Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Ratanbai Songs’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4800 Post No. : 16564 Movie Count :

4511

Today’s song is from an old film – actually a very old film, which is 84 years old – Dhanwan-aka Mazdoor ki beti-1937.

The film was made under the banner of the Imperial Film Company, Bombay and was shot in its studio. It was directed by Premankur Atorthy and the Music was by Harshchandra Bali or H.C.Bali. The cast of the film was Rattanbai, Jamshed ji, Hafisji, W.M.Khan and others. This was the last film made by the Imperial Film Company.

From 1913 to around 1945 upwards, it was strictly a period of Studio Culture. Names of Heroes and Heroines were less important than the name of the studio making the film During the Silent film era films used to be made within a span of a month or even less than that.Most films were shot during day time in the studios where there used to be no roof to its 4 walls, because they needed Sunlight for shooting. An improvement on this was a Glass Ceiling in Imperial studio to filter the strong sunlight in summer.

Studios used to employ people needed to make films, like Actors-M and F, Directors, MDs, Lyricists, Writers, Cinematographers etc on monthly basis pay. For big studios, the Pay-roll lists would have artistes and others in hundreds. Ranjit studio boasted to have more than 900 people on its monthly Pay list at one time. The Government had opened a Ration shop inside the studio premises for their families. Bombay Talkies had made Entertainment and play areas (like Tennis, Badminton courts etc) for use by its employees. Every studio used to have a Canteen for the workers and the other people. Prabhat had appointed some Extra actresses, who used to sweep, do Housekeeping and cook for the studio staff as well as work in small roles in the films, whenever needed.

While there were 20 film companies in Calcutta, at the same time in Bombay there were 31 film companies with studios ( as on today, there are just 13 film studios which are given on rent for shootings). Over a period, the studio system ended, every artiste became a Freelancer and studios remained only for renting out for shootings to independent producers. Films stopped being sold on studio names and actors and directors became the attraction for the audiences to see the films.

Studio system was one of the biggest factors in the evolving and development of the Indian film industry. From this onwards, I plan to write on different well known studios, in my future posts, whenever possible. Today we will know more about the Imperial Film Company. Being the first to make a Talkie film in Hindi, it deserves this honour !

Ardeshir Irani (5-12-1886 to 14-10-1969) built the Imperial Studio of the Imperial Film company, near Kennedy Bridge in Nana Chowk, Bombay, in 1922. At the same time he built another studio, near Chowpatty for Sagar Movietone. All the studios used to be without a roof. These were the days of Silent films.Most Stunt films were shot outdoors but others like Mythologicals were shot in the studios. Films made here were released in Irani’s own Majestic Theatre.

India’s first Talkie film ” Alam Ara” was made in 1931. There was a Processing lab also in the premises. Imperial made some Marathi films also like ‘ Rukmini Haran’ and ‘ Devki’ etc. Till 1937, Imperial was a leading studio. In 1937, Imperial made India’s First indegenous Colour film “ Kisan Kanya”. Irani had not spared any effort to make it technically superb. Unfortunately this film flopped leaving a heavy loan on Irani’s head. He first sold Sagar Studio and then some more land also. In 1938, Ardeshir irani mortgaged Imperial Studio to Kapurchand Mehta against a big sum, but could never redeem it again. Mehta later changed its name to ” Jyoti Studio” and started renting it to other companies for shootings. Some land was sold to Motor garages. After the death of Ardeshir Irani, his legal heir Shapurji looks after whatever land and buildings are left over.

In 1925, Ardeshir Irani founded Imperial Films ( Imperial studio, Imperial Film Company and Imperial Films are all different – legally), where he made sixty-two films. By the age of forty, Irani was an established filmmaker of Indian cinema. Ardeshir Irani became the father of talkie films with the release of his sound feature film, Alam Ara on 14 March 1931. Many of the films he produced were later made into talkie films with the same cast and crew. He is also credited with making the first Indian English feature film, Noor Jahan (1931). He completed his hat-trick of earning fame when he made the first colour feature film of India, Kisan Kanya (1937). His contribution does not end only with giving voice to the silent cinema and colour to black-and-white films. He gave a new courageous outlook to filmmaking in India and provided such a wide range of choice for stories in films that till date, there are films being made which have a theme relating to one of the one hundred fifty-eight films made by Irani.

