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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, I am writing about one of the prominent actors of 1930s and 40s who started his film career in the silent film era and became producer-director during the second half of 1940s. His name – Mazhar Khan, a forgotten name not only for the current generation but also for many in my generation as well.

Let me confess that I was also one of the under ‘many’ category, who was not aware of Mazhar Khan until 2012. I was planning to write an article on one of the songs from Padosi (1941) when I came across Mazhar Khan’s name playing the role of Thakur in the film. But it was during the last two years when I was into 1940s films and songs that I became aware of his status and contributions to the Hindi film industry. I have observed that Mazhar Khan along with Chandra Mohan, Motilal and Jairaj generally escaped the unsavory words from the pen of Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’. This indicate the high respect these actors commanded from the film-goers of that time.
In an interview to a film magazine sometime in 1942, Mazhar Khan had said ‘I doubt whether my life story would be of any interest at all’. But I find from his other interviews with ‘Filmindia’ in June 1941 and November 1942 as also from his subsequent filmy career that his life story is indeed interesting one.

Mazhar Khan (18/10/1905 – 24/09/1950) was born in Dhar (MP). He was sent to Indore for schooling from where he completed his matriculation examination. He was fascinated by the glamour of film industry from the school days and aspired for becoming an actor. His father, a First Class Magistrate, was keen that he joins the law course. Probably, he took a middle path and instead joined the police force as the sub-inspector which has connection with law, a subject close to his father. He was posted in Dhar.
During his service in police force, Mazhar got opportunity to learn horse riding and other athletic activities. He was a polo player, a boxer, a football player and an athlete. But his fascination about the film industry continued. On the other hand, his father was pressurising him to leave the police job and join the law course. He did enroll for the law course but it was short-lived as he ran away to Bombay some time in 1927 to fulfil his ambition of becoming a film actor.

For Mazhar Khan, the situation in the film industry was not as rosy as he thought. It was not like the organised sector where one applies for the job and called for the interview etc. In the film industry, the first obstacle to meet the producer was the studio’s gatekeeper, generally a Pathan who would not allow anyone to enter the studio premises. Again, the studio owners had their own whims and fancies in selecting the actors.

One day, Mazhar Khan somehow managed to gate crash into one of the studios and met Director BP Mishra who gave him a role in Imperial Film Company’s silent film, ‘Fatal Garland’ (1927). This was the beginning of Mazhar Khan’s filmy career after which he never looked back. While the exact number of silent films in which he worked is not known, Wikipedia lists 18 films between 1927-31, mostly under the banner of Imperial Films. The actual number could be higher.

When talkies films came in 1931, Mazhar Khan got the opportunity to work in Imperial Film Company’s ‘Noor Jahan’ (1931). He shifted to Calcutta (Kolkata) in 1932 and worked with New Theatres’ ‘Subah Ka Sitara’ (1932) in which KL Saigal and Ratanbai were in the lead roles. In Calcutta, Mazhar Khan worked mostly in the films produced by East India Film Corporation. During his Calcutta period (1932-37), he worked in around 20 films.

In 1938, Mazhar Khan, returned to Bombay (Mumbai) and joined Ranjit Movietone. He worked in ‘Rickshawala’ (1938), ‘Prof. Waman Msc’ (1938) ‘Ghazi Salauddin’ (1939) and ‘Achhoot’ (1940). He turned free-lancer and worked in Minerva Movietone’s ‘Bharosa’ (1940), CIRCO’s ‘Suhag’ (1940), Fazli Brothers’ ‘Maasoom’ (1941) and Great India Pictures’ ‘Akela’ (1941) among others.

Mazhar Khan got a role of his life time in ‘Padosi’ (1941) when director V Shantaram selected him for the role of Thakur among the many stalwarts who were vying for the role.

In 1942, he turned producer-director with his fist film ‘Meri Duniya’ (1942) under the banner of Mazhar Art Productions. This was followed by ‘Yaad’ (1942), ‘Badi Baat’ (1944), ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) , ‘Sona’ (1948) and ‘Dil Ki Duniya’ (1949). However, he continued to work as actor in the films of other banners. In all, he worked in about 50 talkies during 1931 to 1950. His last film as an actor was ‘Usha Kiran’ (1953).

I have flipped through many pages of ‘Filmindia’ from 1937 to 1949 and can say that Mazhar Khan was one of the few actors whose name and pictures appeared quite often because of the varieties of roles he played in the films. He was a versatile actor capable of donning any roles. I have seen some of the images of his roles in the films which had no bearing on his real look. Seeing these images, one can say that Mazhar Khan was a master of make-up to portray the roles of diverse nature. I have a feeling that Pran may have got the inspiration from Mazhar Khan to have different set of make-up to create a lasting impression of his roles on the audience.

I had no clue as to how Mazhar Khan looked in real life until I saw a picture of him with his family on ‘Filmindia’ while on a picnic to Matheran. Mazhar Khan did not have a great height – more like the present day Khans – Salman, Amir and Shahrukh except that he was a hefty man. And this may be reason that he rarely got to play the romantic hero’s role though he had lead roles in most of the films.

One of the ambitions of Mazhar Khan was to set up his own studio. But his ambition remained unfulfilled. On September 24, 1950, he suddenly passed away at the age of 45.

Mazhar Khan was a broad-minded person. He married a Hindu girl and gave her freedom to follow her own religion and ceremonies in the house. He had a wish to produce a Muslim social film showing the Muslim home life in true perspective which, according to him, was a Hindu-Muslim cultural mix. But he was afraid of the fundamentalists who often resorted to blackmailing producers of such films. Later he did produced and directed a Muslim social film, ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) which was a box office success.

Sami, one of the commentators on the blog, had seen the film ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) on Doordarshan sometime in 1974. He has given a brief story of the film:

It is an excellent movie with a tragic story involving Munawar Sultana, Veena and Motilal. The story is about two Pathan families in which there are two brothers living as neighbours. Their daughters, Munawar Sultana and Veena are so fond of each other that they feel more of sisters than cousins. An engagement gets arranged between Motilal (son of a nawab) and Veena. When Motilal comes to see Veena, by chance, he sees Munawar Sultana in the house. He changes his mind and insists on breaking off the engagement with Veena. He proposes for Munawar Sultan thereby creating a big rift between the two close families.

Towards of end of the film, Munawwar Sultana drinks poison to end her life fearing that her father would kill her for the family honour. Her death unites the warring families and Motilal marries Veena, the original bride.

Out of 10 songs of the film, 6 songs have been covered in the Blog. Today, I am presenting the 7th song ‘Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye’ written by Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri and set to music by Anil Biswas. As per Sami who had seen the movie, the song is picturised on Praveen Paul for whom this was her debut film along with Munawwar Sultana.

The playback singer of the song is not known. But the mp3 clip of the song which I used for making the video of the song has given the name as Roshan Ara. I do not know whether it is the name of the character Praveen Paul plays in the film or Roshanara Begum, the classical singer who had sung in the films like ‘Humjoli’ (1946) and ‘Jugnu’ (1947).
Whoever has sung the song has got a powerful trained voice.


Song – Dil Ko Samjhaaye Huye (Pehli Nazar) (1945) Singer – Unidentified Female Voice, Lyrics – Safdar ‘Aah’ Sitapuri, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

nadi ke beech mein
nadi ke beech mein
kashti hai bas bedaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
jawaani ban ke toofaan
aayi hain hoshiyaa..aar
hoshiyaar ho jaao
jawaani ban ke toofaan
aayi hain hoshiyaar
hoshiyaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
kashti hai bas bedaar ho jaao
nadi ke beech mein
hosh mein aaye huye ae
hosh mein aaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

samajhte  hain  aen
samjhaten hain mohobbat ka chalan
jaanbaaz parwaane
samajhte hain
balaa se khaak hon jal kar
balaa se khaak hon jal kar
na koi raaz e dil jaane
na koi raaz e dil jaane
sab sharmaaye huye
sab sharmaaye huye
laakh machalen armaan
laakh machalen armaan
unko behalaaye huye
dil ko samjhaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye
dil ko samjhaaye huye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

नदी के बीच में
नदी के बीच में
कश्ती है बस बेदार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
जवानी बन के तूफान
आई है होशिया॰॰आर
होशियार हो जाओ
जवानी बन के तूफान
आई है होशियार
होशियार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
कश्ती है बस बेदार हो जाओ
नदी के बीच में
होश में आए हुये॰॰ए
होश में आए हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

समझते हैं॰॰एं
समझते हैं मोहब्बत का चलन
जाँबाज़ परवाने
समझते हैं॰॰एं
बला से खाक हों जल कर
बला से खाक हों जल कर
ना कोई राज़ ए दिल जाने
ना कोई राज़ ए दिल जाने
सब शरमाये हुये
सब शरमाये हुये
लाख मचलें अरमां
लाख मचलें अरमां
उनको बहलाए हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये
दिल को समझाये हुये

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

At the time of the release of National Studios’ film ‘Roti’ (1942) in August 1942, the production house was sold to KM Modi, a prominent film exhibitors of that time who had no interest in producing films. At that time, three films of National Studios were under the advance stage of completion. ‘Jawaani’ (1942) was one among the three films, other two films being ‘Lala ji’ (1942) and ‘Apna Paraaya’ (1942). Anil Biswas was the music directors for all the three films.
I find from the issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazines of 1942 that the publicity given to these three films was subdued as compared with the scale of publicity which National Studios normally used to indulge for their earlier films. Probably, for the new owner, the publicity for the films was not a priority.

