Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4257 Post No. : 15478 Movie Count :

4266

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Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 22
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‘Banarasi’ (1962, Bangla film) was produced by Ruma Guha Thakurta and was directed by her husband, Arup Guha Thakurta. The film was based on a story written by novelist Bimal Mitra (he also wrote the story of the film ‘Sahab Bibi Gholam’).  The main actors in the film are Soumitra Chatterjee, Ruma Guha Thakurta, Tulsi Chakraborty, Tarun Kumar, Asha Devi, Maneka Devi, Shyam Laha etc. The film is available on a video sharing platform with English sub-titles.

I had heard of Ruma Guha Thakurta (Ruma Devi for Hindi film audience) as an occasional actor in Hindi films and an ex-wife of Kishore Kumar. Finding her name in the Bangla film under discussion, that too not only as an actor-singer but also as a producer of the film, I thought I need to know more about her than what I had the impression about her in my mind. Fortunately, information about her is available on-line including her interview on Doordarshan.

Ruma Devi (03/11/1934 – 03/06/2019) was born as Ruma Ghosh (later known as Ruma Guha Thakurta after her second marriage) in a family of talented vocalists. She was the niece of Satyajit Ray.

Ruma Devi started as a dancer in Uday Shankar’s troupe in Almora. Later, she shifted to Bombay (now Mumbai) and worked as a child actor in her first film, the Bombay Talkies’ ‘Jwaar Bhata’ (1944). She worked in three more Hindi films – ‘Mashaal’, 1950 (’Samar’ in Bangla), ‘Afsar’ (1950) and ‘Raag Rang’ (1952). She got married to Kishore Kumar in 1951. After the birth of their son, Amit Kumar in 1952, Ruma Devi stopped working in the films.

In 1958, Ruma Devi and Kishore Kumar parted amicably. Ruma Devi shifted to Kolkata and set up Calcutta Youth Choir (CYC) in collaboration with her maternal uncle, Satyajit Ray and Salil Chowdhury. Throughout her life, she was actively involved with CYC. In 1974, she led a troupe of singers and dancers of CYC to participate in Copenhagen Youth Festival where CYC won the first prize.

In 1959, she worked in her first exclusive Bangla language film, ‘Ganga’ (‘The River’, 1960) as a supporting actor. Her role in the film was critically acclaimed. She worked in about 60 Bangla films from 1950 through 1998 during which she was associated with the renowned  directors like Satyajit Ray in ‘Abhijan; (1962) and ‘Ghanashatru’ (1989), with Tapan Sinha in films like ‘Atithi’ (1959) and ‘Nirjon Saikote’ (1963) and with Tarun Majumdar in films like ‘ Palatak; (1963) and ‘Balika Bodhu’ (1967). She also worked in Bangla films as a playback singer and did choreography in a couple of Bangla films. Her last film as an actor was Mira Nair’s English film ‘The Namesake’ (2006).

In 1960, Ruma Devi got married to director Arup Guha Thakurta with whom she has a son, Ayan and a daughter, Sromona Chakroborty who is a singer.

Ruma Devi passed away in her sleep on 03/06/2019 at her Kolkata residence due to old age-related problems.

The story of ‘Banarasi’ (1962) is as under:

Ratan (Soumitra Chatterjee) works as a draftsman in the railways and stays in an old man’s house in Kolkata as a paying guest. The only person with whom he shares his personal matters and who also help him financially in case of need is his close friend, Monty (Tarun Kumar). One day, while returning from watching a play in the theatre, Ratan sees a girl who has stopped her horse driven coach to buy a paan. The girl’s face resembles that of his childhood friend, Sona (Ruma Guha Thakurta) who was kidnapped at the ghats of River Ganga in Banaras. He watches her until she gets down from the coach and enters a building. Ratan wants to meet her but Monty discourages him by saying that the building houses courtesans. But Ratan is anxious to visit her to ascertain whether she is really Sona, his childhood friend to whom he was to marry later.

One day, without the knowledge of Monty, Ratan visits Sona and comes to know that the girl he saw earlier was indeed Sona whose life has now changed after her kidnapping and she has become a courtesan with a new name ‘Banarasi’. Ratan tells her that he wants to marry her and both of them can still start a life afresh by shifting to a place away from Kolkata where no one would know their background. After much persuasion, Sona agrees. Ratan arranges his transfer to a remote village where Railway is lying new tracks. Sona runs away with Ratan in the night.  Both of them get married in a temple at Kalighat and travel by train to their new place of work in a remote village.

The station master of the village railway station accommodates him in his house until he gets the staff quarters. Both Ratan and Sona are happy. However, their happiness is short lived as Ratan comes across a calendar with her picture as a courtesan in a shop. Now Sona’s past haunts him and there is some tension between husband and wife. Their tension is further compounded when one of Sona’s old clients who has halted in the village on a business trip, recognises Sona. She and Ratan are humiliated in the presence of villagers. Sona decides to leave her husband as she feels that it was due to her past that Ratan has to face the humiliation in the society. She leaves the house in the dead of the night. Ratan, on not finding her wife in the house, goes out searching for her. He meets Sona halfway and promises her that no matter what the society says, he would always be with her. With these words, Ratan accompanies Sona to an uncharted place leaving everything behind in the house.

The film was critically acclaimed but did not do well on the box office front. Probably, the theme of the story was familiar. The extent of sympathy which the director of ‘Umrao Jaan’ (1981) created for the character of the courtesan was missing in the character of courtesan in ‘Banarasi’ (1962). However, both Soumitra Chatterjee and Ruma Guha Thakurta have given sensitive performances as per the demand of their respective roles.

By now, I have come to know that Bangla films with courtesan’s theme or scenes have a couple of Hindi songs. In ‘Banarasi’ (1962) also, there are 3 Hindi songs of which two are mujra songs and the third is a partial holi song in Bhojpuri dialect. I am presenting one of the two mujra songs, “Shabnam To Royi Royi” sung by Ruma Guha Thakurta who is singing for herself as a courtesan. The song is written by Nyay Sharma which is set to music by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan.

Song – Shabnam To Royi Royi, Taare Bhi Roye Bairi (Banarasi)(Bangla) (1962) Singer – Ruma Guha Thakurta, Lyrics – Nyay Sharma, MD – Ustad Ali Akbar Khan

Lyrics

shabnam to royi royi
taare bhi roye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja..aa
jaanewaale aaja
shabnam to royi royi
taare bhi roye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja..aa
jaanewaale aaja
 
taare bhi royen
meri raahen bhi royen
nigaahen bhi royen
meri duaa’en bhi royen
taare bhi royen
meri raahen bhi royen
nigaahen bhi royen
meri duaa’en bhi royen
manzil to khoi khoi
saathi bhi khoye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja
jaanewaale aaja
 
royen muraaden apni
aanchal nahin hai
samjhi hum jisko saahil
saahil nahin hai
kashti to soi soi
kinaare bhi soye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja..aa
jaanewaale aaja

shabnam to royi royi
taare bhi roye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja..aa
jaanewaale aaja
 
palkon ne haar piroye
kis ko pehnaa’en
hichki malhaar gaaye
kis ko sunaa’en
palkon ne haar piroye
kis ko pehnaa’en
hichki malhaar gaaye
kis ko sunaa’en
hasrat to royi royi
nazaare bhi roye bairi
ab to tu aaja aaja
jaanewaale aaja. . .
jaanewaale aaja

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
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शबनम तो रोई रोई
तारे भी रोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आ जा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा
शबनम तो रोई रोई
तारे भी रोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आ जा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा

तारे भी रोएँ
मेरी राहें भी रोएँ
निगाहें भी रोएँ
मेरी दुआएं भी रोएँ
तारे भी रोएँ
मेरी राहें भी रोएँ
निगाहें भी रोएँ
मेरी दुआएं भी रोएँ
मंज़िल तो खोई खोई
साथी भी खोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आजा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा

रोएँ मुरादें अपनी
आँचल नहीं है
समझी हम जिनको साहिल
साहिल नहीं है
कश्ती तो सोई सोई’
किनारे भी सोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आजा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा

शबनम तो रोई रोई
तारे भी रोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आ जा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा

पलकों ने हार पिरोये
किस को पहनाएँ
हिचकी मल्हार गाये
किसको सुनाएँ
पलकों ने हार पिरोये
किस को पहनाएँ
हिचकी मल्हार गाये
किसको सुनाएँ
हसरत तो रोई रोई
नज़ारे भी रोये बैरी
अब तो तू आजा आजा
जानेवाले आ जा॰॰आ
जानेवाले आजा


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4249 Post No. : 15469 Movie Count :

4263

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Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 21
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Ashapurna Devi (1909-1995) was a Bengali novelist who wrote more than 200 novels, over 2000 short stories and over 50 children’s books during her life time. It is to her credit that she could contribute so much to the Bengali literature despite being born in a very conservative Bengali joint family in which female members of the household were not allowed to attend school. For male members, private teachers were appointed who will teach them in their home. It is during this time, Ashapurna Devi learnt Bengali alphabets albeit clandestinely when her brothers were being taught in the house. She won many coveted literary awards including Jnanpith Award for her novel Prothom Protishruti (The First Promise) in 1976.

Many films have been made based on the novels and stories written by Ashapurna Devi. Some of them are ‘Agni Pariksha’ (Bangla, 1954), ‘Padikkathai Methai’ ( Tamil, 1960), ‘Chhaaya Surya’ (Bangla, 1963), ‘Mavana Magalu’ (Kannada, 1965), ‘Chhoti Si Mulaaqat’ (Hindi, 1967), ‘Baluchari’ (Bangla, 1968), ‘Prothom Protishruti’ (Bangla, 1971) ‘Anindita’ (Bangla, 1972), ‘Chaitali’ (Bangla, 1971 and Hindi, 1975), ‘Tapasya’ (Hindi, 1976), and ‘Ek Vivaah Aisa Bhi’ (2008). The list is not exhaustive.

‘Chaitali’ (1971, Bangla film) was one of the films based on a story of the same name by Ashapurna Devi. The film was directed by Sudhir Mukherjee. The main cast included Biswajeet, Tanjua, Basanta Chowdhury, Jahar Ray, Tarun Kumar, Biren Chatterjee, Manmohan etc.

