Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Sadanand Kamath’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4753 Post No. : 16492 Movie Count :

4480

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films:36
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It has been almost one year when I wrote my last article under the series ‘Hindi songs from Bangla films’ on July 23, 2020 in the Blog. There are some more Hindi songs from Bangla films which are yet to be covered. But most of them are those films from which at least one song has been covered in the Blog. So, I kept the series on the back-burner.

A few days back, Partha Chanda ji, a regular visitor to our Blog, suggested me to write on a Hindi song from a Bangla film, ‘Goynar Boksho’ (Jewellery Box, 2013). The song was of my type which I immensely liked it. The synpsis of the film made an interesting reading. These two factors pushed me to write the article forthwith.

In the film, Maushumi Chatterjee has a pivotal role of a ghost who watches three generations of women brought up in a different social status as to how they attach importance to her jewellery box. I had liked Maushumi Chatterjee’s performance of a middle-aged aunt in ‘Piku’ (2015). Another interesting role of a new daughter-in-law in the film was played by Konkona Sen Sharma whose performance I have liked in ‘Wake Up Sid’ (2009). Surely, it was going to be an interesting film to watch with English sub-titles which I did so on one of the OTT platforms.

‘Goynar Boksho’ (2013, Bangla) was produced under the banner of Shree Venkatesh Films Pvt Ltd and was directed by Aparna Sen. The main cast included Maushumi Chatterjee, Konkona Sen Sharma, Saswata Chatterjee, Srabanti Chatterjee, Paran Banerjee, Pijush Ganguly, Aparajita Adhya, Manasi Sinha etc. The film’s story was adapted from the novel of the same name and a short story ‘Rashmonir Sonadana’ both written by Sirshendu Mukhopadhyay, a well-known Sahitya Akademy Award winner Bangla laureate.

In an interview with the Times of India sometime in 2012, Aparna Sen had revealed that she had read the story for the first time in 1993 and immediately decided to make a film on it. However, she could not get the right type of the film production house to finance the film. It took nearly 20 years to find the right film production house by which time, she had become a kind of celebrity film directors of art/parallel films.

The story of the film is as under:

Chandranath (Paran Banerjee) the patriarch of Mitra joint family was once landlord in East Bengal. After partition, the entire family migrates to West Bengal side. The Mitra family stays in a big 3-story house. Being from the family of landlord, none of the menfolk has worked for a living. Obviously, Chandranath’s two sons – Chandan (Saswata Chatterjee) and Chanchal (Pijush Ganguly) pass their time fishing in the pond near their house and visiting their respective courtesans in the evenings.

In the house, the 70-year old aunt, Pishima (Maushumi Chatterjee) who got married at 11 and became widow at 12 in Faridkot, has been deprived of all worldly pleasure, conjugal relationship and good food. She finds solace in her jewellery box containing 5 kgs of gold jewelleries as a part of her ‘streedhan’. Chandranath’s younger son, Chandan gets married to Somlata (Konkona Sen Sharma), a poor girl from an adjoining village. The family’s financial condition can be judged from the fact that the expenses for the wedding are paid off by selling an old Burma teak-wood double bed and an expensive carpet. All the members of Mitra family are afraid of Pishima because of her authoritative and cursing voice. Also no one in the family wants to be in the bad book of Pishima as she holds the jewellery box which the family can inherit once she dies.

One day, Somlata on a visit to Pishima’s room, finds her dead. Knowing fully well that once she dies, her gold jewellery would be sold over time for the family’s sustenance, Pishima turns ghost and entrusts the jewellery box to Somlata with a condition that she should safely keep it in a secret place without any family members knowing it including her husband. Now, the box has been handed over to the second generation. After the death of Pishima, the family members search for the jewellery box but in vain. They also call the police in case the box has been stolen but again police fail to find out the box.

None of the family members can see the hukka smoking Pishima’s ghost except Somlata to whom she bullies just to make sure that her jewellery box is not misused by her. However, due to adverse financial condition of the family, Somlata looks the gold jewelleries as a means of raising capital for her husband to set up a saree shop. For this purpose, she pledges one of the gold ornaments and convince Pishima that once the business earns profit, she would get the jewellery back in the box. Over a period of time, the fortunes of Mitra family improve enabling Somlata not only to get back the pledged ornament but also some of the antiques of the house which the family had sold for their sustenance.

Somlata gives birth to a daughter who grows up to become a college going Chaitali (Srabanti Chatterjee). One day, Somlata shows all the ornaments in the jewellery box to Chaitali who evinces no interest in the ornaments as they are all old style. Besides, she has no interest in wearing gold ornaments. Chaitali has an affair with a boy who is involved in supporting the underground movements in East Pakistan. On the advice of Pishima’s ghost, Chaitali donates all the ornaments to support the underground movements for an independent Bangla Desh. The film ends with a poem recitation-cum-song when the ghost of Pishima merges with the fog over the river.

Maushumi Chatterjee in the role of Pishima – both live and as a ghost, has given a lively performance. Generally, the role of a ghost should bring horror situations. But in this film, Maushumi Chatterjee in the role of ghost, brings comic situations in the film like her hukka smoking, her bullying tactics, the sarcastic comments on the family members, her suggestion to Somlata that like her husband, she should also have an extra-marital affair etc. Probably, the Bangla audience would enjoy more fun from her dialogues which have to be in East Bengali dialect due to her role being a native of Faridkot.

Konkona Sen Sharma as Somlata, the new daughter-in-law, has a contrasting role vis-à-vis Maushumi Chatterjee. She is so scared with the presence of Pishima in the house that she starts stammering. It is much later that a positive bonding develops between Pishima and Somlata. Both of them have a major presence in the film. The superlative performances of Konkona Sen Sharma as well as Maushumi Chatterjee in the film got them Filmfare Awards for the best actress and the best supporting actress, respectively in Bangla film category.

The coverage of the third generation in the film seems to be too rushed up. It gives an impression that the Aparna Sen was in a great hurry to finish the film. Probably, the film had become too long for a non-mainstream category and she therefore may have edited out some sequences from this part of the film.

It is interesting to note that Aparna Sen’s ‘Goynar Baksho’ (2013) was released, on April 12, 2013. After a week, Vishal Bhardwaj’s ‘Ek Thhi Daayan’ (2013) was released. In both these ‘ghost’ films, Konkona Sen Sharma acted. The story of ‘Ek Thhi Daayan’ (2013) was written by Mukul Sharma, the father of Konkona Sen Sharma and the ex-husband of Aparna Sen.

‘Goynar Boksho’ (2013) has 8 songs of which one song is in Hindi. It is interesting to watch a short Bengali rap song which is sung when some distant relatives of Chandranath visits Chandan’s saree shop to buy sarees for their daughter’s baby shower. The lyrics of the rap song mostly use various names of the sarees. The rap song was rendered by all the actors involved in the scene. All the songs were set to music by Debijyoti Mishra who was the chief assistant to Salil Chowdhury for 14 years and for Ilaiyaraja for 2 years.

I am presenting the Hindi song ‘sakhi ri saawan bhaawat naahi’ which is a ‘biraha’ song rendered by Shubha Mudgal in a Dadra format. The lyricist of the song is not mentioned. As with most of the songs in the film which is played in the background in driblets interspersed with dialogues, this ‘biraha’ song also follows the same pattern in the film. So, it is better to listen to the song on the audio clip for getting its seamless rendering.

This is a sublime song using the minimum musical instruments to give prominence to the singer’s voice. In the film, the song plays in the background when Somlata, on the instigation from the ghost of Pishima, is about to get involved with an extra-marital affair when her husband is away on a long tour.

Audio Clip:

Song-Sakhi ree saawan bhaawat naahin (Goynor Boksho)(Bangla)(2013) Singer-Shubha Mudgal, MD-Debijyoti Mishra
Chorus
Shubha Mudgal + chorus

Lyrics

sakhi ri…eeeee
saawan bhaawat naahi..eeeee ee
sakhi ri…eeeee ee eee
haan saawan bhaawat naahi..eeee

bijuri chamkat dar laagat hai
soona..aaaaa aa aa
soona
soona ghar laagat hai
kaun oar gaye peerahwa
kauno bataawat naahi.eee
bataawat naa..hi
saawan bhaawat naahi..ee
saawan bhaawat naahi
saawan bhaawat naahi..ee
saawan bhaawat naahi..ee

aaaaaaaaaaaa aaa
boondiya barsat aangan aangan
mann su….khaa
aa aa aaa
mann soo….kha bin tere saajan
saawan jaihyen baar phir aihyen….en en
gaile joban phir aawat naahin
sakhi ri..ee
saawan jaihen baar phir aihen….en
aa aa aaa
saawan jaihen baar phir aihen….en
gaile joban phir aawat naahi..ee ee
sakhi ri ..eeee
saawan bhaawat naahin
sakhi ri…eeee ee ee
saawan bhaawat naahi…eeeee
saawan bhaawat naahin


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4750 Post No. : 16485

The tale of two brothers – Hafiz Khan and Aziz Khan, sons of the Ustad Waheed Khan of Etawaha Gharana is not only saddening but also contrasting in the end. After a promising start in Hindi films as a playback singer and the music director in the 1940s, Hafiz Khan died in 1972 in extreme poverty. Aziz Khan, on the other hand, after a brief stint with Hindi film industry as a music director, reverted to playing Sitar and trained his son, Ustad Parvez Khan who is now an internationally well-known Sitar player.