‘Jawaani’ (1942) had the usual star cast of National Studios which included Surendra, Husn Bano, Jyoti, AR Kabuli, Sankatha Prasad, Gulzar, Kayam Ali, Wasekar etc. The film was directed by Wajahat Mirza Changezi, his first and the last under National Studios. He did direct a few films for other production houses later.

Wajahat Mirza was a familiar name in my younger days because of his association with ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) as one of the dialogue writers for which he received the Filmfare Award. Later, as a solo dialogue writer, he got the same category of Filmfare Award for ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961). His other famous films as a dialogue writers in the 50s and thereafter was ‘Mother India’ (1957), ‘Yahudi’ (1958), ‘Kohinoor’ (1960), ‘Leader’ (1964), ‘Palki’ (1967) etc. His last film as a dialogue writer was ‘Daaku Aur Jawaan’ (1978). K Asif’s swan song – the film ‘Love and God’ (1986) for which he had written the dialogues, was in the making for a long time and got released later.

As per Wikipedia, Wajahat Mirza Hussain Changezi (known as Wajahat Mirza) was born on 20/04/1908 in Sitapur, a part of Awadh region. He did his college education in Government Jubilee College, Lucknow where he got acquainted with a cinematographer from Calcutta. He accompanied the cinematographer to Calcutta to work as his assistant.

I became aware of Wajahat Mirza’s career in the film industry as lyricist and director only when I ventured into the films of 1940s as a part of the project for the blog. Details taken from his filmography indicate that his first film was New Theatres’ ‘Yahudi Ki Ladki’ (1933) as a dialogue writer. After this work, he had a 5-year hiatus from the film industry. Probably, he may have worked in the film industry during this period in a different capacity about which no information could be found online.

Wajahat Mirza joined Sagar Movietone as a screenplay/dialogue writer and lyricist in 1938. His first film as a dialogue writer/lyricist was ‘Watan’ (1938). Baburao Patel, in his review of the film, has complimented Wajahat Mirza by saying that for the first time in a Bombay film, good Urdu dialogue was written. From this point onward, his career got mostly associated with Mehboob Khan until ‘Roti’ (1942) after which he worked for the films as a free-lancer.

During the course of his association with Sagar Movietone and National Studios, he also worked as a lyricist in films ‘Watan’ (1938), ‘Hum Tum Aur Woh’ (1938), ‘Bahen’ (1941), Jawaani’ (1942) and ‘Roti’ (1942). After leaving National Studios, Wajahat Mirza worked as a dialogue writer in the popular films like ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Shikast’ (1953) and those of 50s and 60s listed above.

During his career, Wajahat Mirza directed 5 films – ‘Jawaani’ (1942), ‘Swaminath’ (1942), Shahenshah Babar’ (1944), ‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945) and ‘Nishaana’ (1950). In his later career, he gave up direction and lyrics writing and concentrated only on story/screeplay/dialogue writing. He was regarded as an expert in writing dialogues in simple language which had the ability to create the desired impact on the scene. Because of this quality, Mehboob Khan recalled Wajahat Mirza to write the dialogue for ‘Mother India’ (1957) which had the story in rural setting. Incidentally, Wajahat Mirza had also written the dialogue for its earlier avatar ‘Aurat’ (1940).

Wajahat Mirza died on 4/08/1990 at the age of 82 in Karachi.

‘Jawaani’ (1942) was advertised as a romantic comedy film where ‘the youth triumphs over the age’. The film had 11 songs written by Wajahat Mirza (7) and Aarzoo Lucknowi (4). Two songs have been covered in the blog. Here is the 3rd song ‘Roney Se Nahi Fursat Jisko Wo Hansna Hansaana Kya Jaane’, sung by Husn Bano who was the female lead in the film. The song is written by Aarzoo Lucknowi and is set to music by Anil Biswas.


Song – Roney Se Nahin Fursat Jisko (Jawaani) (1942) Singer – Husn Banu, Lyrics – Aarzoo Lakhnawi, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

rone se nahin fursat jisko
wo hansna hansaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
kya dard mein dil par banti hai
kya dard mein dil par banti hai
bedard zamaana kya jaane
bedard zamaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko

jo dil ki tamanna ban ke rahe
wo dil kaa lagaana kya jaane
jo dil ki tamanna ban ke rahe
wo dil kaa lagaana kya jaane
dil aap hi naazon kaa hai pala
dil aap hi naazon kaa hai pala
wo naaz uthhaana kya jaane
wo naaz uthhaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko

jis par bhi bharosa hamne kiya
jis par bhi bharosa hamne kiya
ki milke usi zaalim ne daga
ki milke usi zaalim ne daga
patthar ko jo phool samajhta ho
patthar ko jo phool samajhta ho
wo chot bachaana kya jaane
wo chot bachaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
wo hansna hansaana kya jaane
rone se nahin fursat jisko
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
वो हँसना हँसाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
क्या दर्द में दिल पर बनती है
क्या दर्द में दिल पर बनती है
बेदर्द ज़माना क्या जाने
बेदर्द ज़माना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको

जो दिल की तमन्ना बन के रहे
वो दिल का लगाना क्या जाने
जो दिल की तमन्ना बन के रहे
वो दिल का लगाना क्या जाने
दिल आप ही नाज़ों का है पला
दिल आप ही नाज़ों का है पला
वो नाज़ उठाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको

जिस पर भी भरोसा हमने किया
जिस पर भी भरोसा हमने किया
की मिलके उसी ज़ालिम ने दग़ा
की मिलके उसी ज़ालिम ने दग़ा
पत्थर को जो फूल समझता हो
पत्थर को जो फूल समझता हो
वो चोट बचाना क्या जाने
वो चोट बचाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको
वो हँसना हँसाना क्या जाने
रोने से नहीं फुर्सत जिसको


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Some established producer-directors generally have their wish list to make a film or two on the subjects that are close to their hearts. The fulfilment of their wishes gets postponed until such time the producer-directors are able to make the successful films in normal course of their career. After all, they need the financial security to take risk in producing films of their personal choices irrespective of the outcome at the box office.

Producer-director Guru Dutt had one such subject on which he was keen to make a film on a life of a successful director whose career is ruined by the will of the financiers and the personal circumstances in his life. Ultimately, the director dies as a lonely and forgotten man. The film was ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959). The film was said to be based on the life of his mentor Gyan Mukherjee, one of the successful directors of Bombay Talkies.

Given the depressing theme of the story with a tragic end, Guru Dutt seems to have been aware of the box office risk of such a film. He took to produce and direct this film only after his three successive films became the box office hits – ‘Aar Par’ (1954), ‘Mr & Mrs, 1955’ (1955) and ‘Pyaasa’ (1957). Now he was ready to show his mastery over the artistic films and the use of the latest techniques in the film making. Guru Dutt’s expectations about his pet project was very high.

Unfortunately, ‘Kaagaz Ke Phool’ (1959) was a disaster at the box office putting Guru Dutt in dire financial difficulties. But what affected Guru Dutt more than the box office failure was that even the film critics had branded this film as boring and incoherent. But today, this film is regarded as one of the classics in Hindi films’ history.

Producer-Director Raj Kapoor, after producing a series of box office hits, produced ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970) which he had called his favourite film under RK Banner. The film was in the making for about 5-years. Because of the length of the film, it had two intervals. Raj Kapoor may have felt unsure about the risk at the box office. For that, he had some box office ingredients in the film and had roped in Rajendra Kumar, Dharmendra, Manoj Kumar and Dara Singh in the star cast. As usual, the expectation from the director’s pet project was very high from the financiers and distributors.

The film failed at the box office and Raj Kapoor was put into financial distress. Today, ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970) is regarded as the best films from RK Films banner.

Something similar happened to Mehboob Khan in 1942 when ‘Roti’ (1942) was released. After directing films like ‘Alibaba’ (1940), ‘Aurat’ (1940) and ‘Bahen’ (1941), which achieved the tremendous successes at the box office, Mehboob Khan announced the film ‘Roti’ (1942) which went to the floor in June 1941. The theme in the story of the film was the class conflict or disparity between rich and poor, a subject close to the heart of Mehboob Khan if one goes by the logo of Mehboob Productions.

I have seen in an advertisement of National Studios in which along with the names of the then current films under productions, the name of ‘Roti’ (1942) was written in bold letters with a statement ‘Mehboob’s Pride Picture With 5 Renowned Stars’. This shows the status of and the high expectations from the film.

The five ‘renowned stars’ of the film were Chandra Mohan, Sheikh Mukhtar, Sitara Devi, Akhtari Faizabadi (Begum Akhtar) and Ashraf Khan. For the first time, Chandra Mohan worked under the direction of Mehboob Khan in the film. Chandra Mohan was known to be a tough actor to handle as he was frank in giving his opinions to the directors about the shots to be framed on him. I had read in his interview taken sometime in 1941 in which he spelled out the director’s and actor’s roles in the film making. While the director sets his requirement of the scene to the actor, it is the actor who decide how to portray the acting for the scene. In other words, Chandra Mohan did not like to follow the director’s inputs in the acting.

Begum Akhtar who had not worked in the films after 1936 was roped in probably with the recommendation of Anil Biswas. It was doubtful whether she would accept the offer to act in the film. But for her, the offer had come at the right time. At that time, she was the court singer in the state of Rampur and the Nawab of Rampur wanted to marry her. She was not interested in marrying the already married Nawab. So she shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) in the guise of working in the film to wriggle out of Nawab’s marriage proposal.