Although a few of Ashapurna Devi’s novels and short stories have been translated in English and published, I could not locate the story of Chaitali on-line. Probably, this story may be a part of the collections of her stories in Bangla only which I cannot read. The film is available on a video sharing platform in three parts without English sub-titles. So, my understanding of the story of the film is based the visuals and some Hindi dialogues given to the characters of Lajjo (Tanuja), Nawab Sahab (Basanta Chowdhury) and Kumar Sahab (Manmohan) in it.

The film starts with Amitabh, (Biswajit), an engineer travelling from his home town on transfer to his new place of work to oversee the construction of new road (The outdoor shooting of the place with hills and the snow-capped mountains appears to be somewhere between Siliguri and Darjeeling). He is taken to the site office and thereafter to his quarters with a caretaker attached to it. On the very first day, Kumar Sahab (Manmohan) who is not only one of the contractors for the road work but also a notorious local bully, visits the quarter to meet Amitabh. He refuses to meet him by saying that he would prefer official meetings in the site office only. This create the first friction between Kumar Sahab and Amitabh.

Lajjo (Tanuja), an orphaned girl from Hindi heartland stays with her tyrannical aunt in the neighborhoods of Amitabh’s quarters. Because, she has no one else to share her feelings, she finds solace in spending time in the house of an old man, Nawab Sahab (Basanta Chowdhury) who is her neighbour. Nawab Sahab is an admirer of Gurudev Rabindra Tagore’s works. He has taken the task of translating some of Tagore’s works in Urdu and Persians. He is also into music.

Lajjo is a milkmaid who supplies milk to Amitabh’s quarters in the morning. There is always some friction between Lajjo and the caretaker over the late supplies of milk or the quality of milk. But Amitabh always take a sympathetic disposition towards Lajjo whenever his caretaker complains against her. Sometime, Lajjo also does household works in the quarters. Over a period of time, Amitabh develops soft corner for her. He starts teaching her Bangla alphabets and conversation in Bangla which she picks up fast. This is not liked by Nawab Sahab and he gives subtle hint to Amitabh. So, now on, he keeps a distance with Lajjo.

Simultaneously, Amitabh has problems with the quality of road work done by Kumar. So, he postpones the payments of his bills for work done until he personally inspects the road. He also orders his staff to bring out old files pertaining to Kumar’s work. This creates panic for Kumar. He engages his henchmen to intercept Amitabh while on an inspection trip in the forest. However, due to heavy rains and landslides, he is not able to visit the place. In the quarters, the caretaker is worried as he thinks that Amitabh is caught in the landslides. After hearing this news, Laajo who has also kept a distance from Amitabh due to Nawab Sahab insistence, runs to search for him. She finds Amitabh safe in a tent. The meeting ignites their love for each other. They return home after the rains have subsided.

Having failed in an attempt to immobilise Amitabh and also to make his old files missing, Kumar plans a conspiracy in which he pays money to Lajjo’s aunt to facilitate her kidnapping. While going to fetch waters from the river, Lajjo gets kidnapped by his henchmen and blames Amitabh for it since both have been last seen together while returning from his inspection duty and both are missing since then. The fact is that Amitabh has gone to his hometown to meet his brother.

When Amitabh returns from home town, police arrests him on charge of kidnapping Lajjo. He is taken to the police station. However, before he is being questioned, Lajjo’s aunt under pressure from Nawab Sahab confesses her role in Lajjo’s kidnapping. She is arrested. Lajjo runs away from the kidnappers and reaches the police station to tell her side of the story. Amitabh is released and Lajjo comes back and visit Nawab Sahab’s house only to find that Kumar and his henchmen have cornered Nawab Sahab. In the scuffle between him and Kumar, Nawab Sahab gets seriously injured from the bullet fired by Kumar. Before, he could recapture Lajjo, police forces get hold of him and he is arrested. Nawab Sahab dies and Lajjo becomes once again an orphan with her aunt in the jail and Nawab Sahab dead. The film ends with Amitabh and Lajjo meeting at the burial ground who would now take care of her.

Many internet sites refer the Hindi version, ‘Chaitali’ (1975) produced under the banner of Bimal Roy Productions, as a remake of the Bangla version of the film. But it is not so. There are subtle differences between the two versions of the film. In Bangla version, the character of the hero is that of an Engineer who is posted on the site office to oversee the road construction work. In the Hindi version, the hero is a professor in the college and stays in a joint family. Secondly, the character of Lajjo (Chaitali) in Bangla version is different than in Hindi version in which she has been shown as a kleptomaniac and she get reformed after working with a loving joint family.

Rinki Bhattacharya, the daughter of Bimal Roy in a very recent interview (February 2020) has revealed that her father had planned the film with a title ‘Sahara’ based on Ashapurna Devi’s short story ‘Chaitali’ and some shots were filmed in early 1966 with Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore. But he fell ill on the set from which he never recovered. After a gap of 8 years, the film was started afresh under the direction of Hrishikesh Mukherjee with the ‘Chaitali’ as the title of the film replacing Sharmila Tagore with Saira Banu. The film did not fare well on the box office.

In keeping with the Hindi speaking role of Chaitali, the Bangla version of the film had 3 Hindi songs out of 8 songs. I am presenting one of the two Lata solos, ‘paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi’ which is written by Anand Bakshi. All the songs (Hindi and Bangla) in the film were set to music by S D Burman. The tune of the song appears to be based on a Nepali folk song to me.

It is interesting to note that after ‘Samar’ (1950, Bangla film), S D Burman had not composed songs in any Bangla films until ‘Chaitali’ (1971) and this film became his last Bangla film as well.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Paayal baaj gayi aaj (Chaitaali)(Bangla)(1971) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-S D Burman

Lyrics (Based on Video Clip)

paayal
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aaah
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal

ankhiyon ne to mera bhed chhupaaya aa
ankhiyon ne to mera bhed chhupaaya
honthon pe bhi tera naam na aaya
lekin ye anjaam beimaan
paayal
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal

aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aaa
laakh kaha ke tu ye kaam na karna aa
laakh kaha ke tu ye kaam na karna
dekh nigodi badnaam na karna
phir bhi ye anjaan beimaan
paayal
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal

pehle se bhi mere haal pe shaque thha
pehle se bhi mere haal pe shaque thha
badli huyi mere chaal pe shaque thha
uspe ye anjaan beimaan
paayal
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal baaj gayi aaj meri laaj gayi
main kaahe ko tere dwaar piya aaj gayi
paayal


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4246 Post No. : 15465

‘Shatranj Ke Khilaadi’ (1977) was Satyajit Ray’s first and only Hindi feature film which was based on a short-story by the same name written by Munshi Premchand. The film was produced by Suresh Jindal under the banner of Devki Chitra. From the low budget black and white Bangla films, Satyajit Ray charted his way into high budget Hindi colour film with multi-star cast with Mumbai and Kolkata based actors and also actors from the West. The actors included Sanjeev Kumar, Saeed Jaffrey, Amjad Khan, Shabana Azmi, Farida Jalal, Victor Bannerji, Richard Attenborough, Tom Alter, Barry John, Farooque Shaikh, David Abraham, Veena etc.

After successfully producing his first Hindi film ‘Rajnigandha’ (1974), Producer, Suresh Jindal in a chance meeting with Satyajit Ray sometime in 1974 requested him to direct for him a Hindi film, or an English film. If not, he is prepared to produce a Bengali film for him to direct. Satyajit Ray’s reaction to his request was positive as he said that he himself was thinking of directing a Hindi film. This opened their partnership of making ‘Shatranj Ke Khilaadi’ (1977).

From 1974 to 1976, the time was spent mostly on a detailed research on the subject including meetings with scholars in India and the UK. Both Satyajit Ray and Suresh Jindal visited various places in India and abroad which had connection with the story of the film for checking the authenticity of the historical events and also for the selection of authentic props. The visits included havelis of Lucknow and Jaipur, thakur baris of North Calcutta (Kolkata), museums and libraries of Hyderabad and London etc. The shooting of the film was delayed by few months due to non-availability of Sanjeev Kumar for health reasons. The film’s shooting finally commenced in December 1976 and wound up by June 1977. For details about the making of this film, one can read the book ‘My Adventures with Satyajit Ray : The Making of Shatranj Ke Khiladi’ by Suresh Jindal (Harper Collins, 2017).

I had covered in detail the story of the film while discussing one of the songs from the film, Kaanha main tose haari. Just to recapitulate in short, the story is set in the background of the impending take over of Awadh by the British troops as they feel that the Nawab of Awadh, Wajid Ali Shah is busier with singing, dancing and poetry reciting sessions than governing his kingdom. On the other hand, two of the aristocrats of Nawab are unmindful of what is in store for Awadh and of their families, as they are addicted to playing chess. At the end of film, Satyajit Roy has highlighted situational irony in which while Nawab Wajid Ali Shah, in order to avoid bloodshed, abdicates Awadh to Britishers, the chess playing aristocrats continue to play chess at a far-off place from their houses in order to avoid calls from Nawab to fight the Britisher troops. In the event, a bloody fight ensues between the two on a trivial chess move in which they are prepared to kill each other.

The film had 5 songs of which two songs have been covered in the Blog. Of the remaining 3 songs, 2 songs are partially used in the film although the record versions of them are longer. The remaining one song ‘hindola jhoole shyam’ which I am presenting here was deleted from the film before its the release. The song is rendered by Calcutta Youth Choir (as a chorus) which is set to music by Satyajit Ray. The lyrics are written by Wajid Ali Shah. Incidentally, Calcutta Youth Choir was set in 1958 by Ruma Guha Thakurta along with Salil Chowdhury and Satyajit Ray.

The long prelude and the last interlude music with short taraana would indicate that this song has been written for Kathak dance performance or for a musical play on Krishna. The verses were written by Nawab Wajid Ali Shah. The last stanza has some Urdu words. Some of the Urdu poets like Nazeer Akbaradbadi and Hasrat Mohani have written many poems in praise of the beauty of Lord Krishna and on his divine love for Radha in the mixed language of Urdu and Awadhi/Brij.

