Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 5010 Post No. : 16911 Movie Count : 4591

I am presenting a rare song of a 1946 released film, sung by Mohammed Rafi. I came across this song for the first time about 5-6 years back on one of the video-sharing platforms and I immensely liked it. However, to my dismay, I found that the uploaded song was incomplete. I could not find the full song on any of the video sharing-platforms at that time. I tried to locate it from other on-line sources but failed to get it. Gradually, this song went out of my mind. It was only yesterday, I accidentally found the full song – accidentally because the uploader of the song (probably a ‘front’ for SAREGAMA) while uploading the song about 3 years back, wrongly captioned it.

The song is ‘dil samajhta hai yaa khuda jaane’ from an obscure film, ‘Hoor-E-Baghdad’ (1946). The name of the singer is not indicated by SAREGAMA which means that the 78 RPM gramophone record of the song may not have mentioned the name of the singer. However, without any doubt, the voice in the song is that of Mohammed Rafi. The song is written in a ghazal format by F M Pindvi, a name I heard for the first time. Damodar Sharma is the music director. The film had 9 obscure songs of which as of now, only two songs are available.

I get a feeling that F M Pindvi who wrote this song in a ghazal format may have been influenced by Daagh’s ghazal written in the same metre. I reproduce four shers from Daagh’s ghazal:

dil ko kya ho gaya ḳhuda jaane
kyun hai aisa udaas kya jaane

is tajaahul kaa kya thikaana hai
jaan kar jo na mudda jaane

kah diya maine raaz-e-dil apna
us ko tum jaano yaa ḳhuda jaane

kya ġharaz kyun idhar tawajjoh ho
haal-e-dil aap ki bala jaane

‘Hoor-E-Baghdad’ (1946) was produced under the banner of Mohan Pictures and was directed by A M Khan. The star cast included Shiraz, Ayyaz Begum, Devraj, Fazlu, Anwari Bai, Khan Chand, Garib Shah, Aziz Siddiqui, Fateh Singh, Miss Mumtaz etc. From the star cast, it can be guessed that it was a stunt/fantasy film. The story of the film as appeared in this link (probably taken from the song booklet of the film) is reproduced below:

The Shah, feeling that it will soon be the time to pass the crown to one who is duly able, wishes to test his four sons to see who is the most deserving of the honour. Prince Anwar, the Shah’s eldest, was the most able of all and is chosen heir to the throne.

The Shah’s young second wife (Anwaribai) objected, however, as she felt her own son (Devraj) should be the successor. To make her happy, the Shah decides to test them all again, this time in a special court. Again, Anwar was victorious. Still unhappy, the young queen arranges yet another test, with the additional prize being the hand of the vizier’s (A. Siddique) daughter, Almas (Ayaz Begum), who is known as the most beautiful in all of Baghdad. In this new test, each of the sons must risk life and limb to bring back four valuable objects.

With this song, The film. ‘Hoor-E-Baghdad’ (1946) and the lyricist, F M Pindvi make debut on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Dil samajhta hai ya khuda jaane (Hoor e Baghdad)(1946) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-F M Pindvi, MD-Damodar Sharma

Lyrics

dil samajhta hai yaa khuda jaane ae ae
meri muskil ko koi kya jaane
dil samajhta hai yaa khuda

aa aa aa aa aaa
kaisi ulfat
mujhe to wahashat hai…..ae ae
kaash mera wo mudda jaane ae ae
dil samajhta hai yaa khuda jaane ae ae /em>

mere hosh-o-khirad pe…ae ae ae ae ae ae ae ae ae
kya guzri..ee ee ee
nigaahen aaj chhupaaye kya jaane
dil samajhta hai yaa khuda
wo tasawwur mein aen aen
aake kehte hain..aen aen aen
tum ho kaise meri bala jaane ae
tum ho kaise meri bala jaane ae
dil samajhta hai yaa khuda jaane ae


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4912 Post No. : 16730

Today, December 29, 2021 is the 6th Remembrance Day of Subir Sen, singer, actor and the music director in Hindi and Bangla films. The resemblance of his voice with that of Hemant Kumar seems to have influenced the music director, Shankar-Jaikishan to try him as a playback singer in Hindi films. Subir Sen sang just 28 songs in Hindi films in the span of around 12 years. Most of the songs he rendered became popular.

Subir Sen (24/07/1934 – 29/12/2015) was born in Assam and grew up in Guwahati where his father had a pharmacy business. He completed his matriculation from Guwahati. From the childhood, he was drawn towards music and this was the reason that made his father to shift to Kolkata after selling his pharmacy business. During his growing up days, he was highly influenced by the singing of Dhananjay Bhattacharya, Hemant Kumar and Talat Mehmood. When he started singing their songs in some programmes, the audience started appreciating his renditions. He felt that he can also sing like his favourite singers which made him to pursue the singing as a career.

Subir Sen enrolled himself in Marris College of Music (later renamed as Bhatkhande Music Institute), Lucknow. During the third year of his college, he received the first prize for singing a vilambit Khayal in raag Purvi. Later, he learnt Hindustani classical music from Acharya Chinmoy Lahiri, a vocalist in Hindustani classical music. On the advice of Acharya Chinmoy, Subir Sen learnt the Thumri singing from Usha Ranjan Mukherjee for over 2 years.

On an invitation from Guru Dutt, Subir Sen along with the music director, Sudhin Dasgupta shifted to Mumbai and became the part of the Guru Dutt’s Films for his film under production (probably for ‘Pyaasa’1957). However, though they were on the payroll of Guru Dutt Films, they never got opportunity to sing in his film. It is said that Guru Dutt sent Subir Sen to S D Burman for audition. He introduced himself as a singer who sang in the style of Hemant Kumar. S D Burman rejected him without taking his audition by asking him as to why he should use him when he can have the original voice of Hemant Kumar. (Source: Interview of Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma on S D Burman).

While Sudhin Dasgupta returned to Kolkata, Subir Sen got an opportunity to sing for the first time in Hindi films under the baton of Shankar-Jaikishan who were impressed with the resemblance of his voice with that of Hemant Kumar. The first song he sang in Hindi film was manzil wohi hai pyaar ki raahi badal gaye in ‘Kathputli’ (1957) picturised on Balraj Sahni. The song became very popular and was one of the three songs from ‘Kathputli’ (1957) to figure in the top 32 songs of Binaca Geetmala for the year 1958. In 1959-60, Subir Sen sang six songs in six films with six music directors (including one under the baton of Hemant Kumar), all of which became popular.

Subir Sen again came into the attention when his song, dil mera ek aas ka panchhi picturised on Rajendra Kumar (who was nick named as ‘Jubilee Kumar’), became even more popular than his first song, ranking 5th among the top 32 Hindi film songs of Binaca Geetmala for the year 1961.

With the kind of the early successes, Subir Sen must have dreamt of a bright future for him as a playback singer in Hindi films. But his discography in the table given below reveals that his playback singing career in Hindi films did not reach to a level to make a living out of it. In most of the films, he got the opportunity to sing only one song.

No. Songs Name of the Film Co-singer Music Director
1 manzil wohi hai pyaar ki Kathputli (1957) Solo Shankar-Jaikishan
2 pyaar mein milna sanam Ardhaangini (1959) Lata Vasant Desai
3 main rangeela pyaar ka raahi Chhoti Bahen (1959) Lata Shankar-Jaikishan
4 gori tere natkhat nainaa Ham Bhi Insaan Hain (1959) Geeta Dutt Hemant Kumar
5 dil leke jaate ho kahaan O Tera Kya Kehna (1959) Kamal Barot Kalyanji Virji Shah
6 hamen in raahon pe chalna hai Maasoom (1960) Aarti Mukherjee Robin Banerjee
7 gar tum bura na maano Mehlon Ke Khwaab (1960) Asha Bhosle S Mohinder
8 dheere chalaao zaraa Aas Ka Panchhi (1961) Asha Bhosle Shankar-Jaikishan
9 dil mera ek aas ka panchhi Aas Ka Panchhi (1961) Solo Shankar-Jaikishan
10 bahaare luta ke nazaare dikha ke Anarbala (1961) Suman Kalyanpur Bulo C Rani
11 dekho na jaao ae jaaneman Boy Friend (1961) Solo Shankar-Jaikishan
12 sun le daastaan yoon na sata Passport (1961) Solo Kalyanji-Anandji
13 aa jaa re nain dwaare Roop Ki Rani Choron ka Raja (1961) Chorus Shankar-Jaikishan
14 chanda salone itna bata de Sati Renuka (1961) Suman Kalyanpur S L Merchant
15 kya kaha zara phir kaho Gangu (1962) Geeta Dutt Kalyanji-Anandji
16 kasam na lijiye kasam na dijiye Jaadoo Mahal (1962) Purnima Seth Bulo C Rani
17 Jeewan ki lambi raahon par Pick Pocket (1962) Mahendra Kapoor Sardar Malik
18 thaam mujhe gir na jaaun Raaz Ki Baat (1962 UR) Solo Robin Banerjee
19 chaand tale jhoom jhoom Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai (1963) Suman Kalyanpur Dattaram
20 gagan ke chanda na poochh hamse Apne Huye Paraaye (1964) Lata Shankar-Jaikishan
21 haath chod de mera bedardi Hukum Ka Ekka (1964) Aarti Mukherjee Robin Banerjee
22 bujh gaya dil ka diya Jaadui Anghooti (1964) Solo Suresh Kumar
23 ab to aisa lagta hai Roop Sundari (1964) Solo Sardar Malik
24 jaago anjaani raajdulaari Ek Soorat Do Dil (1968) Aarti Mukherjee Bijan Pal
25 aah dil mein hai Rani Chandravati (1968, UR) Solo S N Tripathi
26 Ye pukaar kiske liye Rani Chandravati (1968, UR) Suman Kalyanpur S N Tripathi
27 sedin dujone dulechhinu bone (Bangla) Anubhav (1971) Solo Rabindranath Tagore
28 koi mera ho gaya Midnight (1972) Solo Subir Sen

The initial euphoria Subir Sen created in Hindi film music due to the resemblance of his voice with that of Hemant Kumar may have becoming a stumbling block in his playback singing career. It would be a natural response from the music directors that they would rather work with Hemant Kumar who had already established himself as a playback singer than Subir Sen. Also, producers, directors, actors and the film financiers/distributors have their own preferences for playback singers among the established ones.

