do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa

o oo oooo
ooo ooo ooo
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
ek thhi nindiya
do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa

roz wo pariyon jaisi nindiya aati thhi
donon judwa nainon ko bahlaati thhi
aankhon pe rakh deti thhi meethhe sapne
sapnon waali nindiya maa kahlaati thhi
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa

ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna

roz wo pariyon jaisi nindiya aati thhi
donon judwa nainon ko bahlaati thhi
aankhon pe rakh deti thhi meethhe sapne
sapnon waali nindiya maa kahlaati thhi
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa

oas ki boondon mein jo barsa karti thhi
wo nindiya ab do nainon se roothh gayi
chhoot gaye wo reshmi jhoole sapnon ke
chaandni jaisi lori ki dhun toot gayi
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana

nindiya ki mamta ko baant ke do naina
aadhi aadhi saansen le kar jeete hain
baari baari dekhte hain toote sapne
baari baari aankh ke aansoo peete hain
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa

—————————————————–
Lyrics: Duet Version – Sushma Shreshta, Suman Kalyanpur
—————————————————–

ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa

roz wo pariyon jaisi nindiya aati thhi
donon judwa nainon ko behlaati thhi
aankhon pe rakh deti thhi meethhe sapne
sapnon waali nindiya maa kahlaati thhi
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behana aa

oas ki boondon mein jo barsa karti thhi
wo nindiya ab do nainon se roothh gayi
chhoot gaye wo reshmi jhoole sapnon ke
chaandni jaisi lori ki dhun toot gayi
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna

nindiya ki mamta ko baant ke do naina
aadhi aadhi saansen le kar jeete hain
baari baari dekhte hain toote sapne
baari baari aankh se aansoo peeten hain
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
ek thhi nindiya do thhe naina
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna aa aa aa
raat ki jaayi shaam ki behna..aa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4412 Post No. : 15809

Today, August 16, 2020 is the 2nd Remembrance Day of Atal Bihari Vajpayee (25/12/1924 – 16/08/2018), the former prime minister, one of the greatest statesmen, a nationalist, a good orator and a poet.

The political career of Atal Bihari Vajpayee has been an open book and it does not require an elaborate discussion. Suffice to say in brief that at the age of 18, Atal Bihari Vajpayee became politically active by participating in Quit India Movement of 1942 and was imprisoned for one month. In 1957, He became the member of Lok Sabha for the first time at the age of 33. From 1967 to 1984, he continued as a member of Lok Sabha without any interruption. Again from 1991 to 2009, he became the member of Lok Sabha. With nearly 5 decades of experience – both from the opposition and ruling parrties’ sides, one can gauge the vast political knowledge he had gathered to be rightly called as ‘Bhishma Pitamah’ of Indian politics who was admired by both the ruling and opposition parties.

Atal Bihari Vajpayee was known for his hard-hitting speech as a member of the opposition. But his speeches always remained within the boundary of political rivalry on ideological platforms and did not spill into personal enimity. It is because of this quality that Atal Bihari Vajpayee commanded the respect of all the prime ministers he faced in the Lok Sabha and of members of the opposition when he was the prime minister. In his very first terms in Lok Sabha during 1957-62 as a member of the opposition parties, Pandit Nehru, the then prime minister, was very much impressed by his debating skills. Once, he introduced Atal Bihari Vajpayee to a visiting foreign dignitary as a young and dynamic member of the opposition and he predicted him to be India’s future prime minister. His prediction came true after 40 years.

Let us recall a couple of examples in support of what has been stated above. During the Vote of Confidence motion in 1996 in Lok Sabha, Atal Bihari Vajpayee as a prime minister had quoted an instance that happened in the Rajya Sabha in November 1962 during the discussion on Chinese aggression in October 1962 :

It is not that I did not have disagreements with Nehru ji. These disagreements came out strongly during debates. In one of such debates I called Nehru’s personality and character as a mixture of Churchill and Chamberlain. (Neville Chamberlain, the Prime Minister of the UK from 1937-40 was highly criticised for his appeasement policy with Adolf Hitler. Winston Churchill was the prime minister who led the English to victory against Nazi Germany in the Second World War). Despite the comparison to two of the most controversial and critiqued world leaders, Nehru did not get angry. Later that evening, I ran into Nehru ji at a banquet in honour of a visiting foreign dignitary. He called and congratulated me for giving a rousing speech in the Rajya Sabha and he left smiling.