I was eager to know as to where this deleted song would have appeared in the film. I had read that Nawab Wajid Ali Shah had written plays about Lord Krishna and his raasleela with Radha in which, sometime he himself used to perform as Krishna. With this background, I guess this song would have fitted in the beginning of the film, during which a short Kathak dance is being performed by Wajid Ali Shah (Amjad Khan) as Lord Krishan along with Radha and other dancers.

The song is not only pleasing to ears but also soothing to the mind.

Audio Clip:

Song-Hindola jhoole Shyam (Shatraj Ke Khilaadi)(1977) Lyrics-Wajid Ali Shah, MD-Satyajit Ray

Lyrics

hindola jhoole shyam
hindola jhoole shyam
shyam gane se ghana chalat pawan
shyam gane se ghana chalat pawan
sanan sanan sanana naa aa aa
hindola jhoole shyam
hindola jhoole

sab sakhiyaan mil peng badhaao
deke ??
re ma pa ni sa
tanan tanana tan tanana aa aa aa
hindola jhoole shyam
hindola jhoole

mor mukut kati kehari kingini
paayal baaje ae
jhanan jhanan jhan jhanana aa
hindola jhoole

?? ??
tha de
dhe tha dhe tha
dhe tha re de re tha
jaan-e-aalam rahas mubarak
jaan-e-aalam rahas mubarak
yug yug jiyo sada viraajo
yug yug jiyo sada viraajo
maatar meera sang rahas mubaarak
jaan-e-aalam rahas mubaarak
jaan-e-aalam rahas mubaarak
jaan-e-aalam
jaan-e-aalam
jaan-e-aaaaaa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4242 Post No. : 15460 Movie Count :

4259

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 20
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‘Aarohan’ (The Ascension, 2011 – Bangla film) was directed by Pinaki Choudhuri who wrote story and screen-play for the film. Soumitra Chatterjee and Sandhya Roy who were 76 and 69 years of age respectively at the time of making of this film were in the lead roles. The other supporting cast included Shamdarshi Dutta, Rituparna Sengupta (special appearance), Siddharth Chatterjee, Tulika Basu, Ashok Mukherjee, Rajesh Sharma, Nandini Chatterjee (special appearance) etc.

This film was selected for Montreal International Film Festival (2010) even before it was released in India. Pinaki Choudhury, the film’s director, in an interview, had said that he had read in a newspaper article about Mukti Bhavan in Varanasi where people who are about to die are given shelter for one month. He visited the place and spent few days with the inmates of the Bhavan. He was fascinated by the philosophy of the inmates who believe that dying in Varanasi give them salvation thus breaking the endless cycles of birth and death. Based on his experience, he wrote the story revolving around a patriarch of the family who decides to shift to Mukti Bhavan in Varanasi expecting that he would die within a month of his stay as per the prediction based on his horoscope.

It is not an easy decision for the old man to shift to Mukti Bhavan in Varanasi. There are clashes of thoughts between him and his aged wife, between him and his grandson also his friend. All of them react differently but for the same purpose of preventing him from going to Varanasi.

The film opens with a scene in which the 75-year old Surya Shekhar Chatterjee (Soumitra Chatterjee) while trying to cross a busy road in Kilkata is about to be hit by a speeding car when a young photographer saves him in the nick of time from the accident. Surya Shekhar is grateful to the photographer and invites him to his house.

Surya Shekhar is the firm believer in the horoscope. All predictions made on the basis of his horoscope has, so far, come true. One of the future predictions of his horoscope is that there will be threat to his life at the age of 75. And that threat was about to become true if the photographer had not saved him from the accident. Now he is fully convinced about his impending death as per the prediction in his horoscope. So, he plans to shift to Mukti Bhavan in Varanasi to attain salvation upon his death.

Surya Shekhar shares his plan with his wife (Sandhya Roy). She opposes his plan by saying that she had always supported him in his decisions but she would not agree for his shifting to Mukti Bhavan. But Surya Shekhar is adamant on his decision. His wife requests one of his close friends to counsel him to abandon his plan to stay in Mukti Bhavan. His friend tries to dissuade him from his plan by saying that what he is doing is not a faith but the plain superstition in believing the predictions. The young photographer who had saved him from the accident also tries to convince him by saying that astrology is not a science and no one can predict the future. But Surya Shekhar ends the debate by saying that Varanasi is his life’s last halting station.

As a flash back, Surya Shekhar does not have a good rapport with his son as the latter ridicules him for his so much dependence on the horoscopes. Their relation goes for the worst when the son decides to marry a girl outside his caste and that too without matching the horoscopes. Son gets married and settles down in the US. The son and his family had become persona non grata in Surya Shekhar’s house. Both father and son have not spoken to and seen each other for the last 25 years though his wife and the daughter-in-law are in communication with each other.

Surya Shekhar had not talked to his son when latter had a heart attack. He held a firm view that as per his horoscope, his son would not die before his death. Surya Shekhar has not even spoken and seen the face of his young grandson born and studied in the US who has come to India on a short vacation. The young photographer who had earlier saved Surya Shekhar is none other than his grandson Arijit (Samadarshi Dutta) which is revealed to Surya Shekhar by his wife while nominating him as the heir for his fixed deposits after his death.

Surya Shekhar departs for Varanasi along with his wife. Arijit accompanies them which would also give him the glimpses of Varanasi which has its unique character as a pilgrimage centre. The first few days of their stay in Varanasi goes well during which time he comes to know from the Manager of Mukti Bhavan that some old people who had come to die here have to make a revisit a number of times as they survived on each of their one-month stay. To hasten his death, Surya Shekhar decides to forgo dinner and also reduces his intake of food. The weakness caused by low intake of food makes him almost bedridden.

One day, Surya Shekhar get a mild chest pain. Since doctors are not permitted to visit Mukti Bhavan, Arijit informs his parents about his grandfather’s deteriorating health. Both his son and daughter-in-law rush to Varanasi to see him. Despite his son firmly telling him that by foregoing food he is in fact committing suicide, Surya Shekhar is not in a mood to argue with his son as he is destined to die in the next few days.

Parallelly, events are happening in Varanasi when Arijit gets involved with a married village woman from Bihar (Rituparna Sengupta) who also stays in the Mukti Bhavan with her mother-in-law who has also checked in for salvation. Her husband is a gay but her mother-in-law curses her being ‘baanj’ (barren) almost every day. Fed-up with her every day’s tantrums, daughter-in-law challenges her by saying that one day she will prove that she is not a baanjh. Her clandestine relation with Arijit results in her becoming pregnant. When her mother-in-law comes to know about it, she dies of shock. Now, the Bihari woman has to vacate the Mukti Bhavan. She becomes homeless as she has nowhere to stay with her illegitimate pregnancy. Seeing her predicament, Arijit decides to marry her and reveals his intention as such to his parents who at that moment are with his grandfather.

Arijit’s parents are shocked to know that he is going to marry not only a married woman but also outside his caste. Both of them oppose his proposal. But Arijit is adamant. In a fit of anger, Arijit’s father tries to slap him during which time, he gets a heart attack and dies in the Mukti Bhavan. Arijit performs his last rites at Varanasi Ghat. Surya Shekhar’s wife points out to her husband that he had said that the son would not die when he is alive. She questions him as to whose salvation he had predicted from the horoscope. After listening to his wife, Surya Shekhar takes out his horoscope from his pocket and tears it. He goes with his grandson to immerse his son’s ashes in the River Ganga. Arijit goes back to US with an assurance to his grandparents that he would soon return to India.

While returning to their room in Mukti Bhavan, Surya Shekhar finds the Bihari woman sitting with her meagre belonging at the Ghat. The film ends with Surya Shekhar asking the Bihari woman to accompany them to Kolkata where he has an old house. He would construct a bigger house where all of them would stay together. And that would be his salvation and emancipation.

This is the first time I watched the Dada Saheb Phalke Award winner, Soumitra Chatterjee in a lead role of 75-year old man in which he has got full scope to show his histrionic. He is well supported by equally talented Sandhya Roy with her excellent performance. I liked the young Samdarshi Dutta in the role of US returned grandson. His dialogues are in American accented English with American mannerism. Yet his character requires him to tune with the Indian ethos. It was a bit difficult role for him, that too in front of the senior actors which he has admirably performed. Ritupurna Sengupta in a role of a Bihari village woman has done a commendable performance of a rustic village woman with her dialogues in colloquial Hindi. All in all, it is a good film to watch.

In the DVD of the film I watched, there are 3 songs of which two are in Bengali and one in Hindi. In addition, there are two short Hindustani classical renderings by Ustad Rashid Khan in the background. I am presenting Hindi song ‘dil ko chura kar chale jaana na’ sung by Shreya Ghoshal which is picturised on Rituparna Sengupta who is in her beautiful dream sequence in Bollywood style. Samadarshi Dutta is also seen in the sequence. While lyricist of the song is unidentified, it is set to music by Suparna Kanti Ghosh.

Enjoy the beautiful interlude music from esraj (a musical instrument which produces the mixed sound of sitar and sarangi) and the flute along with the song.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Dil ko chura ke chale jaana naa (Aarohan)(Bangla)(2011) Singer-Shreya Ghoshal, MD-Suparna Kanti Ghosh

Lyrics (based on video clip)

hmm hmm hmm hmm
ha aa aaa
ha aa aa haa
ha aa aa aa aaa
hmm hmm hmm hmm chale jaana na
ha aa aaa
aa aa aaa
dil ko chura ke chale jaana na
dil ko chura ke chale jaana na
main ro ro maroongi tumhaare bina
apna bana ke chale jaana na
dil ko chura ke chale jaana na

zulmi iss duniya ne aur kya kiya
badnaami aur aansoo se dil bhar diya
phir tu ne pyaar se jo apna liya aa
phir tu ne pyaar se jo apna liya
rahoon kaise tumko nihaare bina
apna bana ke chale jaana na
dil ko chura ke chale jaana naa

tere jo saath hai to mumkin nahin
magar ab to kuchh bhi hai mushkil nahin
dhoondhti hoon khwaabon ki manzil yaheen ee
dhoondhti hoon khwaabon ki manzil yaheen
mile to jee loongi tumhaare bina aa
apna bana ke chale jaana na
dil ko chura ke chale jaana na
main ro ro maroongi tumhaare bina
apna bana ke chale jaana na
dil ko chura ke chale jaana na
ho o ooooooooo
o o o o o


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4240 Post No. : 15455 Movie Count :

4257

Hindi Songs from Bangla Films : 19
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‘Jogajog’ (Relationship, 2015) was a Bangla film which was based on a novel of the same name written by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore and published in 1929. The film was directed by Shekhar Das. The main cast included Bhartya Basu, Suvalagna Mukherjee, Ananya Chatterjee, Arjun Chakraborty, Shaheb Chatterjee, Locket Chatterjee etc. By the way, Bhartya Basu, the lead actor in the film was the MLA and the Minister of Tourism of the Government of West Bengal when the film’s shooting started. It was a debut film for the lead actress, Suvalogna Mukherjee.