Ashutosh Banerjee, music director who had composed many Bangla films and non-film songs for Subir Sen was of the view that while in Mumbai, Subir Sen started listening to a lot of western music during which Jim Reeves and Nat King Cole became his favourite singers. From Jim Reeves, he picked up the tonal quality and from Nat King Cole the drama in singing. In his subsequent renditions, Subir Sen was influenced by the styles of these two American singers.

Some changes in Subir Sen’s rendition style are evident in his later songs. For instance, in ‘dheere chalo zara’ from ‘Aas Ka Panchhi’ (1961), one can feel some shades of Mukesh in the song. In ‘dekho na jaaneman’ which he sang for Shammi Kapoor in ‘Boy Friend’ (1961), his voice sounds somewhat different giving a feel of Manna Dey. I have listened to some of his Bangla non-film songs and I feel that he had adapted to a style of rendition to sound somewhat different from Hemant Kumar’s voice. For examples, ‘oy ujjwal din’ and ‘pagol hawa’ (a rehash of non-film Bangla song originally sung by Jatileshwar Mukherjee and ‘na jaane tum’ from ‘Chhoti Si Baat’, 1976).

With his playback singing career in Hindi films getting stangnated, Subir Sen returned to Kolkata sometime in early 1970s. He recorded hundreds of Bengali modern and Rabindra Sangeet numbers over three decades. He also acted along with Uttam Kumar in Bangla film, ‘Momer Alo’ (1964) and in Hindi film “Anubhav’ (1971).

Subir Sen and also Dwijen Mukherjee could not create a place for themselves in Hindi films mainly because they were born with their voice boxes almost similar to Hemant Kumar. And both of them were the contemporary of Hemant Kumar and in competition with him. Also, they came at a time when the troika of the main male playback singers – Mohammed Rafi, Mukesh, Talat Mehmood and later Kishore Kumar had already well-established in Hindi film industry.

On the occasion of the 6th Remembrance Day of Subir Sen, I am presenting ‘chaand tale jhoom jhoom tirak rahi hai’ rendered by him with Suman Kalyanpur for the film ‘Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai’ (1963). The song is written by Shailendra which is set to music by Dattaram.

With this song, all the six songs of ‘Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai’ have been covered in the Blog.

Acknowledgements:

1. Videos of interview of Subir Sen by Kolkata Gaan available on YouTube. Since the interview was conducted in Bengali, I requested Partha Chanda ji for the English translation which he promptly sent me with the links of a couple of Subir Sen’s Bangla songs. Thanks Partha Chanda ji.

2. Interview of Ashutosh Banerjee which appeared on The Times of India E-Paper, updated on 29/12/2015.

Audio Clip:

Song-Chaand taley jhoom jhoom (Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai)(1963) Singers-Suman Kalyanpur, Subir Sen, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-Dattaram
Suman Kalyanpur + Subir Sen
Male chorus
Female chorus
All chorus

Lyrics

ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha

ho o o o
ho o o
o o o o

ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha

ho o o o
ho o o
o o o o

chaand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hai ghoongharwaaliyaan
mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hai taaliyaan
haand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hai ghungharwaaliyaan
mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hai taaliyaan

ho o o o
aa aa aa
o o o o
ho o o o
aa aa aa

ho o o o
aa aa aa aa
ho o o o
ho o o o
aa aa aa
o o o o

chori chori dil ko mere kaun gaya chhoo
aaj meri har nazar pe kis ki justujoo
aa aa aa
o o o o
aa aa aa
o o o o
bekaraar mera pyaar meri aarzoo
mere dil ko bhaa gayi hai aaj tu hi tu

haay main bhi aaj main nahi tu bhi nahin tu
hoy
chaand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hai ghungharwaaliyaan

mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hai taaliyaan

ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha

ho o o o
o o o
o o o o

ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha aa aa aa
ha

ho o o o
o o o
o o o

aaj itne paas hain jo kal thhe paraaye
saamne hai jo kabhi thhe khwaab mein aaye

la ra ra ra
la ra la ra li ra
la la la la
la ra la ra li ra
dekhti hai par nigaah sochti nahin
kya bharam kya hai sach ye jaanati nahi
o mere dil ki manzile hain bas yahin kahin
hoy
chaand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hai ghungharwaaliyaan

mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hai taaliyaan
ho o o o
ha aa aa
o o o
ho o o o
ha aa aa
o o o

be-dhadak ye dil mein mere aa raha hai kaun
apni raah mujhko bhi bhula raha hai kaun
ha aa aa aa
ho o o o
ha aa aa aa
ho o o o
dheere dheere dil se dil mein la raha hai kaun
dekhiye to pyaar se bula raha hai kaun

o kya khabar ye mujhko aajma raha hai kaun
chaand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hain ghungharwaaliyaan
mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hain taaliyaan

chaand tale jhoom jhoom
thirak rahi hai ghungharwaaliyaan
mastiyon ki aaj dhoom
khushi baja rahi hai taaliyaan


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4879 Post No. : 16674

Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment – Lord Buddha

Thinking about the past events in the life and planning for the future is one of the common activities of human beings most of the time. This, at times, can become a stressful activity during which negative thoughts can creep in the mind. In this process, we tend to lose focus on the current activities. We try to neatly plan for the future based on the past experiences. But not all the parameters of the future plan run on the basis of what was determined at the time of planning. The reason is that there are many uncertainties on the way to attaining the goal. I will give the example of planning my Himalayan treks to elucidate the tyranny of uncertainties.

I have always made a well-charted plan for each of my Himalayan treks. But the uncertainty starts when the train or the flight which we have booked gets delayed by a few hours jeopardizing the connecting travels to the base town/village from where the trek is to start. The second uncertainty is through natural calamities. A landslide or a flooded water stream cutting across the road can block the vehicle movements for a considerable time. The third element of the uncertainty is the weather. A rain/snow storm during the trek can force one to stay inside the tent or in a shelter on the way for a considerably long time. Lastly, the last-minute health issues of a trekker can force him the abandon the trek mid-way. Ultimately, one is not sure whether the trekker’s goal to reach his destination would be achievable or not.

Because of these perceived uncertainties, for the next trek, we plan more meticulously than what is necessary. Things work out smoothly and at the end of the trek, though we are happy to complete the trek in time without hic-cups, we feel cheated by the nature. We are left with extra days which means additional expenses. In short, there is no fixed solution in the planning for the future.

Because of the futility of the past memories and the uncertainty of the future, a philosophical thought has emerged which is known as ‘live in the moment’. This philosophy reminds us that our presence is in the present only. We cannot live in the past as that timeframe is over. We cannot plan for the future as there are many uncertainties. When we think of our past, the thought process influences our future goals. There is no guarantee that our past experiences would lead to achieving the future goals successfully.

Perhaps, it was in this context, Lord Buddha advised his followers to forget about the past, not to dream about the future and devote full time for present moment. In other words, there is no need for Mungerilal ke haseen sapne as there is no guarantee – kal ho na ho. So, enjoy the present moment on which the human beings have some control. Just go with the flow of life as beautifully visualised by Sahir Ludhianv in the song, main zindagi ka saath nibhaata chala gaya.

There may be many among us who are following ‘living for the moment’ philosophy, albeit unknowingly. After reading about this philosophy, I have realised that I have unwittingly followed this philosophy covering the important social and financial events in my life. I had flown with then current situation as needed without bothering about the future – especially in regard to my education, employment, buying a residential house, financial planning for the future etc. I had not made any financial planning for my future as at that time, I felt that my provident fund balance and the gratuity amount would take care of my future financial requirements. As I see it today, I was not completely right about this thinking as interest earned on this amount would not have taken care of a good standard of living in my post-retired life. Fortunately, when my job became pensionable in 1997, it helped me to maintain a good standard of living after retirement.

Let me add a caveat to the ‘live in the moment’ philosophy. Each one of us follow a different life style. Some will thrive with their life to flow with the needs as and when arise without planning for the future. Some may like to have a perspective plan for their future life, may be with some flexibilities. There is also the third possibility – a sort of mix of both where one partially plans and also partially swims with the flow.

I found a rare song from the film ‘Dukh Sukh’ (1942) which depicts, more or less, the ‘live in the moment’ philosophy, probably for a drunkard in a tavern. The song is ‘hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa, majhe se pee aur majhe se khaa’ which is rendered by Rajkumari Dubey. The words are of Wali Sahab which are set to music by Khemchand Prakash.