In 1994, when United Nations Human Right Commission at Geneva was to discuss a Pakistani resolution to label India as human right violator in Jammu & Kashmir, the then Prime Minister, P V Narsimha Rao chose the leader of the opposition, Atal Bihari Vajpayee as the leader of the Indian delegation to defend India. The Pakistani resolution was defeated. The fact that Narsimha Rao selected Atal Bihari Vajpayee as the leader of the delegation rather than other senior leaders from his party like Salman Khurshid who were part of the delegation, speaks volume about the calibre of and confidence reposed on Atal Bihari Vajpayee by then prime minister.

It is not known when Atal Bihari Vajpayee turned a poet. Whether it was the poet in him that pushed him to the politics or vice versa. He had said once that ‘he was poet by instinct and the politician by accident’. He had a literary bend of mind if we go by his association with magazines such as ‘Rashtradharma’, ‘Panchjanya’ and the newspapers like ‘Swadesh’ etc, during his younger days. Probably, he may have started writing poems during the the Quit India Movement of 1942. On August 15, 1947 when India got indepedence and people were celebrating the freedom from British Rule, Atal Bihari Vajpayee wrote the poem in a sombre mood:

पंद्रह अगस्त का दिन कहता
आज़ादी अभी अधूरी है।
सपने सच होने बाकी है,
रावी की शपथ न पूरी है॥

जिनकी लाशों पर पग धर कर
आज़ादी भारत में आई,
वे अब तक हैं खानाबदोश
ग़म की काली बदली छाई॥

The people of India at large came to know Atal Bihari Vajpayee also as a poet after his release from the Bengaluru Central Jail in 1977 following emergency. In his one year of life in the jail, Atal Bihari Vajpayee had written many poems in the pseudo name ‘Kaidi Kavirai’, some of which used to be smuggled out of the jail, translated in Kannada and pasted on the walls of colleges in Hubbali and Dharwad. ‘Kaidi Kavirai Ki Kundalian’, the collections of poems written by him while in the jail has been published. These poems belong to satirical and inspirational genres. An example of one of his satirical poems which he wrote while when he was ill in the jail:

डॉक्टरान दे रहे दवाई, पुलिस दे रही पहरा।
बिना ब्लेड के हुआ खुरदुरा, चिकना-चुपड़ा चेहरा।
चिकना-चुपड़ा चेहरा, साबुन, तेल नदारत।
मिले नहीं अखबार, पढ़ेंगे नई इबारत।
कह कैदी कविराय, कहां से लाएं कपड़े।
अस्पताल की चादर छुपा रही सब लफड़े।

But post-emergency years, Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s poems have become more visible than before. In some of his political rallies, he had started reciting his poems probably realising that poems of 6-8 lines have more impact on his audience to draw his point of view than a longer speech.

Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s most popular and an inspiring poem, kadam milaakar chalna hoga has been included in class-8 textbook along with the poems of Hazari Prasad Dwivedi, Ramdhari Singh Dinkar, Surykant Tripathi Nirala, Ismat Chugtai, Harishankar Parsai etc for 2019-20 onwards.

When Atal Bihari Vajpayee was admitted in a hospital in New York in 1988 for his kidney check-up, doctors had suggested kidney operations. That whole night, he could not sleep. During that night, the poem, maut se than gahi was born.

Another poem of Atal Bihari Vajpayee which I like is hari hari doob par. The last six lines sums up the philosophy of life which say that the sun will rise again and there will be sunshine. But I will not get to see the dew drop on the green carpet of grass of my garden in all the seasons:

सूर्य तो फिर भी उगेगा,
धूप तो फिर भी खिलेगी,
लेकिन मेरी बगीची की
हरी-हरी दूब पर,
ओस की बूंद
हर मौसम में नहीं मिलेगी।

To quote Bhagwat Goyal who has translated Vajpayee’s poems in to English, Atal Bihari Vajpayee believed that “politics and literature cannot belong to separate compartments. Rather they enrich and refine each other. When a litterateur gets involved in politics, his politics gets more refined. Similarly, if a politician has a literary background, he cannot ignore human feelings and emotions.” I have watched some of the important proceedings of the Lok Sabha in which I saw his speeches both as a Prime Minister and as a member of the opposition. To me, his speech sounded like a mix of statesmanship and literature like the one below.