Unfortunately, the film is not available on video sharing platforms. So, I had to depend upon the English edition of Tagore’s novel which is available online as well as review of the film on the Times of India. Having gone through both the sources, I get an impression that the film’s director, Shekhar Das has, by and large, adhered to the story of the novel including the names of the characters. The novel itself is a commentary on the declining influence of aristocracy of landlords in Bengal Presidency from early 20th Century and the emergence of neo-rich business class and their clash of culture and values. It is a feminist novel but at the end, it is the defeat for the female protagonist in the novel.

The gist of the story of the film is as under:

The story revolves around the hostility of two families – the Chatterjees and the Ghoshals. The Chatterjees are landlords whose fortunes have declined while that of Ghoshals have improved considerably thanks to their flourishing business. Bipradas Chatterjee (Arjun Chakraborty), current head of Chatterjee family is indebted to Madhusudan Ghoshal (Bratya Basu), the middle-aged head of Ghoshal family. To resolve the debt issue, Madhusudhan offers Bipradas to marry his younger sister, Kumudini (Suvalogna Mukherjee), a strong-willed, religious minded and cultured girl. She agrees to get married to Madhusudan who is twice her age to save her elder brother from the clutches of indebtedness to Ghoshals.

From the day Kumudini comes to Madhusudhan’s house after her marriage, she is assigned a subsidiary status in an already dysfunctional Ghoshal family in which there is a hen-pecked younger brother, a sister-in-law, Shyamasundari (Ananya Chatterjee) who has become widow at a young age. Kumuduni carries out her work in the household which is expected of a married woman. As she has been brought up in a cultured family where women have been treated equal with their men folks, Kumudini finds Ghoshal house exactly opposite of her cultural upbringing. Here she is treated as a sub-servient to Madhusudan as well as an object of his sexual desires. His vulgar display of wealth and the rustic way of conversations with her puts her off to such an extent that she develops aversion towards her husband. Added to her woos is Madhusudan’s illicit relationship with his sister-in-law, Shyamasundari. With these background , she takes recourse to spirituality. She identifies herself with Meerabai and find solace in singing Meera bhajans.

Over a period of time, Kumudini is subjected to emotional trauma and the marital rape. Not able to cope up with her emotional trauma any more, Kumudini comes back to her elder brother’s house. He gives her assurance that she is not a burden on him. On the contrary, it is her right to be in his house. However, when Kumudini’s pregnancy is revealed, her elder brother does not agree with Kumudini to get her liberation from the marriage as she is carrying Madhusudhan’s child. He justifies his stand by saying that it is not right to deprive the child from the father’s home. Kumudini is sent back to the Ghoshal household.

In a way, it is a defeatist end in the novel to Kumudini. Probably, Tagore went with the stark reality of that time. Since director, Shekhar Das had made this film in the 21st century, the film’s end comes with some minor changes so as not to make the film with a defeatist end for Kumudini. I have seen the end part of a pirated version of the film on a video sharing platform in which Madhusudhan visits Chatterjee’s house and meets Kumudini privately. He tenders his apology to Kumudini for his wrongdoings and request her to come back home.

‘Jogajog’ (2015) has two Meera bhajans of which I am presenting one of the most popular and famous bhajans ‘mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koi’. The bhajan is rendered by Shreya Ghosal whom I consider as ‘Lata Mangeshkar of 21st century insofar as per playback singing is concerned. I have watched her growing from the winner of ZEE TV’s ‘sa re ga ma’(children) programme sometime in the 90s and her first playback singing for Hindi film ‘Devdas’ (2002) and thereafter. I still remember the confidence and the pose with which she rendered a song in front of stalwarts like Ustad Ali Akbar Khan, Ustad Zakir Hussain, Girija Devi, Anil Biswas etc on the dais and many more stalwarts in the audience.

The song is picturised on Suvalogna Mukherjee and Bratya Basu is an impatient listener. The bhajan is set to music by Pandit Debojyoti Bose who is a Sarod player and a disciple of Sarod Maestro Ustad Amjad Ali Khan. He is more into concerts than the music director.

I checked and found out that this Meera bhajan has been a part of more than a dozen Hindi films from 1932 onward. The singers varied from Zubieda, Sitara Kanpuri, M S Subbulaxmi, Mangeshkar sisters (Lata, Asha, Usha) to Vaani Jayraman. This is not an exhaustive list. There may be more singers in non-film segment.

I find Shreya’s Ghoshal’s version of this popular Meera bhajan equally pleasing to listen.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koye (Jogajog)(Bangla)(2015) Singer-Shreya Ghoshal, Lyrics-Meera Bai, MD-Pandit Debojyoti Bose

Lyrics

mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koi
mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koi
jaake sir mor mukut mero pati soi
mere to Giridhar Gopal

taat maat bharta bandhu apna nahi koi
chhaadi do kul ki kaani
chhaadi do kul ki kaani kaa kariye koi
mere to Giridhar Gopal

aayi main bhakti ka jo jagat dekhat mohi
daasi Meera Giridhar prabhu
daa..aasi Meera Giridhar prabhu taaro ab mohi
mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koi
mere to Giridhar Gopal doosro na koi
jaake sir mor mukut mero pati soi
mere to Giridhar Gopal


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4237 Post No. : 15448 Movie Count :

4254

Hindi Songs from Bangla Films – 18
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‘Jhinder Bandi’ (Prisoner of Jhind, 1961, Bangla film)) was based on a Bangla novel of the same name by Saradindu Bandopadhyay and an English novel ‘The Prisoner of Zenda’ written by Anthony Hope on which a Hollywood movie of the same name was made in 1937. The Bangla film was directed by Tapan Sinha. The main star cast included Uttam Kumar (in double role), Arundhati Devi, Soumitra Chatterjee, Tarun Kumar, Radhamohan Bhattacharya, Sandhya Roy, Dilip Roy, Dhiren Mukherjee etc. The film is available with English sub-titles on video sharing platforms. The story of the film is as under:

In the State of Jhind (now in Madhya Pradesh), the King dies. He has two sons – Shankar Singh (Uttam Kumar) and Udit Singh (Tarun Kumar). The elder brother, Shankar Singh is a drunkard, lazy and irresponsible but the people of Jhind love him. Udit Singh on the other hand has an evil personality and people of Jhind hate him.

On the eve of the coronation of the King in waiting, Shankar Singh is found missing. And this has happened for the third time. This time, if he is not found on the day of the coronation, his younger brother, Udit Singh would be coronated as the King of Jhind. The Fauji Sardar (Radhamohan Bhattacharya), the loyalist to Shankar Singh, suspects the role of Udit Singh behind the disappearance of Shankar Singh and is determined to locate him before the day of the coronation.

As part of the search mission, Fauji Sardar reaches Calcutta (Kolkata). In a club, he watches a sword fight in progress. Suspecting one of the sword fighters to be Shankar Singh because of his resemblance to him, Fauji Sardar meets him in his elder brother’s house who introduces the sword fighter as Gauri Shankar Roy (Uttam Kumar). Finding Gauri Shankar Roy has a striking resemblance to Shankar Singh, Fauji Sardar gets an idea to make him to pretend as Shankar Singh on the coronation day. He is also surprised to see in the house a portrait of Kali Shankar Roy, the father of Gauri Shankar Roy.

Fauji Sardar explains to Gauri Shankar Roy the situation in the kingdom of Jhind. He tells him that he had arranged the coronation of the Shankar Singh twice but on both the occasions, Udit Singh has managed to make him disappear. This is the third occasion Shankar Singh has disappeared. If he is not found now, Udit Singh would automatically become the king. He requests Gauri Shankar Roy to impersonate Shankar Singh for coronation as the king of Jhind until the real Shankar Singh is found. While Gauri Shankar Roy is prepared to do this adventure, his elder brother refuses telling him that this is a dangerous pretension. But Gauri Shankar Roy goes ahead and accompanies Fauji Sardar to Jhind.

The first thing Gauri Shankar Roy is to do is to shave off his moustache. The second hurdle is to get examined by the royal physician who is surprised to find ‘Shankar Singh’ hail and hearty and there is no swelling of his liver despite his drinking habit. So, he has passed the test to pretend as Shankar Singh as the royal physician did not have doubt about him. He also regularly rehearses sword fighting.

In the meanwhile, Udit Singh and Mayurvahan (Soumitra Chatterjee), his right-hand man get the wind of the arrival of Fauji Sardar with an unidentified person through his informer, the station master of the railway station, where they alighted for their onward journey to the Jhind. Udit Singh comes to meet Gauri Shankar Roy now pretending to be Shankar Singh in the palace. By looking at him, Udit Singh is shocked to such an extent that he forgets to wish him. He asks him as to who he was. The Fauji Sardar with surprise on his face tells Udit Singh sarcastically that this was an odd question to ask to his brother. Of course, Udit Singh knew that he could not be Shankar Singh because he was in the custody of Mayurvahan. And questioning Fauji Sardar at this stage would expose his wrong doing.

In the meantime, Gauri Shankar Roy is crowned as the King of Jhind. Now onwards, from a pretending king, he has also to pretend as the fiancé of Queen Kasturi Bai (Arundhati Devi), the princes of Zorawar who has been betrothed to him which he was not made aware of when he agreed to be a pretending king. This was a most difficult job.

