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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Majrooh Sultanpuri


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The first time I saw this film, it was on Doordarshan, and the only song that I could appreciate (given my age) was “Bibi Mendaki Ri Tu To Paani Mein Ki Raani”. Rest of the film, its emotional and familial nuances were all lost on me. Those were the days, when watching television was a privilege bestowed upon oneself by a friendly neighbor. One would go to watch television at a neighbor’s home, or hang on to the windows, if entry was not permitted. And so, the opportunity that one gets to watch a movie was in itself a treat, and an accomplishment. And one always wanted to make the most of such opportunities. Getting bored was not only not an option, but it was a thought furthest from the mind. I have this placement in front of a TV screen, and I will watch it for as long as I am allowed, whatever may be the content. The serious stuff was mostly OHT (Overhead Transmission), and the mind would remember and register the fun parts like Balraj Sahni having poori and lassi at a halwai shop in the morning before reaching his office, or singing this above mentioned song with his children on the Sunday when he is at home. But as far as watching time is concerned, it was to be religiously spent, to watch the entire film, whether I could make out more of it or not.

In later years, small memories of the films, snatches of screen shots, would replay randomly in the mind – Jayant taking Rashid Khan to task very onerously, or Balraj Sahni with a bundle of mail in his hand, standing in front of the sorting dockets, trying to quickly put the mail items into the correct dockets, Balraj Sahni admiring a new coat hanging in the display window of a tailor’s shop. Mind you, the names of the characters and the words to describe the scene are all being currently generated. In the mind’s eye, it is just the images themselves that are very familiar, without any labels, without any words.

Many years on, just on a memory recall, I started to search for this film. For quite a long time this film was not available. A friend once got a version of it, but that was just about an hour long. So one can imagine what would have remained after such merciless cutting. That version seemed to have gone around, and a rumor followed it – the songs of this film are lost forever. Then, when the Geet Kosh volume three was released, it also carried a footnote to this film which says that except for one song, all songs were deleted from this film, and the film was truncated to half its length, and renamed as ‘The Clerk & The Coat’. This further strengthened the fears of the lost songs and lost film.  However, in all probability, this was just a version created from the original, for consumption in the foreign markets, or for participation in foreign film festivals. Thankfully, none of these prophecies proved to be true eventually. Once the VCD binge started, and more and more films started landing in the market, the original of this film also finally appeared in a near complete state. And then, I got to see it once again.

‘Garam Coat’ is a very poignant film. It deals with the everyday problems in the lives of lower middle income strata of society in a newly independent and developing India. Balraj Sahni is a lowly paid postal clerk, with a monthly salary of one hundred rupees, and a family of five. In the hands of Rajendra Singh Bedi and performance lead Balraj Sahni, both stalwarts of the IPTA movement, the film has descended to the practical levels of realism, and to pragmatic heights of credibility. The home of this clerk is a bare bones home. The kitchen is frugally stocked. The children are not well dressed. The housewife is very simply presented. The protagonist himself wears an old and ragged coat throughout the entire film. The name of the banner is Cine Co-operative Ltd, Bombay. In all probability, this was yet another joint effort of social conscience of IPTA.

The clerk fancies a new coat. On his way to work, he always pauses outside a tailor’s shop, admiring a new coat on display. The owner of the shop, sees him daily, and one day invites him into the shop, enquiring whether he plans to buys some new clothes. Unable to defend himself, and knowing that he is unable to afford the price of a new coat, he sheepishly tells about the qualities and the warmth of the coat that he is wearing, and that, no, he does not plan to buy a new one.

Come pay day, and the clerk returns home, happy with the load of a solitary one hundred rupee note in his pocket. Life is spring, and all is happiness in the household. Next morning, it is going to be a shopping spree for the month, and all expectations are high. The morning begins with the fun song “Bibi Mendaki Ri. . .”, and off goes the clerk to the market, with a list of shopping and hundred rupees in his pocket.