The film took more than one year to complete and its release was delayed due to a last minute problem. Megaphone Recording Company brought a stay order as Akhtaribai had an exclusive singing contract with the Company. Finally, the stay order was withdrawn and the film was released only after all her six songs were deleted from the film. Later, Megaphone released 78 RPM records of these six songs. The film was released in Bombay (Mumbai) on 25/08/1942.
The film did not create ripple on the box office front though it ran for few weeks. I have watched the film on YT and my take as to why the film did not click for Mehboob Khan as much as it was expected is as under:

1. It was expected that with Chandra Mohan in terms of star value, Begum Akhtar in terms of her singing, and Sitara Devi with her dances would attract the audience to the theatres. The deletion of all the six songs of Begum Akhtar from the film would have definitely disappointed her fans.

2. With the deletion of all the six songs of Begum Akhtar, continuity in the film was lost. One can notice the abrupt moves from one scene to another scene in the film. Also Begum Akhtar did not look like a sophisticated daughter of a businessman. For her fans, she was engraved in their minds as a vocalist in semi-classical music.

3. In the traditional definition of the hero and the heroine of the film, Chandra Mohan and Begum Akhtar had leading roles with Chandra Mohan one sided love with Begum Akhtar. But Chandra Mohan had also had the role of a villain as he was responsible for murdering his partner whose daughter he now loves. Under such a situation, unless the director is able extract the emotional scenes to bond with the audience with such a character, it is difficult to maintain the interest of the audience in the film.

4. The class conflict as the main theme of the film was not brought out in a manner which could have kept the audience interest intact. The whole idea of bringing the life style of Sheikh Mukhtar and Sitara Devi in their forest dwelling in contrast with that of Chandra Mohan as a rich and greedy businessman in a palatial residence did not create a forceful anti-capitalist impact in the film. The scenes of Ashraf Khan giving his philosophical preaching was boring.

Later, Mehboob Khan adopted the sickle and the hammer as the logo for his film production company, Mehboob Productions in 1942 in accordance with the main theme of his film ‘Roti’ (1942).

‘Roti’ had 14 songs of which Begum Akhtar had 6 songs. 7 songs (3 Begum Akhtar’s songs) have already been covered in the Blog. I am presenting the 8th song from the film which is a ghazal rendered by Begum Akhtar. The ghazal is ‘wo hans rahen hain aah kiye jaa raha hoon main’ written by Aarzoo Lucknowi. After listening to the style of rendition of the ghazal, I feel that it has more of Begum Akhtar’s contribution than that of Anil Biswas as a music director.


Song – Wo Hans Rahe Hain Aah Kiye Jaa Raha Hoon Main (Roti) (1942) Singer – Akhtari Bai, Lyrics – Aarzoo Lakhnawi, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

wo o o o
wo o o  o o o
wo hans rahe hain
aah kiye jaa raha hoon main
main
wo hans rahe hain
aah kiye jaa raha hoon main
main
pathar ke dil mein raah
kiye jaa raha hoon main
main
pathar ke dil mein raah
kiye jaa raha hoon main

bahr e karam ko  ..oo
josh mein
laane ke wa..aaste ae
ae ae ae ae
ae ae ae ae
aen aen aen  aen  aen
daanishtaa
daanishtaa kuchh gunaah kiye
jaa raha hoon main
main
daanishtaa kuchh gunaah kiye
jaa raha hoon main
main
daanishtaa kuchh gunaah kiye
jaa raha hoon main

aadat ke ba..aad
dard bhi dene lagaa aa mazaa
aaa
aa  aa aaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aaa
hans hans ke
ae ae ae 
ae ae ae
hans hans ke
aah aah kiye
jaa raha hoon main
main
hans hans ke aah aah kiye
jaa raha hoon main
aen aen

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

वो ॰॰ओ॰॰ओ
वो ॰॰ओ॰॰ओ॰॰ओ
वो हंस रहे हैं
आह किए जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
वो हंस रहे हैं
आह किए जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
पत्थर के दिल में राह
किए जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
पत्थर के दिल में राह
किए जा रहा हूँ मैं

बहर ए करम को॰॰ओ॰॰ओ
जोश में
लाने के वास्ते॰॰ए
॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
दानिश्ता
दानिश्ता कुछ गुनाह
किए जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
दानिश्ता कुछ गुनाह
किए जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
दानिश्ता कुछ गुनाह
किए जा रहा हूँ मैं

आदत के बा॰॰आद
दर्द भी देने लगा मज़ा
॰॰आ
॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
हंस हंस के
॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
हंस हंस के
आह आह किए
जा रहा हूँ मैं
मैं
आह आह किए
जा रहा हूँ मैं ॰॰एं॰॰एं


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This post is 501st post by Sadanand Ji. Due to a tagging error, we all missed the event of 500th post by him (his previous post).

In the early part of the golden era of Hindi film music, there were many films which were box office disasters. These films got released but vanished from the theatres quickly. These films also got ‘erased’ from the memories of the film audience of that time except those who had interest in Hindi film history. Some of such obscure films had the treasures of melodious songs.

If I confine myself to the first half of 1950, I get quite a good numbers such obscure films having melodious songs. Some of such films were ‘Adaa’ (1951, Madan Mohan), ‘Malati Madhav’ (1951, Sudhir Phadke), ‘Ghunghroo’ (1952, C Ramchandra), ‘Nirmohi’ (1952, Madan Mohan), ‘Raag Rang’ (1952, Roshan), ‘Baaghi’ (1953, Madan Mohan), ‘Fareb’ (1953, Anil Biswas), ‘Jhaanjhar’ (1953, C Ramchandra), ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954, Sardar Malik), ‘Naaz’ (1954, Anil Biswas), ‘Rishta’ (1954, K Datta), ‘Garam Coat’ (1955, Amarnath Chawla), ‘Madhur Milan’ (1955, Bulo C Rani) etc. The list is not exhaustive.

These obscure films of early 1950s had the adverse impact on the careers of some of the music directors for no faults of theirs. The then upcoming music directors like Madan Mohan and Roshan had to struggle hard to establish themselves in the film industry. Like-wise, the already established music directors like Anil Biswas and Bulo C Rani had difficulties in retaining their positions in the film industry.

‘Maan’ (1954) was one such film which had very melodious songs from the baton of Anil Biswas. The film was directed by Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri, a well-known lyricist, and screen play/dialogue writers of 1930s and 40s. This was his second and the last directorial venture, the first being ‘Bhook’ (1947). The star cast included Ajit, Chitra, Gajanan Jagirdar, Durga Khote, M Kumar, Achala Sachdev, Kamlesh Kumari, Yashodara Katju, Chandabai etc. The film belongs to the costume drama genre.

Dr.Safdar Aah Sitapuri was a Urdu laureate. He started his career in the Hindi film industry sometime in 1930s, probably with Mohan Pictures. He worked with Anil Biswas for the first time in ‘Comrades’ (1939) made under the banner of Sagar Movietone followed by ‘Alibaba’ (1940) and ‘Aurat’ (1940).

When Sagar Movietone was merged with General Films and renamed as National Studios in 1940, Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri and Anil Biswas shifted to this banner. Under National Studio Banner, Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri worked with Anil Biswas in films like ‘Aasra’ (1941), ‘Bahen’ (1941), ‘Nai Roshni’ (1941), ‘Roti’ (1942) etc. After Anil Biswas joined Bombay Talkies in 1942, he had to work with lyricists which were already in the pay roll with the banner. So he had no chance of working with Dr Safdar Sitapuri in Bombay Talkies but worked with lyricists Pt. Narendra Sharma and Kavi Pradeep among others.

After a gap of about 3 years, Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri got the opportunity to work with Anil Biswas for the film ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) in which he wrote, among other songs, “Dil Jaltaa Hai To Jalne De” and Mukesh sang from his heart to make the song an iconic one. Thereafter Dr.Safdar Aah Sitapuri had worked with Anil Biswas in films like ‘Laadli’ (1949), ‘Laajawaab’ (1950), ‘Badi Bahu’ (1951), ‘Naaz’ (1954) and ‘Maan’ (1954) which was his last film as the director and I guess, it was also his last film as a lyricist.

The information on the internet indicates that Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri returned to his teaching profession sometime in the later 50s though it appears that he was involved with writing screen-play and dialogues for ‘Son Of India’ (1962). Post-retirement from the film industry, Dr, Safdar Aah Sitapuri wrote books like ‘Amir Khusro Bhaisiyat Hindi Shaayar’, ‘Rubiyaat-e-Zamzama’, ‘Tulsidas Aur Ramcharitmanas’. I came to know through internet a few years back that he was also a guide for students doing Ph.d in Urdu literature.

Coming back to Anil Biswas, I personally feel that after Lata Mangeshkar started singing for him from ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) onwards, his song compositions attained a higher level of melody than what was earlier. For example, I find his song compositions in the film ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) in which Lata Mangeshkar sang for him for the first time, superior to those in ‘Veena’ (1948) in which Lata Mangeshkar had no songs. Incidentally, stories of both these films revolved around love triangles.

I recall reading few years back that when Sardul Kwatra, the music director was asked as to how his compositions are so beautiful. His reply was that he got inspiration from the singers themselves to compose the beautiful songs. I think, Anil Biswas could compose some of the best soulful songs for Lata Mangeshkar because of her voice and the faster pick up of nuances of song compositions. This quality of her could inspire anyone to compose the songs for her better than their best.