Audio Clip:

Song-Hai aaj kal ki fikar hi kya (Dukh Sukh)(1942) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Wahi Sahab, MD-Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa

ye aaj tere haath hai
ye aaj tere haath hai
kal ki kal ke saath hai
kal ki kal ke saath hai
kal kaa din jo aayega
kal kaa din jo aayega
to kal ko dekha jaayega
to kal ko dekha jaayega
hai kal ki tujhko fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai kal ki tujhko fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa

shabaab phir na aayega
ye abr phir na chhaayega
shabaab phir na aayega
ye abr phir na chhaayega
ye chaar din hain pyaar ke ae
ye chaar din hain pyaar ke ae
maz utha tu bahaar ke
maze utha tu bahaar ke
bahaar ke tu maze uthha
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
bahaar ke tu maze uthha
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4867 Post No. : 16659

Today, November 14, 2021 is the 4th Remembrance Day of Shyama (real name – Khurshid Akhtar) who enthralled the Hindi film buffs with her blinks and smiles in her Hindi films of 1950s. There was a spontaneity and energy in her performances reflecting, what I guess, her joie de vivre nature.

My earliest memory of watching Shyama was in ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) on its repeat release sometime in 1974 as a part of Guru Dutt’s Film Perspectives. I became familiar with her face when some of the songs picturised on her from the films like my all-time favourite, ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), ‘Bhaabhi’ (1957), ‘Sharda’ (1957), ‘Mr Qartoon MA’ (1959), ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960) and many more, used to be telecast on Mumbai Doordarshan’s  ‘Chhaaya Geet’ programme. Some of her songs have remained in the limelight even today. I can never get tired of watching those songs pictuirsed on Shyama.

Shyama (07 Jun, 1935 – 14 Nov, 2017) was born in Lahore but her family had shifted to Mumbai in early 1940s. She did her schooling in Anjuman-E-Islam High School in South Mumbai. Shyama’s foray into her first Hindi film, ‘Zeenat’ (1945) was an accidental one. When she was on a visit to watch the film’s shooting along with her school friends, the film’s director, Shaukat Hussain Rizvi invited her to be the part of the chorus singers for the picturization of the qawwali song, “Aahen Na Bhari Shiqwe Na Kiye”. At that time, she was 9. Thereafter, she did small roles as a child actor and side roles as a teenager in around 35 films. At a young age, she had become the bread-earner for her large family. Her screen name, Shyama was given by Prakash Pictures’ Vijay Bhatt when working in his film, ‘Nai Maa’ (1946) as a child artist.

Everything was not roses on the way to reach the stardom for Shyama. She had to struggle very hard to get roles during the early stage of her life when she was growing from her childhood to a teenager. Her struggling days got over when she bagged her first lead role in Filmistan’s ‘Shrimati ji’ (1952) with Nasir Khan. Thereafter, there was no dearth of work for her in the films.

During her filmy career of over 4 decades, Shyama worked in around 175 films. Some of her notable films are ‘Hum Log’ (1951), ‘Sazaa’ (1951), ‘Dil-E-Naadan’ (1953), ‘Shart’ (1954), ‘Aar Paar’ (1954), ‘Musaafirkhaana’ (1955), ‘Chhoo Mantar’ (1956), ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), ‘Shaarda’ (1957), ‘Bhaabhi’ (1957), ‘Johnny Walker’ (1957), ‘Mr. Qartoon MA’ (1958), ‘Laala Rukh’ (1958), ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1959), ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960), ‘Zabak’ (1961), ‘Bahurani’ (1963). From 1960’s onwards, Shayma switched over to character roles. She was active till the end of 1970s. However, after the death of her husband in 1979, she virtually took retirement from the films. Shyama faced the camera for the last time in ‘Hathyaar’ (1989).

I was going through her filmography from 1952 when she started getting lead actor’s roles to 1960 when her career was in the waning stage as a lead actor. It is amazing to note that during 1952-60, she worked in as many as 84 films making an average of nearly 10 films per year. I do not recall any other actress of her time achieved this distinction. The main reason for her large number films was that she accepted both the lead as well as supporting actor’s roles. Her films covered a variety of genres with a large assortments of lead actors like Motilal, Ashok Kumar, Premnath, Shammi Kapoor, Bharat Bhushan, Karan Diwan, Guru Dutt, Balraj Sahni, Sunil Dutt, Kishore Kumar, Johnny Walker, Ranjan, Mahipal, Talat Mehmood etc.

Shyama faced her worst financial and emotional turmoil in 1953 when she decided to marry director and cinematographer Fali Mistry. They fell in love  on the sets of ‘Sazaa’ (1951). The marriage was opposed by her father and her brothers. She had revealed her agony in her article in the Urdu film magazine ‘Shama’, published in November 1954, the English translation of which is available in Yasir Abbasi’s book ‘Yeh Un Dinon Ki Baat Hai’ (2018).

According to Shyama, apparently the problem for her large family was that having got used to living lavishly on her earnings, they feared that her marriage with Fali Mistry would strip them off comforts and luxuries. When she decided to go ahead with the marriage, she was forced to leave her own house without her money and jewelry as her father and brothers confiscated all her assets including the bank balances. She and her supporting mother had to stay with the family of producer-director M Sadiq for a month before she could buy her own house by arranging money. It took another six months for Shyama and Fali Mistry to get married. But the marriage was not revealed in public for a long time for fear of film producers avoiding her to sign the new films.

Shyama spent her financially secured retired life, socializing with her close friends like Nanda, Shakeela, Waheeda Rehman, Jabeen Jaleel etc. Just about 5 years before her death, she got a paralysis attack making her movements restricted. However, she majorly recovered from the paralysis. She breathed her last on November 14, 2017 due to lung infections, leaving behind her two sons and a daughter. Her elder son, Faroukh Mistry is a Cinematographer in Hindi feature films and has directed many documentary and advertising films. The second son, Rohinton Mistry is settled in London as a businessman. Both her elder son and her daughter, Shirin were with her while she breathed her last.

As a tribute to Shyama on the occasion of her 4th Remembrance Day, I have chosen a song pictuirsed on her in the film ‘Khota Paisa’ (1958). This film was among four films in which Shyama acted opposite Johnny Walker in lead role. The other three films in this combination were ‘Chhoo Mantar’ (1956), ‘Johnny Walker’ (1957) and ‘Mr Qartoon MA (1958). Incidentally, all these three films had OP Nayyar as the music director.

‘Khota Paisa’ (1958) had 7 songs of which 5 songs have been covered on the Blog. All the songs were written by Rajinder Krishan which were set to music by Madan Mohan. I am presenting the 6th song, “Ye Zaalim Nighaaon Ki Ghaat” which is sung by Asha Bhosle. It is a club song during which NA Ansari, the menacing pipe smoking villain, is present along with his henchmen.

It is interesting to note that in the record version there is some changes in wordings of the song as under:

Film Sound Track Version Record Version
Mukhda
ye zaalim NIGHAAON ki GHAAT
badi tikhi badi NATKHATI
Mukhda
ye zaalim MOHABBAT ki CHAAT
badi tikhi badi CHATPATI
Antara-2
GAA le ZARA jahaan mein
NAGMA to aashiqi kaajo NAYE pyaar ki RAT RATI
Antara-2
LE le MAZA jahaan mein
DAM BHAR LO aashiqi kaajo NA THHI pyaar ki PHATPATI
Antara-3
KATNE bhi de khushi se
ye BAHAAR ke zamaane
Antara-3
LOOTNE bhi de khushi se
ye PYAAR ke zamaane

Other features of this song is that Asha Bhosle seems to imitate the style of Geeta Dutt  and Madan Mohan’s musical composition of the song closely resembles that of OP Nayyar.

Video

Audio

Song – Ye Zaalim Nigaahon Ki Ghaat (Khota Paisa) (1958) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Rajinder Krishan, MD – Madan Mohan

Lyrics

ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
apne apne muqaddar ki baat
kiske hisse mein kitni bati
ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
jo nazar na milaayi
na jigar pe chot khaayi
us dil kaa faayda kya
jo kisi pe aa na jaaye
hai wo zindagi bhi koi zindagi
jo mohobbat kiye bin kati
ye zaalim nighaaon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
jo huwa na kisi ka
dushman hai zindagi ka
gaa le zara jahaan mein
nagma to aashiqi ka
tu jiya bhi to kya
do ghadi ke liye
jo na ye pyaar ki rat rati
ye zaalim nigaahon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
 
ye dil kaun jaane
lut jaaye kis bahaane
katne bhi de khushi se
hain bahaar ke zamaane
lut gaye dil kai
mit gaye dil kai
par mohobbat kabhi na ghati
ye zaalim nigaahon ki ghaat
badi teekhi badi natkhati
apne apne muqaddar ki baat
kiske hisse mein kitni bati

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी
अपने अपने मुकद्दर की बात
किसके हिस्से में कितनी बटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

जो नज़र ना मिलाई
ना जिगर पे चोट खाई
उस दिल का फायदा क्या
जो किसी पे आ ना जाए
है वो ज़िंदगी भी कोई ज़िंदगी
जो मोहब्बत किए बिन कटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

जो हुआ ना किसी का
दुश्मन है ज़िंदगी का
गा ले ज़रा जहां में
नग़मा तो आशिक़ी का
तू जिआ भी तो क्या दो घड़ी के लिए
जो ना ये प्यार की रट रटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी

ये दिल कौन जाने
लुट जाये किस बहाने
कटने भी दे खुशी से
हैं बहार के जमाने
लुट गए दिल कई
मिट गए दिल कई
पर मोहब्बत कभी ना घटी
ये ज़ालिम निगाहों की घात
बड़ी तीखी बड़ी नटखटी
अपने अपने मुकद्दर की बात
किसके हिस्से में कितनी बटी


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4863 Post No. : 16654

‘Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai’ (1963) was produced by Surinder Kapoor under the banner of Amar Chhaaya Films and was directed by Kedar Kapoor. The star cast included Geeta Bali and Pradeep Kumar in the lead role with the supporting cast of Agha, Vijaylaxmi, Siddhu, Sunder, Tun Tun, Mohan Choti, Ravikant etc. Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Om Prakash, Bhagwan, Kumkum, and Shyama made their guest appearances in the film. This was Surinder Kapoor’s maiden film as a producer.