Etawaha Gharana popularised the Sitar and Surbahar and Ustad Waheed Khan was a famous exponent of both these musical instruments. He appeared in Satyajit Ray’s ‘Jalsaagar (1958) in which he can be seen playing Raag Bihaag on Surbahar in one of the scenes of the film. Ustad Waheed Khan was a court musician at the court of Holkar of Indore for 18 years, in the court of Maharaja of Patiala for 3 years and later in the court of Nizam of Hyderabad until 1948. Naturally, he wanted his two sons to continue the Gharana tradition of playing Sitar and Surbahar. With this aim in mind, Ustad Waheed Khan gave extensive training in Sitar, Surbahar and vocal music to his two sons. At the age of around 12 , Hafiz Khan was sent to Kolkata to receive further training in Sitar and Surbahar from his uncle, Ustad Inayat Khan (father of sitar maestro Ustad Vilayat Khan) who found Hafiz Khan to be a promising student of Sitar and Surbahar. He used to accompany his uncle in his sitar/surbahar concerts.

In Kolkata, Hafiz Khan got mesmerised with the songs of K L Saigal and Pankaj Mullick. He was now more interested in becoming a singer in Hindi films than learning Sitar and Surbahar. On a visit to Hyderabad to spend some time with his father who had then become a court musician in the court of Nizam, Hafiz Khan got a chance to sing songs on Hyderabad Radio. Knowing fully well of his father’s strong aversion to film songs, he had to sing on the radio without revealing his name. He got some money for his singing on the radio.

Knowing that his father would never allow him to sing for Hindi films, one day Hafiz Khan ran away from Hyderabad with his money earned from radio singing to Mumbai some time in 1934. After doing some odd jobs in the film studio including small roles as actor, producer Chandrarao Kadam, who was producing ‘Bahadur Kisaan’(1938) for which Mir Sahab was entrusted with the music direction, gave him a chance to sing a solo song ‘baalam gaye pardes ri sajni’ which became his debut playback song in a film. With this song, Hafiz Khan became known as a singer. Since he wanted to hide his name associated with film songs from his father, Mir Sahab gave him a new name ‘Khan Mastana’ keeping in view his jolly nature.

After the release of ‘Bahadur Kissan’ (1938), Mir Sahab joined Minerva Movietone as the music director. He also took Khan Mastana to Minerva Movietone where he was taken as a playback singer on a 3-year contract. During this period, he sang songs in ‘Jailor’ (1938), ‘Talaaq’ (1938), ‘Pukaar’ (1939) ‘Main Haari’ (1940), etc. His songs from these films raised his popularity graph. During the last year of the contract with Minerva Movietone, Sohrab Modi wanted him to play sitar in addition to his contract as playback singer. Khan Mastana refused to play sitar as he did not wish to become a musician. He left Minerva Movietone. By that time, he had also got an offer from a film producer to work as a music director (probably for ‘Virginia’, 1940). Since Sohrab Modi did not want to lose Khan Mastana, he gave him a chance as a music director in his film ‘Vasiyat’ (1940) which he accepted as a free-lancer.

In around 1945, Khan Mastana’s younger brother, Aziz Khan had also joined Bombay film industry as a music director. To conceal his identity for his association with films, he had also changed his name to ‘Aziz Hindi’. By 1947, Khan Mastana had become a top male playback singer next only to G M Durrani and had given music direction to as many as 23 films. Everything was going very fine in his filmy career. He had money, fame and the luxury of staying in any one of his 5 flats in Mumbai. But his misfortune started when he paid a visit to Hyderabad sometime in 1947. His father who was a court musician at that time with Nizam, did not allow him to return to Mumbai. Instead, he pressurized Khan Mastana to learn classical music and sing in front of him rather than in the films. This continued for almost a year which led to delay in films for which he was committed to complete the recording of the songs as playback singer and as a music director. The producers of such films had to engage some other music directors to complete their films. Khan Mastana’s unprofessional attitude resulted in losing some prospective films as the music director.

In early 1948, Khan Mastana once again ran away from Hyderabad for Mumbai. One year of the absence from the film industry is sufficient for a film artist to be forgotten. Khan Mastana managed to get some playback singing assignments to re-establish himself in the film industry. One of the songs in which he sang with Mohammed Rafi was ‘watan ki raah pe watan ke naujawaan shahid ho’ from ‘Shaheed’ (1948) which became very popular. When Khan Mastana has just settled down in the film industry mainly as a playback singer in his second innings, his father came to Mumbai and forcibly took him ( also his brother, Aziz Khan) back to Hyderabad. This time, he was trapped in Hyderabad for about 2 years.

When Khan Mastana returned to Mumbai after 2 years – probably in 1951, he had not only faced the wrath of producers and music directors for his unprofessional behaviour, he had to face stiff competition of emerging playback singers like Mohammed Rafi, Mukesh, Talat Mehmood and Manna Dey. Some new music directors had also emerged during his absence who were happy with the emerging playback singers. Khan Mastana realised that his days as playback singer and the music director were over. In his third inning in film industry, he could get only a handful of songs to sing. He sang his last song as a playback singer, zindagi hai yaa koi toofaan hai in ‘Zindagi Yaa Toofaan’ (1958) which became his swan song.

From the mid 1950s up to his death in March 1972, Khan Mastana lived a life of extreme poverty. During his heydays, he lavishly spent money on his friends who also made him addicted to some vices including drinking. So, he had not saved money for the future. He was staying with his family in a small room mocated in a lane adjunct to Mahim Dargah. He had got afflicted with paralysis in 1966. His only son got similar affliction at the age of 14.

Khan Mastana who had sung nearly 150 songs, composed music in around 30 films besides acting in around 10 films died unsung in abject poverty in March 1972.

What a sad end of a lineage from the Etawah Gharana. His nephew, Ustad Shahid Parvez Khan (son of his brother, Aziz Khan) who is an accomplished sitar player of international repute is of the view that going by the recordings of his uncle’s Hindustani classical renditions and sitar/surbahar recitals available with the family’s archive, Khan Mastana would have become one of the leading exponents of Hindustani classical music if he had concentrated on playing Sitar/Surbahar and as a classical vocalist rather than in the Hindi film industry.

‘Muqabala’ (1942) was one of the films of Khan Mastana’s heydays for which he was not only the music director, he also sang for himself in the film and also provided playback singing for other actors. This film seems to have been produced at a time when Wadia Movietone was in the verge of a split between Wadia Brothers. The film was made under the banner of J B H Wadia Productions but it was a Homi Wadia presentation. The film was jointly directed by Batuk Bhatt (Nanabhai Bhatt) and Babubhai Mistry. The star cast included Nadia and Yaqub in the lead role supported by Srinivas, Rajni, Dalpat, Nazira, Agha, Jal Khambata, M K Hasan, Baby Madhuri etc.

The film had 9 songs of which 3 songs have been covred in the Blog. All the songs were written by A Karim. I am presenting the film’s 4th song, ‘mujrim hoon mohabbat ka jo chaahe saza dena’ which is picturised on Yaqub. Agha is also seen in the song picturization.

Almost all on-line resources mention Yaqub as the singer. But it is apparent that the voice in the song is that of Khan Mastana.