Today, I am presenting one of the soulful songs ‘Guzraa Hua Ulfat Ka Zamaana Yaad Karke Royenge’ from the film ‘Maan’ (1954). The song is rendered by Lata Mangeshkar on the words of Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri.


Song – Guzra Hua Ulfat Ka Zamaana (Maan) (1954) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Safdar ‘Aah’ Sitapuri, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

guzraa hua ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
apni kahaani apna fasaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
guzraa huwa ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge

jab saawan ki mast ghataayen
dhoom machaati aayengi ee
jab saawan ki mast ghataayen
dhoom machaati aayengi  ee
jab koyal ki meethi taanen
kaanon mein bas jaayengi
ham ik bhoola hua taraana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge

kabhi kabhi jab tumko apne
dil kaa dard sunaate thhe
kabhi kabhi
kabhi kabhi jab tumko apne
dil kaa dard sunaate thhe
pyaar se dhaadas dekar saajan
hamko gale lagaate thhe
wahi pyaar se gale lagaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
guzraa hua ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
अपनी कहानी अपना फसाना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

जब सावन की मस्त घटाएँ
धूम मचाती आएंगी
जब सावन की मस्त घटाएँ
धूम मचाती आएंगी
जब कोयल की मीठी तानें
कानों में बस जाएंगी
हम इक भुला हुआ तराना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

कभी कभी जब तुमको
अपने दिल का दर्द सुनाते थे
कभी कभी
कभी कभी जब तुमको
अपने दिल का दर्द सुनाते थे
प्यार से ढाढ़स दे कर साजन
हमको गले लगाते थे
वही प्यार से गले लगाना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

 


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, I am presenting a duet song “Zulm Bhi Karten Hain Aur Kehten Hain Fariyaad Na Kar” sung by Suman Kalyanpur and Mohammed Rafi in ‘Mera Ghar Mere Bachche’ (1960). This song has been in my radar for more than two years, to present in the blog. However, I got overtly involved with locating the rare songs from the films of 1940s and share those. During this period, I thought that Rafi fans or ‘Sureeli’ Suman Kalyanpur fans among the Atulites would post this song on the Blog. But this did not happen. So I am destined to present this song.

I have been occasionally listening to this song during the last two years. Each time I heard this song, I felt that what a loss of opportunity for many top music directors to exploit Rafi-Suman Kalyanpur combination which has its own charm for listeners like me. There are obvious reasons for not utilising Rafi-Suman Kalyanpur combination by music directors which are known to most of the Hindi film music lovers. To evaluate what the Hindi film music lovers have lost, listen to some of her songs with Rafi given below:

Chand Takta Hai Idhar  –   Dooj Kaa Chaand (1964) – Roshan

Aapne Huzoor Mujhe Kya Se Kya Bana Diya – Fariyaad (1964) – Snehal Bhatkar

Mujhe Ye Phool Na De Tujhko Dilbari Ki Kasam –  Ghazal (1964) – Madan Mohan

Parbton Ke Pedon Par Shaam Ka Basera Hai – Shagoon (1964) – Khaiyyam

Agar Teri Jalwaa Numaayee Na Hoti –   Beti Bete (1964) – Shankar-Jaikishan

Thahariye Hosh Mein Aa Loon – Mohabbat Isko Kehten Hain (1965) – Khaiyyam

Aise To Na Dekho –   Bheegi Raat  (1965) – Roshan

Incidentally all the teasers listed above had been sung by Suman Kalyanpur with Rafi when Lata Mangeshkar  had stopped singing with him. I did not miss Lata Mangeshkar in the above listed songs.

I have done some approximate calculations of Suman Kalyanpur’s songs with Mohammed Rafi which gives me a tally of 133 songs out of the total of about 760 songs sung by her during her career.  I note from the right side of the home page of the blog that as many as 86 duets of Rafi-Suman Kalyanpur have been covered in the Blog.

While it is difficult of get the exact figure as to how many songs Suman Kalyanpur sang with Mohammed Rafi during the period when Lata Mangeshkar had stopped singing with him (1960-63). The reason is that the points of cessation/resumption of singing by Lata Mangeshkar with Rafi as well as the releases of the films are at different points of time.   One important advantage that Suman Kalyanpur got during 1963 to say 1967 was that  she started getting A grade films with top music directors as against mostly B grade films she used to get for singing during the earlier part of her playback singing career.

‘Mera Ghar Mere Bachche’ (1960) was a Minerva Movietone’s film, produced and directed by Sohrab Modi. The star cast included Sohrab Modi, Sulochana Latkar, Sudesh Kumar, Naaz, Subbiraj, Kavita, Balraj, Sadhana Chowdhari, Charlie, Nana Palsikar, Daisy Irani etc. I have watched the film which is available on YT with some missing portions resulting in the loss of continuity in the film’s story including the end of the film.While the subject of the film – the effect of generation gap – is good, somehow, Sohrab Modi has not been successful in making the subject interesting. Probably, financial constraint may be the reason.

It appears to me that the film was considerably delayed in production. Two signs I get from the film in this context. First, different playback singers have been used for the same character played by Sudesh Kumar for whom both Rafi and Mukesh lip sync for him. Again Mukesh lip syncs for Subbiraj and Rafi for Charlie as well. The second and more important evidence for the film getting delayed is that the credit title shows actress Sadhana Chowdhari being introduced in this film for the first time. The fact is that Sadhana Chowdhari appeared in films ‘Sahara’ (1958), ‘Post Box No,999 (1958) and ‘Bus Conductor’ (1959) which were released earlier than the  ‘Mera Ghar Mere Bachche’ (1960).

Now the story in nutshell:

The story of the film is built around the effect of the generation gap. Inderjit, the father, (Sohrab Modi) and the owner of an engineering firm, is a strict disciplinarian and autocrat. His younger son, Kishore (Sudesh Kumar) and daughter Meena (Naaz) wish to pursue the careers in music and dance respectively which is resented by the father. He imposes his own will as to what career path they should choose. There is a resentment in son and the daughter on this issue. But they cannot express their feelings to the father because of his autocratic nature.

While the younger son is in love with Lata (Kavita) who was an orphan and given shelter in the house, the daughter is in love with Narendra (Subbiraj) whose father (Nana Palsikar) works in  Inderjit’s firm. The father resents both the love affairs mainly because they are not in the same financial status as him. Lata is sent back to her native place and Kishore is made to work in his father’s factory. Narendra’s father is dismissed from the job.

In the meanwhile, knowing her daughter and son’s preferences for their life partners, Parvati, the mother (Sulochana) secretly arranges their marriages. Inderjit is furious and in a fit of anger, he drives all of them out of his palatial house. Now he lives alone in the house.

On the marriage front, nothing works out between Narendra and Meena and between Kishore and Lata. There are arguments and quarrels. In this scenario, Kishore falls in the trap of Lily (Sadhana Chowdhari) and Meena returns to her mother.  The family is in the verge of disintegration.

[Since, the end part of the film was missing in the VCD, I am not aware as to how the film ends. But a scene shown in Inderjit’s office with Lily does gives an indication that Inderjit is prepared to mend his way. But what is the trigger that unites the family? Arun ji, in his comments on one of the songs of the earlier posted songs of this film, has indicated that]
Inderjit suffers a heart attack. The entire family comes to his side to attend to him to make him recover from the illness. This gesture makes Inderjit to realise the importance of family. The entire family is united.

The film had 9 songs all penned by Hasrat Jaipuri, the brother-in-law of Sardar Malik who set the songs to music. Four songs have been covered in the Blog. The song which I am presenting is not available on the DVD/VCD of the film. I have no idea whether the song was originally deleted from the film or deleted only from the DVD/VCD.

Without video also the song is pleasant to the ears.  It is worth noting that the first part of the last two antaras have been rendered by both the singers in higher octave.

Enjoy the romance filled teasing song written by the king of the romantic songs, Hasrat jaipuri.


Song – Zulm Bhi Karte Hain Aur Kehte Hain Ke Fariyaad Na Kar (Mera Ghar Mere Bachche) (1960) Singer – Suman Kalyanpur, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – Hasrat Jaipuri, MD – Sardar Malik

Lyrics

zulm bhi karten hain
zulm bhi karten hain
aur kehte hain fariyaad na kar
ek bulbul pe sitam
o mere sayyaad na kar
ek bulbul pe sitam
main hoon tera meri ummeed ko naashad na kar
meri ulfat ko samajh le
meri ulfat ko samajh le
mujhe barbaad na kar
meri ulfat ko samajh le

kuchh na puchho bade zaalim hai zamaane waale
dil kahin aankh kahin jaa ke milaane waale
dil kahin aankh kahin jaa ke milaane waale
ab koi yaad bhi aaye to usey yaad na kar
ek bulbul pe sitam
o mere sayyaad na kar
ek bulbul pe sitam

sab to zaalim nahi hote hain zamaane waale ae
sab to zaalim nahi hote hain zamaane waale
ishq mein jaan bhi dete hain nibhaane waale
ishq mein jaan bhi dete hain nibhaane waale
jhoota ilzaam na de haaye re bedaad na kar
meri ulfat ko samajh le mujhe barbaad na kar
meri ulfat ko samajh le

pyaar sach hai to hamen koi shikaayat hi nahin
pyaar sach hai to hamen koi shikaayat hi nahin
ye na samajho ke hamen tumse mohabbat hi nahin
ye na samajho ke hamen tumse mohabbat hi nahin
pyaar se dil mein samaa pyaar ki fariyaad na kar
pyaar se dil mein samaa….aa