His first stop is a toy shop. He browses, he selects something for his children, almost pays for the items pulling out the hundred rupee note; but then thinks better of it, and saying he will return shortly, stuffs the note back into his coat pocket. His next stop is a halwaai shop where he has poori and lassi. He is in high moods, joking with the shopkeeper and other customers. As gets up to leave and pushes his hands in his coat pocket to pay for the breakfast – all the agonies of hell descend upon him. The note is missing. An impressive portrayal of a person who has lost everything in life – Balraj Sahni is insulted and kicked out of the halwaai shop. He runs back to the toy shop, tries to convince the shopkeeper that he might have dropped his money at his shop. Once again, he is insulted and made to leave the premises. Now, he simply has no place to go.

The remaining part of the movie is about his trials and tribulations on trying to survive without his salary through at least one more month till the next pay day. The movie is full of scenarios of what such a person will do – he tries to borrow, he tries to get advance, he tries to take up a part time job as a tutor, he goes without lunch, he contemplates suicide, even tries it. But the agonies simply do not cease. How he shares this calamity with his wife, and how does his wife respond, are all classic scenes to be visited again. The wife goes to the pansaari (grocery shop owner) and tried to get groceries on account, she and children start to make paper bags out of newspapers in an effort to raise some money. There are friends at office like Jayant who try their best to help him within his limited means. And there are unfriendly colleagues like Rashid Khan, who are completely unmoved by the troubles of their co-worker. There are scenes and performances that move me to tears as I watch the helplessness of an honest good man, trying to keep his wits together and to keep his family alive. The saving grace of the film is that the lost money is located at the end. And it is a very interesting way that it turns up.

In this sad and poignant film, this song is probably the saddest and the most pain filled song. Having come to know of the calamity that has befallen her husband, and the manner in which he is trying to fight these problems, there comes a point when the wife’s hopes probably break and she calls for help. The entire scenario and the get up of the film is so deeply entrenched into the simple values of our social system. She has no help at hand, she has no one with whom she can share her pain. For a woman in our culture, her last hope is her maternal family. But she is too afraid to inform them or talk to them. So she tells the bird to take her message to her parents and family, and let them know that she just a cheerless bundle of tears these days.

Then after telling this to the crows, she starts to make amendments to her request. First, she prohibits the crow from telling her mother, she will break down and cry. Then, thinking some more she prohibits the crow from telling her father also, he will cry into the cloth of his pugree (head dress) and not know what to do. She tells the crow to tell everyone, but not these two.

Then in the next stanza she makes some more amendments. She tells the crow not to tell her sister either, for she may give up her own food. Then she says, do not even tell my bhaabhi (sister-in-law, brother’s wife), for the fear that she might spread this in her own maternal family and make fun of it. She tells the crow to tell everyone, but not these two.

The embattled lady then ends the verses with telling the crow, to go an tell this tale of woes to her brother only. He will surely come to her aid, riding the blue steed.

The agony and the poignancy contained in these verses is so emphatic. She wants this message to be told to everyone in her family, and then slowly, one by one she decides not to tell this or that person, and finally, in conclusion she is ready to tell it to her brother only. The words, the composition and the rendition, brings tears to my eyes, as many times as I have heard this play. And it also underscores the vitality of the brother-sister relationship in our culture. When all seems to be lost and the lady is totally helpless, it is her brother that she thinks of, to go and share. (You may have noticed, I have tagged this song as a ‘brother-sister song’).

This low key, less heard of film, is one of my favorites – in and about the art of telling a poignant story through cinema. Although Lata ji has herself selected “Jogiya Se Preet Kiye Dukh Hoye” from this film, as one of her most favorite songs, in my humble opinion, I would rate this song even higher than “Jogiya Se . . .”.

Wonderful memories of an era of very simple living, of traditions and culture, of values – a touch of India that is very dear to me.