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Acknowledgement: Sometime last year, one of my friends sent me a photocopy of an article written by Madhup Sharma which was published in Hindi magazine, ‘Madhuri’ in 1969. This article was based on the interview the author had taken with Khan Mastana in his house. Much of the information about Khan Mastana in my article is based on this source with some updates.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Mujrim hoon mohabbat ka jo chaahe sazaa dena (Muqaabla)(1942) Singer-Khan Mastana, Lyrics-A Karim, MD-Khan Mastana

Lyrics

aa aa aa
haaa haaa
aaaa aaaaa
mujrim hoon mohabbat ka
jo chaahe saza dena
mujrim hoon mohabbat ka
jo chaahe saza dena

mujrim hoon mohabbat ka aa aa
haan aan
jo chaahe saza dena aa aa
par yaad rahe itna
dil se na bhula dena
par yaad rahe itna
dil se na bhula dena

main dil tumhen deta..aa hoon
lekin kahe deta hoo..n
main dil tumhen deta hoon
lekin kahe deta hoon
mujhko to mitaaya hai
isko na mita dena
mujhko to mitaaya hai
dil ko na mita dena

aaraam na hai din ko….o o o o
aur neend na raaton ko…o o o o
aaraam na hai din ko
aur neend na raaton ko..o o o
beemaar kiya tumne
ab tum hi dawa dena
beemaar kiya tumne
ab tum hi dawa dena

wo guzri huyi baaten
raaton ki mulaakaaten
wo guzri huyi baaten
raaton ki mulaakaat..en
bhoole se jo yaad aaye
do aansoo baha dena
bhoole se jo yaad aaye
do aansoo baha dena
mujrim hoon mohabbat ka
jo chaahe saza dena
par yaad rahe itna
dil se na bhula dena


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4748 Post No. : 16476

Kishore Sahu, actor, producer, director and story/screen-play/dialogue writer must be a dynamic, ambitious and resourceful person. Otherwise, how could one explain the pace at which he turned producer after the release of only one film? He started his acting career with a lead role in Bombay Talkies’ ‘Jeewan Prabhat’ (1937). One film old Kishore Sahu set up a film production company, India Artists Ltd. As a managing director of the company, he produced ‘Bahurani’ (1940) which was released in June 1940. The film was commercially successful.

By 1945, Kishore Sahu had become a successful film producer, director, writer and actor. But before that he faced a ‘speed breaker’ in his career path. Sometime in the latter half of 1940, Kishore Sahu’s marriage with Snehprabha Pradhan, his co-star in ‘Punar Milan’ (1940) in September 1940 ran into trouble. In less than six months of their marriage, they separated. The long court battles and the resultant divorce sometime in 1942 affected Kishore Sahu to such an extent that he left Bombay in early 1941 and went into ‘hibernation’ for a year or so in his native town and Nagpur.

It is said that a person in a depressed mind for a long time is likely to experience change in his personality after he overcomes the depression. But in the case of Kishore Sahu, it appears that more than the likely change in his personality, the recovery from the personal problems changed his filmy career for the better. Kishore Sahu returned to Bombay with a story of ‘Kunwaara Baap’ (1942) which was his debut film as a director. He was also the lead actor opposite Protima Dasgupta. It was a social satirical film.

The box office success of ‘Kunwaara Baap’ (1942) encouraged him to direct two more films with similar theme – ‘Raja’ (1943) and ‘Sharaarat’ (1944) making them a trilogy of films with social satire as the theme. He was once again paired with Protima Dasgupta in both these films. While ‘Raja’ (1943) was a commercial success, ‘Sharaarat’ (1944) did not fare well at the box office. But his subsequent film, ‘Veer Kunal’ (1945) which Kishore Sahu produced and directed under the banner of Ramnik Productions was a commercially successful film. In this film, he played the lead role of Veer Kunal.

The next line of career progression took place in 1945 when he bought the banner, Hindustan Chitra Production and become the producer-director under his own banner. Films like ‘Sindoor’ (1947), ‘Saawan Aaya Re’ (1947), ‘Kali Ghata’ (1951) and “Mayur Pankh’ (1954) became successful at the box office. As a director, he saw success in ‘Saajan’ (1947), ‘Nadiya Ke Paar’ (1948). ‘Dil Apna Aur Preet Paraayi’ (1960), ‘Grihasti’ (1963) etc. He also acted in films of other banners.

As happens with many film directors, after his successful innings of around 10 years, Kishore Sahu, by and large, failed as a director in his later part of the career. After ‘Grahasti’ (1963), he could not attain the same level of success as in the 1940s and 1950s. In the 1960s and 70s, Kishore Sahu produced and directed ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965), ‘Hare Kaanch Ki Chooriyaan’ (1967), ‘Pushpanjali’ (1970) and directed ‘Dhuen Ki Lakeer’ (1974) but could not create ripples on the box office front.

Of these four films, I had seen ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965) when it was released. The film was a suspense thriller. I found the film interesting with tightly maintained suspense coupled with outstanding song compositions by Salil Chowdhury. Around the same time, I had seen ‘Gumnaam’ (1965), and later, I had also watched on TV ‘Wo Kaun Thhi’ (1964), The common factors in all these three films were (i) suspense thriller, (ii) Manoj Kumar as the lead actor and (iii) melodious music and songs. While ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ failed at box office, the other two films were box office success. Can it be said that the young directors were more innovative and had read the pulse of the filmy audience of mid 1960s better than Kishore Sahu or was it simply a loss of his magic touch?

When Kishore Sahu was facing a downturn in his career as a producer-director, he started doing character roles in the films of other banners. Dev Anand seems to be fond of Kishore Sahu who acted with him in ‘Kala Paani’ (1958), ‘Kala Baazar’ (1960), ‘Guide’ (1965), ‘Gambler’ (1971) and ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (1972). By the way, Dev Anand worked with Kishore Sahu for the first time in ‘Namoona’ (1949).

Kishore Sahu died on August 22, 1980 while on a family trip to Thailand. His last film, ‘Vakil Babu’ (1982) was released after his death.

‘Raja’ (1943) was Kishore Sahu’s third film as a director and the 5th film as an actor. He also wrote the story, screen-play and dialogues for the film. The star cast included Kishore Sahu and Protima Dasgupta in the lead roles supported by Ranibala, Moni Chatterjee, Gulab, Vijay Sahu, Wasker, Anant Prabhu etc.

There were 8 songs in the film of which one song has been covered on the Blog. I am presenting the film’s second song, ‘aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle’. The song is written by Amritlal Nagar which is set to music by Khan Mastana. Most of the on-line resources mention Kishore Sahu as the singer. But it is apparent that the voice in this song is that of Khan Mastana.

When I first listened to the song, it gave me an impression of a song of enjoyment. By the time I come to the last stanza of the song, it dawns to me that all is not well in protagonist’s love life.

Audio Clip:
Song-Aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle (Raja)(1943) Singer-Khan Mastana, Lyrics-Amritlal Nagar, MD-Khan Mastana

Lyrics

shar…..aab
shar….aab
ye shar…..aab
aankhon ki ye sharaab
aankhon ki ye sharaab
aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle
haan jhoom ke nikle
haan haan jhoom ke nikle
armaan mere dil ke
armaan mere dil ke ghaav choom ke nikle
haan choom ke nikle
haan haan choom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab
aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle
haan jhoom ke nikle
haan haan jhoom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab

main kis tarah bachoon
main kis tarah bachoon na ke madhosh banoon main
behosh banoon main aen
main kis tarah bachoon na ke madhosh banoon main
behosh banoon main
behosh banoon main
gar ?? khud sharaab
gar ?? khud sharaab bane jhoom ke nikle
haan jhoom ke nikle
haan haan jhoom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab
aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle
haan jhoom ke nikle
haan haan jhoom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab

toota huwa dil ek bhi apna sa na paaya
hamne nahin paaya
toota huwa dil ek bhi apna sa na paaya
hamne nahin paaya
hamne nahin paaya
ham pyaar ki duniya se
ham pyaar ki duniya se bahut ghoom ke nikle
haan ghoom ke nikle
haan haan ghoom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab
aankhon ki ye sharaab piye jhoom ke nikle
haan jhoom ke nikle
haan haan jhoom ke nikle
armaan mere dil ke
armaan mere dil ke ghaav choom ke nikle
haan choom ke nikle
haan haan choom ke nikle
aankhon ki ye sharaab


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4746 Post No. : 16473

Sixty-five years have passed since ‘Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje’ (1955) -JJPB for short – was released. I had seen the film in a theatre in South Mumbai either in 1955 or 1956 (this film had run for nearly 2 years in a single theatre in Mumbai). But I had no recollection of much of the film. It was only after I watched some parts of the film on the video sharing platforms over a period of time, I could connect some scenes from the film I saw in my childhood. The film still evokes interest of the cinema lovers especially of those who relish the classical dance/music.

I am now in a better position the appreciate a bold and somewhat adventurous decision Shantaram took to produce and direct JJPB with the classical dance as a theme. If not handled properly, the theme could have turned the film into a documentary rather than a feature film. It was a high budget film in a technicolour extravaganza. Shantaram’s bold and daring decision to make JJPB has be admired in the backdrop of the following handicaps he faced:

(1) The successive failures at the box office of ‘Surang’ (1953) and ‘Subah Ka Taara’ (1954), both directed by V Shantaram had already put a financial strain on his banner, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. Under the circumstances, producing a film with a classical dance theme which Shantaram had never handled in the past, that too in technicolour was fraught with a huge financial risk.

(2) There were examples in the 1940s when Sagar Movietone made ‘Kumkum The Dancer’ (1940) and Wadia Movietone made ‘Court Dancer/Raj Nartaki’ (1941) with classical dance theme. The results were not encouraging. Both these films failed at the box office putting the financial strains on the respective banners. Eventually, Sagar Movietone had to be merged with National Studio and Wadia Movietone got split between Wadia Brothers and the Wadia Studio was sold to V Shantaram.