———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

ज़ुल्म भी करते हैं
ज़ुल्म भी करते हैं
और कहते हैं फरियाद ना कर
एक बुलबुल पे सितम ओ मेरे सैय्याद ना कर
एक बुलबुल पे सितम
मैं हूँ तेरा मेरी उम्मीद को नाशाद ना कर
मेरी उलफत को समझ ले
मेरी उलफत को समझ ले
मुझे बर्बाद ना कर
मेरी उलफत को समझ ले

कुछ ना पूछो बड़े ज़ालिम हैं जमाने वाले
दिल कहीं आँख कहीं जा के मिलाने वाले
दिल कहीं आँख कहीं जा के मिलाने वाले
अब कोई याद भी आए तो उसे याद ना कर
एक बुलबुल पे सितम ओ मेरे सैय्याद ना कर
एक बुलबुल पे सितम

सब तो ज़ालिम नहीं होते हैं जमाने वाले
सब तो ज़ालिम नहीं होते हैं जमाने वाले
इश्क़ में जान भी देते है निभाने वाले
इश्क़ में जान भी देते है निभाने वाले
झूठा इल्ज़ाम ना दे हाए रे बेदाद ना कर
मेरी उलफत को समझ ले
मुझे बर्बाद ना कर
मेरी उलफत को समझ ले

प्यार सच है तो हमें कोई शिकायत ही नहीं
प्यार सच है तो हमें कोई शिकायत ही नहीं
ये ना समझो के हमें तुमसे मोहब्बत ही नहीं
ये ना समझो के हमें तुमसे मोहब्बत ही नहीं
प्यार से दिल में समा प्यार की फरियाद ना कर
प्यार से दिल में समा॰॰आ


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Before the partition in 1947, two of the well-known and successful Lahore-based producers-directors were Dalsukh M Pancholi of Pancholi Art Pictures and Roop K Shorey of Shorey Pictures. After the partition, both of them had to shift to Bombay (Mumbai), having lost their assets including the studios which were burnt down during the communal riots. It took some time for both of them to re-organise their film production companies in Bombay. Roop K Shorey released his first post-partition film, ‘Ek Thhi Ladki’ (1949) under a new banner, Shorey Films. Dalsukh M Pancholi took one more year to release his first post-partition film ‘Meena Baazar’ (1950) under a new banner, Pancholi Productions.

There was one more producer-director who was also affected by the partition woos. But his case was on a different footing. His filmy career started in Bombay and then ended in Bombay, traversing the Calcutta-Lahore-Calcutta route. His name was Raghubir Chand Talwar, better known as RC Talwar.

I was aware of his association with films like ‘Sangdil’ (1952), ‘Mem Sahib’ (1956) and ‘Ek Dil Sau Afsaane’ (1963) which he produced and directed. But it was only during the last 5-6 years, I became aware of the fact that RC Talwar also produced and directed some films in the 1940s and that he was one time the First Assistant to Director Kidar Sharma for the film ‘Aulad/Dil Hi To Hai’ (1939).

A few days back, I came across an interview of RC Talwar, taken sometime in 1949 at the time of commencement of the shooting of ‘Khilaadi’ (1950), his first film in Bombay as producer-director after the partition. I was amazed by his fighting spirit to come out successfully each time he faced problems due to extraneous factors during his film career from 1937-1965. The interview was published in August 1949 issue of SOUND magazine. I am thankful to Prof. Surjit Singh ji for making available some old issues of filmy magazines on his website which have some invaluable information and rare images of the films of the second half of 1940s.

RC Talwar was born on 21/10/1910 at Talagang, near Rawalpindi (now in Pakistan) in an affluent family. After completing his school in Rawalpindi, Talwar graduated from Dayal Singh College, Lahore. The father had observed that his son was interested in pursuing a filmy career. In order to specialise in some branches of film production, Talwar was enrolled in The Institute of Photography and RCA Institute of Sound Engineering, both in New York. After completing the two years courses in these institutions, Talwar was awarded Diplomas in the respective subjects.

Having gone to USA, Talwar spent 6 months in Hollywood but was disappointed as he could not get to meet any film technicians. While returning to India, he took break at London to study the working of film studios. In London, with the help of Diwan Sharar who was his father’s friend and a well-known person in the Fleet Street film circle, Talwar got opportunity to visits film studios in London and met some technicians.

Armed with the technical knowledge about the film productions, Talwar returned to India and landed in Bombay sometime in the middle of 1937. On his very first day in Bombay, he was employed by Bombay Talkies as a Technical Assistant in its laboratory. He worked in Bombay Talkies for one year after which he joined Film Corporation of India (FCI), a film production company based in Calcutta as the Head of Laboratory, a higher post with a higher salary.

Having worked in two full-fledged film production companies, Talwar’s ambition was to become a film director, a commanding position in the film industry at that time. When FCI roped in Kidar Sharma as director for their film ‘Aulad/Dil Hi To Hai’ (1939) and ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), Talwar got chance to work as his First Assistant. When ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) was in the making, FCI’s financial position worsened with debtors going to court for the liquidation of the company. Before ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) was released, the company went into liquidation. For the first time, Talwar faced the impending unemployment.

Instead of looking for work elsewhere, Talwar decided to form his own film production company called Talwar Productions by taking some of the displaced staff of FCI and getting an office space in FCI’s studio at Tollygunj. After producing and directing two Punjabi films, Talwar decided to produce and direct his first Hindi film ‘Khamoshi’ (1942). The film was an average success at the box office.

When Talwar was planning his next ambitious film on a big scale, he faced his second tragedy. The Japanese air force bombed some part of Calcutta in December 1942. In the circumstances, he decided to close down his production office in Calcutta and shifted to Lahore along with his staff who were willing to join him in Lahore. He reorganised his film production unit and started the shooting of his next film ‘Manchali’ (1943), followed by ‘Shikaayat’ (1944) in one of Lahore studios. Both these films were box office hits and celebrated jubilees.

Talwar’s next film was ‘Albeli’ (1945) followed by ‘Raazdaar’ and ‘Toote Sapne’. While ‘Albeli’ (1945) was released, the other two films could not be released due to the tense situations in Lahore following the announcement of partition. The situation in Lahore became worse, turning into communal riots. Following the partition in 1947, Talwar faced his third tragedy. He had to leave everything in Lahore except the negative of his completed film ‘Toote Sapne’ which he carried with him when he decided to shift to India after partition.

While Pancholis and Shoreys decided to shift to Bombay, Talwar decided to shift once again to Calcutta where he was more familiar with the film industry than in Bombay. To his surprise, the conditions in Calcutta had so much changed in the post-partition period that Talwar could not even make a new start. Sometime in 1949, he shifted to Bombay and started reorganising his film production unit. He got an office space in Bombay Talkies and in June 1949, he launched his first Hindi film in post-partition period. The name of the film was ‘Khilaadi’ (1950) starring Ashok Kumar and Suraiya in lead roles. The film was a box office success.

Talwar’s other films in the post-partition period were ‘Sangdil’ (1952), ‘Saaqi’ (1952), ‘Ilzaam’ (1954), ‘Rukhsana’ (1955), ‘Mem Saheb’ (1956), ‘Ek Dil Sau Afsane’ (1963). His last film which he directed was ‘Naya Kaanoon’ (1965).
As mentioned earlier, ‘Khamoshi’ (1942) was RC Talwar’s first Hindi film he produced and directed under his own banner, Talwar Productions. The star cast included his favourite actress Ramola Devi paired with AS Gyani. Others actors included Sundar, Ram Dulari, Manorama, Leela Mishra, Shyam Sundar, Nand Kishore, Himmat Rai etc. It may be observed that some of the actors had worked in the films produced by Film Corporation of India before it became defunct.

The film had 11 songs written by Himmat Rai, the younger brother of Kidar Sharma. All the songs were set to music by GA Chishti. The interesting features of the songs are that all the 11 songs have been rendered by actors on themselves and Ram Dulari who was in the supporting role in the film has sung 10 out of 11 songs. Two songs have been covered in the blog.

I am presenting the third song from the film to appear in the blog, a rare one. This song was not available on YT until I uploaded the video a few months back. The song is ‘Mann Ko Kaise Behlaayen’ sung by Ram Dulari.


Song – Mann Ko Kaise Behlaayen (Khamoshi) (1942) Singer – Ram Dulari, Lyrics – Himmat Rai, MD – GA Chishti

Lyrics

mann ko kaise behlaayen
mann ko kaise behlaayen
ye bipda aa
ye bipda kise sunaayen 
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen

kisko o mann ki baat sunaayen
kisko o mann ki baat sunaayen
kaise mann ka meet bulaayen
kaise mann ka meet bulaayen
neer bhare pyaase nainon ki
neer bhare pyaase nainon ki
kyonkar pyaas bhujaayen
o o o o
kyonkar pyaas bhujaayen
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen

kit jaayen ab kaun hamaara
kit jaayen ab kaun hamaara
rooth gaya hamse jag saara
rooth gaya hamse jag saara
kaah karen ab kaun jatan se
kaah karen ab kaun jatan se
bigdi baat banaayen
o o o o o
bigdi baat banaayen
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen
———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–
मन को कैसे बहलाएं
मन को कैसे बहलाएं
ये बिपदा॰॰आ
ये बिपदा किसे सुनाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं

किसको मन की बात सुनाएँ
किसको मन की बात सुनाएँ
कैसे मन का मीत बुलाएँ
कैसे मन का मीत बुलाएँ
नीर भरे प्यासे नैनों की
नीर भरे प्यासे नैनों की
क्योंकर प्यास बुझाएँ
ओ ओ ओ
क्योंकर प्यास बुझाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं

कित जाएँ अब कौन हमारा
कित जाएँ अब कौन हमारा
रूठ गया हमसे जग सारा
रूठ गया हमसे जग सारा
काह करें अब कौन जतन से
काह करें अब कौन जतन से
बिगड़ी बात बनाएँ
ओ ओ ओ
बिगड़ी बात बनाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

In the 1940s, Lala Jagat Narayan of Jagat Talkies Distribution was one of the biggest controller of the chains of theatres and film distributions network in Northern India having his office at Chandni Chowk in Delhi. He was regarded as an undisputed king of film distribution and exhibition. By virtue of his experience in film distribution and exhibition business, he was in a better position to assess the likes and dislikes of the film audience.