Song – Kahiyo Roye Dukhia Re, Ja Re Panchhi Tu Ja Re (Garam Coat) (1955) Singer – Lata MangeshkarLyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD – Pt Amarnath

Lyrics

kahiyo roye dukhia re
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re

ek na kahiyo maa raani ko
royegi wo meri gudiyon ko dekh ke
ek na kahiyo maa raani ko
royegi wo meri gudiyon ko dekh ke
ek na kahiyo babul ji se
ek na kahiyo babul ji se
royenge pagdi ko munh se lapet ke
aur sab se kahiyo tu pyaare
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re

ek na kahiyo behna meri se
haathon ki roti gira degi ro ke
haathon ki roti gira degi ro ke
ek na kahiyo bhabhi meri se
maike mein jaa ke hansegi wo munh pe
maike mein jaa ke hansegi wo munh pe
aur sab se kahiyo tu pyaare

kahiyo re dukh mera bhaiyya se jaa ke
kahiyo re dukh mera bhaiyya se jaa ke
aayega wo neela ghoda uda ke
utrega mere duaare
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे

एक ना कहियो माँ रानी से
रोएगी वो मेरी गुड़ियों को देख के
एक ना कहियो माँ रानी से
रोएगी वो मेरी गुड़ियों को देख के
एक ना कहियो बाबुल जी से
एक ना कहियो बाबुल जी से
रोएँगे पगड़ी मुंह से लपेट के
और सब से कहियो तू प्यारे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे

एक ना कहियो बहना मेरी से
हाथों की रोटी गिरा देगी रो के
हाथों की रोटी गिरा देगी रो के
एक ना कहियो भाभी मेरी से
मायके में जाके हंसेगी वो मुंह पे
मायके में जाके हंसेगी वो मुंह पे
और सब से कहियो तू प्यारे

कहियो रे दुख मेरा भैया से जाके
कहियो रे दुख मेरा भैया से जाके
आएगा वो नीला घोडा उड़ा के
उतरेगा मेरे द्वारे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे

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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (5 may 2017) is the 11th death anniversary of Naushad saab. He passed away on the 5th of May 2006.

This is the 9th opportunity for this blog to pay a tribute to Naushad saab on his death anniversary. And yet, though I’ve written tributes for many here, I don’t remember writing one for Naushad saab yet. So here goes.

Naushad saab is not just an absolute legend in the world of HFM, he is somebody whose music I have extremely high regard for.

There are some composers for whom Shakespeare’s words from Julius Caesar “He doth bestride us like a colossus…” would not be inappropriate at all. Naushad saab very comfortably fits in – such was his stature, and such is his contribution, to HFM.

I will not discuss his life or career in great detail here – this is available from other sources. Besides, there are people far more competent than me to discuss this luminary’s life and career. I will, as I usually do, give my own personal take on Naushad saab.

I was a young boy when I first heard of Naushad saab. I used to listen to AIR a lot – and his songs would play very often. Not surprisingly, considering how popular his songs were in their time. And are, to this day.

That was how I first heard of the combination Shakeel Badayuni – Naushad. The announcer would invariably say “geetkaar Shakeel Badayuni” and more often than not, it would be followed by “sangeetkaar – Naushad”.

In those days, mid-70s, I had a totally wrong impression of Naushad saab’s age.

Roughly in my head, I had the following generations:
i) My generation (current) : Rajesh Khanna & co
ii) Previous generation (Gen -1) : Shammi Kapoor, Joy Mukherjee & co
iii) Still earlier generation (Gen -2) : Raj Kapoor, Dilip Kumar
iv) Still earlier generation (Gen -3) : Naushad, KL Saigal, Pankaj Mallick, Anil Biswas etc

Before that, no generation existed in my mind.

Most of us lived in the current generation or in previous generations upto Gen-2. If anyone in my friends’ circle knew any song of Gen-3, he would be looked at with awe. 🙂

Mind you, this was, say 1975 – and “jab dil hi toot gaya” from Shahjehan (1946) was hardly 30 years earlier.
Yet, in our schoolboy minds, that was ancient!

Today, that would be the equivalent of considering “chandni, meri chandi” as ancient. 🙂
See how things are relative!

Anyway, back to Naushad saab. I think his tagging as Gen-3 came from listening to songs like “Awaaz de kahaan hai” in the voices of Noor Jehan and Surendra. Or “akhiyan milaake” by Zohrabai Ambalewaali. These type of songs would play fairly regularly – and somehow got me to get a wrong impression of Naushad saab’s age.