(3) It was a high budget film but the lead actors in the film were non-stars – a handicap for the box office collections. The lead actor, Gopi Krishna was just emerging as a choreographer in a couple of films while the lead actress, Sandhya had acted in two Hindi films prior to getting the lead role of a dancer in JJPB. Moreover, she was not a trained classical dancer like Vyjayantimala who had already became a star actor-dancer and had the capacity to attract the crowd in the theatres much higher than that of Sandhya.

Despite these handicaps, going ahead with JJPB showed the confidence level of Shantaram as a director and a master craftsman of the cinema medium. Probably, Shantaram may have felt that with his technicolour film, he was in a better postion to present the classical dance theme than what Sagar Movietone and Wadia Movietone had made in 1940-41. He put Sandhya under Gopikrishna for the intensive dance training for over a year which included training during the shooting of the film as well.

Shantaram was very successful in winning over the audience who had rejected his previous two films. He made the Indian classical dances visually appealing to the audience by presenting them in a hybrid choreography, coupled with the lavish settings. The visuals in Technicolour appealed to the audience. The film became Shantaram’s most successful films on the box office front. More than the commercial success of the film, it was personal satisfaction for Shantaram as a producer-director when JJPB won the National Award and the Filmfare Award for the Best Film for 1955.

Since JJPB was all about Indian classical dances, it was apparent that the songs need to be based on the Hindustani classical music. It is said that some well-wishers of Shantaram including Vasant Desai had suggested him to entrust the music direction of the film to Naushad who had emerged as a star music director in the classical genre after the phenomenal success of his songs in ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952). But Shantaram entrusted the music direction to Vasant Desai. It is interesting to note that after ‘Dahej’ (1950), as a music director, Vasant Desai was not associated with Shantaram’s subsequent films, ‘Parchhaain’ (1952), ‘Surang’ (1953), ‘Teen Batti Chaar Raasta’ (1953) and ‘Subah Ka Taara’ (1954).

In his zeal to prove the confidence reposed on him by his mentor, Vasant Desai travelled all over India to pick up the best musicians for his music team for JJPB. In Jammu, he picked up Shiv Kumar Sharma, an upcoming Santoor player who was still in his teen at that time. From Banaras, he picked up Pandit Samta Prasad, the renowned Tabla player. Ustad Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan of Indore played sitar for Vasant Desai. In JJPB, Santoor as a musical instrument was used for the first time which later became a part of many Hindi film songs and background music.

After almost all the songs had been recorded, Vasant Desai had composed the title song in raga ‘Darbari’ for which he persuaded Ustad Amir Khan to sing. Ustad Amir Khan arrived at the recording studio for the final rehearsal and recording. At the last moment, Vasant Desai felt that he should get consent of Shantaram before the recording. So, he invited him to the recording studio to listen to the final rehearsal. Upon listening to the rehearsal, Shantaram was unhappy. He called Vasant Desai to an adjoining room and advised him to cancel the recording and suggested to either change the tune or the singer or both. Somehow Vasant Desai, on some pretext, persuaded Ustad Amir Khan to come for the recording the next day.

A nervous Vasant Desai reached home and sat down quietly. He did not know what was wrong with the composition and could not sleep that night. Early morning, it dawned to him that all the dances in the film had very fast tempo and rhythm whereas his tune was in very slow tempo and so were the aalaaps. Vasant Desai composed the same song in Raga Adana in very fast tempo and aalaaps. He rehearsed the new tune with Ustad Amir Khan in the presence of Shantaram who was pleased with the new composition. [Source of this triva on title song -”Journal of SIRC”, Annual 2012].

I am presenting here the much talked about title song, ‘jhanak jhanak paayal baaje’ rendered by Ustad Amir Khan. The words are of Hasrat Jaipuri and the music composition is of Vasant Desai.

The title song became so popular that Ustad Amir Khan used to get ‘farmaish’ in his public concerts to sing the title song. Later, Ustad Amir Khan started singing a much-elongated version of this song (nearly 9 minutes) in his concerts and the gramophone record for the same was released. Ustad Amir Khan sang live the title song of the film on the occasion of the diamond jubilee (60th week) celebration of the film in the presence of the distinguished guests at the Liberty cinema in Mumbai.

Audio Clip:

Video Clip:

Audio Clip (Concert Verson):

Song-Jhanak jhanak paayal baaje (Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje)(1955) Singer-Ustad Amir Khan, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Vasant Desai

Chorus

Lyrics: (Based on Audio Clip)

jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

paayaliya ki runak jhunak par
paayaliya ki runak jhunak par
chham chham manwa naa..che
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

neel gagan bhi sunkar jhoome
madhur madhur jhanka…ar
madhur madhur jhankaar
soyi dharti jaag uthhi hai
soyi dharti jaag uthhi hai
goonj uthha sansaar
raag rang bhi saa…je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

jhanak jhanak paa…yal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

[sargam]
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

(aaaaaaaaaaaa)

jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal baa..je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
paayal baa….je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal aaa baa..je ae
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal baa…je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
(aaaaaaaaaaaaaa)
jhanak-jhanak paayal baaje
(aaaaaaaaaaaaaa)
jhanak-jhanak paayal baaje


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4743 Post No. : 16470

Playback singing was introduced for the first time in Hindi films for a song in New Talkies’ ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’ (1935) under the music direction of R C Boral. The song main khush hona chaahoon was sung by Parul Ghosh, Suprobha Sarkar, Harimati and K C Dey. In Bombay film industry, playback singing was introduced for the song ‘jeewan hai ek kahaani’ in Sagar Movietone’s ‘Mahageet’ (1937) which was sung by Anil Biswas under his own music direction. Unfortunately, gramophone record for this song was not issued.

There is a general impression that playback singing was introduced with a view to making trained singers sing for actors who can not sing. But the original intention of introducing the playback singing was mainly to segregate the functions of composing songs from the shooting of the song to afford flexibilities in picturisation of the song sequences. Hence, in the initial stages of playback singing – say during 1935-40 – it was mainly actors who would first record the songs in their own voices which would be lip sync on them on the screen. For examples, actor-singers like K L Saigal and Kanan Devi in Kolkata, Surendra and Khurshid Bano in Mumbai used to first record the song in their voices to be playback during the songs’ shooting.

It was some time towards the end of 1930s and the beginning of 1940s, that professional and trained singers started lending their voices to be lip synced by actors who were not good singers. A beginning was made by actor-singers like Rajkumari Dubey and Amirbai Karnataki who either gave up acting or reduced their acting commitments to concentrate mainly on playback singing. Around the same period, radio singers like G M Durrani, Shamshad Begum, Zohrabai Ambalewaali and radio singers/musicians like Khan Mastana, S D Batish and Rafique Ghaznavi also started lending their voices to actors.

Soon film producers realised that the gramophone records of songs rendered by trained and professional singers sold out like hot cake swhich was an additional source of revenue for them. The stock of the handful of playback singers of that time went skyhigh when the songs of films like ‘Khazaanchi’ (1941), ‘Khandaan’ (1942), ‘Kismet’ (1943), ‘Rattan’ (1944) became very popular with the masses. The film industry felt the need to search for trained singers who could be used as playback singers. The easiest way of searching for prospective playback singers for films at that time was to consider singers whose voices ere heard on All India Radio.

In the last couple of months, I have been going through past issues of fortnightly bulletins that are available on line, namely ‘The Indian Listener’ of the All India Radio (AIR) from 1936 to 1950. Daily programmes of the various stations of AIR are listed in it . Browsing of the pages of the Bulletin has revealed that most of the popular playback singers of Hindi cinema of the 1940s had their origins as radio singers on AIR. Take AIR, Lahore, for example. Shamshad Begum started singing on AIR Lahore in 1937, followed by Noor Jehan in 1939, Zeenat Begum, Naseem Akhtar and Naseem Begum in 1940, Surinder Kaur, Mohammed Rafi, Dilshad Begum, Munawwar Sultana, Iqbal Begum in 1943 etc.

Zohrabai Ambalewali and Shamshad Begum had shifted their base from Lahore to Mumbai in the late 1930s and early 1940s, respectively while Zeenat Begum shifted to Mumbai in 1944. All these three playback singers gave some tough competition to Mumbai-based Rajkumari Dubey and Amirbai Karnataki. There were many other radio singers attached to AIR Lahore, like Munawwar Sultana, Dilshad Begum, Naseem Akhtar, Naseem Begum, Iqbal Begum, Rashida Begum, Bahar Begum, Mohammed Rafi etc. Most of them made their debuts as playback singers around middle of 1940s. There were also the radio singers from AIR, Delhi, Mumbai, Lucknow and Kolkata etc. Some of them became playback singers too. For example, Zohrabai Ambalewali, G M Durrani, Khan Mastana, Geeta Roy, Mohantara Talpade, Sitara Kanpuri, Utpala Sen, Kalyani Das and many more,

I am very fond of the voices of playback singers Dilshad Begum, Munawwar Sultana and Nazira Begum. Unfortunately, their playback singing careers did not take off despite having very good voices for the singing of film songs. The total numbers of identified songs rendered by them since their debut totaled 27, 30 and 6 respectively. What could be reasons that they did not succeed in their playback singing career?