In 1948, Jagat Narayan decided to diversify into the film production business and set up a separate entity named Jagat Pictures. As a businessman, he was attempting for a vertical integration of film productions with his existing business of distribution and exhibition. As a student of economics, I would call his attempt as a backward linkage in that he would have some flexibility in supply chain for film distribution and exhibition.

Jagat Narayan had not done anything new. My understanding is that earlier, Imperial Film Company of Ardeshir Irani had done the same vertical integration albeit in a different way. In 1929, Ardeshir Irani set up Sagar Films (later known as Sagar Movietone) as a subsidiary of Imperial Film Company. In 1930, he roped in Chimanlal Desai and Ambalal Patel, as partners of Sagar Films. They were already the owners of Select Film Circuit in Bangalore which was the sole distributors for South India of the films from Imperial film Company. After sometime, Ardeshir Irani left Sagar Films and Desai and Patel became the sole proprietors of Sagar Films. With this, Desai and Patel had film productions and distributions under their command.

The vertical integration business model was later replicated by some prominent film distributors such as NN Sippy of Prithvi Pictures in 1960, Tarachand Barjatya of Rajshri Film Production in 1962, Gulshan Rai of Trimurti Films in 1970 etc. There are, however, pros and cons for the vertical integration of film business in terms of the risk-reward perception.

Coming back to the Jagat Pictures, ‘VEENA’ (1948) directed by JP Advani was its maiden offering. The star cast included Rehman, Sulochana Chatterji, Veera, Yakub, Hemavati, Leela Mishra, Girdhari etc. It was a social film with familiar story line of a love triangle. The gist of the story of the film based on a review published in December 1948 issue of ‘Sound’ magazine is as under:

Madan (Rehman), a poet, having lost his mother and father in the childhood has been brought up by his grand-mother (Leela Mishra). She gets worried about Madan who spends most of his time in idleness. After having lost in her efforts to make him work, the grand-mother decides to follow the traditional remedy, that is, to get him married. She chooses a girl, Veena (Veera) who is a doctor. Madan is not ready for the marriage. So he runs away from the home.

After days of traveling, Madan reaches a village where he falls in love with Ratna (Sulochana Chatterji), the village girl. He becomes the guest of Ratna’s brother Manglu (Yakub), a vagabond. In the village, Manglu loves Myna (Hemavati) but he is not aware that she also loves him. This leads to a situational comedy. At last, he takes the help of Madan to guide him to woo Myna. He succeeds.

In the meanwhile, Madan and Ratna’s love for each other results into the engagement. However, soon he gets the news that his grand-mother is on the death bed and he must visit her. At first, Madan was not ready but Ratna convinces him to visit so that he also gets blessings from his grand-mother for their impending marriage. So Madan visits her grand-mother. Just before her death, grand-mother places Veena’s hand with his hand and dies before Madan could reveal to her that he was already engaged to Ratna. Much against his wish, Madan gets married to Veena.

After the marriage, Madan tells Veena that she could get anything from him but not his love. But Veena was interested only of his love and nothing else. Madan deserts her and goes back to Ratna. But Veena takes it as a challenge to win over her husband. Veena gets an opportunity to prove her point. When Ratna gets seriously ill, it is Veena who is called upon to perform surgery on Ratna which result in saving her life. Madan has a change of heart and with Ratna’s advice, he goes back to his wife, Veena.

The film was reported to be a box office success. And why not? Being produced by a person who has been in the film distribution and exhibition business for long, his maiden film had all the ingredients of a box office formula – drama, romance, comedy, 12 songs, a couple of dances etc.

The film had 12 songs written by three songwriters, viz. Pt. Narendra Sharma (5), Swami Ramanand Saraswati (4) and Prem Dehlvi (3). All songs were set to music by Anil Biswas. 10 songs are available on YT of which 7 songs have been covered in the blog.

I am presenting one of the two rare songs which were not available on YT. The song is ‘Mera Mann Banphool Phoola Na Samaaye Re’ sung by Shamshad Begum. The words are written by Pt. Narendra Sharma.

An unusual feature of this song is that the musical interludes take place even during the singing of mukhda and antara parts in addition to the usual interludes. These musical interludes are as pleasant to the ears as the song. The long flute interlude during the first antara of the song may be the work of Pt. Pannalal Ghosh.

The musical orchestration gives me an impression of a dance song in a rural setting which means that it may have been picturised on Sulochana Chatterji.


Song – Mera Mann Banphool Phoola Na Samaaye Re (Veena) (1948) Singer – Shamshad Begum, Lyrics – Pt Narendra Sharma, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

mera mann banphool
phoola na samaaye re
mera mann banphool
phoola na samaaye re
mera mann banphool

kabhi hanse kabhi gaaye
kabhi hanse kabhi gaaye
kabhi sharmaaye re
mera mann banphool
phoola na samaaye
mera mann banphool

naache ban bel sang
naache ban bel sang
aaj mere ang ang
naache ban bel sang
naache ban bel sang
aaj mere ang ang
kaun jo ragon mein meri
ras ban jaaye re
kaun jo ragon mein meri
ras ban jaaye re
mera mann banphool
phoola na samaaye re
mera mann banphool

saadh huyi meri poori
saadh huyi meri poori
door do dilon ki doori
saadh huyi meri poori
door do dilon ki doori
koi sapnon ke phool-doley mein jhulaaye re
koi sapnon ke phool-doley mein jhulaaye re
mera mann banphool
phoola na samaaye re
mera mann banphool 
———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

मेरा मन बनफूल
फूला ना समाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल
फूला ना समाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल

कभी हँसे कभी गाये
कभी हँसे कभी गाये
कभी शरमाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल
फूला ना समाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल

नाचे बन बेल संग
नाचे बन बेल संग
आज मेरे अंग अंग
नाचे बन बेल संग
नाचे बन बेल संग
आज मेरे अंग अंग
कौन जो रगों में मेरी
रस बन जाये रे
कौन जो रगों में मेरी
रस बन जाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल
फूला ना समाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल

साध हुई मेरी पूरी
साध हुई मेरी पूरी
दूर दो दिलों की दूरी
साध हुई मेरी पूरी
दूर दो दिलों की दूरी
कोई सपनों के फूल-डोले में झुलाए रे
कोई सपनों के फूल-डोले में झुलाए रे
मेरा मन बनफूल
फूला ना समाये रे
मेरा मन बनफूल


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Leela Chitnis (1909-2003), who was known for portraying the role of a suffering mother during 1950s through 1970s was one among the early female actresses in 1930s with an educated background. She was the first film actress from India to appear in the advertisement for the Lux soap in 1941 which she endorsed at that time.

After registering box office hits in her successive films like ‘Sant Tulsidas (1939), ‘Kangan’ (1939), ‘Azaad’ (1940) and ‘Bandhan’ (1940), Leela Chitnis decided to set up a film production company named Chitra Productions in partnership with C R Gwalani (probably he was her second husband). ‘Kanchan’ (1941) was the maiden film under the newly set up banner. However, being the new banner, Chitra Productions relied heavily on the infrastructure and resources of Ranjit Movietone where she had earlier done one of her successful film, ‘Tulsidas’ (1939).

Apart from the film’s director, Manibhai Vyas, who was a regular with Ranjit Movietone, some of the actors who were on the rolls of Ranjit Movietone at that time like Arun Kumar Ahuja, Mubarak, Kesari, Nagendra Mazumdar etc were taken. The star cast of the film included Leela Chitnis and Arun Kumar Ahuja in the lead role. The supporting cast consisted of Pramila, Mubarak, Kesari, Vimla Vashisht, Bhagwandas etc. D N Madhok, the lyricist and Gyan Dutt, the music director who were already associated with Ranjit Movietone were entrusted with their respective fields in the film.

Months before the film went to the shooting floor, Leela Chitnis did the spade work for film production. She had a couple of dances in the film apart from singing 8 songs on herself for which she did rehearsals for months. The film’s story was written by her. So she had to go through the screen-play and dialogues.

The film was released sometime in the month of August 1941. The film’s review was published in October 1941 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine. The gist of the story based on the ‘Filmindia’ review is as under:

A tailor (Nagendra Mazumdar) has two daughters – Kanchan (Leela Chitnis) and Kumud (Pramila). Both the daughters are in love with Kishore (Arun Ahuja), an educated young man. Kishore likes Kanchan and he reciprocates her feelings towards him whereas he avoids Kumud. Subsequently, Kumud works out a plot which forces Kishore to leave for a city job.

Now a landlord (Mubarak) enters in the scene. He has a vicked manager who, for a very minor reason, burns down the huts of the farmers. Kishore comes to know about it and he rescues the farmers from the clutches of the fire. In this process, the father of Kanchan and Kumud also comes under the monetary trap of the landlord as he lends money to reset the house.