I was wondering as to how Surinder Kapoor could manage to rope in Shammi Kapoor and Shashi Kapoor for the qawwali song in the film. It became clear when I came to know that Surinder Kapoor was the cousin of Prithviraj Kapoor. When he shifted to Mumbai from Peshawar in 1950, Prithviraj Kapoor helped him in getting his first job as an assistant to K Asif in ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960). Since the film took a lot of time to be completed, Surinder Kapoor left K Asif and became the Secretary to Geeta Bali. Kedar Kapoor, the film’s director was from Peshawar. Probably, he may also be related to Prithviraj Kapoor.

It was Geeta Bali who encouraged Surinder Kapoor to become a film producer. She arranged the finance, the crew and the cast. So, getting the guest actors for the qawwali song became an easy task for Surinder Kapoor. The film was launched in 1958 and got completed in 1963. The film did not fare well on the box office. This was the last released film of Geeta Bali.

‘Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai’ (1963) had six songs in the film written by Shailendra (5) and Anand Bakshi (1) which were set to music by Dattaram. Four songs have been covered on the Blog.

Here is the 5th song ‘Muhammad Shah Rangeele gaawat aaj prem raag’ from the film to appear on the Blog. The song is rendered by Manna Dey on the words of Shailendra. The video clip of the song is not available on any video sharing platform. So, it is difficult to know as to in which context, this song was picturised in the film. My wild guess is that the song may have been picturised on Agha in a comical situation using the bandish-based classical song.

Muhammad Shah ‘Rangeela’ was the Mughal emperor during 1719 to 1748. He was a patron of performing arts and music. His court had many musicians, the prominent among them being Niyamat Khan who used to compose bandishes under his pen name. ‘Sadarang’ and his nephew, Feroz Khan under the pen name of ‘Adarang’. Sadarang has been credited with the introduction of Khayal as a form of Hindustani classical music. He composed many Khayal bandishes for his desciples which included a few women from the harem of Muhammed Shah ‘Rangeela’.

There are some persons who are known by their work and not by their names. Niyamat Khan was one of them whose name is unknown for the present generation. Some of us may have listened to his khayal bandishes rendered by stalwarts like Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Ustad Amir Khan, Ustad Rashid Khan, etc without knowing that these were composed by Niyamat Khan ‘Sadarang’.

One of the Khayal bandish composed by Niyamat Khan was ‘Muhammad Shah rangeele re, tum bin main kya karoon badariya, nit na suhaawe’ in raag Miyan Ki Malhar in praise of Muhammad Shah. The song under discussion is based on this bandish with different ‘bole’ written by Shailendra and composed by Dattaram in raag ‘Miyan Ki Malhar’. It is rendered as ‘chhota khayal’.

By the way, Muhammad shah rangeele re from ‘Nadirshah’ (1968) was also based on the abovementioned bandish. Both ‘Nadirshah’ (1968) and ‘Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai’ (1963) took a long time to be completed and released. So, it is difficult to guess as to which one of two films got inspired from this bandish first.

Audio Clip:

Song-Muhammad Shah rangeeley (Jab Se Tumhen Dekha Hai)(1963) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-Dattaram

Lyrics

hriday na…………….th
hey ae ae na…….th
aa aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aaaa
aa aaa
dhoom ta na ta na na
pranaam

muhammad shah rangeele
muhammad shah rangeele ae
muhammad shah rangeele
gaawat aaj prem raag
gaawat aaj prem raag
sur bade nasheele ae
muhammad shah rangeele
rangeele
rangee…..le

pa……aa
ma ma ma ni pa….aa
ma ma..aa
pa ni…ee pa…aa
pa pa pa ni
pa pa pa ni
pa pa pa sa
pa ni pa ni
pa pa ni
pa ni dha
ma dha pa
ma pa ga ma
dha ni dha ni dha ni dha ni
pa ni..ee
pa ni
pa ni

tere bin jee na sakoon
tere bin jee na sak……………oon
jee na sak…oon
na sakoon
tere bin jee na sakoon
tere bin jee na sakoon
jee na sakoon
tere bin
jee na sakoon
tere bin
tere bin jee na sakoon
lekin ab kya main karoon
lekin ab kya kya main karoon
lekin ab kya kya main karoon
saans saans kehti aas
saans saans kehti aas
jee..ee le
jee..ee le
jee..ee le
muhammad shah rangeele
muhammad shah rangeele
gaawat aaj prem raag
gaawat aaj prem raag
sur bade nasheele ae
muhammad shah rangeele
rangeele
rangee…..le


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4862 Post No. : 16653

Shekhawati region of Rajasthan consists of the districts of Churu, Jhunjhunu, Sikar and some parts of Jaipur and Nagaur districts. The region is well-known for its painted havelis and temples. I had travelled in Shekhawati region in February 2013 mainly to see the magnificent painted havelis. There are hundreds of such havelis, some abandoned, some still being used as residential houses and a few which have been converted into heritage hotels. There are extensively and intricately painted havelis of some of the industrialists like Birla, Singhania, Goenka, Jhunjhunwaala, Podar, Morarka, Modi etc.

Shekhawati region is also known for producing hundreds of musicians, kathak dancers and vocalists – especially from Churu district. Some of the musicians, dancers and singers have been associated with Hindi films since 1931 when the sound films made their presence. A few of them have indirectly contributed to Hindi films by training some film artists in dancing and singing. Here are some of the artists from Shekhawati region who contributed to Hindi film industry.

Pandit Jagannath Prasad (1930-1996), was a classical vocalist from Khudi village. He was a court singer in Nepal and Dharbhanga before settling down for some time in Kolkata. He came to Mumbai in 1941 and remained in Mumbai until his death. His disciples included K L Saigal and Prithviraj Kapoor in Kolkata and Shahu Modak, Mukesh, Premnath, Raj Kapoor, Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Raj Khosla, Nutan etc in Mumbai. He also composed songs for ‘Krishnarjuna Yuddh’ (1946) and ‘Prisoners of Golconda’ (1954).

Pandit Gourishankar (1916-1992) was the first kathak dancer to perform kathak dance abroad during the Berlin Olympic in 1936. In 1938, he was appointed as kathak dance teacher in Shanti Niketan in 1941. He shifted to Mumbai and established a dance institution. His disciples included Pahadi Sanyal, Nalini Jaywant, Meena Kumari, Sandhya, Aruna Irani etc. He choreographed dances for Meena Kumari in ‘Paakeezah’ (1972).

Pandit Hanuman Prasad (1913-1969) was from Sujangarh who was a classical vocalist, a kathak dancer, a musician playing multiple musical instruments and a poet. He was the music director for many Hindi films which included ‘Draupadi’ (1944), ‘Raseeli’ (1946), ‘Bhakt Prahlad’ (1946), ‘Hip Hip Hurray’ (1948), ‘Chilman’ (1949), ‘Saudagar’ (1951) etc. He was a choreographer for ‘Geet Gaaya Patharon Ne’ (1964). He died in 1969 after choregraphing one dance song in ‘Jal Bin Machali Nritya Bin Bijli’ (1969). He was also the music teacher in Hill Grange High School, Mumbai till his death in 1969.

Pandit Laxman Prasad Jaipurwaale (1915-1977) was a Hindustani classical vocalist who was a purist in his renditions. So, he kept away from Hindi film music, But his connection with Hindi cinema was through his disciples which included Sudha Malhotra, Aarati Mukherjee and Meenu Purshottam among others.

Pandit Girdhar Prasad Jaipurwaale was the son of Pandit Laxman Prasad Jaipurwaale who, apart from being the Hindustani classical vocalist, exceled in playing Tabla. He played Tabla for many music directors including R D Burman, Laxmikant-Pyarelal and Jagjit Singh, His two sons, Jaydeep and Sanjay are musicians and music arrangers in Hindi films.

Pandit K Mahavir (1938-1987) was a talented music composer from Bidasar who unfortunately remained in the sideline of Hindi film industry as an assistant to some music directors which included Khemchand Prakash. His talent was recognised by Lata Mangeshkar who sang under his baton a few non-film songs in the genre of ghazal and geet. Pandit Hridaynath Mangeshkar was one of his disciples. One of his tough compositions which Lata Mangeshkar sang with ease was aankh se aankh milaata hai koi. After the death of Pandit Hanuman Prasad, Pandit K Mahavir was employed in his place as the music teacher in Hill Grange High School until his death in 1987.