In fact, to be honest, I thought he was long dead. I did not remember him composing – though he might have composed for the odd film that I was not aware of. Unlike an SD Burman who I remember was active (as much as he could be) till he passed away in 1975. So for us at the time, SD Burman was “current”, Naushad was “ancient”. Now when I check, I find that SD Burman was born in 1906, Naushad in Dec 1919. So, a full thirteen years later. 🙂

What misconceptions the mind comes up with!

It was only when I happened to come across a Naushad interview (sometime probably in the late 70s/early 80s), that I even knew that he was alive. I know it sounds naïve – but those were days when I had very limited awareness of such matters. I didn’t grow up with a lot of aware people around me – almost all my knowledge came from watching movies, listening to songs and the odd article. Naushad saab wasn’t very much in the public eye in the 70s. I think it was deliberate – he had sort of mentally retired too by the end of the 60s.

And yet, his songs would play every single day. With the treasure-house that he composed, that’s only to be expected. Songs from Andaaz, Baiju Bawra, Mughal-e-Azam and Ganga Jamuna were hot favourites on AIR, but also songs from Babul, Amar and the 1960s films like Leader, Saathi and Aadmi. So he was a fixture on AIR.

I always loved his music. I couldn’t then place what exactly made me love it – later I realized it must have been the classical tunes he composed that were so soothing and pleasant to the ear. Not one false tuning, not one jarring note. And mind you, this was all in the time when composers didn’t have all the paraphernalia to correct their work. They had a few instruments – and they usually had to get it right first time, or within very few attempts. Just this itself makes me respect composers of that time so much more.

With this limited support, they delivered such fabulous music. And Naushad saad was at the forefront of it.

I do not know of any Naushad saab song that I find jarring. Or that I do not like. The classical ones (like “aaj gaawat man”) are obviously in a league of their own but even the less classical or non-classical ones are pleasant to listen to. Such was Naushad saab’s sense of music.

Today, when I think of his songs, I feel an enormous sense of gratitude towards him. The songs keep playing in my head – my childhood favourites from Andaaz (oh, how I love ALL the songs of this film!), then the two biggies from Anmol Ghadi (“awaaz de” and “jawaan hai mohabbat”), the songs of Baiju Bawra, Ganga Jamuna, Uran Khatola (“o door ke musafir”)….what can I say!

There was this “natural” sense in Naushad saab’s music which fitted perfectly with the occasion for every song he composed. When Dilip Kumar danced to Rafisaab’s rendition of “nain lad jayee hai”, the song looks just so perfect – but there’s Naushad saab (and of course Shakeel too) very much behind this gem. In fact, all songs of Ganga Jamuna are gems – hard to pick one. How can you ignore songs like “dhoondho dhoondho re saajna” or “do hanson ka joda”?

Many of the films for which Naushad saab composed music went on to become Silver Jubilee hits. How much of this is attributable to his music, cannot be gauged but I won’t be surprised if the music played a big part in the success of these films. For example, Baiju Bawra, without its songs, is hard to imagine.

So thank you, Naushad saab, for leaving us with this invaluable treasure for eternity.

Today’s song is from, what I’d like to call, post-retirement Naushad saab. By the end of the 1960s, Naushad saab felt that the changing scene of HFM was not to his liking. Music was becoming loud and too westernized for his taste. Many of his contemporaries were also struggling to deal with this change. So Naushad saab quietly withdrew from the scene. He might have composed for just the odd film (maybe finishing his assignments) but otherwise, he had “retired”.

The 1970s were therefore left to, and dominated by, the likes of RD Burman, L-P and Kalyanji Anandji.

And then, Naushad saab made a comeback in the early 80s with a film called Dharam Kaanta. I remember this was much talked about mainly (possibly only) because of Naushad saab’s comeback.

The film was a multi-starrer – but didn’t quite click. Naushad saab’s music also didn’t quite make the impact it was expected to make – although the song “ye gotedaar lehenga” was quite popular.