After the coronation, Queen Kasturi Bai meets Gauri Shankar Roy as the king when she performs a welcome aarti. Her dislike to the king is evident as the king’s conversations remains one sided. However, when she is about to serve him wine, he refuses to drink by saying that he has given up drinking. This changes her expression as until now she has known him to be drunkard and good for nothing prince without much interest in administration of the kingdom. She started liking him with his changed attitudes. Within few days, they start seeing each other.

Gauri Shankar Roy now finds himself in a piquant situation. His pretension as a fiancé of Queen Kasturi Bai cannot go on for long as they have to get married soon. So, he is in a hurry to quit his role as a fake king. However, he cannot go back until the real Shankar Singh is found who is held as a prisoner under the watchful eyes of Mayurvahan. In a way, Gauri Shankar Roy is also like a prisoner in the palace where he has to act as per the direction of Fauji Sardar. The only way for him to go back to Calcutta is to find the real Shankar Singh.

In the meanwhile, knowing that Gauri Shankar Roy has been uncomfortable in faking as a king as well as the fiancé of Kasturi Bai, Fauji Sardar reveals a secret to him that both Shankar Singh and Udit Singh are the sons of Kali Shankar Ray, the Diwan of Jhind to whom the King, who was issue less, had adopted them. So, Gauri Shankar Roy deserves to be the King of Jhind as much as his brothers – Shankar Singh and Udit Singh. This was an interesting revelation to Gauri Shankar Roy.

The pretending king comes to know through the informers that the real Shankar Singh is being held in a fort owned by Udit Singh who plans to murder Shankar Singh once he gets rid of Gauri Shankar Roy. He decides to visit the fort in the night along with a guard and the informer who knows the way to reach the inside of the fort through a secret entrance. On the way, Gouri Shankar Roy is intercepted by Mayurvahan and a fight breaks out in which Gauri Shankar Roy injures Mayurvahan. As he approaches the room, he kills Udit Singh and gains the entry into a room where Shankar Singh has been held prisoner. In the meanwhile, Fauji Sardar with his guards comes to the fort and kills Mayurvahan when he once again confronts Gauri Shankar Roy.

When Gouri Shankar Roy sees the real Shankar Singh for the first time, his thoughts are to get rid of Shankar Singh to become the real King of Jhind but as a good samaritan, he abandons his thoughts. All these actions have been shown without dialogues but with the expressions of both Shankar Singh and Gauri Prasad. He orders Fauji Sardar to take Shankar Singh to the palace as early as possible to ward off the risk to his life. He meets Kasturi Bai for the last time who thanks him for saving the kingdom. As Gouri Shankar Roy is about to leave the fort on his way to Calcutta, Kasturi Bai asks him as to what sins she has committed to shatter her beautiful dream. Gouri Shankar Roy responds by saying that it was just a dream and mounts on the horse to reach the railway station to take the train to Calcutta (Kolkata).

Earlier, I had watched Tapan Sinha’s Bangla films like ‘Kshuidita Pashan’ (1960), ‘Atithi’ (1965), ‘Hatey Bazarey’ (1967) and ‘Harmonium’ (1976) in one sitting each. But for ‘Jhinder Bandi’ (1961), it took me 3 sittings to complete the film viewing. Even though the film had an unusual story, somehow the film did not create in me the eagerness to watch in one go. Probably, the film was heavily edited in its DVD format. This doubt has come to my mind as I find that Soumitra Chatterjee in a villainous role and Sandhya Roy in the role of the love interest of one of the guards (Dilip Roy) have lesser duration than what their respective roles demand.

By the way, Uttam Kumar and Soumitra Chatterjee appear together for the first time in ‘Jhinder Bandi’ (1961). Later on, they have worked together in some more Bangla films until 1980. Another point worth mentioning is that Uttam Kumar and Tarun Kumar who are real brothers, acted in this film as reel brothers as well.

In the DVD of the film, I could get to hear only two songs one of which is the raagmala in three different Hindustani classical raags which I am presenting here. The raagmala is rendered by Pandit Prasun Banerjee, a Hindustani classical vocalist belonging to Patiala Gharana and the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. The lyrics are traditional.

In between the rendering of raagmala, there are dialogues in Bengali. The first dialogue-break is between Shankar Singh (Uttam Kumar) and his guards for pouring more wine to which the Fauji Sardar tells him that he should not take any more drink as he has to be ready for his coronation (Obhishek). The second dialogue-break is when his younger brother Udit Singh (Tarun Kumar) comes to meet him.

Video Clip:

Song-Jiya Mora ghabraaye (Jhinder Bandi)(Bangla)(1960) Singer-Pt Prasun Bannerji, MD-Ali Akbar Khan

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaa
jiya…..aaa moraa ghab….raaye ae ae
kaase kahoon mann kee…eeee batiyaa..an
kachhu na une bina morey
pala….chhina beetat naahi..ee
dukh kee..eeee ee ratiyaan
ratiyaan..aan

[Dialogues in Bangla]

din din de re ghanana
din din de re ghanana
?? ?? ?? ??
din din de re ghanana
?? ?? ?? ??
din din de re
shubh ghadi shubh din sukhad mahurat
shubh ghadi shubh din sukhad mahurat
kalash daroon tere
aan aan aan aan aan
aan aan aan aan aan
din din de re ghanana

[Dialogues in Bangla]

meethe laage tore nain
tore naina
tore naina
meethe laage tore nain
laaj bhare kajara aa aa
kajara aa aa aa
kajara aa aa aa
kajara aa aa re

[Dialogue in Bangla]

wo aa gaye hain hamen
jinka
jinka intzaa….aar thhaa aa
wo aa gaye hain hamen….


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4224 Post No. : 15428 Movie Count :

4252

Hindi Songs from Bangla Films -17
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Bengali film industry has given us many eminent film directors. If I list the names in chronological order, the first name that comes to my mind is Debaki Kumar Bose who had directed classic films like ‘Chandidas’ (1932), ‘Puran Bhagat’ (1933), ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Nartaki’ (1940) etc. Next in line is P C Barua known for classic films like ‘Devdas’ (1935). ‘Mukti’ (1937), ‘Jawaab’ (1942) etc. Then we have Nitin Bose, Phani Majumdar, Bimal Roy etc. In respect of parallel cinema, names of Satyajit Roy, Mrinal Sen, Ritwik Ghatak, Tapan Sinha, Rituparno Ghosh etc are well known not only in India but also internationally. This list is not exhaustive as their names came to my mind mainly because they were associated with Hindi films.

During the last few months, I have been selectively watching Bangla films on video sharing platforms. In this way, I became aware of some more directors for the first time. Among them, one of the directors whose film direction I liked is that of Ajoy Kar. I have seen his films like ‘Harano Sur’ (1957), ‘Saptapadi’ (1961), “Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963). I have also gone through the details of his other films on the net. His films are mostly based on unusual story line. Being a cinematographer himself, his films are full of some fine black and white photography. In fact, his photography ‘speaks’ dialogues for the actors on whom the shots have been framed. His four films have received National Film Awards for the best feature film/Certificates of Merit in Bengali film category.

Recently, I watched one more of his film, ‘Khelaghar’ (1959) which strengthened my view that Ajoy Kar was one of the greatest Bengali film directors whose name has, by and large, remained unknown to non-Bengali film audience. He had no occasion to direct any Hindi film although one of his Bangla film ’Saat Paake Bandha’ (1963) was remade in Hindi as ‘Kora Kaagaz’ (1974) with Anil Ganguly as director.

‘Khelaghar’ [1959 (Playhouse)] was a suspense film based on a patriotic theme of pre-independent India with more prominence to human relationship. The story was written by Salil Sen Gupta who also wrote dialogues for the film. The main cast consisted of Uttam Kumar, Mala Sinha, Chhabi Biswas, Asit Baran, Salil Datta, Preeti Majumdar, Ashish Mukherjee, Khagen Pathak, Dhiraj Das etc. Hemant Kumar was the music director for the film.

The story in the film revolves around a revolutionary, Gautam Chatterjee (Uttam Kumar) and Ruchira (Mala Sinha), the daughter of the Police Insepctor Banerjee (Chhabi Biswas). The film starts with a scene in which revolutionary Gautam who has been awarded death sentence by hanging has escaped from the jail. After deceiving the police forces, he accidentally enters into a compound of the Police Inspector’s residence and climb the pipe leading to a bedroom where Ruchira is sleeping. He gags her and tells that to save his life, he is forced to do this act. After discarding his jail uniform and wearing Police Inspector’s casual dress, he leaves the house and remains elusive to the police.

In the meanwhile, Ruchira’s marriage has been fixed with a foreign-return boy against her wish but she agrees to the marriage to keep her father’s word. The prospective husband’s constant interference in her personal matters creates a rift between them and Ruchira avoids meeting him. Her father is bent upon marrying her with the boy despite Ruchira’s dislike for him. One day, after heated arguments with her father over her marriage, Ruchira runs away from home in the night. Her father sends his police to bring her back. In trying to dodge the police, Ruchira lands alone in a shady street where a group of goons try to catch up with her. A well-dressed person saves her from the goons. The person is none other than revolutionary Gautam who though recognises Ruchira, refrains from mentioning it while Ruchira fails to recognize him. Both introduce each other with their false names and background.

Having failed to convince Ruchira to go back to her home or take shelter in a women’s hostel, Gautam arranges for a small room for her stay with the help of his Hindi speaking associate (Asit Baran). In the meanwhile, the police forces are looking for Gautam. After getting a tip off from an informer, the police raid the house in which Ruchira is staying where Gautam has come on a visit. But his associate who has already got a wind of the police raid, makes both of them to escape from the back door. While Gautam knows that police had come to catch him, Ruchira thinks that her father had sent the police force to take her back home.

After this incidence, Gautam’s associates suggest him to leave Ruchira as the risk to his life by associating himself with a daughter of the Police Inspector is very high. They also think that she could be a mole from the police to catch him. But Gautam rejects the proposals and arranges her stay in a room of his associate’s house. Over a period of time, Ruchira starts liking Gautam who also likes her but he downplays his feeling towards her as he has no future for a settled life with noose around his neck already waiting.