Sohanlal and his brother Hiralal were kathak dancers of Jaipur Gharana who migrated to Chennai in the 1940s. They worked in South films as dancers and choreographers. Later, they shifted to Mumbai and worked as choreographers in many films during 1950s to 1970s. Sohanlal’s major Hindi films were, Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Taj Mahal’ (1963), ‘Parasmani’ (1963), ‘Arzoo’ (1965), ‘Guide’ (1965), ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (1971), ‘Satyam Shivam Sundaram’ (1971) etc. ‘Hiralal did choreography in films like ‘Naagin’ (1954), ‘New Delhi’ (1956), ‘Raagini’ (1958), ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961), ‘Prem Pujari’ (1970). ‘Shalimaar’ (1978) etc.

Khemchand Prakash (12/12/1907 – 10/08/1950) was one of the four sons of Pandit Govardhan Prasad who belonged to Khudi village in Churu district. He received in vocal training and in kathak dance from his father and his elder brother, Badri Prasad. He was the court singer and dancer in Royal Court of Jaipur. Later he shifted to the royal court of Nepal as vocalist and kathak dancer. After about 5-7 years, he came to Kolkata and became the assistant to music director Timit Baran. In 1939, he shifted to Mumbai and joined Ranjit Movietone as music director. While in Mumbai, apart from working as a music director, he got further training in Kathak dance from Pandit Achhan Maharaj.

Khemchand Prakash introduced the blending of classical music with Rajasthani folk music for Hindi film music. During his short stint of about 10 years as a music director in Hindi films, he composed songs for as many as 46 films – a very high output in 1940s standards. ‘Pardesi’ (1941), ‘Tansen’ (1943), ‘Bhartruhari’ (1944), ‘Mumtaz Mahal’ (1944), ‘Sindoor’ (1947), Ziddi’ (1948), ‘Mahal’ (1949) are some of his films having his memorable song compositions.

Basant Prakash (27/01/1928-19/03/1996) was the youngest among the 3 brothers of Khemchand Prakash. Because he was 20 years younger than his elder brother, Khemchand Prakash treated him like his son. It is said that later, Basant Prakash was legally adopted by Khemchand Prakash as his son.

Basant Prakash got the initial musical training from Khemchand Prakash and remained with him as his assistant. He was not as prolific as Khemchand Prakash. He composed music for about a dozen films many of which were in combination with other music directors.

Jamal Sen (29/01/ 1904 – 12/04/1979) was born in Sujangarh in Churu district in a traditionally music family. He got his musical training from his father, Jeewan Sen. Apart from being a vocalist, he was also trained in Tabla and Dholak. He started his singing career in All India Radio, Kolkata. He later went to Lahore and worked with music director, Ghulam Haider as a musician for the film, ‘Khazaanchi’ (1941). This was one of the earliest Hindi films in which dholak played by Jamal Sen was prominently used in all the songs.

Jamal Sen’s association with Ghulam Haider ended when the latter migrated to Pakistan in 1948. After working as a freelance musician, he got an opportunity as an indepedent music director when Kidar Sharma selected him for his film ‘Shokhiyaan’ (1951). Although the film did not fare well on the box office, Jamal Sen’s music was well appreciated. Kamal Amrohi selected him as a music director for his film, ‘Daaera’ (1953). Again, while the film failed at the box office, all the songs of the film became popular.

Despite the good music, the two failed films dented Jamal Sen’s career as a music director. He never got big banner films. In the emerging film music scenario, his raag and folk based music was regarded as misfit. During his career of over 2 decades, he was the music director for about a dozen films.

Jamal Sen had 4 sons of which the eldest son, Shambhu Sen became a dancer. He also composed music for two Hindi films, ‘Mrigtrishna’ (1975) and ‘Banno’ (1987). The second son, Dilip Sen along with his nephew Sameer Sen (son of Shambhu Sen) became the music director duo. Shambhu Sen’s third son, Lalit Sen was also the music director who majorly worked for T V Serials and non-film albums.

Mubarak Begum, the playback singer was born in Sujangarh in Churu district but brought up in Ahmedabad. Her playback singing career started with a couple of songs in ‘Aaiye’ (1949). But she could never come close to top 5 female playback singers of her time. Her career progress was earatic. As a result, though she was active as a playback singer up to 1981, she sang less than 200 songs in Hindi films.

Shankar-Shambu, the brothers, famous for their sufi qawwals, belong to Impalsar village in Churu district whose family later settled in Chanduasi village in Aligarh district of UP. They were trained by their father, Pandit Chunnilal in Dhrupad, Dhamar and Khayal singing and later by Ustand Chand Khan of Delhi Gharana. The duo also worked as the music director in 7 Hindi films besides singing in ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960), ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966), ‘Aas’ (1972), ‘Laila Majnu’ (1976) among other films.

There are singers born in Shekhawati region but migrated to Pakistan after partition. Ashiq Hussain, one of the prominent actors of Hindi films of 1930s and 1940s and the Kathak dancer, belonged to Shekhwati region whose family had settled in Uttar Pradesh. He abandoned his acting career to concentrate on Kathak dance. Because of his expertise in Banaras Gharana of Kathak dance, he was conferred the title of ‘Nritya Samrat’. He used ‘Samrat’ as his surname when he migrated to Pakistan.

Mehdi Hasan, one of the most popular ghazal singer was born in Luna village of Jhunjhunu district who migrated to Pakaistan. So was Reshma, the folk singer of Pakistan who was born in Loha village of Churu district. Both of them also sang as playback singers in Pakistani films.

The list is not exhaustive as some musicians and dancers may have been associated with Hindi films but did not get documented especially in the initial stage of sound films

For selecting a song for this post, I had varied choices among the artists I covered in the article. Finally, I settled for a song from ‘Kasturi’ (1954) which is set to music by Jamal Sen.

‘Kasturi’ (1954) had 9 songs of which 6 songs, all under the music direction of Pankaj Mullick, have been covered on the Blog. The remaining 3 songs from the film which are yet to be covered on the Blog, have been set to music by Jamal Sen. All the 9 songs were written by Vrajendra Gaur who also directed the film.

I am presenting the 7th song, ‘mujhe apna banaaya door door se’ from the film, rendered by Asha Bhosle. The video clip contains only partial song. The full song is available on the audio clip. The song has a flavour of the Rajasthani folk music.

Note: The basic information about some of the artists mentioned in this article is based on the Ph.D thesis ‘The Contributions of Churu District in the Growth and Development of Jaipur Gharana Kathak’ by Jagdish Sundarlal Gangani – Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Department of Dance (2007). Information on Jamal Sen is based on an article by Peeyush Sharma which appeared on Silhouette.

Audio Clip:

Video Clip (Partial):

Song-Mujhe apna banaaya door door se (Kasturi)(1954) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Vrajendra Gaur, MD-Jamal Sen

Lyrics (Based on Audio Clip):

ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o
ho o o o o

mujhe apna banaaya door door se
dil ki baaten kahoongi main huzoor se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
dil ki baaten kahoongi main huzoor se

ho o o o o
meri ankhiyaan sote se jaagin
ho o o o
meri ankhiyaan sote se jaagin
aur jaagin to tum sang laagin
kyun na dekhoon main
kyun na dekhoon main tumko guroor se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
dil ki baaten kahoongi main huzoor se

ho o o o
kiya kismat ne aisa ishaara aa aa
kiya kismat ne aisa ishaara
mila mujhko tumhara sahaaraa aa aa
tumne rishta
tumne rishta nibhaaya majboor se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
dil ki baaten kahoongi main huzoor se

ho o o o o
tum to chhup ke se aaye mere man mein
ho o o o
tum to chhup ke se aaye mere man mein
mera uljha hai man uljhan mein
dekho badla na lo
dekho badla na lo bekusoor se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
mujhe apna banaaya door door se
dil ki baaten kahoongi main huzoor se


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4860 Post No. : 16650

There was a time when the combination of Pyare Lal Santoshi (P L Santoshi), as a director, Rehana as the heroine and C Ramchnadra as a music director was a sure shot of the box office success of the films. This combination gave hit films like ‘Shehnaai’ (1947), ‘Khidki’ (1948) and ‘Sargam’ (1950). But in 1952, this successful combination came to an end when ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) miserably failed at the box office. Though P L Santoshi remained active in the next about 2 decades, he did not regain the status in Bombay film industry which he had enjoyed in the 1940s.

P L Santoshi had the chequered career in the Hindi film industry. His career interchanged between lyricist, writer, director and producer, sometime all of them together. But his career mainly concentrated as a lyricist with around 650 songs to his credit. He also frequently changed his employment from one film studio to another when the studio system was in vogue.

Jabalpur-born P L Santoshi (07/08/1916 – 07/09/1978) completed his matriculation from Jabalpur and came to Mumbai in 1936. His filmography shows that he started as a lyricist in ‘Vish Vaman’ (1936) for which he wrote all the songs for the music director, Govindrao Tembe. Thereafter, he joined Jaddanbai’s film production company, Sangeet Movietone and wrote a few songs for ‘Moti Ka Haar’ (1937) and ‘Jeewan Sapna’ (1937). In the same year, he shifted to Ranjit Movietone and wrote lyrics for 18 films between 1937 and 1940.

In 1941, P L Santoshi joined Bombay Talkies as dialogue writer/lyricist for ‘Anjaan’ (1941), ‘Jhoola’ (1941), ‘Basant’ (1942). ‘Kismet’ (1943) and ‘Milan’ (1946). In 1946, he got an opportunity to direct his first film, ‘Hum Ek Hain’ (1946) under the banner of Prabhat Film Company in which Dev Anand made his debut as an actor and Rehana got her first lead role. The film did not fare well on the box office front.