All in all, it was probably just a confirmation to Naushad saab that the times had truly changed. That was the disco era – Naushad saab would have felt very out of place. But like Tennyson said “the old order changeth, yielding place to new”. That was the last I remember of Naushad saab’s music, though his bio suggests he did compose a bit more.

The song is picturised on Jeetendra and Rajesh Khanna. The voices are of Rafisaab and Bhupendra. It is quite odd to watch Bhupendra sing for Rajesh – this is the first time I’m seeing this. It left me wondering why Kishore didn’t do the job – but maybe Naushad saab wanted to have Bhupendra there, instead of Kishore. Any story here about Naushad saab & Kishore?

The lyrics for this song were sent to me by Peevisie’s Mom. She has done the write-up for the one other song from this film posted on this blog already – “ye gotedaar lehenga”.

One memory of this film.

I saw this in Kolkata in a film hall in 1982. I happened to be in town with some friends, we went for this late-night (9-12) show. I don’t remember the film too well but when I returned to my hotel room, I discovered the backpocket of my trousers had been slit – I had been pickpocketed. I must have had about Rs 150 or so in it, so not a huge sum – though in those days, this was a respectable sum.

But what made me feel worse was that the trousers were brand new – they were very expensive Vimal suiting material and I was wearing it for the first time. I got it stitched again but it didn’t look good – and I never wore those trousers again.

That was also the last time I kept any money in my backpocket. Lesson learnt.

So that is my memory of Dharam Kaanta (1982).

I’ll leave you with the song – I hope you enjoy it. It is in the cadre of “ye dosti, hum nahin chhodenge”. I will leave it to you to judge whether the music is reminiscent of Naushad’s earlier tunes. I could feel it here and there, though I think Naushad saab tried to make it a bit modern too.

The video doesn’t cover the complete song, so an audio is also provided here (courtesy Peevesie’s Mom).

Video (Partial)

Audio (with complete song) :

Song-Duniya chhoote yaar na chhoote (Dharam Kaanta) (1982) Singers-Mohammad Rafi, Bhupendra, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-Naushad
Both
Rafi + Bhupinder + Chorus

Lyrics(Provided by Peevesie’s mom)

Aa ha aa
(whistling)
La la la la la la
(whisting)
La la la la la la la
(whistling)

duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote
jaan se badh kar yaari hai ae
dil ke dharam kaante par dekha
dil ke dharam kaante par dekha
pyaar ka palda bhaari hai ae

duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote

kismat se tera saath mila
baat hui na haath mila
aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa
kismat se tera saath mila
baat hui na haath mila
dukh jitne thhe jhel chuke
khel hum apne khel chuke
aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaaa aaa aaa aaa
dukh jitne thhe jhel chuke
khel hum apne khel chuke
aaj milan ki baari hai ae
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote
jaan se badhkar yaari hai
dil ke dharam kaante par dekha
pyaar ka palda bhaari hai ae
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote

yaari hai dildaaron ki
jodi hai talwaaron ki
yaari hai dildaaron ki
jodi hai talwaaron ki
pyaar mile to pyaar kare
waqt pade to waar kare
pyaar mile to pyaar kare
waqt pade to waar kare
ye talwaar do-dhaari hai ae
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote

aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa

pyaare agar mujhmein hai dam
tu bhi nahin hai mujhse kam
aaa aaa aaaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa
pyaare agar mujhmein hai dam
tu bhi nahin hai mujhse kam
main sooraj hoon
dhoop hai tu
mera hi ik roop hai tu
aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa
main sooraj hoon
dhoop hai tu
mera hi ik roop hai tu
baat ye kitni pyaari hai
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote
jaan se badhkar yaari hai
dil ke dharam kaante par dekha
pyaar ka palda bhaari hai ae
duniya chhoote
yaar na chhoote

Aa haa aa
(whistling)
La lala laa lalal
(whisting)
La la la la la la la
(whistling)


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

A few days back, Sudhir Jee was acting strange and was insisting on posting all the articles in the blog, including even my writeps, and in addition, he was asking me to go slow on my writeups. As a result, I found myself with so much time at my disposal that I finally managed to write a long article describing my meeting with Lucknow based regulars. I did not intend to send any song lyrics with the writeup, thinking that Sudhir Ji would take care of that too. But no, Sudhir ji wanted me to send a song link with the writeup as well.