Neither of the three seem to have pursued the playback singing career seriously. They confined their playback singing career mostly to films produced at Lahore or with Lahore-based music directors like Pandit Amarnath, G A Chishti, Lachhiram Tomar and lesser-known music directors like Inayat Hussain, K S Sagar and Master Mohan. Probably, they did not wish to travel out of Lahore for song recordings say, in Mumbai. Most of the films for which they sang were not from the top banners. To add to their woes, due to partition, some of the films produced during 1946-47 were either remained unreleased or had released after inordinate delays.

The Blog has so far covered the melodious voices of Lahore’s lesser-known playback singers, Munawwar Sultana (11), Dilshad Begum (12) and Nazira Begum (1). I am presenting today, a melodious song from the film ‘Chupke Chupke’ (1948) sung by one of the lesser known playback singers from Lahore. The song is a ghazal, ‘apne dil mein pyaar ki duniya basa kar loot gaye’ which is set to music by S D Batish. There were two lyricists – Tufail Hoshiyarpuri and Wakar Pandey. But individual distributions of the songs among the lyricists are not available.

It is learnt that the label of 78 RPM gramophone record of the song does not mentione the name of the singer. Some on-line websites have mentioned the name of the singer as Iqbal Bano. I have some doubt about Iqbal Bano being the singer of the song on two counts. First, the singing voice in the song under discussion does not sound to match with that of Iqbal Bano. Second, Iqbal Bano was born sometime in 1935. At the time of the recording of the song which could be as early as 1946 (I suspect the film was the victim of partition and its released got delayed to 1948), Iqbal Bano’s age was around 12 years. I wrote to Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji, an expert in identifying the singers of Hindi film songs especially of 1930s and 1940s. He replied that Jayraman of RMIM Group has identified the singer of the song as Nazira Begum and he agrees with him. So, for the time being, Nazira Begum has been accredited as the playback singer of the song under discussion.

This song proves that Nazira Begum had a very melodious voice. She has rendered the indentified songs in only 4 films, out of which three films remained unreleased – ‘Rustam Aur Sohrab (1940s), ‘Pardesi Baalam’ (1940s) and ‘Basant Panchami’ (1940s).

Audio Clip:

Song-Apne dil mein pyaar ki duniya basa kar lut gaye (Chupke Chupke)(1948) Singer-Nazeera Begam, MD-S D Batish

Lyrics

apne dil mein pyaar ki
duniya basa kar lut gaye
gair nikle hum jinhen
apna bana kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

zindagi ki har khushi
karwat badal kar rah gayi
zindagi ki har khushi
karwat badal kar rah gayi
ek wafa na aashna hai se
dil laga kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

kya khabar
iss mohabbat ki haqeeqat hai fareb
kya khabar
iss mohabbat ki haqeeqat hai fareb
pyaar ne dhokha diya
dhokhe mein aa kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

shaakh thak wo jal gayi
kisi ka apna aashiyaan
shaakh thak wo jal gayi
kisi ka apna aashiyaan
apne dil ki aag se
dil ko jala kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

kya kare….n
jaa kar kisi se
badnaseebi ka gila aa aa aaa
is dil-e-betaab ki
is dil-e-betaab ki
baaton mein aa kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4739 Post No. : 16463

Blog 10-Year Challenge (2011-2021) – Song No.30
——————————————————————

In Hindi film industry, the experiences of lyricists turning producer/director have not been generally good barring very few exceptions like P L Santoshi and Gulzar. Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri, after successfully writing lyrics for 25 films during 1939-1945, turned director with ‘Bhook’ (1946). The film flopped at the box office. With this, he reverted to song writing until 1954 when he directed ‘Maan’ (1954). This film also flopped. After this, he went back to his teaching profession.

Nakshab Jarchvi, who started his filmy career as lyricist in 1945, turned producer-director with ‘Nagma’ (1953) which was a successful film at the box office, He produced and directed his next, ‘Raftaar’ (1955) which flopped. Next, he directed ‘Zindagi Ya Toofaan’ (1958) which did not do well on the box office front. After this film, he migrated to Pakistan.

Ishwar Chand Kapoor directed two films – ‘Chaand Sitaare’ (1948) and ‘Tarang’ (1952) after which he was absent from Hindi film industry between 1952-57 to resurface as lyricist in 1957. J S Kashyap, the writer and lyricist, directed the only film ‘Anyaya’ (1949). Bharat Vyas, after directing his first film, ‘Rangeela Rajasthan’ (1949), refrained from directing any film thereafter. Aziz Kashmiri directed his first film, ‘Sabz Baag’ (1951). After about a decade, he directed his second and the last film, ‘Pathan’/’Rang Raliyaan’ (1962). Both the films were failures at the box office.

The hardship experienced by Shailendra when he produced ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) is well known. Jaan Nisar Akhtar produced ‘Bahu Begum’ (1967). Despite having top actors and excellent music, the film failed at the box office. Probably, he may have realised that producing a film was not his cup of tea. He, therefore, concentrated only on song writing thereafter. There may be some more examples of lyricists turning producer/director and failed. Kavi Pradeep was one among them.

Kavi Pradeep started his career as lyricist with Bombay Talkies and wrote lyrics for six films between 1939-43. The tremendous success of ‘Kismet’ (1943) with its songs, all written by Kavi Pradeep becoming very popular, took his career as a lyricist took a great height. In 1943, because of the internal rift, Ashok Kumar, Shashdhar Mukherjee, Gyan Mukherjee, Rai Bahadur Chunnilal and a few more left Bombay Talkies to form Filmistan. Kavi Pradeep also joined them with a 5-year contract.

‘Chal Chal Re Naujawaan’ (1944) was the first film produced under Filmistan banner whose all songs were written by Kavi Pradeep. The film failed at the box office. It appears that after this, Kavi Pradeep was sidelined in Filmistan. Except for ‘Shikari’ (1946), Kavi Pradeep did not get to write songs for Filmistan’s other films like ‘Mazdoor’ (1945), ‘Eight Days’ (1946), ‘Do Bhai’ (1947), ‘Nadiya Ke Paar’ (1948) and ‘Shaheed’ (1948). Since he was under contract with Filmistan and was almost inactive, Kavi Pradeep wrote for films made outside Filmistan such as ‘Kadambari’ (1944), ‘Amrapali’ (1945), ‘Sati Toral’ (1947) and ‘Veerangana’ (1947) under an assumed name of ‘Miss Kamal B.A.’

After the end of his contract period with Filmistan in 1948, Kavi Pradeep became a freelancer. During this period, he decided to turn producer with a newly set up film production company, Lokmanya Productions along with Amiya Chakrabarty and produced the first (and the last) film, ‘Girls’ School’ (1949) which was directed by Amiya Chakrabarty. The film’s star cast included Geeta Bali and Sohan in lead role with Sajjan, Shashikala, Ram Singh, Mangala, Vimala Vashisht, Haroon, in subsidiary roles.

The film’s synopsis is as under:

Meena (Geeta Bali) leaves home when she is forced to accept an arranged marriage. She comes to a village and set up a girls’ school which is opposed by local landlord. Bipin (Sajjan), the landlord’s brother-in-law has an eye on Meena. The school is in need of a teacher. In response to an advertisement, Shanti Kumar Majumdar appears for an interview and gets selected as teacher in the girls’ school. The landlord’s widowed sister Sumitra Devi (Vimla Vashisht), a supporter of the school, objects because he is not married. Meena and Shanti Kumar fall in love but he realises the damage he may cause to her school and leaves. Bipin then spreads rumours about Shanti Kumar’s morals, which cause a further difficulty that has to be resolved before both the future of the school and of the loving couple may be assured. (Source: https://indiancine.ma/FLM).

The film failed miserably at the box office and Kavi Pradeep lost his good amount of money which probably made him realised to settle for only the song writing for the rest of his life. Amiya Chakravarty started his own banner ‘Mars & Movies’ and successfully produced and directed films like ‘Daag’ (1952), ‘Patita’ (1953) and ‘Seema’ (1955).