Fortunately for P L Santoshi, Filmistan entrusted him with the directions of ‘Shehnaai’ (1947) and ‘Sargam’ (1950) for which he wrote story and dialogues besides writing songs. These two films became the box office hits. Buoyed by the success as a director, P L Santoshi floated his own film production banner, Santoshi Productions with its maiden film, ‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952). And with this film, his fortune in the film industry reversed to such an extent that he could never recover to his past glory as a writer, lyricist and a director.

‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) was a fantasy film in which P L Santoshi’s favourite heroine, Rehana teamed up with Ranjan. The other actors were, Sadhana Bose, Veera, Mumtaz Ali, Indu Paul, Radhakrishan, Baby Tabbasum, Tiwari etc. The film’s story was written by Ramanand Sagar. The film was passed by Censor Board for the universal exhibition. However, the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting banned the release of the film on the ground of low moral tone, glorifying the criminal characters, treating the sacred objectives irrelevantly which are against the interest of the public decency and morality.

Although the ban was lifted probably through the intervention of the court, the film did not garner sufficient support from the cinegoers to make it a box office hit film. With this, P L Santoshi did not venture into the film production during rest of his career. His muse, Rehana suffered her career setback as a lead actor forcing her to ultimately migrate to Pakistan in 1956.

After the debacle of ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952), P L Santoshi’s career went on a roller-coaster ride. His career as a lyricist virtually ended by the end of 1960s. Most of the films directed by him in second half of 1950s did not fare well on the box office front. The box office success of ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’ (1960) did not help him to revive his career as a director. His subsequent films, ‘Opera House’ (1961), ‘Pyaar Ki Daastan’ (1961), ‘Dil Hi To Hai’ (1963), ‘Holiday In Bombay’ (1963) and ‘Qawwali Ki Raat’ (1964) could not give fillip to his career as a director. He directed his last released film, ‘Roop Rupaiya’ (1968) after which he concentrated mainly on screenplay and dialogue writing until his death in 1978.

‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) had 7 songs. All songs were written by P L Santoshi which were set to music by C Ramchandra. Six songs have been covered on the Blog, details of which are as under:

Songs Date of Posting Singers
Tum kyaa jaano tumhaari yaad me ham kitna roye 01/08/2009 Lata Mangeshkar
Ye khilti kali koi le 07/02/2013 Lata-Chitalkar
Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo 17/12/2014 Chitalkar – Lata
Kuchh chuhalen hon kuchh charche hon 14/03/2016 Kishore Kumar – Lata
Arre baabaa…ye hansi baabaa…ye khushi baabaa 19/07/2017 Lata – Chitalkar
Sai re Sai re ghar ghar mein ik chor sai 01/08/2019 Lata Mangeshkar

I am presenting the 7th and the last song from the film, kaise hai mizaaj kahiye’ rendered by Lata Mangeshkar.

With this song, all the songs from the film ‘Shin Shinaaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) have been covered on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaise hain mizaaj kahiye kaise hain mizaaj (Shin Shinaaki Bubbla Boo)(1952) MD-Lata, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-C Ramchandra

Lyrics

ho o o
bade soorma ban ke nikle thhe ghar se
ke bijli gira denge guzren jidhar se
o o o na shekhi rahi wo na daawa raha wo
arre uljhe pade hain
kisi ki nazar pe
kahiye

kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj

ye aap hi kaa ghar hai
ghabaraahiye nahin
aeji ghabaraahiye nahin
sharm buri cheez hai
sharmaahiye nahin
aeji sharmaahiye nahin
le leejiye jo chaahiye
aap hi kaa raaj
le leejiye jo chaahiye
aap hi kaa raaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj

khaatir karoon kya aap ki
batlaahiye huzoor
aeji batlaahiye huzoor
main to paas aap ke
hain aap mujhse door
hain aap mujhse door
main aap ki iss bedili kaa
kya karoon ilaaj
main aap ki iss bedili kaa
kya karoon ilaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj
kaise hain mizaaj kahiye
kaise hain mizaaj
bade khushnaseeb ham hain
aap aaye aaj
jo aap aaye aaj


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4858 Post No. : 16648

Today, November 5, 2021 is the 13th Remembrance Day of producer-director, B R Chopra. I admire him for his courage to make films on sensitive and socially relevant issues at a time when most of other producers would have avoided such issues. As far as I know, B R Chopra became the director without working under any one of the well-known directors of his time or even working in any other departments of the film making which is laudable.

Baldev Raj Chopra (22/04/1914 – 05/11/2008) was born in Rahon village in Ludhiana district of Punjab. His father was working in the Public Works Department in Lahore. So, most of his childhood, school and college education were done in Lahore. As a teenager, he was fascinated by films. After the completion of M A in English literature from Punjab University, he took a job as a film journalist for a film magazine, ‘Cine Herald’ which was published from Lahore so that he connects with the film personalities. Over a period of time, he took over the management of the magazine which he managed until 1947.

Just a couple of months before the partition, some friends of B R Chopra’s father suggested him to make a film which they would finance. So, he started his first film, ‘Chandni Chowk’ based on a story by I S Johar. G A Chishti was to be the music director and Khayyam, his assistant. Unfortunately, the film had to be abandoned in the wake of communal riots following the partition. B R Chopra along with his family migrated to Delhi and resumed working as a film journalist for some time. However, his heart was in the film making.

B R Chopra shifted to Mumbai with most of his joint family members sometime in 1948. With the pooling of all the resources from the family, he co-produced and directed ‘Karwat’ (1949) which bombed at the box office. After this, he became apprehensive about making one more attempt in film making. It was one of his friends who bumped in B R Chopra at a café and assured him that he would arrange the finance provided B R Chopra directed the film. That was how the film ‘Afsaana’ (1951) happened which he co-produced and directed based on a story written by I S Johar. The film was a box office success.

B R Chopra co-produced and directed his next two films, ‘Shole’ (1953) and his stalled film of 1947 – ‘Chaandni Chowk’ (1954) with his friend and partner financing these films. While ‘Shole’ (1953) did the average business, ‘Chaandni Chowk’ (1954) was a box office success.

In 1955, with the death of his partner, their joint venture in film production was dissolved. B R Chopra set up his own film production banner, B R Films. The banner’s logo had an interesting text in Latin, ‘Ars longa vita brevis’, meaning ‘Art is long, life is short’. The banner produced its first film, ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (1956) with a theme of widow remarriage. It was a bold decision on the part of B R Chopra to produce and direct a film with such a sensitive subject in his maiden venture. But the risk paid off. The film scored a box office success.

B R Chopra produced and directed his next film, ‘Naya Daur’ (1957) with a theme of ‘man versus machine’. This was the film, with which Sahir Ludhianvi’s association with B R Films started as a full-pledged lyricist which continued until his death in 1980 with some break during 1976-79. In ‘Sadhna’ (1958), he took the subject of rehabilitation of a prostitute. In ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ (1959), B R Chopra portrayed the issues concerning the children born out of wedlock. In this film, B R Chopra entrusted the direction to his younger brother, Yash Chopra which was his maiden film as a director. Another brother, Dharam Chopra debuted as a full-time cinematographer with this film. Both these films were highly successful on the box office front.

B R Chopra experimented with his first songless film, ‘Kaanoon’ (1960) which focused on the capital punishment based on the eye witness and questioned whether one man’s words should cost another man’s life. It was a daring effort on the part of B R Chopra to produce the songless film especially at a time when the film songs had become one of the main ingredients for the box office success of the films. Later, he also produced another songless film, ‘Ittefaaq’ (1969) which happened to be last film B R Chopra and Yash Chopra worked together.

‘Gumraah’ (1963) was a personal triumph for B R Chopra as a director for his matured handling of a theme of extra-marital affair. He was successful in garnering sympathy for all the three protagonists of the film – Ashok Kumar as husband, Mala Sinha as his cheating wife and Sunil Dutt as the lover of Mala Sinha. By the way, in the same year (1963), ‘Ye Raaste Hain Pyaar Ke’ (1963) was released with a same theme.

‘Waqt’ (1965) was B R Chopra’s first colour. multi-starer and a high budget film. The film was directed by Yash Chopra. The usual ‘lost and found’ formula got reinvented with this film with sleek screen-play and dialogues. For the first time, a B R Film had elaborate sets and high glamour quotients. This film set the trend for Yash Chopra when he produced and directed films under his own banner.

During his 5 decades of association with Hindi films, B R Chopra produced 35 films and directed 20 films. Some of the major films he produced were ‘Hamraaz’ (1967), ‘Aadmi Aur Insaan’ (1969), ‘Daastaan’ (1973), a remake of ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Dhund’ (1973), ‘Zameer’ (1974), ‘Chhoti Si Baat’ (1975), ‘Karm’ (1977), ‘Pati, Patni Aur Woh’ (1978), ‘The Burning Train’ (1979), ‘Insaaf Ka Taraazu’ (1980), ‘Nikkah; (1982), ‘Mazdoor’ (1983), ‘Tawaif’ (1984) ‘Aawaam’ (1987), ‘Kal Ki Aawaaz’ (1992), ‘Baaghbaan’ (2003), ‘Baabul’ (2006), ‘Bhootnath’ (2008) etc.