Since the father is not able to repay the loan, the landlord gives him options of either attaching his whatever the assets or to give one of his daughters in marriage. Kumud refuses to act as a pawn to the landlord. Kanchan agrees to marry the landlord thus sacrificing her love for Kishore.

When the arrangements for the marriage are going in full swing, Kanchan’s mother who had known the landlord from her younger days when she was in love with him, gives the landlord a long lecture of self-consciousness on the issue. The landlord has a change of heart and he withdraws himself as the bridegroom. Kanchan gets married to Kishore.

It is evident that there was nothing new in the story to keep the audiences’ interest in the film. The Review has criticised the way the screen-play has been written which makes the story disjointed. Then there is a couple of dances of Leela Chitnis which were said to have created obstacles in the smooth flow of the story.

The review has also criticised the acting of all the major actors except Nagendra Mazumdar in the role of the father of two daughters. About the acting of Arun Kumar Ahuja, the hero, the reviewer writes:

‘He is clumsy most of the time and has a gait hardly suitable for a hero. He seems to have been taken for his slender figure and a long nose. And that is hardly enough equipment for a hero.’

It was reported in a subsequent issue of ‘Filmindia’ that Arun Ahuja was annoyed with the adverse remarks made about him in the review. He was reported to have conveyed through a person to tell Baburao Patel that he was a Sikh and he would break every bone of his if he keeps on writing like this. Baburao Patel’s repartee was that Arun was a kid. Let him put his own bones in order and moves them a bit when asked to.

The film failed at the box office and Leela Chitnis had to return to Bombay Talkies to work for ‘Jhoola’ (1941) which became a box office hit. After about 14 years, Leela Chitnis produced and directed ‘Aaj Ki Baat’ (1955) under the banner of L C Productions. This was her last film as a producer as well as a director.

‘ KANCHAN (1941) had 11 songs of which 3 songs have already been covered in the Blog. One of the 11 songs was set to music by Naushad.

I am presenting one of the two rare songs which was uploaded by me on YT a few months back. The song is ‘mori gali aa re sajan mori gali aa’ sung by Leela Chitnis. The song is written by D N Madhok and is set to music by Gyan Dutt.

The song has about 1:10 minutes of prelude music which gives me an impression that it may be a dance song.


Song-Mori gali aa re sajan (Kanchan)(1941) Singer-Leela Chitnis, Lyrics-D N Madhok, MD-Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
kook raha mero mann
kook raha mero mann
meri gali aa aaa
kook raha mero mann
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa

ambuwaa ke jhaad taley
chori chori aan miley
ambuwaa ke jhaad taley
chori chori aan miley
o jise mann khoj raha
mero piya aa
jise mann khoj raha
mero piya
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
kook raha mero mann
kook raha mero mann
mori gali aa aaa
kook raha mero mann
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa
mori gali aa re sajan
mori gali aa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

After the partition in 1947, prominent music directors like Ghulam Haider, Khwaja Khursheed Anwar, G A Chisti, Feroze Nizami, Rafique Ghaznavi , Innayat Hussain migrated to Pakistan. Most of them were born or brought up in western part of Punjab of undivided India which became a part of Pakistan. So rather than calling the process as migration, they actually returned to their original places.

There were two music directors who had started their filmy career in the 1940s but decided to migrate to Pakistan in early 1960s. They were Nashaad from Delhi and Nisaar Bazmi from Jalgaon, Maharashtra. They did very well in Pakistani film industry. While Nashaad was reportedly persuaded by producer-director-lyricist, Nakhshab Jarchavi to accompany him to Pakistan, Nisaar Bazmi migrated to Pakistan after getting an offer from Producer Fazli to compose songs for his films ‘Aisa Bhi Hota Hai’ (1965).

Syed Nisaar Ahmed a.k.a. Nisaar Bazmi (1/12/1924 – 22/03/2007) was born in Naseerabad in the present day Jalgaon district of Maharashtra. His family did not have any kind of musical background nor did Nisaar Bazmi have any formal training in music in his childhood. In 1936, he came to Bombay and joined as one of the accompanists for the Qawwali singer Yasin Qawwal of Bombay (Mumbai). This association developed his interest in singing.

Nisaar Bazmi came into contact with Ustad Aman Ali Khan of Bhendi Bazar Gharana. He accepted him as his disciple after observing his aptitude for music. He taught him various raagas for about 4 years. During this period (around 1939), he joined All India Radio as an artist.

In 1944, Ammembal Dinkar Rao, (also known as D. Amel, A. Dinkar Rao), the then Programme Executive in-charge of music, All India Radio (AIR) entrusted Nisaar Bazmi to compose songs for a play ‘Nadir Shah Durrani’ which was broadcasted on AIR. All the songs were sung by Rafique Ghaznavi and Ameerbai Karnataki. The songs became very popular. Producer-director, A R Zamindar after listening to his compositions in the play, offered him the opportunity to compose songs for his film ‘Jamna Paar’ (1946).

After getting his first film, Nisaar Bazmi bid good bye to both his permanent job in AIR and also his desire of becoming a singer. He also changed his name from Syed Nisaar Ahmed to Nisaar Bazmi. During his stint in India, he was music directors for around 40 films of which 28 films were released. These included ‘Pickpocket’ (1946), ‘Kaufnaak Aankhen’ (1947), ‘Dagabaaz Dost’ (1947), ‘Roop Lekha’ (1949). ‘Gazab’ (1951), ‘Kyon Ji’ (1952), ‘Khoj’ (1953), ‘Halla Gulla’ (1954), ‘Toofaan Mail’ (1955), ‘Zarina’ (1956), ‘Jungle Queen’ (1956), ‘Kal Kya Hoga’ (1958), ‘Shola Jo Bhadke’ (1961). His last film in India was ‘Mr. Toofaan’ (1963). From the names of the films and their star casts, it can be observed that most of his films belonged to stunt/action genre of ‘B’ and ‘C’ grade.

Probably, Nisaar Bazmi would have continued to get B and C grade films in India. But a chance visit to Lahore, Pakistan sometime in 1962 to meet his relatives and also to bring back to India son of his friend from Jalgaon, changed Nisar Bazmi’s fortunes. In Lahore, he met Fazal Karim Fazli [probably a brother of Fazli Brothers, the film producer who had produced films like ‘Qaidi’ (1940), ‘Maasoom’,(1941), ‘Fashion’ (1943), ‘ Dil’ (1946), Duniya’ (1949) etc] and accepted the offer to compose songs for his film ‘Aisa Bhi Hota Hai’ (1965).

Nisar Bazmi was a fan of Noor Jahan. However, he could not get any opportunity to compose songs for her during pre-partition years. Probably, the chance of his missed opportunity as well as his disappointment with the way his filmy career was shaping in India may have prompted to try his luck in Pakistan. For his very first film in Pakistan, he got opportunity to compose songs for Noor Jahan. The film was a hit. With this, while the son of his friend did return to India, Nisaar Bazmi got permanently settled in Pakistan due to his continuous busy schedule in Pakistani film industry during 1960s and 1970s.

In Pakistan, Nisaar Bazmi did around 65 films during 1965-1985. It is really a remarkable feat for Nisaar Bazmi, a new comer in Pakistan film industry, to create a niche for himself in the midst of some of the well-known music directors like Khwaja Khursheed Anwar, Rashid Attre, G A Chisti, Feroze Nizami, Inayat Hussain etc. It is said that once Nisar Bazmi got his foothold in Pakistani film industry, he would accept the music direction assignments only after he has read the film story and also as to who would be directing the film. He did not like interference from the directors in compositions and orchestrations. He was one of the few music directors in the Indian sub-continent who would not only composed the tune but also arrange the orchestra for the songs.

Nisar Bazmi spent the last 20 years of his life in Karachi teaching music to students and lived a contended life of a Sufi. He left for the heavenly abode on March 22, 2007.

[With resources from a write-up on Google Groups based on the meeting with Nisaar Bazmi in January 2000, articles in DAWN, March 28, 2007 and IN STEP News, April 1, 2007].

Nisaar Bazmi is known for his iconic song chanda kaa dil toot gayaa hai from ‘Khoj’ (1953) among his songs from Indian films. Like-wise, among the hit songs from the Pakistani films, he is known for his song ranjish hi sahi dil hi dukhaane ke liye aa, a ghazal by Ahmed Faraaz and rendered by Mehdi Hasan in film ‘Mohabbat’ (1968).

Today, I am presenting a rare song composed by Nisaar Bazmi for the film KHOJ (1953) which I recently heard for the first time on one of the Radio Ceylon programmes. The song is ‘aaye thhe thhodi der ko betaab kar gaye’, sung by Ashima Bannerji. The song is written by Hasrat Jaipuri.

KHOJ (1953) was produced by C R Dogra and was directed by Balwant Bhatt. The star cast included Mahipal, Shammi, Lalita Kumari, Satish, Kesari, Habib, Nagpal, Kishore Dogra, Helen etc. The film had 7 songs of which 1 song has been covered in the Blog. Songs were written by Raja Mehdi Ali Khan (4), Hasrat Jaipuri (2) and Anjum Jaipuri (1).

I wonder how this beautifully rendered song remained unknown on the internet for so long while the other song from the film ‘chanda kaa dil toot gaya hai’ had been popular for a long time.