‘Girls’ School’ (1949) had 9 songs of which 7 songs have been covered in the Blog, details of which are given below:

Sr. No. Details of Songs Date of Posting
1. Tumhi kaho mera man kyun rahe udaas nahin 25/04/2011
2. Baar baar tum soch rahi ho…chaar din ki chaandni hai 09/07/2011
3. O shahar ke baanke baaboo…zara dil pe rakhiyo qaaboo 19/05/2015
4. Kuchh sharmaate huye aur kuchh saham saham 06/02/2016
5. Raam bharose meri gaadi 25/10/2016
6. Danke ki chot par kehta hoon main 11/12/2017
7. Phoolon ka sapna dekhne waalon 01/05/2021

Generally, Kavi Pradeep was known for his patriotic, inspirational and religious songs. In ‘Girls’ School’ (1949), he had written some light-hearted songs such as songs at Sr. Nos. 4 and 6 in the above table. I am presenting one more light-hearted song, ‘gori ek baat sun badi mazedaar hai’ from the film sung by Chitalkar (C Ramchandra) and Shamshad Begum. The song is set to music by C Ramchandra. I had uploaded the video of the song more than 4 years back with a view to posting the song on the Blog. It is only today, the song got a muharat to be presented under ‘Blogs 10-Year Challenge (2011-2021)’.

Enjoy this ‘nok jhok’ song.

Lyrics of the song were provided by Prakashchnadra.

Audio Clip:

Song-Gori ek baat sun badi mazedaar hai (Girls’ School)(1949) Singers-C Ramchandra, Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Kavi Pradeep, MD-C Ramchandra
Both

Lyrics(provided by Prakashchandra)

gori ek baat sun
badi mazedaar hai
kyaa
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai

piya tum kitne samajhdaar ho
ha ha
kaun kehta hai ki tum ganwaar ho
kyon gori kaisi kahi
badi mauke ki rahi
magar ye baat tumhaari nahin
magar ye baat tumhaari nahin
udhaar hai

haain
teri takraar mein bhi
uun hoon

teri akal se das guni hai gori
mujh mein akal
zara sheeshe mein dekho apni shakal
jyaada bak bak mat kar
jyaada bak bak mat kar
bas ho jaa chupchaap
baap re baap
ghadi ghadi mujhko sata mat
lagega paap
baap re baap
mere bhagwaan bata…aa
mere bhagwaan bata
ye kya chamtkaar hai
mera baalam hai
ya police ka zamadaar hai

teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai

aaj se sun papeeha
aaj se sun papeeha
teri meri kutti
apne naihar ko chali ja
hai tujhe chhutti
aisa mat bolo piya
dhak dhak hoye jiya
aisa mat bolo piya
dhak dhak hoye jiya

phir kaahe ko akadti
meri sarkaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai

teri meri preet gori
kabhi nahin chhoote
kabhi nahin chhoote
hato ji hato balam
hato ji hato balam
tum ho bade jhoothe

meri dugdugi baje dug dug
o mere saiyyaan jio jug jug
meri dugdugi baje dug dug
o mere saiyyaan jio jug jug
tera mera jhagda mita
ab to beda paar hai
tera mera jhagda mita
ab to beda paar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai
teri takraar mein bhi pyaar hai


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4732 Post No. : 16452

After leaving Prabhat Film Company in May 1942, V. Shantaram had announced his new film, ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) under his own banner, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. He was looking for a reputed writer who could write screen-play and dialogues for the film. Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’ magazine who had business relations with Prabhat Film Company (through its printing press) and with V Shantaram, suggested the name of Dewan Sharar, author, playwright, poet and journalist of the international repute. In those days, Dewan Sharar used to publish his short stories every month in ‘Filmindia’ magazine after returning to India sometime in 1941 from London where he had been staying for many years.

Around the same time, D R D Productions of D R D Wadia had announced its maiden film, ‘Ishaara’ (1943) based on the Dewan Sharar’s famous novel, ‘The Gong of Siva’ (1935). With this film as well as ‘Shakuntala’ (1943), Dewan Sharar had shifted from Delhi to Mumbai and had made Cricket Club of India (CCI) as his temporary abode to write screen-play and dialogues for both these films. Since V Shantaram, after leaving Prabhat Films, did not have his own office, it was at CCI where he and Dewan Sharar met frequently to finalise the screen-play and dialogues for ‘Shakuntala’ (1943).

‘Ishaara’ (1943) was released in June 1943 and after couple of months, ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was released. Both these films were box office success. Dewan Sharar had a long partnership with Rajkamal Kala Mandir as a story, screen-play, dialogue, song writer and sometime as an actor until ‘Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje’ (1955).

Shantaram was to direct ‘Omar Khayyam’ under the banner of Prabhat Films in 1941 and the screen-play of the film written by Baburao Patel was ready. However, at that time, Shantaram did not go ahead with the film as his relationship with other directors of Prabhat Films was strained. After leaving Prabhat Films and the successful run of his maiden film, ‘Shakuntala’ (1943), Shantaram toyed the idea of reviving ‘Omar Khayyam’. He entrusted Khwaja Ahmed Abbas to rewrite the screen-play of ‘Omar Khayyam’. However, due to the fear of copyright issue that may crop up with Prabhat Films, Shantaram once again abandoned the plan to direct ‘Omar Khayyam’. It is quite possible that during this period, Khwaja Ahmed Abbas might have brought to the notice of Shantaram his novella, ‘And One Did Not Come Back’ which was based on the life of Dr. Dwarkanath Kotnis who spent 4 years in China during 1938-42 on a medical mission.

The story of Dr, Dwarkanath Kotnis impressed Shantaram so much that he not only decided to make a film as a biopic but also decided to act in the title role of Dr. Kotnis. The film took nearly 2 years to complete at a total cost of Rs.20 lakhs. The delay was mainly due to reshooting of some sequences which Shantaram was not happy when viewing the film at the editing table. For the sake of authenticity, Dr. B K Basu, one of the doctors who accompanied Dr. Kotnis to China and a Chinese lady was part of the production team to supervise during the shooting of the film [Source; from the advertisement which appeared in ‘Film Pictorial’, April 1946].

‘Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani’ (1946) was made in Hindi and English with the title ‘The Eternal Tale of Dr. Kotnis’. The film had V Shantaram in the title role of Dr. Kotnis and Jayshree as Chinese nurse, Ching Lan. Other actors in the film were Keshavrao Date, Pratima Devi, Ulhas, Janaki Das, Dewan Sharar, Salvi, Hudlikar, Baburao Pendharkar, Master Vinayak etc. The screen-play was jointly written by Khwaja Ahmed Abbas and V P Sathe, the writer and publicist. Dialogues and songs were written by Dewan Sharar. The film was released on March 16, 1946 at Swastik Theatre, Mumbai.

I am not sure whether the English version of film was released. But there is a mention in one of the issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazine of 1946 that Shantaram along with Jayshree and Dewan Sharar sailed to London in July 1946 on their way to New York taking with them the English version of ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) and ‘Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani’ (1946) for release in the USA.

‘Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani’ (1946) had 7 songs – all written by Dewan Sharar which were set to music by Vasant Desai. Three songs have been covered on the Blog. I am presenting the 4th song, ‘chit doley nit doley subah shaam prabhu ji’ a lullaby from the film sung by Jayshree on whom the song is picturised along with V Shantaram. Dewan Sharar makes a brief presence in the song picturisation. The child in the cradle is Rajshree, the reel and the real daughter of V Shantaram and Jayshree.

Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Chit doley nit doley (Dr Kotnis Ki Amar Kahaani)(1946) Singer-Jayshree, Lyrics-Dewan Sharar, MD-Vasant Desai

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra):

chit doley
nit doley
chit doley
nit doley
subah shaam prabhu ji ee
chit doley
nit doley
chit doley
nit doley
subah shaam
ho shaam savera
subah shaam
ho shaam savera
mann preetam kaa ho dera
aa aa
mann preetam kaa ho dera
iss dere kar bhi le
iss dere kar bhi le
vishraam prabhu ji
chit doley
nit doley

neele parvat khet sunahre
neele parvat khet sunahre
neeli nadiyaan gahre gahre
neeli nadiyaan gahre gahre
chanda taare lete saare
chanda taare lete saare
ae ae
teraa naam prabhu ji ee
chit doley nit doley

pyaare nazaare
pyaare nazaare hain pyaare pyaare
pyaare nazaare
pyaare nazaare hain pyaare pyaare
aaankhon hi aankhon mein
ae ae ae ae
aankhon hi aankhon mein karte ishaare
nain tere
nain mere
nain tere
nain mere
ae ae ae
din rain prabhu ji
chit doley
nit doley
subah shaam prabhu ji
chit doley
nit doley


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4727 Post No. : 16442 Movie Count :

4463

Wadia Movietone has been one of the well-known Hindi film production companies which was set up by Wadia Brothers – J B H Wadia and Homi Wadia in the late 1920s. Wadia Brothers’ partnership continued till 1942 when the brothers decided to split with Homi Wadia forming Basant Pictures while J B H Wadia continue to produce films under his own name.

Recently, I came to know that there was one more Wadia in Hindi film industry as a producer under his banner D R D Productions. I was aware of this banner but was not aware that it belonged to D R D Wadia, fondly called as ‘Daddy Wadia’ in the film circle. He was Bar-at-Law, an industrialist, an amateur photographer and the radio enthusiastic of international repute. I have seen some of the photographs taken by him in the 1940s including a few with Mahatma Gandhi on the Google Photos.