While Gautam is having a meeting with his associates in an underground hideout, police forces raid the place. While trying to run away from the place, Gautam is hit by a bullet on his leg. Somehow, he escapes from the police dragnet and reaches to Ruchira who tends him. At this point, he tells her to return to her father’s home as he knew from the beginning that she was the daughter of Police Inspector, Banerjee. Later, she also comes to know from an old newspaper with his photo that the person who has helped her is none other than the revolutionary Gautam to whom the entire police force is looking to catch him. Guatam once again tries to persuade Ruchira by telling her that the last few days they spent together was like a playhouse on a sand which would be swept away by sea waves. But Ruchira remains firm on her decision not to leave him in this situation.

After few days, Inspector Banerjee is shocked to get the news from an informer that his daughter is looking after the injured Gautam in a house. He calls for police force and lead himself for a raid. He asks Gautam to surrender but Ruchira comes in his way and tells her father that he can take Gautam over her dead body. Nevertheless, Gautam surrenders and he is taken to the police station. Despite repeated plea from her father, Ruchira refuses to return home with him by telling that she would stay back in her husband’s house. Though she has not married to Guatam, her it was her intention to let her father know.

Now, here comes the suspense part of the film. Next day after the re-arrest of Gautam, a person surrenders in front of the Inspector Banerjee claiming that he is the real revolutionary Guatam Chatterjee and he would prove this only in the court. In the retrial of Gautam, the real Gautam Chatterjee reveals that the arrested person is Shantanu Roy (Uttam Kumar) who is not a member of the Revolutionary Group but a poet and musician in whose house the revolutionary group used to meet occasionally. During one such meeting in his house, the police raid led by Inspector Banerjee Shantanu Roy held the door until all the revolutionaries including Guatam Chatterjee escaped from the back door. Since Inspector Banerjee addressed Shantanu Roy as Gautam Chatterjee, this gave an idea to Shantanu Roy to impersonate himself as Gautam Chatterjee to save the real Gautam Chatterjee.

The court pronounced the judgement giving 2 years of rigorous infringement to Shantanu Roy for falsifying as Gautam Chatterjee and having link with the revolutionary group. The film ends with Shantanu Roy telling Ruchira that after all, the playhouse is going to remain true as it is the question of few months wait.

The film is a ‘must watch’ for its superb story telling direction, the excellent performances by the main actors and the sublime black and white photography. Most of the scenes have been shot in the night in keeping with the theme of the film. That Ajoy Kar took some excellent close-up shots of Mala Sinha and Uttam Kumar, speak a lot about their acting ability. I never felt bored in watching this film which has English sub-titles.

I found only one song listed in the film on various sites which is a Bengali song rendered by Hemant Kumar. I came to know about a short (of about 2 minutes) Hindi song only after watching the film which I am presenting with this article. The song is ‘kehti hai mujhko duniya deewaana nashe mein hai’ sung by Mohammed Rafi and picturised on Asit Baran in the role of an associate of the revolutionary Gautam in the film. Since his dialogues in the film are in Hindi, the song has to be in Hindi which is set to music by Hemant Kumar. Going by the credit titles of the film, the song is written by S H Bihari.

Actually, Asit Baran is acting as a drunkard to get into a room where he is secretly scheduled to meet Gautam. Since the duration of the song is less than 2 minutes, probably no gramophone record of the song was made. Luckily, the video clip of the song is available. There is another two- line Hindi song sung by Rafi and picturised on Asit Baran.

By the way, Asit Baran was a well known actor-singer and playback singer who has acted and sung in Hindi films like ‘Saugandh’ (1942), ‘Kashinath’ (1943), ‘Wapas’ (1943), ‘Wasiyatnama’ (1945), ‘Manzoor’ (1949), ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Suhag Sindoor’ (1953 ), etc. But for the song under discussion, Rafi sang for him. The reason is that by 1953, Asit Baran’s voice had somewhat deteriorated. In the film ‘Suhaag Sindoor’ (1953), songs sung by Shailesh Mukherjee may have been picturised on Asit Baran who was the lead actor in the film.

Enjoy this lesser known Rafi song.

Video link:

Song-Kehti hai mujhko duniya deewaana nashe mein hai (Khelaghar)(1959) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-S H Bihari, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics

kehti hai mujhko duniya
deewaana nashe mein hai
ha ha ha
wah
nashe mein hai
meri nazar se dekho
zamaana nashe mein ha….i
kehti hai mujhko duniya
deewaana nashe mein hai
meri nazar se dekho
zamaana nashe mein hai
hic
nashe mein hai

bhookha koi gareeb jab
raahon mein gir pada
bhookha koi gareeb jab
raahon mein gir pada
duniya ne ye kaha ke
uthhaana nashe mein hai
kehti hai mujhko duniya
deewaana nashe mein hai
meri nazar se dekho
zamaana nashe mein hai

ik jaam aur de de
ho saaqi tera bhala
de de saaqi kya kami hai
ik jaam aur de de
ho saaqi tera bhala
aakhir tera deewaana hai
maana nashe mein hai
kehti hai mujhko duniya
deewaana nashe mein hai
meri nazar se dekho
zamaana nashe mein hai
hic
nashe mein…..


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4221 Post No. : 15424 Movie Count :

4251

Hindi songs from Bangla Films – 16
—————————————————-
‘Basanta Bahaar’ (1957) was a Bangla film directed by Bikas Roy who also acted in the film. The main cast consisted of Basanta Chowdhury, Sabtri Chatterjee, Pahadi Sanyal, Sunanda Devi, Bikash Roy, Aparna Devi, Asha Devi, Nitish Mukherjee etc. The music was composed by Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh who had in the 1940s also composed songs for two Hindi films, ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Muzrim’ (1944).

When I first came to know about this Bangla film, I assumed that this may be a remake of Hindi film ‘Basant Bahaar’ (1956). After watching the Bangla film, I realised that except the common theme of Hindustani classical music, the story of both Hindi and Bangla films are quite different.

In Hindi version of the film, the story is about a rivalry between two singers to become the royal court musician by way of competition. When it became apparent that Bharat Bhushan has the best chance of a winning singer, his rival singer’s father gives him a glass of holy water with some substance which ruins his voice. It is the dancer (Nimmi) who helps him to regain his voice and wins the competition to become the royal court musician.

In Bangla version of the film, after watching the film (unfortunately, the film is not available with English sub-titles), my understanding of the story is that there is a cold war going on between the teacher, Munni Bai (I am not able to recognise the actress) and her disciple Jayanto (Basanta Chowdhury). This cold war is accentuated by the disciple falling in love with Munnibai’s daughter, Lata (Sabitri Chatterjee) who is also her mother’s disciple. The relationship is resented by Munnibai as also from Jayanto’s family because of the different background. Both Jayanto and Lata secretly get married in a temple.

While Lata’s father (Pahadi Sanyal) who is also a sarangi player for Munnibai in her concerts, is sympathetic towards his daughter’s relationship with Jayanto, he is not vocal about his stand in front of Munnibai. As a result, Lata is forced to stay separetely with her parents, In desperation, Jayanto leaves the place and wanders all over India.

In the meanwhile, Munnibai repents and decided to leave for Kashi where she dies. Lata’s father takes care of her musical training as a vocalist. In her maiden public concert, she fumbles her lines to be timely prompted by a person from the audience who is none other than Jayanto. They are united. The film ends with their daughter rehearsing a bandish in Raag Basant Bahar with which both Lata and Jayanto were also trained. They are happy with their daughter’s performance.

Two important features of the film are the use of songs in Hindustani classical music and a part song in Tamil in Carnatic music along with an excellent 5-minute kathak dance performance by Roshan Kumari (daughter of playback singer, Zohrabai Ambalewaali).

‘Basanta Bahaar’ (1957, Bangla film) had 14 songs (including multiple versions) of which 7 were in Hindi (Hindustani classical vocals) in different raags. However, only 9 songs in record versions were issued (7 Bengali songs +2 Hindi songs). Rest of the songs were available on the film’s sound track only.

I am presenting from the film a traditional bandish, ‘naveli kali khilan ab aayi ban ban mein’ in Raag Basant Bahar rendered as a Chhota Khayal by Hirabai Barodekar. The song is picturised on an actress in the role of Munnibai in a Hindustani classical music conference. It has two more version rendered in the film – first by Manik Varma for Sabitri Chatterjee as a solo while she is rehearsing and second by Manik Varma and Pandit A T Kanan as duet providing vocals for Sabitri Chatterjee and Basanta Chowdhury on the screen. The record version of this duet is longer as alaaps, taan, bol-baant and sargam are incorporated. However, the bandish bol (lyrics) are the same for all the four versions. Hence, I have given below lyrics for Hirabai Barodekar version of the song only.

It is interesting to note that all the singers of this Bandish belong to Kirana Gharana or had an influence of this Gharana. Hirabai Barodekar, apart from the daughter of Ustad Abdul Karim Khan, the doyen of Kirana Gharana has been the disciple of Ustad Abdul Wahid Khan and Suresh Babu Mane, both of Kirana Gharana. Manik Varma (nee Dadarkar) was the disciple of Hirabai Barodekar. Pandit A T Kanan’s style of singing was influenced by Ustad Amir Khan who first adopted the Kirana Gharana style and later improvised it to be called the Indore Gharana.

By the way, I was always wondering for a long time as to how Hirabai started using the surname as ‘Barodekar’. She could have used her mother’s surname ‘Mane’ after separation of her mother from her father, Ustad Abdul Karim Khan in 1922 or her husband’s surname ‘Gandhi’. In this context, I recently came across a trivia mentioned in the book ‘The Lost World of Hindustani Music’ (2006) by Kumar Prasad Mukherjee.

After eloping with Tarabai Mane, the daughter of Sardar Marutirao Mane who was the brother-in-law of the then Maharaja of Baroda, Ustad Abdul Karim Khan never visited Baroda again. After some years, Sayajirao Gaekwad, the Maharaja of Baroda visited Mysore to witness Dussera festival. There, he met Ustad Abdul Karim Khan and enquired about his family. Ustad while asking for His Highness’s forgiveness said that it was his destiny which took him away from the magnanimous patronage of Maharaja of Baroda. He revealed to Maharaja that as part of his gratitude to Baroda, he attached ‘Barodekar’ to the names of all his children.

But only Champu (Hirabai) used the surname ‘Barodekar’ till her last.