The game of power would continue. Governments would come and go. Political parties would be formed and dissolved. But the country should survive and democracy should remain there forever. The debate (on Vote of Confidence Motion) would come to an end but the chapter which would start from the next day needed to be pondered over. The bitterness should not increase.

On the occasion of Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s 2nd Remembrance Day, I present one of his poems, ‘apne hi mann se kuchh bolen’ (2002) which has been turned into a non-film song composed and sung by Jagjeet Singh. The video of the song featuring Shahrukh Khan and Atal Bihari Vajpayee was produced by Saregama which was directed by Yash Chopra. The song is preceded by a preface read by Amitabh Bachchan, which was written by Javed Akhtar. This song is a part of an album, ‘Samvedna’ (Sensitivity) containing six poems written by Atal Bihari Vajpayee which have been turned into songs composed and sung by Jagjeet Singh.

The poem is philosophical one. It says that let the heart speak. Let it measure what has been gained and what has been lost. In one of the antaras, the poet says that earth is millions of years old and life is eternal. Elders may give a blessing of 100 years of life (sau sharadon ki vaani) but body has its limit. So, one should be ready to open the doors on the last knock.

Video Clip :

Audio Clip:

Song-Kya khoya kya paaya jag mein (Jagjeet Singh NFS)(2002) Singer-Jagjeet Singh, Lyrics-Atal Bihari Vajpayee, MD-Jagjeet Singh

Lyrics

kya khoya kya paaya jag mein
milte aur bichhadte mag mein
kya khoya kya paaya jag mein
milte aur bichhadte mag mein
mujhe kisi se nahin shikaayat
yadhyapi chhala gaya pag pag mein
ek drishti beeti par daalen
yaadon ki potali tatolen
ek drishti beeti par daalen
yaadon ki potali tatolen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen

prithhvi laakhon varsh puraani
jeevan ek anant kahaani
prithhvi laakhon varsh puraani
jeevan ek anant kahaani
par tan ki apni seemaayen
yadyapi sau sharadon ki vaani
itna kaafi hai antim dastak
par khud darwaaza kholen
itna kaafi hai antim dastak
par khud darwaaza kholen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen

janm maran kaa avirat phera
jeewan banjaaron kaa deraa
janm maran kaa avirat phera
jeewan banjaaron kaa deraa
aaj yahaan kal kahaan kooch hai
kaun jaanta kidhar savera
andhiyaara aakaash aseemit
praanon ke pankhon ko taulen
andhiyaara aakaash aseemit
praanon ke pankhon ko taulen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen
apne hi mann se kuchh bolen
apne hi mann se …. kuchh bolen


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4408 Post No. : 15798

apni kahaani chhod jaa
kuchh to nishaani chhod jaa
kaun kahe iss or
tu phir aaye naa aaye

That is how Balraj Sahni left his mark as an outstanding method actor in most of his nearly 100 films in which he acted during the course of his 27 years of filmy career. Balraj Sahni started his filmy career as an actor almost at the same time as Dev Anand, Dilip Kumar and Raj Kapoor, the trinity of the golden period of Hindi film industry. But he had to struggle hard to establish himself as an actor in demand. It took him more than a decade to do so while his compatriot trinity had become the stars in early 1950s.

Balraj Sahni was very bitter about his early experiences in his filmy career. Having associated with IPTA and being a card member of the Communist Party of India, it was difficult to get roles in the films despite the success of ‘Hum Log’ (1951) and ‘Hulchul’ (1951) in which he had important roles. Those days, it was a fashion to brand any one as communist if he had difference of opinion with men of authorities. Since Balraj Sahni was already a member of Communist Party, many producers were wary of offering him roles. In a few films in which he got the roles, he was unceremoniously dropped later from the films either directly or indirectly by offering him smaller roles.