In 1972, Yash Chopra separated from B R Films and established his own banner, Yash Raj Films. This separation seems to have affected B R Films as most of his film made after Yash Chopra’s exit from B R Films, did not reach the level of successes as his earlier films got. However, B R Chopra undertook a mammoth work of TV serial ‘Mahabharat’ for Doordarshan with 94 episodes which were telecast during 1988-90. ‘Mahabharat’ became one of the most successful TV serials which was high TRP ratings even on the repeat telecasts.

‘Baaghbaan’ 2003) was a sort of a ‘come back’ film for B R Films followed by ‘Baabul’ (2006). However, B R Films could not sustain the new success as both B R Chopra and his son, Ravi Chopra passed away in 2008 and 2014 respectively. After ‘Bhootnath’ (2008), B R Films have not produced any film.

B R Chopra was conferred with Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 1998 in recognition of his contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinemas. He was awared Padma Bhushan in 2001.

‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (1956) was the first film produced and directed by B R Chopra under his own banner, B R Films. The star cast included Ashok Kumar, Meena Kumari, Sunil Dutt, Yashodhara Katju, Ravikant, Manik Kapoor, Uma Dutt, Nazir Kashmiri, Radhakishen etc. Kumkum and Radhika were the guest actors in the film.

The film had 8 songs (including one multiple version) of which 7 songs have already been covered on the Blog, the details of which are as under:

Songs Date of Posting Singers
Chali gori pee ke milan ko chali 31/01/2009 Hemant Kumar
Saanwle salone aaye din bahaar ke 21/04/2009 Hemant Kumar -Lata
Bade bhaiyya laaye hain London se chhori 11/04/2012 Asha Bhosle
Chamka ban kar aman ka taara 15/08/2012 Lata-Hemant Kumar
Bekas ki aabroo ko neelaam kar ke chhoda 27/11/2012 Lata Mangeshkar
So ja nanhe mere tu to so jaa Multiple version song 31/03/2021 Hemant Kumar-Lata Mangeshkar

On the occasion of 13th Remembrance Day of B R Chopra, I present a song ‘kaisi lagi jaaye to jaaye jiya’ from ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (1956) rendered by Asha Bhosle and Usha Mangeshkar. The song is written by Majrooh Sultanpuri which is set to music by Hemant Kumar. It is a dance song in which Asha Bhosle and Usha Mangeshkar sing for Kumkum and Radhika respectively.

With this song, all the songs from ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (1956) have been covered on the Blog.

Note: The early life sketch of B R Chopra is based on his interview recorded in 1995 after he was conferred ‘Filmfare Life Time Achievement Award’. The interview was published on April 4, 1997 in rediff.com.

Audio

Video

Song-Kaisi lagi kaisi lagi (Ek Hi Raasta)(1956) Singers-Asha Bhosle, Usha Mangeshkar, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-Hemant Kumar
Both

Lyrics

kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote aisi lagi

kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote aisi lagi
kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhote aisi lagi

kothhe pe main to khadi thhi bholepan mein
chori chori koi samaaya mere man mein
kothhe pe main to khadi thhi bholepan mein
chori chori koi samaaya mere man mein
dheere se bolo jiya
kaisi lagi
dheere se bolo jiya
kaisi lagi

aisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote
aisi lagi
kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote aisi lagi

jiya na maane ke ruk ruk machle
koi ye pukaare bache to zara bach le
jiya na maane ke ruk ruk machle
koi ye pukaare bache to zara bach le

haaye re haaye daiyya
kaisi lagi
haaye re haaye daiyya
kaisi lagi
aisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhote aisi lagi

kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote aisi lagi

dar ke maare kaleja mora dhadke
kahin more saiyyan ye chunri pakad ke
dar ke maare kaleja mora dhadke
kahin more saiyyan ye chunri pakad ke
laagoon main tohra piya
kaisi lagi
laagoon main tohra piya
kaisi lagi

aisi lagi
aisi lagi
aisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote
aisi lagi
kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote
aisi lagi
kaisi lagi
kaisi lagi
jaaye to jaaye jiya
laagi na chhoote
aisi lagi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This article is his 700th post in the blog.

Blog Day :

4851 Post No. : 16641

O P Nayyar was an odd man out in Hindi film industry as a music director. He did not have the formal or informal training in the music. He did not undergo ‘apprenticeship’ under any music directors. He did not work with Lata Mangeshkar during his entire career as a music director. The top three star-actors of 1950s and 60s – Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand and Raj Kapoor avoided him as a music director after working with him for one or two films. He did not work with Raj Khosla after his spate with him in ‘Ek Musaafir Ek Haseena’ (1962). His egoistic, stubborn, ‘calling spade a spade’ type of nature and some shades of eccentricities should have made him persona non grata in the Hindi film industry. Despite all these odds, he attained the status of one of the top music directors of Hindi films during 1950s and 1960s.

I always felt that O P Nayyar was the ‘Eklavya’ of Hindi film music – a self-trained music director who got inspirations from more than one Dronachaya of music directors – R C Boral, Pankaj Mullick, Ghulam Haider and Anil Biswas. As a teenager, O P Nayyar was fascinated by the films of New Theatres which he watched in Lahore. He was mesmerised by the songs of K L Saigal and Pankaj Mullick which guided him to pursue the singing career. He was a regular singer of bhajans and ghazals on AIR, Lahore in the 1940s until the partition. Two of his Kabir dohas which he used to recite on AIR. Lahore were recorded and released on HMV disc in 1943. He composed his first recorded song – a non-film, ‘preetam aan milo’ in the voice of C H Atma in 1945 which became very popular.

After shifting to Mumbai following the partition, O P Nayyar’s first three films – ‘Aasmaan’ (1952), ‘Cham Chama Cham’ (1952) and ‘Baaz’ (1953) turned out to be the flop films. It was only after a huge box office success of ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) that O P Nayyar established himself as music director and remained one of the top music directors of Hindi films until about end-1960s.

O P Nayyar achieved his musical career progression despite the handicap of his stubbornness and other traits. The same handicap also resulted in his downfall. In 1966, he had a spate with Mohammed Rafi during one of the songs recording of ‘Saawan Ki Ghata’ (1966) after which he did not work with Rafi for a long time. In 1974, Asha Bhosle, his muse of over 15 years, decided to part with him in what appears to be the clash of egos. By this time, Asha Bhosle had also become a force to reckon with in Hindi film music.

O P Nayyar’s musical journey virtually ended by mid-1970 though he did a few sporadic films until 1995. He spent rest of his life in isolation away from film industry and his family until his death in January 2007.

The question that may come to the minds of many Hindi film music enthusiasts as to how O P Nayyar could churn out many beautifully crafted songs based on Hindustani classical raags. In this context, it is worth mentioning the observations of Ustad Ameer Khan when he heard all the 11 songs of ‘Phaagun’ (1958). When O P Nayyar met Ustad Ameer Khan in some context, the latter asked him as to why he had composed all the 11 songs in Raag Pilu. O P Nayyar had no answers except to tell him it was just a coincidence that his compositions matched with Raag Pilu. Incidentally, Ustad Ameer Khan rendered for O P Nayyar, a bandish, jogiya mere ghar aaye in raag Lalit in ‘Raagini’ (1958). In the later years, Ustad Ameer Khan pointed out to him that in akeli hoon main piya aaa from ‘Sambandh’ (1969), he has used about 16 different raagas. Probably, music composition was God’s gift to O P Nayyar.

O P Nayyar has composed many raag-based songs, some of which are semi-classical compositions in the films like ‘Aasmaan’ (1952), ‘Naya Daur’ (1957), ‘Raagini’ (1958), ‘Phaagun’ (1959), ‘Kalpana’ (1960), ‘Phir Wohi Dil Laaya Hoon’ (1963) etc. Almost all of his semi-classical songs have been covered on the Blog. But there is one semi-classical song which did not get as much attention from the Hindi film music lovers as it deserved. The song is from an obscure film ‘Qaidi’ (1957) which is yet to be covered on the Blog.

‘Qaidi (1957) was produced by F C Mehra under his banner, Eagle Films and was directed by Mohammed Hussain. The star cast included Padmini, Suresh, Anwar Hussain, Helen, Agha, Ragini, Leela, Johny Walker, M Kumar, Kamal Mehra, Rajan Kapoor etc. It was a ‘B’ grade action-oriented film. The film was released in January 1957.

The film had 8 songs of which 6 songs have been covered on the Blog. All the songs were written by Jaan Nisaar Akhtar which were set to music by O P Nayyar. I am presenting the 7th song, ‘bedardi preet nahi jaani’ which is a semi-classical song rendered by Asha Bhosle and Usha Mangeshkar. The video clip of the song is not available on any of the video sharing platforms. There is one audio clip which is available with an average sound quality. I have, therefore, made a new video clip from a mp3 clip of the song with me in a better sound quality and have uploaded the same.

From the lyrics as well as taraanas, the song appears to be picturised on two dancers. From the star cast, there are 4 dancers in the film – Padmini, Ragini, Helen and Leela. From the available video clips of the songs, it is observed that Asha Bhosle has sung both for Padmini and Helen in the film. In addition, Shamshad Begum has also sung for Padmini. If the song is used for the dance competition, it is quite likely that the dancers could be Padmini and Ragini as both are trained Bharatnatyam dancers and in the film, Ragini plays the role of Padmini’s friend.