D R D Wadia set up his film production company, D R D Productions in 1942 almost at the same time when V Shantaram was setting up his Rajkamal Kala Mandir. Another coincidence was that D R D Productions maiden film, ‘Ishaara’ (1943) and Rajkamal Kala Mandir’s maiden film, ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) had the same writer – Dewan Sharar. While ‘Ishaara; (1943) was adapted from Dewan Sharar’s internationally well-known novel ‘The Gong of Shiva’ (1935), the screen-play and dialogues for ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was written by Dewan Sharar.

After the box office success of ‘Ishaara’ (1943), D R D Productions produced ‘Aaina’ (1944), ‘Nek Parveen’ (1946) and ‘Pati Seva’ (1947) which seems to be the last film produced by the banner.

‘Nek Parveen’ (1946) was directed by S M Yusuf. The star cast included Ragini (Sr.) and Ulhas in the lead role with W MKhan, Yakub, Yashodhara Katju, Mirza Musharaf, Kumar, Nazir Kahsmiri, Shakir in the subsidiary roles. It was a Muslim social film, a love triangle. The story, screen-play, dialogues and songs were written by Waheed Qureshi.

Surprisingly, the film is available for viewing on one of the video sharing platforms on the internet. The lead actress, Ragini has been known for her tear-jerking performances just as Nimmi got branded as such in the 1950s. So, before watching the film ‘Nek Parveen’ (1946), I was sure that it would have a tear-jerking story. The film was released on June 14, 1946 in Mumbai’s Novelty theatre. The story of the film is as under:

Afzal (Ulhas), Shaukat (W M Khan) and his crony Nabbu (Yakub) are friends. They often meet to play cards and gamble in Shaukat’s gambling den. Both Afzal and Shaukat love Parveen (Ragini). Except for card gambling as his vice, Afzal is a good person while Shaukat has all the bad vices and is also the leader of the gang of gamblers and drunkards. The elders in Parveen’s family had already approved Afzal as a husband of Parveen.

Shaukat is not happy about Parveen getting married to Afzal. So, with the help of Nabbu, he devises a plan to make Afzal a vagabond person in the eyes of Parveen and her aunt. Both of them make him a habitual drunkard and a visitor to a courtesan. Afzal’s newly acquired vices are resented by Parveen’s aunt. After some initial hesitation, Parveen’s aunt, who has looked after her after the death of her father, agrees for the marriage of Parveen with Afzal. Their married life is smooth. But Shaukat is bent upon spoiling their married life.

With the help of Nabbu, Afzal is induced to gambling and drinking in Shaukat’s gambling den. In the process, Afzhal loses all his money. Even his palatial house is mortgage to Shaukat. In the gambling den, a heated argument between Shaukat and his friend, Munir results in the death of the latter. The murder is falsely pass on to Afzal who was found drunk near Munir’s dead body. When Afzal realises the seriousness of the situation, he runs away from the den before the police forces arrive. To wood wink the chasing police forces, Afzal boards a running train to Mumbai. In the train, he meets one businessman( Kumar) who offers him employment.

In the meanwhile, Parveen’s aunt dies leaving her alone with a kid to fend herself. The trusted servant, Thasin (Shakir) looks after Parveen and her child with his meagre savings. Afzal is untraceable to the police and after some time, he is presumed dead as a dead body was found under the same train in which he was travelling.

Shaukat is trying to win over Parveen and persuade he to marry him. But she is not interested in the marriage. Afzal with his new employer in Mumbai performs well and over a period of time, he becomes financially well off. Once he visits his house incognito and finds that Shaukat has kidnapped Parveen and the child. Afzal visits Shaukat’s den incognito where Shaukat is forcing Parveen to accept nikah with him. In this effort, Nabbu refuses to help Shaukat and in a fit of rage, Shaukat kills Nabbu. Some one from the den informs the police about the murder of Nabbu. Before, the police arrive, Shaukat is overpowered by Afzal and is handed over to the police. Afzal and Parveen are united.

‘Nek Parveen’ (1946) has 7 songs written by Waheed Qureshi which have been set to music by Feroz Nizami.

I am presenting the film’s first song ‘sun le meri iltija, sun le khuda meri dua’ to appear on the Blog which is sung by Zeenat Begum. The song is picturised on Ragini who has preferred Zeenat Begum’s voice in most of her films in which she had lead actress roles. Ulhas is also seen in the picturization of the song.

This is a ‘iltija’ (prayer) song which Ragini sings after her marriage with Ulhas for the well being of their married life. A feature of this song is that there is no interlude music. I like the song’s soft musical composition and Zeenat Begum’s rendition.

With this song, ‘Nek Parveen’ (1946) makes its debut on the Blog.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Sun le tu meri iltija (Nek Perveen)(1946) Singer-Zeenat Begam, Lyrics-Waheed Qureshi, MD-Feroz Nizami

Lyrics

sun le tu meri iltija
sun le khuda meri dua
sun le tu meri iltija
sun le khuda meri dua
lamba safar hai zindagi
ham do musaafir ajnabi
lamba safar hai zindagi
ham do musaafir ajnabi
bhool naa jaayen raasta
sun le khuda meri dua
sun le tu meri iltija
sun le khuda meri dua

ham ko tu kar de ek jaan
ghar ko bana de gulsitaan
ham ko tu kar de ek jaan
ghar ko bana de gulsitaan
tujhko nabi kaa waasta
tujhko nabi kaa waasta
sun le khuda meri dua
sun le tu meri iltija
sun le khuda meri dua

jhoole kushi ke jhoolen ham
paas naa aaye koi gham
jhoole khushi ke jhoolen ham
paas naa aaye koi gham
tu meharbaan rahe sada
sun le khuda meri dua
sun le tu meri iltija
sun le khuda meri dua


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4726 Post No. : 16441

Blog 10-Year Challenge (2011-2021) – Song No.28
——————————————————————-

After the successful release of Prabhat Film’s ‘Padosi’ (1941) on January 25. 1941, V Shantaram, the director, remained inactive for more than one year in Prabhat Films which was unusual for him. His next directorial venture was ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) under his own banner which was released sometime in the second half of 1943. Apparently, there was something unusual happening in Prabhat Films.

To know what was going on in Prabhat Films in general and with V Shantaram in particular, I browsed through the available issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazine of the yeas 1941 and 1942 wherever there were references to Prabhat Films and V Shantaram. What I gathered from the various columns of the magazine is summarized below which explanins as to why V Shantaram got sidelined in Prabhat Films:

(1) The grapevine was that all was not well among the 5 partners of Prabhat Film Company after the release of ‘Padosi’ (1941). It was speculated that some of the partners were not on the speaking terms and they rarely met to discuss the future plans. This discontentment was evident from the fact that in January 1941, there was an announcement that V Shantaram will direct Prabhat’s next film, ‘Omar Khayyam’ with Jayshree in the lead role. The screen-play and dialogue writing were completed and film was to go on shooting floor in April 1941. But no progress was made beyond screen-play and dialogue writing. Eventually, the film was shleved.

(2) Sometime in the middle of the year 1941, Prabhat Film Company had spared the services of V Shantaram to Government of India as the Chief Producer for its Film Advisory Board (later called as Film Division) at a remuneration of Rs.2500/- per month. He was the first Indian to head the Film Advisory Board of the Government of India. Although he was allowed to work for Prabhat Films whenever his services were required, Prabhat Films did not give him any assignment.

(3) Around the same time, V Shantaram married Jayshree Kamulkar who was the lead actress in Prabhat Film’s Marathi version of ‘Padosi’ (1941), titled as ‘Shejari’. Earlier, one of the partners of Prabhat Films, Keshavrao Dhaiber had married actress Nalini Tarkhud who was the heroine in Prabhat’s ‘Rajput Ramani’ (1936). For this, he was made to exit from the partnership of Prabhat Films. Since then, there was a rule in Prabhat Films that any partner marrying the actress in the payroll of the Company would have to leave the partnership. This rule would also apply to V Shantaram.

Since V Shantaram did not immediately exit from the partnership of Prabhat Films after the marriage, it is quite possible that sparing his services to the Film Advisory Board was a way out to keep V Shantaram out of Prabhat Films. This arrangement may have also suited V Shantaram as he got the time to plan for his future film ventures before he finally exited from his partnership in Prabhat Films.

V Shantaram exited from the partnership of Prabhat Films in May 1942. He continued with his new assignments with Film Advisory Board until September 1942 when he resigned his post as the Chief Producer. By this time, he had set up Silver Screen Exchange, his film distribution company for Western India and was in advance stage of setting up of his film production company. He had already announced ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) as the first film under his newly set up banner, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. He had almost finalised buying National Studio for Rs.7 lakhs and he had already made the announcement to this effect.