Finding an appropriate song turned out to be a big hassle for me. Most appropriate get together songs were already covered. A few songs with words like “tumse milna” etc were there but I found them inappropriate for the writeup.

Unable to find any “suitable” song, I seriously considered sending this lyrics of the “Kaala Sona”(1975) song and I even noted down its lyrics. But I kept thinking again and again that a cabaret song involving Helen (and also Parveen Babi) cannot be an appropriate song to discuss the mini gangout with our dignified Lucknow based regulars. 🙂

“Better” sense prevailed and I finally sent lyrics of a song whose video was not available and which was more of a ghazal like song than a cabarat like song, and thus sounded somewhat more appropriately Lucknowi to me. 🙂

It turns out that the lyrics of this “Kaala Sona”(1975) song was sent earlier by Peevesie’s mom, and she too had sent this song to celebrate an earlier gangout, namely the Mumbai gangout of november 2016. Yes, one must say that a song like this is more appropriate for Mumbai gangout. I can imagine this song serving as a perfect setting while our Mumbai gangout members go about their underground activities. 🙂

That gangout happened many months ago. At this moment another mini gangout took place just yesterday (29 april 2017), with representatives of Delhi Daredevils (Sudhir Ji and Jawed Hamid ji) and Mumbai Indians (Mr Arunkumar Deshmukh ji, the host, and Mr Sadanand Kamath) in attendance. 🙂

The reports of the meeting is not yet in. We only know about what was on the menu in the lunch. 🙂

Come to think of it, this “Kala Sona”(1975) song is just a perfect song on the occasion of a Mumbai gangout. Here is the take of Peevesie’s mom on a typical Mumbai gangout vis a vis this song:

People with similar tastes and likes gang up together. And when a gang meets there should be music appropriate for the event. I don’t know if there were any Helens, Cuckoos, Silk Smithas or Disco Shantis discussed. But the song with this post should have been there when a gang meets. It is the typical villain’s den song that a standard Hindi movie will feed us with. No! No! I am not in my wildest imagination calling any of those at the gangout a villain. 🙂

The song is from the 1975 Ravikant Nagaich directed “Kala Sona”. It had Feroz Khan, Danny, Imtiaz Khan, Prem Chopra, Helen, Parveen Babi, Master Raju, Durga Khote, Bipin Gupta, Keshto Mukherjee and Farida Jalal. Majrooh Sultanpuri was the lyricist and R.D.Burman was the music director. This song has the cross fading effect which RDB seemed so fond of. He has used only the voice of Asha Bhonsle for all the female actors in the movie. I would like to know how to write out lyrics of songs with this kind of fading effect. This dance number is essentially a Helen dance where Parveen Babi is playing the supportive dancer. The two of them are trying to get Prem Chopra, Imtiaz and gang distracted so that the movie can move towards an action- packed climax. Danny is also there to help them in their task as Feroz Khan is sitting next to Chopra so he can’t do anything personally.

In a recent writeup, I had mentioned about Asha Bhonsle giving playback to two dancers (in series) and I had mentioned that she had even given playbacks to two dancers in parallel. It is this song that I was talking about as the example of Asha Bhonsle singing in parallel (viz simultaneously) for two dancers.

This song was a very popular song of its time. This song was threatening to become the song with my Lucknow mini gangout writeup. Now, here is this song now, to mark the occasion of yet another Mumbai gangout taking place. The report of this meet will hopefully come out soon. For the time being, here is this lively song from “Kaala Sona”(1975).

This song has Helen and Parveen Babi dancing in it. And this song will go down in history as the only song where Keshto Mukherji too dances ! You do not believe me ? Then watch the picturisation carefully from 4:08 to 4:12. 🙂

With this song, “Kaala Sona”(1975) joins the list of movies that have all their songs covered in the blog.