Video Clip(Hirabai Barodekar version)

Video Clip(Manik Verma solo version)

Video Clip (Partial)(Manik Verma and Pandit A T Kanan)

Audio Clip (Full)(Manik Verma and Pandit A T Kanan)

Song-Naveli kali khilan ab laagi ban ban mein(Basanta Bahaar)(Bangla)(1957) Singer- Hirabai Barodkar/ Manik Verma/ Manik Verma, Pt A T Kanan, MD-Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh

Lyrics (Based on Hirabai Barodekar version)

aaaa aaa aa aaaa aaa
aa aa aa aaaaaa aaaa
aaa aaa aaa aaaaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaaaa aaa
aa aa aaaaa
naveli kali…ee ee ee
naveli kali
khilan ab laagi ban ban mein
madmaati daar daar
baar baar koyal boli
naveli kali
naveli kali……ee ee ee ee
aa aa aa aa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aaaaaaaa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaa
aaaaaa aa aaaaaa aa
naveli kali
khilan ab laagi ban ban mein
madmaati daar daar
baar baar koyal boli
naveli kali

aaaaaaaa
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi…eeeeee
aa aa aaaaa na aa
aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa aa na
aa ah aa ah ha ha ha ah
aaaaaaaaaa aaaa aaaa aa aa haa
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi
lagan jagaayi prem badhaayi
lagan jagaayi prem badhaayi
sabhi rang mein kunj gali
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa aa
naveli kali
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
naveli kali
aaa aaa aa aaa aaa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
naveli kali….ee…eeee
naveli kali
naveli kali
naveli kali


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4218 Post No. : 15420 Movie Count :

4248

‘Anokha Milan’ (1972) is a dubbed Hindi version of Bangla film, ‘Paari’ (1966). Produced by Pranoti Bhattacharya (nee Ghosh, wife of Abhi Bhattacharya) under the banner of New India Pictures, Calcutta, the filmias directed by Jagannath Chatterjee. The main star cast includes Dharmendra, Pranoti Ghosh, Abhi Bhattacharya, Bikash Roy, Dilip Roy, Satya Banerjee, Padma Devi, Renuka Roy etc. Dilip Kumar had a guest role of a Warden of Andaman Jail. The film is based on a story written by the famous Bengali writer, Jarasandha (real name: Charu Chandra Chakraborty). Pranoti Ghosh is not new to the Hindi films. Earlier, she had worked in Hindi films like ‘Phulwaari’ (1951), ‘Parichay’ (1954), ‘Jagriti’ (1954), ‘Love Marriage’ (1959) and ‘Sautela Bhai’ (1962).

‘Paari’ (1966, Bangla film) is the only film in which Dharmendra got opportunity to work with his childhood idol, Dilip Kumar even though he had only one or two scenes with his idol. However, Dharmendra could not get a full-fledged Hindi film to work with Dilip Kumar. He felt that some ‘jinx’ came on the way and he could not fulfil his dream of working with Dilip Kumar in a Hindi film. The ‘jinxed’ examples are set out below:

Dharmendra was to work in ‘Aadmi’ (1968) with Dilip Kumar but his role ultimately went to Manoj Kumar. In 1979, his dream of working with Dilip Kumar almost became a reality when Nasir Hussain selected Dharmendra and Rishi Kapoor in the role of sons of Dilip Kumar in ‘Zabardust’. However, after a few days of shooting, the film was shelved reportedly due to creative differences between the director and Dilip Kumar about the storyline. Later, Nasir Hussain made the film afresh in 1985 with Sanjeev Kumar, Sunny Deol and Rajiv Kapoor with some changes in the story. BR Chopra selected Dharmendra to play the role of Chandragupta in ‘Chanakya’ (1980s) in which Dilip Kumar had a role of Chanakya. However, the film got shelved due to financial problems faced by the producer. When Dilip Kumar got chance to act and direct ‘Kalinga’ (UR – 1990s), Dharmendra tried his best to get a role for himself but Dilip Kumar told him that he could not be fitted in any worthwhile role in the film.
(These are taken mostly from interviews Dharmendra gave to film journalists at various times).

The chance which Dharmendra got to work with Dilip Kumar in the Bangla film ‘Paari’ (1966) was like a ‘consolation prize’ for him having done only a couple of scenes with Dilip Kumar in the film towards the end. The story of the film which was dubbed in Hindi with a new title as ‘Anokha Milan’ (1972) is as under:

The story is set in the pre-independence period in a rural setting in Bengal. The film starts with a Jail Warden asking Tara Sen (Pranoti Ghosh), a prisoner as to why she has requested to be transferred to Andaman Jail. From here onwards, the story is unfolded in a flash-back mode until her sea journey to Andaman Jail.

Tara is the only daughter of a landlord in a village. She is fond of walking in the midst of nature in the village along with her childhood friend Ghanshyam (Dharmendra) who is looked after by the landlord. Because both of them indulge in some sort of mischiefs in the village, Ghanshyam’s gaurdian sends him to the city for schooling. After few years, Ghanshyam returns to the village as he failed in matriculation examination. He is employed by the landlord. Tara and Ghanshyam like each other but due to societal constraints, they refrain from expressing their love for each other to culminate into a marriage. After all, Tara is the daughter of a wealthy landlord and Ghanshyam is a poor commoner who works for landlord.

Tara’s parents are looking for a suitable boy for her marriage. In the meanwhile, she falls prey to the lust of the village Daroga, Badal Gupta (Abhi Bhattacharya) who is a drunkard and a womaniser. Tara’s parents try their best to take care of her by arranging her marriage with a suitable boy. However, the scandal comes to the notice of the father of the groom, a landlord who humiliate Tara and her father in derogatory words. Ghanshyam gets angry that his employer and Tara are getting insulted. He starts dispersing groom’s side supporters by wielding his lathi which accidentally kills the groom’s father. Ghanshyam is arrested on murder charge. Tara’s father is also under threat of arrest as an accomplice.

With scandal looming on her head coupled with police case, Tara decides to marry Daroga, Badal Gupta provided he drops the charges against her father and Ghanshyam which he agrees. They get married. Tara tries her best to make her husband to mend ways and give up his vices but fails. One day, Tara comes to know that her husband is going to spoil the life of an innocent girl who happens to be her friend. She confronts him. In fits of anger, she stabs her husband resulting in the life-threatening injuries to him. Tara is arrested as she has admitted the crime.

While in hospital, Daroga requests his wife Tara to change her statement to police to say that he accidentally fell on a sharp instrument so that she is saved from the jail and more importantly to preserve his self-respect as he has never been defeated in his life, that too from a woman. Tara refuses to change her statement to the police. Badal dies of stab injuries. Tara is jailed for the murder of her husband.

In the meanwhile, Tara comes to know that the court has awarded Ghanshyam the imprisonment for life and he is jailed in Andaman. She remembers the sacrifice made by Ghanshyam to save her honour and wishes to be with him as he has no one to support in Andaman. She pleads with the Jail Warden to transfer her to Andaman Jail which is granted. The Warden of Andaman Jail (Dilip Kumar) is not prepared to accept her in the Andaman jail as she cannot stay with Ghanshyam as a prisoner who is on parole. The reason is that as per the Jail Manual, only the husband and wife prisoners can stay together not necessarily in prison but in the outskirts of the prison as well.

In the meantime, Warden has gone through their files and suggest to both of them to get married so that they can stay together in Andaman. Both Tara and Ghanshyam are not ready to get married to each other due to their conventional upbringing. The Warden shows his helplessness and orders her repatriation to her original prison. The next day, Tara runs away from the jail. The jail police forces fail to locate her. Ghanshyam is also on lookout for her but returns unsuccessful. The film ends with Ghanshayam returning to his room disappointed only to find Tara sitting in a corner of his room in a semi conscious state. Ghanshyam brings her to consciousness and for the first time they embrace each other.

The highlight of the film is the presence of Dilip Kumar in a special appearance in the role of the Warden of Andaman Jail. His presence suddenly galvanises the film for about the last 15 minutes. His fluency in dialogue delivery with voice control – both in Hindi (Bengali in Bangla version) and English is worth watching. The video of Dilip Kumar’s 15 minutes’ role in the film as a Warden is here for those interested in watching his performance.

‘Anokha Milan’ (1972) has three songs one of which is a Bangla pre-marriage folk song. I am presenting the first song from the film to appear on the Blog. The song is ‘Bandhu Re, Ye mann dole bole kya re koi jaane’ sung by Manna Dey. The song is set to music by Salil Chowdhury on the words of Haneef-Jackie whose names I heard for the first time. I have also listened to the equivalent song in the Bangla version of the film ‘Paari’ (1966) which is written and set to music by Salil Chowdhury. The same tune has been used for the Hindi version song which I feel, is more or less the translation of the Bangla version. Haneef-Jackie seems to be the pseudo names.

A small part of the song under discussion is also used as a background song on the day of the marriage of Tara (Pranoti Ghosh) with Badal Gupta (Abhi Bhattacharya). I like the prelude music of the song with a beautiful combination of musical instruments especially Flute, Sitar and Guitar which is partly available in the video clip but fully available on the audio clip. It is interesting to note that Manna Dey sings second stanza of the song with somewhat Bengali pronunciation.