When I completed reading Balraj Sahni’s autobiography in Hindi, I was surprised as to how he got drawn into Hindi films when he had an impressive curriculum vitae before he became an actor in Hindi films. He completed his double M.A. in Hindi and English literature from Government College, Lahore and joined Shanti Niketan along with his wife, Damyanti Sahni to work with Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. He worked there as a lecturer in Hindi and English. After two years, he and his wife shifted to Sewagram in Wardha to work with Mahatma Gandhi where he also worked as teacher in the institute run in Sewagram. In 1939, with the blessing of Mahatma Gandhi, he and his wife joined BBC London as a Radio Announcer and as a producer, respectively for their Hindi services. In 1944, Balraj Sahni and his wife landed back in Mumbai and got involved in Hindi plays under IPTA. From this point of time, both he and his wife got drawn towards acting in the films, that too not by their own volitions but through Chetan Anand, their close friend.

Balraj Sahni (01/05/1913 – 13/04/1973), was born as Yudhishthir Sahni in Rawalpindi in an Arya Samaji family. His father was a successful businessman – a wholesale cloth merchant who could afford to have a summer villa in Srinagar. In 1930, after completing his matriculation, he joined Government College, Lahore for B.A. His college days coincided with the advent of talkies during which he watched many Hindi and English films. He also participated as an actor in College’s dramatic society. By the time, he had completed M.A. in Hindi and English literature, he had developed an interest in literature rather than in acting in the films.

During four years of his stay in London, Balraj Sahni watched many English plays and Russian films which he felt was ahead of American films. Through Russian films, he got introduced to Marxism and Leninism. By the time, he and his wife returned to Mumbai in 1944, they had embraced Marxism. For some time, both of them stayed at Chetan Anand’s bungalow at Bandra whom he knew from his days in Government College, Lahore. Chetan Anand was also associated with IPTA where Balraj Sahni got acquainted with K A Abbas, Krishan Chandra, Phani Mujumdar, Prem Dhavan, V P Sathe, C P Joshi among others. In IPTA, K A Abbas who was writing a play ‘Zubeida’ selected Balraj Sahni to direct it. The play became a hit. This was the start of his long association with K A Abbas.

During his IPTA days, Chetan Anand offered him and his wife major roles in his maiden film ‘Neecha Nagar’ (1946) which was in the planning stage. However, Chetan Anand was not able to arrange the finances. So, the making of the film got delayed. During the same time, Phani Mujumdar offered him a small role of the hero’s friend in ‘Insaaf’ (1946). At first, Balraj Sahni was not enthusiastic to accept the small role. It was only after Phani Majumdar assured him that in his next film ‘Door Chalen’ (1946), he would give him a major role which he kept his words. Both the films did not click at the box office.

In the meanwhile, IPTA got a licence to produce a full-length feature film which K A Abbas used it for making ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946). It was IPTA’s first and the last film. Both Balraj Sahni and Damyanti Sahni got major roles in the film along with other IPTA actors. This film also failed at the box office as the film’s release coincided with communal violence in Mumbai. However, the film was critically acclaimed both nationally and internationally. Thereafter, both Balraj Sahni and Damyanti Sahni worked in ‘Gudia’ (1947) in lead roles. However, soon after the completion of the film, Damyanti Sahni who also used to work with the slum dwellers in Mumbai as a part of her social work, fell ill. Due to adverse reaction of the medicines, she died in April 1947 at a young age of 26, leaving Balraj Sahni with two kids, Parikshit and Shabnam.

A devasted Balraj Sahni soon left Mumbai and started staying in his father’s summer villa in Srinagar while his kids were sent to Rawalpindi at his parent’s house. But within few months, the communal riots on the eve of the partition made Balraj Sahni and his parents with kids to come back to Mumbai leaving everything behind. While IPTA took care of him on his second coming, he also commenced shooting for ‘Gunjan’ (1948) in which he had got the offer of the lead role opposite Nalini Jaywant when he was in Srinagar.