Song-Koi aaya aane bhi de (Kaala Sona)(1975) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics

laalaalaa
laalaalaa
laalaalaalaalaalaalaalaalaalaa

huff huff huff huff
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho
huff aho

koi aaya aa
aane bhi de ae
koi gaya aa
jaane bhi de ae
koi aaya aa
koi aaya
aane bhi de
koi gaya aa
koi gaya
jaane bhi de
lalala
tujhko aata hai masti mein jeena
jee le
he ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
aane bhi de
koi gaya
koi gaya
jaane bhi de
lalala
tujhko ata hai masti mein jeena
jee le ae ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
aane bhi de

tu to hai deewaana
bahke ja mahke ja
khushi ke nashe mein
aise hi maze mein
aaha aa
tu to hai diwaana
bahke ja mahke ja
khushi ke nashe mein
aise hi maze mein
aaha
mahfil mein
rang bharta ja
subah talak
rangeele ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
aane bhi de ae
koi gaya
koi gaya
jaane bhi de
lalala
tujhko ata hai masti mein jeena
jeele ae ae ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
aane bhi de

he ho
he ho
he ho
he ho
he ho

laalaalalalalala
laalaa

jhoome ja mastaane
chhede ja taraane
kal kya ho kya jaane
jaane ye tumhaari bala aa
jhoome ja mastaane
chhede ja taraane
kal kya ho kya jaane
jaane ye tumhaari bala
aage bhi hone de andhere
sapne to hain chamkeele ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
aane bhi de
koi gaya
koi gaya
jaane bhi de
lalala
tujhko aata hai masti mein jeena jee le ae ae
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya
koi aaya


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The music of “Kaala Sona”(1975) was quite popular during its time. I would have loved to watch this movie but for the back that I was not allowed to watch any movies from 1972 till 1978, viz as long as I was school.

And now, when I can watch the movie and that too online, I feel disinclined to do so. Obviusly the principle of demand and supply is at work, and this time in the reverse direction.

Now a days, I can only watch the video of songs and that is all. “Kaala Sona”(1975) had four songs in it. Two of these songs have been covered in the blog, which means I have watched the picturisation of those songs.

I have watched the picturisation of the two remaining songs as well. The settings are similar in both the picturisations. And I am intrigued by the fact that Keshto Mukherji figures quite prominently in both the picturisations. He plays a drunkard alright, but did he play such a big role in the movie that he fitted in as many as two songs of this movie and that too quite prominently ? I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on this fact.

Here is the third song from “Kaala Sona”(1975) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Asha Bhonsle. The song is picrurised on Parveen Babi who is shown lip syncing this song for the benefit of Keshto Mukherji ! Yes indeed ! Of course other dubious looking characters are also visible in the picturisation.

Majrooh Sultanpuri is the lyricist. Music is composed by R D Burman.


Song-Ek baar jaane jaana iqraar karte jaana (Kaala Sona)(1975) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics

ek baar
jaane jaana
ikraar karte jaana
ek baar
jaane jaana
ikraar karte jaana
jhooth hi kah do
mera dil rakh lo
chaahe phir tum na aana aa aa aa aa
ek baar jaane jaana
ikraar karte jaana
jhooth hi kah do
mera dil rakh lo
chaahe phir tum na aana aa aa aa aa
ek baar jaane jaana

jhoothi baaten bhi yaar ki
lagti hai baaten pyaar ki ee ee ee ee
aha aha
aha
aa aa
jhoothi baaten bhi yaar ki ee
lagti hain baaten pyaar ki ee ee
hum bhi kya kare tum bhi kya karo
dekho na sanam
arre
haan aan aan
ek baar
jaane jaana ikraar karte jaana
jhooth hi kahdo
mera dil rakh lo
chaahe phir tum na aana aa aa
ik baar jaane jaana

tum jo mil jaao ek baar
main bhi dikhla doon wo bahaar aar aar
aha
aha
aha aa aa
tum jo mil jaao ek baar
main bhi dikhla doon wo bahaar aar
bhoole na kabhi
saari zindagi
allah ki kasam
arre haan aan aan
ek baar jaane jaana
ikraar karte jaana
jhooth hi kah do
mera dil rakh lo
chaahe phir tum na aana aa aa aa aa
ek baar jaane jaana
ikraar karte jaana
jhooth hi kah do
mera dil rakh lo
chaahe phir tum na aana aa aa
ek baar jaane jaana
ek baar jaane jaana
ek baar jaane jaana