I am not able to tell on which Raag the song has been composed. However, the tune closely resembles that of ae ri jaane na doongi from ‘Chitralekha’ (1964) which, according to Swarganga, is based on Raag Kamod.

Note: In this article, I have taken some inputs from an interview of O P Nayyar which appeared on http://www.cinemasangeet.com. and also from an article on O P Nayyar which was published in millenniumpost.

Audio Clip:

Song-Bedardi preet nahin jaani (Qaidi)(1957) Singers-Asha Bhonsle, Usha Mangeshkar, Lyrics-Jaan Nisaar Akhtar, MD-O P Nayyar
Both

Lyrics

tana naadir dirta ni ta nata taani ee
tana naadir dirta ni ta nata taani ee

bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
main to roothhi sajanwaa
jaa tum sang nahin bo….loon
naahi boloo..n
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee

jaa jaa jaa jaa re sainyyaan more
kaahe hamri bainyyaan marore
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
jaa jaa jaa jaa re sainyyaan more
kaahe hamri bainyyaan marore

aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
jaa jaa jaa jaa re sainyyaan more
kaahe hamri bainyyaan marore

ghoonghat ke pat main nahin kholoon
ghoonghat ke pat main nahin kholoon
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
tana naadir dirta ni ta nata taani ee
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
main to roothhi sajanwaa
jaa tum sang nahin bo…loon
naahi boloo…n
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee

main na tere bas mein aaun
jaa re jaa nahin ankhiyaan milaaun
aaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
main na tere bas mein aaun
jaa re jaa nahin ankhiyaan milaaun/font>
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaa
main na tere bas mein aaun
jaa re jaa nahin ankhiyaan milaaun

kaahe sainyyaan main teri ho loon
kaahe sainyyaan main teri ho loon
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
tana naadir dirta ni ta nata taani ee

main to roothhi sajanwaa
jaa tum sang nahin bo….loon
naahin boloo…n
bedardi preet nahin jaani ee
tana naadir dirta ni ta nata taani ee


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4849 Post No. : 16639

This is the tale of a Hindi film director whose first film he wrote and directed, became a super hit. Unfortunately, he also reached the pinnacle of his career as a director with his very first film. The reason was that none of his subsequent films could achieve the same scale of successes as was with his first film. He was associated with Hindi films as a director for nearly 3 decades, but he directed only 6 films. During the same period, he also produced 3 films. His name was Ram Krishna Nayyar, better known in Hindi film industry as R K Nayyar. In my view, he was a director whose expertise was in directing films in the genre of romantic mystery thriller.

Not much information is known about R K Nayyar’s early life. He started his filmi career as an assistant to Raj Kapoor in ‘Aah’ (1953) and to Prakash Arora in ‘Boot Polish’ (1954). He made his debut as a director in Sashadhar Mukerji’s ‘Love in Simla’ (1960). The film became super hit at the box office with debutant lead actors, Joy Mukerji and Sadhana. It is said that R K Nayyar was instrumental in suggesting the fringe hair style which Sadhana used in this film to hide her broad forehead. Her hairstyle became so popular that it became known as ‘Sadhana Cut’.

R K Nayyar’s next directorial venture came after a gap of 3 years in ‘Ye Raasten Hain Pyaar Ke’ (1963). This film was based on the famous Nanavati-Ahuja case of 1959. But the film was only moderately successful. He next directed Sashadhar Mukerji’s ‘Aao Pyaar Karen’ (1964) with Joy Mukerji and Saira Bano in the lead roles. The film did not click on the box office despite having a good musical score by Usha Khanna.

In 1966, R K Nayyar married Sadhana. In the same year, he released his first film as a producer-director, ‘Ye Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai’ (1966) under his own banner, R K Nayyar Films. It was a high budget film with a major part of shooting taking place in Europe. The film did not fare well on the box office front.

Once again after a gap of 3 years, R K Nayyar directed ‘Intaqaam’ (1969) which was produced under the banner of Shaktiman Enterprises with Sadhana and Sanjay Khan in the lead roles. It was a ‘come back’ film for Sadhana after she had some medical issues. ‘Intaqaam’ (1969) was a hit film which should have revived the career of R K Nayyar. But it took him as long as 17 years to direct his next film. ‘Qatl’ (1986) which he also produced. It was his last film as a director. After this, he produced his last film. ‘Pati Parmeshwar’(1989) under R K Nayyar banner but entrusted Madan Joshi, his assistant to direct the film. Both these films flopped at the box office.

I was wondering as to why R K Nayyar had gaps in his filmi career. I got the answer from a rare interview which Sadhana had given sometime in 2012. R K Nayyar had lost a lot of money when his films. ‘Ye Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai’ (1966), ‘Qatl’ (1986) and ‘Pati Parmeshwar’ (1989) flopped at the box office. Loans were to be repaid. Sadhana had almost withdrawn from the films after her persistent medical issues. All these put R K Nayyar in financial crunches affecting his own health. He had become an asthma patient which later became the reason for his death in 1995.

As mentioned earlier, ‘Ye Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai’ (1966) was R K Nayyar’s first film as a producer-director under his own banner, R K Nayyar Films. The star cast included Ashok Kumar, Joy Mukerji, Saira Bano, Motilal, Sayeeda Khan, Hari Shivdasani, Badri Prasad, Mohshin Abdullah, Janakidas, Manmohan etc. The film was a romantic thriller with some good songs. But the film failed to sustain audience’s interest to make it a box office hit film. It is said that the film’s complicated plot with Saira Bano playing the double role with the same name and Joy Mukerji playing imposter confused the average cinema audience.

The film had 7 songs (including one multiple version) of which 4 songs (including one multiple version) have been covered on the Blog. All the songs are written by Rajinder Krishan and set to music by Ravi.

I am presenting the 5th song, ‘nange baazoo nangi taange husn ka ye meyyar nahi’ from the film to appear on the Blog which is sung by Mohammed Rafi. It is picturised on Joy Mukerji when he and Saira Bano are on a visit to Paris for participating in Mr Universe and Miss Universe, respectively.

I was not aware of this song until I heard this song a couple of days back. What invited my attention to this song was the unusual mukhda for a Hindi film song. There are other unusual features of the song:

In the film sound track version, the song starts with antara, ‘tera badan hai raaj khuda kaa’ followed by mukhda, ‘nange baazoo nangi taange’ as a refrain. This is because Joy Mukerji responds in song when Saira Bano says –“kya main ladki nahi hoon?, kya main haseen nahi hoon?” Furthermore, there are 4 antaras in the film sound track version of the song. In the record version, the song starts with mukhda followed by only two antaras – 1st and 4th of the film sound track song probably to accommodate the song within the space of a 78 RPM record.

In the film sound track version, the mukhda is ‘nange baazoo nangi TAANGE’. However, in the record version, mukhda is ‘nange baazoo nangi RAANEN’. ‘Raanen’ is a Urdu word which means ‘thighs’.

In the lyrics, some other unusual Urdu words have been used as under:

Meyaar= Standard, Measurement

Paash= Sprinkle

Khoo-e-uriyaani= Habit of nakedness

Enjoy the song with Mohammed Rafi intoxicatingly singing ‘beemaar’ in the song.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Nange baazoo nangi taangen (Ye Zindagi Kitni Haseen Hai)(1966) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-Ravi

Lyrics (Based on Video Clip)
———————————————-

tera badan hai raaj khuda kaa
insaanon par paash na kar
tera badan hai raaj khuda ka
insaanon par paash na kar
yaa aisa ghar mujhe dikha de
jis mein koi deewaar nahin ee

nange baazoo nangi taangen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthhaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin ee
nange baazoo nangi taangen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahi
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthhaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin ee
nange baazoo

aankh shama se tab hatati hai
jab tak wo khaamosh na ho o
be-parda ho jaaye to koi
takne to taiyyar nahin
nange baazoo nangi taangen
husn ka ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthhaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin ee
nange baazoo

la la la laa laa laa
la la la laa laa laa laa
la la
la la la laa laa laa laa
la la la laa
la la laa
la la laa
la la laa

kisne dekhi chaand ki chaandi
kahaan bika suraj ka sona
kahaan lagaa inki boli
aisa koi baazar nahin
nange baazoo

apna ek ek ang dikha kar
jeet li toone husn ki baazi
soch zara ye thhande dil se
jeet teri kya haar nahin ee
nange baazoo nangi taangen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthhaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin
nange baazoo

——————————
Lyrics (Based on Audio Clip)
——————————

nange baazoo nangi raanen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin ee
nange baazoo nangi raanen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahin
nange baazoo

tera badan hai raaj khuda kaa
insaanon par baash na kar
tera badan hai raaj khuda kaa
insaanon par baash na kar
yaa aisa ghar mujhe dikha de
jis mein koi deewaar nahin ee
nange baazoo nangi raanen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahin
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthhaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahi
nange baazoo

la la la laa laa laa
la la la laa laa laa laa
la la
la la la laa laa laa laa
la la la laa
la la laa
la la laa
la la laa

apna ek ek ang dikha kar
jeet li tune husn ki baazi
apna ek ek ang dikha kar
jeet li tune husn ki baazi
soch zara ye thhande dil se
jeet teri kya haar nahi ee
nange baazoo nangi raanen
husn kaa ye meyaar nahi
khoo-e-uriyaani se lutf uthaaun
rooh meri beemaar nahi
nange baazoo


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 5000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2022) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

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