But unlike doing business in Kolhapur and Pune, Mumbai was highly competitive. When the news of his buying National Studio became known in the film industry, Keki Mody, the Chief of Western India Theatres put his bid for National Studio at much higher price and snatched away the deal from V Shantaram. It was a setback for V Shantaram as he had planned to start the shooting of ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) soon after the acquisition of the National Studio.

The necessity of buying a studio become a prestige issue for V Shantaram more than for the immediate requirement for the commencement of shooting for his first film. So, he immediately bought Wadia Movietone’s studio for Rs.2 lakhs – much lower price than his bid for National Studio. But it had a hidden cost – the cost of renovation and the resultant delay of about 3 months to commence the shooting of ‘Shakuntala’ (1943).

The shooting of ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) started in January 1943 and got completed in July 1943. Therafter the film was released. It ran for 104 weeks in a single theatre in Mumbai. Thus the two years of inactivity of V Shantaram in commercial cinema was rewarded with a grand success of ‘Shakuntala’ (1943).

10 years ago on this date (26 June 2011), one song from the film ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was posted on the Blog. So far, 10 songs (out of 13) from the film have been posted on the Blog, details of which are as under

Sr. No. Song Posting Date
01 Jeewan ki naao na doley 09/06/2011
02 Kamal hai mere saamne 25/06/2011
03 Pyaari pyaari ye sukhad maatribhoomi apni 26/06/2011
04 Jhooloongi jhooloongi 30/06/2011
05 Tumhe prasann yoon dekh ke 04/05/2014
06 Chaand sa nanha aaya 06/05/2014
07 Na jaane kahaan ka ye jaadoo kiya hai 24/07/2017
08 Chali apne ghar ko Shakuntala 18/08/2018
09 Mere baba ne baat meri maan li 04/08/2019
10 Ek prem ki pyaasi bani banwaasi 25/06/2021

I am presenting the 11th song, ‘meri biraha ki rain thhi ek to badi’ from the film ‘Shakuntala’ (1943). The song is rendered by Amirbai Karnataki. There were two lyricists – Diwan Sharar and Ratan Piya for the film. However, for the song under discussion, individual accreditation is not available.

The song is picturised on a dancer whom I am not able to identify. The situation of the song is that as soon as King Dushyant gets to see the ring which he had presented to Shakuntala after his marriage with her, his memories of the time he spent with Shakuntala is restored. He becomes restless and is eager to see Shakuntala. This song is the reflections of what is going in the mind of King Dushyant.

Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.

Audio Clip:

Video


Song-Mere birha ki rain thhi ik to badi (Shakuntala)(1943) Singer-Amirbai Karnataki, MD-Vasant Desai

Lyrics (provided by Prakashchandra)

mere birha ki rain thhi ik to badi
dooje badhti ee gayi
aur badhti gayi
mere birha ki rain thhi ik to badi
uthhi rang(?) ki siyaahi se kaali ghataa
kaali raat ke chadhti ee
chadhti ee gayi
mere birhaa ki rain thhi ik to badi

hai biyog ki lambi kahaani meri
kabhi ant main uska likh naa saki ee
kabhi likhti rahi
kabhi padhti gayi ee
phir likh likh
likh kar
padhti gayi
mere birha ki rain thhi ik to badi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4725 Post No. : 16438

———————————————————–
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2011-2021) – Song No.27
———————————————————–

The story of Shakuntala which is based on a classic Sanskrit play ‘Abjijanashakuntalam’ written by Kalidas has been one of the favourites of film makers. Two silent films with the title ‘Shakuntala’ were made in 1920 – one directed by Suchet Singh and the other by Shrinath Patankar. In 1929, Fatma Begum also directed a silent film with the same title. With the advent of sound film in 1931, two films were released with the same title in 1931 – one directed by Mohan Bhavnani and the other by J J Madan. Sarvottam Badami of Sagar Movietone directed ‘Shakuntala’ (1932) in Telugu. Jyotish Banerjee directed ‘Shakuntala’ (1941) in Bengali.

When V Shantaram set up his own Rajkamal Kala Mandir in 1942, he produced and directed ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) as his first film under his banner. He remade the film in 1961 with the title ‘Stree’. Bhupen Hazarika made the film in Assamese in 1961 and Kunchako directed the film in 1965 in Malayalam. The list is not exhaustive but the number of films made so far shows the popularity of the story of Shakuntala.

Since Prabaht Films did not make film on ‘Shakuntala, probably, V Shantaram thought of making Shakuntala as his first film after leaving Prabhat Films in May 1942, V Shantaram set up his own film production company, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. In October 1942, he acquired Wadia Movietone’s studio and renovated the same which took about 3 months. Simultaneously, he was also busy with the preparatory work for his maiden film, ‘Shakuntala’ (1943). When the studio was ready after renovation, he signed Chandramohan for the role of Dushyant opposite Jayshree in the role of Shakuntala. The shooting of Shakuntala started in January 1943 and it took about six months to complete the shooting. The film was released tereafter.

‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was a big box office hit which laid a strong foundation for Rajkamal Kala Mandir. In Mumbai, the film ran for 104 weeks in Swastik theatre. In 1947, the film was released in the USA with English sub-titles. The New York Times carried the review of the film in its issue dated December 26, 1947. Among other things, the review has said:

Shakuntala has charm entirely of its own. The story – call it a fairy tale or just plain Hollywood – is strictly boy-meet-girl, forest version with inevitable reunion. The lovely background, the unabashed naivete of acting of the entire cast, the crudely rich musical score and above all the expertly flavoursome English subtitles all blend together to make Shakuntala a sturdy screen promises from our Indian friends.

Almost all the songs of the film became very popular. I recall that my mother used to often sing at least 3 songs from the film, one of which I am presenting with this article. She was singing despite the fact that she did not speak and understand Hindi at that time (in the late 1940s) in my native place. Of course, I heard her singing in my childhood only when we shifted to Mumbai in early 1950s and realised after about six decades that the songs she was singing were from ‘Shakuntala’ (1943).

‘Shakuntala’(1943) was the beginning of a long association of V Shantaram with Vasant Desai as a music director which continued till ‘Mausi’ (1958). It is said that during the making of ‘Navrang’ (1959), their relations sour leading to the separation. But his respect to his mentor, V Shantaram was so great that he did not reveal the reasons of his separation even to his family members. Later, he was recalled by V Shantaram to provide background music for ‘Geet Gaya Patharon Ne’ (1964) and as a music director for ‘Ladki Sahyadri Ki’ (1966).

10 years back, one song from the film ‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was posted on the Blog. So far, 9 songs (out of 13) from the film have been posted on the Blog, details of which are as under:

Sr. No. Song Posting Date
01 Jeewan ki naao na doley 09/06/2011
02 Kamal hai mere saamne 25/06/2011
03 Pyaari pyaari ye sukhad maatribhoomi apni 26/06/2011
04 Jhooloongi jhooloongi 30/06/2011
05 Tumhe prasann yoon dekh ke 04/05/2014
06 Chaand sa nanha aaya 06/05/2014
07 Na jaane kahaan ka ye jaadoo kiya hai 24/07/2017
08 Chali apne ghar ko Shakuntala 18/08/2018
09 Mere baba ne baat meri maan li 04/08/2019

I am presenting the 10th song, ‘ek prem ki pyaasi bani banwaasi’ from the film, sung by Amirbai Karnataki. The song is written by Ratan Piya which is set to music by Vasant Desai.

The song is picturised on Zohrabai (not to be confused with Zohrabai Ambalewaali), in the role of Menaka to seduce sage Vishwamitra to break his meditation. The song can be regarded as one of the earliest attempts of ‘honey trap’ which Lord Indra laid, fearing that with his deep ascetic practice and meditation, sage Vishwamitra would acquire enormous power to challenge the gods.

Audio

Video


Song-Ek prem ki pyaasi bani banwaasi (Shakuntala)(1943) Singer-Amirbai Karnataki, Lyrics-Ratan Piya, MD-Vasant Desai

Lyrics

aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aaa
ek prem ki pyaasi
ek prem ki pyaasi
bani banwaasi
ban mein tumhaare aayi
ban mein tumhaare aayi
nain khol dekh o bairaagi
nain khol dekh o bairaagi
bairaagan kya laayi
bairaagan kya laayi
aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa

main roopmayi
tum gyaanjayee
main vilaasi tum banwaasi ee
prem bina sab gyaan adhoora
prem bina sab gyaan adhoora aa
mat bhoolo sanyaasi
mat bhoolo sanyaasi
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa
ek prem ki pyaasi bani banwaasi
ban mein tumhaare aayi
nain khol dekh o bairaagi
bairaagan kya laayi
bairaagan kya laayi
aa aa aaaaaa


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16492

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1280
Total Number of movies covered =4475

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