Song-Aaye thhe thhodi der ko (Khoj)(1953) Singer-Ashima Bannerji, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Nisar Bazmi

Lyrics

aaye thhe thhodi der ko
betaab kar gaye
aankhon mein rang de ke wo
aansoo bhi bhar gaye ae
aaye thhe thhodi der ko

un se mili thhi aaj nazar
mil ke reh gayi
dil ki kali khili thhi magar
khil ke reh gayi
jhonke hawa e shauk ke
aa kar guzar gaye ae
betaab kar gaye ae
aaye thhe thhodi der ko

dekha thha ek khwaab sa
jo toot kar raha
daaman khushi ka haathon se
ab chhoot kar raha
meri hadeekasi se wo
sautan ke ghar gaye ae
betaab kar gaye ae
aaye thhe thhodi der ko

dil dhoondhta thha yaad ki
duniya liye huye
armaan bhatak rahe hain
tamanna liye huye
paimaane zindagi ke ab
aansoo se bhar gaye ae
betaab kar gaye ae
aaye thhe thhodi der ko
betaab kar gaye
aankhon mein rang de ke wo
aansoo bhi jhar gaye ae ae
aaye thhe thhodi der ko

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

आए थे थोड़ी देर को
बेताब कर गये
आँखों में रंग दे के वो
आँसू भी भर गए
आए थे थोड़ी देर को

उन से मिली थी आज नज़र
मिल के रह गई
दिल की एक कली खिली थी मगर
खिल के रह गई
झोंके हवा ए शौक के
आ कर गुज़र गए
बेताब कर गये
आए थे थोड़ी देर को

देखा था एक ख्वाब सा
जो टूट कर रहा
दामन खुशी का हाथों से
अब छूट कर रहा
मेरी हदीकसी से वो
सौतन के घर गए
बेताब कर गये
आए थे थोड़ी देर को

दिल ढूँढता था याद की
दुनिया लिए हुये
अरमान भटक रहे हैं
तमन्ना लिए हुये
पैमाने ज़िंदगी के अब
आँसू से भर गए
बेताब कर गये
आए थे थोड़ी देर को
बेताब कर गये
आँखों में रंग दे के वो
आँसू भी भर गए
आए थे थोड़ी देर को

 


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Who was the first female music director in Hindi film Industry? The answer to this question has changed thrice during the last few years.

It was believed that Saraswati Devi (real name: Khorshed Minocher-Homji) was the first female music director who composed songs for ‘Jawaani Ki Hawa’ (1935), produced under the banner of Bombay Talkies. Subsequently, it was established that Jaddanbai, who composed the songs for ‘Talaash-e-Haq’ (1935) was the first female music director, her film having been released earlier than ‘Jawaani Ki Hawa’. It will be interesting to know as to which of the songs from these two films were recorded first on the respective film’s sound track.

The latest is that the first female music director of Hindi films was Ishrat Sultana who composed songs for the film ‘Adal-e-Jahangir (1934). In the absence of any proper documentation of the history of Hindi films, it is quite possible that some other name for the first female music director may prop up in future especially when it is a well-known fact that for many films of 1931-32, names of the music directors are unknown as of now.

Ishrat Sultana, the first female music director of Hindi films, was none other than Bibbo, her better known name as the popular actor-singer of 1930s and 40s. Probably, her transition from music director to actor-singer was demand-driven. During the initial period of the talkies, good female singers were in great demand from the studios as actor-singer. Bibbo was a trained singer. Her mother Hafeezan Bai was a singer and a courtesan in Delhi. With a photogenic face and the good singing ability, she was soon employed by Ajanta Cinetone as actor-singer with her first film ‘Rangeela Rajput’ (1933).

After working for 8 films of Ajanta Cinetone during 1933-36, Bibbo joined Sagar Movietone to act in ‘Manmohan’ (1936) which was supposed to be its answer to New Theatres’s ‘Devdas’ (1935). For this purpose, director Mehboob Khan had taken Surendra as actor-singer who was groomed as ‘Bombay Saigal’. The film became a hit and the lead pair of Surendra-Bibbo became popular. They worked together in as many as 7 films of which 5 films were regarded as box office hits. Some of her other films with Surendra under Sagar Movietone were ‘Jaagirdaar’ (1937), ‘Gramophone Singer’ (1938), ‘Dynamite’ (1938), ‘Seva Samaaj’ (1939), ‘Ladies Only’ (1939) etc.

By 1939, Bibbo had become one of the top actor-singers and her popularity had reached the zenith. Her popularity can be judged by the fact that in the film ‘Gharib Ke Laal’ (1939), there is a song which starts with her name amongst the names of many actors of that time. The song is “Tujhe Bibbo Kahun Ke Sulochana” sung as a duet in accompaniment with Mirza Musharraf.

After the closure of Sagar Movietone in 1939, Bibbo became a free-lancer during which she did ‘Sneh Bandhan’ (1940), ‘Laxmi’ (1940), ‘Sohag’ (1940) and ‘Akela’ (1941) etc. There was a gap in her filmy career during 1941-44.
It is said that towards of the end of 1930s, Bibbo got married to S Khalil, her co-actor during her stint with Ajanta Cinetone who also directed ‘Adal-e-Jahangir’ (1934) in which she composed songs under the name of Ishrat Sultana. They shifted their base to Lahore. They jointly produced ‘Qazzak Ki Ladki’ (1937) in which she composed songs along with Dr Samad. However, the film failed miserably and Bibbo had to came back to Bombay.

Her second stint in the film industry during 1944-47 was not as rosy as the first one. She mostly got the side roles in films such as ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) and ‘Sassi Punnu’ (1946). ‘Pehla Pyaar’ (1947) was her last film in India after which she migrated to Pakistan where she continued to work in films getting character roles till 1966. Bibbo died on May 25, 1972 in Karachi.

‘Dynamite’ (alias name ‘Kis Ke Saajan’) (1938) was one of the films under the banner of Sagar Movietone in which Bibbo is paired with Surendra. The film was directed by Chimanlal Luhar. Others actors listed in the star cast of the film are Maya Bannerji, Yakub, Sankatha Prasad, Budho Advani, Jamu Patel, Qaiyam Ali, Pessi Patel etc. The film belongs to mystery/suspense genre. I have no idea about the story of the film. Going by a few photographs of the scenes from the film, it appears that Surendra had some sort of camouflage roles – one with Bibbo and another with Maya Bannerji.

The film had 7 songs written by Pandit Indra (6) and Zia Sarhadi (1) which were set to music by Anil Biswas. Here is the first song “Kaliyaan Raseeli Saiyaan Bhanwraa Ganwaar Hai’ sung by Bibbo and Surendra. The song is written by Pandit Indra.

I heard this song for the first time a few days back and liked it immensely. Going by the implicit meaning of the lyrics, Anil Biswas has given a soft touch to the composition of the song which have been rendered in line with its softness.

With this song, ‘Dynamite’ alias ‘Kis Ke Saajan’ (1938) makes its debut on our blog.


Song – Kaliyaan Raseeli Piya Bhanwra Ganwaar Hai (Dynamite) (1938) Singer – Bibbo, Surendra, Lyrics – Pandit Indra, MD – Anil Biswas
Bibbo + Surendra

Lyrics

kaliyaan raseeli saiyaan
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
kaliyaan raseeli saiyaan
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
kehti hain kaliyaan dekh deewaane
kehti hain kaliyaan dekh deewaane
do din dheeraj dhar mastaane
do din dheeraj dhar mastaane
hota huwa ye singaar hai
hota huwa ye singaar hai
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
kaliyaan raseeli saiyaan
bhanwraa ganwaar hai

jeewan mein ras dhaar bahegi
jeewan mein ras dhaar bahegi
pyaar bhari taqraar rahegi
pyaar bhari taqraar rahegi
swarg yahi sansaar hai
swarg yahi sansaar hai
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
kaliyaan raseeli saiyaan
bhanwraa ganwaar hai

chaatak pyaasa nadi kinaare
chaatak pyaasa nadi kinaare
rooth gayen hain bhaagya hamaare
rooth gayen hain bhaagya hamaare
dil ke ab armaan pukaare
dil ke ab armaan pukaare
toota huwa ye sitaar hai
toota huwa ye sitaar hai
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
kaliyaan raseeli saiyaan
bhanwraa ganwaar hai
———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

कलियाँ रसीली सैंय्या
भँवरा गंवार है
कलियाँ रसीली सैंय्या
भँवरा गंवार है
कहती हैं कलियाँ देख दीवाने
कहती हैं कलियाँ देख दीवाने
दो दिन धीरज धर मस्ताने
दो दिन धीरज धर मस्ताने
होता हुआ ये सिंगार है
होता हुआ ये सिंगार है
भँवरा गंवार है
कलियाँ रसीली सैंय्या
भँवरा गंवार है

जीवन में रस धार बहेगी
जीवन में रस धार बहेगी
प्यार भरी तकरार रहेगी
प्यार भरी तकरार रहेगी
स्वर्ग यही संसार है
स्वर्ग यही संसार है
भँवरा गंवार है
कलियाँ रसीली सैंय्या
भँवरा गंवार है

चातक प्यासा नदी किनारे
चातक प्यासा नदी किनारे
रूठ गए हैं भाग्य हमारे
रूठ गए हैं भाग्य हमारे
दिल के अब अरमान पुकारे
दिल के अब अरमान पुकारे
टूटा हुआ ये सितार है
टूटा हुआ ये सितार है
भँवरा गंवार है
कलियाँ रसीली सैंय्या
भँवरा गंवार है


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than eight years. This blog has over 13300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3200 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1012
Total Number of movies covered =3703

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