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mohammed Rafi – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 35
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“शम्मा बुझने को चली

Of the many colors of Rafi Sb’s voice, probably the most touching, and the most impressive is his interpretation of the emotions of sadness. Maybe, it be so that the “. . . sweetest songs are the ones that tell of the saddest thoughts” (from the poetry of Percy Shelley, that inspired the iconic song of ‘Patita’ (1953) – “Hain Sab Se Madhur Wo Geet Jinhen Hum Dard Ke Sur Mein Gaate Hain”). And maybe, that the genuineness and honesty of expressions that go together with the unfeigned and substantive voice of Rafi Sb, it simply makes us feel the true depth of this ‘sweetness’ – a sweetness that touches a very familiar, a very dear chord within.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Sau Ka Note”(1955) was produced by Ram Singh and directed by Yashwant Pethkar for R S Films, Bombay. This “social” movie had Geeta Bali, Karan dewan, Begam Para, ram Singh, Krishnakumari, Manorama, Sundar, Leela Mishra, Sulochna, Narbada Shankar, Lotan, Bango etc. Then there were gust appaerances by Zabeen, Chaand Usmani, Tiwari, Bard Prasad, Smriti Biswas, Ranjit Kumari, Vivek, Dhumal, Rajan, Naaz Chandabai, Mohana, Chitra and Johny Walker.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Ek Ladki Saat Ladke”(1961) was directed by Roop K Shorey for Filmistan, Bombay. This obscure movie had Amita, Ravindra Kapoor, Durga Khote, Badri Prasad, Majnoo etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Imtihaan”(1974) was directed by Madan Sinha for New Arts Pictures, Bombay. This movie had Tanuja, Vinod Khanna, Bindu, Ranjeet (special appearance), Abhi Bhattacharya, Asit Sen, Sapru, Murad, C S Dubey, Abhijit Sen, Shashtri, Amrit Patel, Sunayna Santosh, Uday Arora, Neel Oberoy, Sonika Khanna, Dewal Verma, Naveen Pandya, Vijay Kumar, Bhanwar Shrivastava, Ibrahim, Seema, Madhu, Jugnu, Durga, Ravi Kanwar, Sunil Rege, Ibrahim Khan, Geeta Shah, Shankar Bhake, Nasir, Farooque, Chanda, Kamal etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Imtihaan”(1974) was directed by Madan Sinha for New Arts Pictures, Bombay. This movie had Tanuja, Vinod Khanna, Bindu, Ranjeet (special appearance), Abhi Bhattacharya, Asit Sen, Sapru, Murad, C S Dubey, Abhijit Sen, Shashtri, Amrit Patel, Sunayna Santosh, Uday Arora, Neel Oberoy, Sonika Khanna, Dewal Verma, Naveen Pandya, Vijay Kumar, Bhanwar Shrivastava, Ibrahim, Seema, Madhu, Jugnu, Durga, Ravi Kanwar, Sunil Rege, Ibrahim Khan, Geeta Shah, Shankar Bhake, Nasir, Farooque, Chanda, Kamal etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Sheesha” (1952) is an obscure movie which was produced by Umar Ansari and directed by Shahid Latif for Asian Pictures, Bombay. It had Sajjan, Nargis, Vimla, Kumkum, Amar, Achla Sachdev, Zebunnissa, Anwari Bai, Rakhan, Laman, Habeeb, Rashid, Cuckoo, Majnu etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than eight years. This blog has over 13200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3150 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Movies with all their songs covered =1003 Total Number of movies covered =3703

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008 Active for 3000 days.
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