In 1948-49, Balraj Sahni was mostly associated with IPTA plays and communist party activities. During this period, he got married to Santosh Chandok, his cousin who was a writer and actor in IPTA. During the rehearsal of the play ‘Signalman Dulee’, all IPTA members were called to participate in a procession taken by the communist party which had taken anti-Nehru stance, branding him to be an agent of British Government. Carried away by the party line, Balraj Sahni wrote and acted in an IPTA play ‘Jaadu Ki Kursi’ which was directed by Mohan Sehgal. The play was a satire on Pandit Nehru’s policies. During this time, Communist Party took out a procession in the street of Mumbai with slogan shouting and criticising Nehru’s policies. Balraj Sahni and other IPTA members had also joined the procession. There was lathi charge and police firings. Many prominent activists of IPTA such as Balraj Sahni, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Ali Sardar Jafri, Deena Pathak etc. were arrested and imprisoned in Arthur Road jail for 2 years.

Before his arrest, Balraj Sahni had got a major role in K Asif’s film, ‘Hulchul’ (1951) on the recommendation of Dilip Kumar. Shooting of the film had commenced but Balraj Sahni was in jail. With the good offices of producer, K Asif, Balraj Sahni got permission from the Jailor to join shooting during the day time under the police escorts. Incidentally, Balraj Sahni acted in this film in the role of a Jailor. The arrangements continued until the film’s shooting was completed.

After about 6 months of imprisonment, Balraj Sahni was freed from the jail. It is not known as to how he got released from the jail in 6 months but I feel that there must be some reason for remission in his jail terms and this was not liked by his party. He found to his dismay that the party has branded him as ‘traitor’ and some of his friends and acquaintances avoided meeting him. After some time, Balraj Sahani left IPTA and Communist Party of India due to difference of opinions. Those days, any party member having put forward a different opinion than the party line, used to be branded as ‘reactionary’, ‘traitor’ etc.

Notwithstanding leaving IPTA and Communist Party, Balraj Sahni remained a committed Marxist with ‘Das Kapital’ as his reference point rather than the communist ideaology. Things began to improve in his filmy career as soon as the tag of ‘communist’ against his name was obliterated. Despite film offers coming to him on a regular basis, he could do only few films as he selected mostly socially oriented films – like the role of unemployed and sickly Raj in ‘Hum Log’ (1951), the rickshaw puller, Shambhu Maheto in ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), the compassionate manager of an orphanage in ‘Seema’ (1955), the idealistic poet, Shrikant in ‘Sone Ki Chidiya’ (1958), a loving elder brother in ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1959), a committed village doctor in ‘Anuradha’ (1960), a migrant Afghani, Abdul Rehman Khan in ‘Kabuliwala’ (1961) etc. However, as he advanced in age, he started getting the character actor’s roles during which time, he mostly worked in the mainstream Hindi films.

Sometime in 1950, Chetan Anand, the head of Navketan Films, invited Balraj Sahni to write screen-play and dialogues for ‘Baazi’ (1951) which he gladly accepted because it suited to his temperament as a writer. Guru Dutt, the director wanted to start the shooting of the film even before the script was ready. Balraj Sahni made it very clear to him that he would part with screen-play and dialogues only when it is complete in all respect. It was only when he gave the screen-play and dialogues duly bound, the shooting of the film commenced. Though ‘Baazi’ (1951) was a big hit on the box office, Balraj Sahni did not draw any benefit or pleasure from it as his screen-play and dialogues were changed without his consent as was the practice by most of the directors. So, he gave up the idea of taking up the assignment of screen-play writing any more. He also directed ‘Laal Batti’ (1957), the only film as a director during his filmy career. He also worked in some Punjabi films.

By the end of 1950s, Balraj Sahni had adjusted to the unorganized way of working in Bollywood. He was once called for shooting in the morning and he was sitting in the studio throughout the day without being called for a single shot. From then onwards, he decided to carry his typewriter for shooting so that he could use his free time for writing articles and short stories for the magazines. While working in Shanti Niketan in the late 30s, Balraj Sahni was advised by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore that he should write articles and stories in Punjabi as a writer can effectively express his thoughts in his own mother tongue. Balraj Sahni took his advice seriously and learnt afresh writing in Gurumukhi.

Balraj Sahni major break through as an actor was in a neo-realistic film, ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946). It was just a co-incident that his last film ‘Garam Hawa’ (1973) also happened to be a neo-realistic film. His son, Parikshit Sahni had said in an interview that the film had perfect pathos in almost every scene and dialogues delivered by his father.