With this song, ‘Anokha Milan’ (1972) makes its debut in the Blog.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Bandhu re ye man doley boley kyaa re (Anokha Milan)(1972) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Haneef Jackie, MD-Salil Chaudhary

Lyrics

bandhu re. . .ae
ye mann doley boley kya re koi jaane
jal bhara megh ye
dil ke pyaasa
je mann sune
ye mann wohi re gaaye

bandhu re. . .ae hey
ye man dole bole kya re koi jaane
jal bhara megh ye
dil ke pyaasa
je mann sune
ye mann wahi re gaye
bandhu re. . .ae. . .ae

ban harini…eeeeee
ban harini tumhar lochan dekhe na
ban morni chalan tumhaar dekhi na
ban harini tumhar lochan dekhe na
ban morni chalan tumhaar dekhi na
jo ye lochan tore dekhe aaj wo bhoole na
bandhu re. . .ae
ye man dole bole kya re koi jaane
jal bhara megh ye
dil ke pyaasa
ye mann sune
ye mann wahi re gaye
bandhu re. . .ho. . .ho

ichhamati re. . .ae. . .ae

ichhamati nadi tum kya kya ho bolo na
donon re dole dole aao re dolo na aa
ichhamati nadi tum kya chaaho bolo na
donon re dole dole aao re dolo na
bolo chaahe doob ke maroon tumhaare taley
bandhu re. . .ae hey
ye man dole bole kya re koi jaane
jal bhara megh ye
dil ke pyaasa
ye mann sune
ye mann wahi re gaye
bandhu re. . .ae. . .ae

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————
बंधु रे॰॰ए
ये मन डोले बोले क्या रे कोई जाने
जल भरा मेघ ये
दिल के प्यासा
जे मन सुने
ये मन वही रे गाये

बंधु रे॰॰ए हे
ये मन डोले बोले क्या रे कोई जाने
जल भरा मेघ ये
दिल के प्यासा
जे मन सुने
ये मन वही रे गाये
बंधु रे॰॰ए॰॰ए

बन हरिणी॰॰ई
बन हरिणी तुम्हार लोचन देखे ना
बन मोरनी चलन तुम्हार देखि ना
बन हरिणी तुम्हार लोचन देखे ना
बन मोरनी चलन तुम्हार देखि ना
जो ये लोचन टोरे देखे आज वो भूले ना
बंधु रे॰॰ए
ये मन डोले बोले क्या रे कोई जाने
जल भरा मेघ ये
दिल के प्यासा
जे मन सुने
ये मन वही रे गाये
बंधु रे॰॰ए हो हो

इच्छामती रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
इच्छामती नदी तुम क्या क्या हो बोलो ना
दोनों रे डोले डोले आओ रे डोलो ना॰॰आ
इच्छामती नदी तुम क्या क्या हो बोलो ना
दोनों रे डोले डोले आओ रे डोलो ना॰॰आ
बोलो चाहे डूब के मरूँ तुम्हारे तले
बंधु रे॰॰ए हे
ये मन डोले बोले क्या रे कोई जाने
जल भरा मेघ ये
दिल के प्यासा
जे मन सुने
ये मन वही रे गाये
बंधु रे॰॰ए॰॰ए


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4211 Post No. : 14410 Movie Count :

4246

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films: 15
—————————————————

Recently, while browsing through the internet, I came across an old article, Gems that never got their due, published in the ‘Times of India’. The article lists 8 critically acclaimed Bangla films which have been forgotten mainly due to their commercial failures. Of the 8 such films, one film to which I got interested because of its unusual title was ‘Antariksha’ (1957) directed by Rajen Tarafdar. Luckily, the film was available for viewing on a video sharing platform with English sub-titles. Probably, after restoration, this film may have been shown in one or more of some international film festivals.

My awareness about the Bangla film personalities have been limited to those who had also been associated with Hindi films. Ranjen Tarafdar, the director of ‘Antariksha’ (1957) was a new name for me. A statement by the writer of the article referred to above that “Rajen Tarafdar was of the same school of thought as Satyajit Ray. He was a painter himself and would sketch each shot division before starting to shoot. ….” prompted me to know more about him. This took me to another article, Tale of a forgotten director which appeared in ‘The Statesman’ on the occasion of his birth centenary in July 2017.

Like Satyajit Ray, Rajan Tarafdar (07/06/1917 – 23/11/1987) got associated with the Bangla films with the background of working in an advertising company in Calcutta (Kolkata). A graduate from Government College of Arts and Crafts, Kolkata, Tarafdar joined an advertising company as a Graphic designer where he worked up to 1958. His debut film which he directed apart from writing dialogues and screen play was ‘Antariksha’ (1957). It is said that his style of working and uncompromising nature did not suit the Bangla film producers. Hence, during his 3 decades of association with Bangla films, he directed only 7 Bangla films – 6 between 1957-75 and the last one in 1987. He also acted in 4 films of which 2 were Hindi films – ‘Arohan’ (1983) by Shyam Benegal and ‘Khandhar’ (1984) by Mrinal Sen.

‘Ganga’ (1960) was Rajen Tarafdar’s second Bangla film which won a Certificate of Merit in National Film Awards, 1960. ‘Palanka’ (1975), his 6th film won the Best Feature Film in Bengali at National Film Awards, 1975. The reason as to why Rajen Tarafdar has been forgotten is that most of his films were not available for viewing. It is mainly during the last couple of years, his films were restored and now available for viewing on the video sharing platforms.

As mentioned earlier, ‘Antariksha’ (Space, 1957) was Rajen Tarafdar’s debut film which he made mostly with new actors except some character actors. The star cast included Chhabi Biswas, Kajal Gupta, Prabir Kumar, Dinen Gupta, Premangshu Bose, Padma Devi, Kalipada Chakraborty, Kamala Adhikari, Sandhya Roy etc.

The film’s story is weaved around Raja Babu (Chhabi Biswas), a landlord in a rural Bengal who is stubborn, dictatorial and egoist as expected in a feudal system that was prevalent in those days. As against this, one of his employees, Jayanta is honest and a sincere worker who has been brought up by the landlord as his own son. Hence, he has the liberty to discuss with the landlord without any hesitation. For instance, he suggests to landlord to give donation to a rural school. But the landlord disagrees. Jayanta tells him that as a landlord, he has also a duty to safeguard the interest of his subjects.

Jayanta likes Bani (Kajal Gupta), the daughter of a priest of a local temple and has the intention to marry her. He conveys his wish to the priest who agrees after some hesitation. The landlord after his wife convinces him, agrees to the proposal. The landlord takes care of all the marriage expenses. He even arranges for a courtesan to sing for his guests during the marriage functions.

However, soon after the marriage, a mystery breaks out when an unknown person visits his house and tells him that he is Gagan Ganguly, the husband of Bani. He also says that as a proof, he is in possession of a letter which mentions that Bani was married to him when she was 7 years of age. The fact is that Bani was indeed married to one Gagan Ganguly in her childhood. But he went missing immediately after the marriage with the dowry amount and jewelries. Since he was never found, he was presumed dead. Now the unknown person impersonating as Gagan Ganguly wants to blackmail Jayanta by making the letter public if he does not pay him Rs.25000/-. He had gotten hold of the crucial letter written by the Priest while pick-pocketing Jayanta’s his purse. The letter was to be handed over to Priest’s spiritual guru while on his visit to Varanasi for purchase of saris for the wedding.

Jayanta loves his wife who is pregnant. She is not aware of the mental agony Jayanta is going through. He cannot afford to pay Rs.25000/- to the blackmailer nor he can let the matter becomes public that he has married a girl who was already married in her childhood. Because of the agony, he starts reaching home very late. Bani starts questioning him as to why he so much immersed in thoughts. But he evades answer.

To come out of the blackmailer’s clutches, Jayanta decides to run away from the village in a bullock cart with his pregnant wife with cash taken from his landlord’s treasury without his knowledge. The blackmailer comes to know when he visits Jayanta’s house to collect the money. He chases and confronts Jayanta on the way to handover the money. In the shuffle, the blackmailer gets killed. Jayanta is arrested and is put behind bar for fraud and murder.

While all of the landlord’s staff and family members think that Jayanta is innocent, the landlord is not convinced. Jayanta’s well-wisher tried to get him bail so that he can look after his pregnant wife whose health has deteriorated. The only person who can arrange bail for Jayanta is the landlord who is not willing to pursue his bail application. It is now the Priest who tell the landlord true facts from the letter written by Bani’s grand mother requesting him to adopt Bani as his own daughter when Gagan Ganguly, Bani’s husband had deserted her. Though, this leads to soften his stand against Jayanta, still he is not convinced as to why Jayanta had fraudulently taken money from his treasury to run away from the village. Since all his family members including his wife, real son and daughter-in-law, all his staff has gone to be with Jayanta’s wife who is seriously ill, he feels isolated and has a change of heart. The film ends with landlord visiting Jayanta’s house to enquire about Bani’s health and then proceeding to the police station on his horse carriage to wriggle Jayanta out of the piquant situation.

The director has presented this film in a very realistic way. Even though at some points, the story moves slowly, the film was not boring. Much of the story has been told by way of expressions and gestures of the artists supplemented by an excellent background music by Sarod maestro Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. He has prominently made use of the combination of Sarod, Sitar and Flute for the background music. Dialogues are minimal and that too mostly short – one or two sentences. The romantic scenes are shown in a subtle manner in keeping with the rural setting. There are some poignant scenes in the latter part of the film without much melodrama.

The film has only one song, that too a mujra song in Hindi which a courtesan sings on the occasion of the marriage of Jayanta with Bani. The song is ‘taras taras gaye nain bichaare’ sung by Pratima Banerjee and Swarooplata. The song is written by Pandit Bhushan which is set to music by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Taras taras gaye nain (Antariksha)(Bangla)(1957) Singers-Pratima Banerjee, Pratima Banerjee+ Swarooplata, Lyrics-Pt Bhushan, MD-Ustad Ali Akbar Khan

Lyrics (Based on video clip)

taras taras gaye…ae nain
o o o o o o
o o o o o nain
haay
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
piya ke daras ko ye matwaare
piya ke daras ko ye matwaare
taras taras gaye nain

kabhoon tu aahiyen mukh dikhalainhen
kabhoon tu aahiyen mukh dikhalainhen
haan mukh dikhalainhen
dukh se kati hain din rain
haan more raam
dukh se kati hain din rain
o more raama
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
taras taras gaye nain

more piya jab angna milaihain
more piya jab angna milaihain
phulwa ki aankhen chhil chhil jaihain
haan chhil chhil jaihain
ho chhil chhil jaihain
mann mein basi hain sukh chain
haan more raam
mann mein basi hain sukh chain
o more raama
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
taras taras gaye nain

more piya aa aa aaa aa aa jab
more piya…..aaaa aa jab
gharwa mein..aen hain
more piya jab gharwa mein aaihain
more piya jab gharwa mein aaihain
roothhi hoon main piya moko manaihen
moko manaihen
haan moko manaihen
bole hain meethhe meethhe bain
o more ram
bole hain meethhe meethhe bain
o more rama
taras taras o o
piya ke daras ko
taras taras gaye nain bichaare
taras taras gaye nain


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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