And why not? If one sees the events happening in the film in a broader manner, Balraj Sahni had actually experienced them in reality. Towards the end of the film, he lost his young daughter Amina who commits suicide following her bad marriage. This had actually happened to Balraj Sahni about one year before the film’s shooting was completed. His daughter, Shabnam by his first marriage had returned to him after a divorce and died young due to a brain hemorrhage. All the pains in losing his daughter was reflected on his face in the film.

On his 60th birthday, Balraj Sahni was to make an announcement to leave the film industry and settled down in Punjab to devote rest of his life to the literature. For this, he had bought a cottage in Punjab which was being refurbished. But God wished differently. Just before a month of his 60th birthday and a day after completion of his dubbing for ‘Garam Hawa’ (1973), Balraj Sahni died of heart-attack on April 13, 1973. At the Juhu Crematorium, besides close family members, friends and film paternity, there was a large crowd of hotels workers, fishermen and others from the Juhu village whom he had financially helped to improve their living conditions.

Bhisham Sahni, Balraj Sahni’s younger brother and a renown theatre personality (remember his T V Serial, ‘Tamas’, 1988) has talked about his elder brother’s deep and abiding love for his family. He said that the scene from ‘Waqt’ (1965) in which Balraj Sahni sings ae meri zohra-zabeen, showering his love for his wife is the exact reflections of his exuberating nature which many have witnessed in his house. Sometime in mid-1960s, Balraj Sahni constructed his bungalow at Juhu mainly to accommodate his entire family under one roof and for the visiting relatives and friends.

Balraj Sahni had jokingly said in his autobiography that he got more chance to do romance with the heroines of the films when he did character actor’s roles than as a hero. One of the films in which as a hero, he romanced with Geeta Bali was ‘Sapan Suhaane’ (1961). The film was produced under the banner of K R Films which was directed by Kidar Kapoor. The star cast included Balraj Sahni, Geeta Bali, Kamini Kadam, Chandrashekhar, Helen, K N Singh, Leela Mishra, Bhagwan Dada, Praveen Paul, Keshav Rana, Tun Tun, Ram Mohan etc.

Four songs (out of 7) have been covered in the Blog. I am presenting the 5th song, ‘o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa’ from ‘Sapan Suhaane’ (1961). The song is rendered by Manna Dey and Lata Mangeshkar for Balraj Sahni and Geeta Bali. The song is written by Shailendra which is set to music by Salil Chaudhuri.

Acknowledgement:

Much of the information for this article has been drawn from:

1. ‘Meri Filmy Aatmkatha’ by Balraj Sahni (1974).

2. Balraj – My Brother by Bhisham Sahni (1981).

3. Two Brothers – Balraj and Bhisham Sahni – Some experience in IPTA by Kalpana Sahni.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-O gori aaja gaddi vich baithh jaa (Sapan Suhaane)(1961) Singers-Manna Dey, Lata, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baithh jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega
o….o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega

tu jaise phoolon waali daali..ee
goriye tu to hai naazon ki paali
gora rang jal jaaye na
na to main phoolon waali daali..ee
chhaliye na main hoon naazon ki paali
tu kisi aur ko bana

khadi tarsaaye main ko aaja aa aa
karoon kya jiya kahe na aa aa aaa
o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega
o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega

ye raahen meri anjaani..ee
nigaahon mein hai bachpan ki naadaani
mera dil kho jaaye na

ye raahen maana hai anjaani…ee
tere sang main jo hoon meri pahchaani
ye saathi chhod jaaye na ae ae
kahenge kya ye duniya waale ae ae
na dekho din mein sapna aa aa aa aaa

o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega
o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega

kah do doli leke aaun
bana ke dulhan tujhko ghar le jaaun
agar tu dil se kahe haan
agar tum doli leke aao…o
bitha ke palkon mein mujhko le jaao
mera dil kahe chaahe na

bhula mat dena apna waada aa aa
sanam ne kar to diya haan….. aan
o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega
o…o gori aaja gaddi vich baith jaa
jaao ji koi kya kahega


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15900 song posts by now.

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