In 1933, Irani produced and directed the first Persian talkie, Dokhtar-e-Lor. The script was written by Abdolhossein Sepanta who also acted in the film along with members of the local Parsi community.

Irani’s Imperial Films introduced a number of new actors to Indian Cinema, including Prithviraj Kapoor and Mehboob Khan. He also interfered with the medium. He produced Kalidas in Tamil on the sets of Alam Ara, with songs in Telugu. Also, Irani visited London, England for fifteen days to study sound recording and recorded the sounds of Alam Ara on the basis of this knowledge. In the process, he created a whole new trend unknowingly. In those days, outdoor shootings were shot in sunlight with the help of reflectors. However, the outdoor undesirable sounds were disturbing him so greatly that he shot the entire sequence in the studio under heavy lights. Thus, he began the trend of shooting under artificial light.

Imperial Films Company Est: 1926. Successor to the Majestic and Royal Art Film companies set up by Ardeshir Irani as a diversification of his exhibition interests in partnership with Esoofally, Mohammed Ali and Dawoodji Rangwala. Organised as a vertically integrated combine with its own exhibition infrastructure. Started following the decline of Kohinoor, it continued many of the latter’s Mohanlal Dave-inspired genres, often with the same stars and film-makers. Imperial became closely associated with the costumed historical genre launched with Anarkali (1928), shot and released almost overnight in direct competition to Charu Roy’s The Loves of a Mughal Prince (1928).

Irani also rushed out Alam Ara (1931), released as India’s first full talkie narrowly beating Madan Theatres’ Shirin Farhad (1931). Imperial was the first studio to shoot scenes at night (in Khwab-e- Hasti, 1929) using incandescent lamps. It owned India’s top silent star, Sulochana, and promoted her along with Zubeida, Jilloo and, for a while, the young Prithviraj Kapoor. This was perhaps the first major instance of a deliberate manufacturing of a star-cult as a marketing strategy.

Top Imperial film-makers include R.S. Choudhury, B.P. Mishra and Mohan Bhavnani, whose film-making set the house style, as did Nandlal Jaswantlal’s sound films. A fair number of the studio’s talkies were remakes of its own silent hits with Sulochana (Anarkali, 1928 & 1935), Wildcat of Bombay (1927) became Bambai Ki Billi (1936), etc. It made films in at least nine languages: Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Burmese, Malay, Pushtu and Urdu. The first Iranian sound film, Dukhtar-e-Lur (aka Dokhtare Lor Ya Irane Diruz Va Emruz, 1932) was also made here. Kisan Kanya (1937) by Gidwani was India’s first indigenously manufactured colour film, made with the Cinecolour process. When it closed in 1938, its economic and generic inheritance was continued by Sagar Movietone.

Film Kisan Kanya-1937 was famous as the First indigenously made colour film of India, made by Ardeshir Irani’s company- Imperial Film Company. Film pioneer Irani was the first to make an International Co-Production, with Italy, film Nala Damayanti- a silent film of 1920. Secondly, he had the honour of making and releasing India’s First Talkie Film ” Alam Ara-1931″. And with the film Kisan Kanya, he achieved a Hat Trick of ‘ First in India’ credit in film making.

Ardeshir Irani was very keen to become the First to make a Talkie film of India. He knew that Madon Theatres of Calcutta too were busy in making their First Talkie film, with two popular stars of the day. Irani hastened the speed of his shootings and recordings. Lot of secrecy was maintained in filming the movie. From his secret sources in Calcutta, he was getting information on the progress of Madon Theatres’ film in making. He came to know that their film was to have about 20 songs in the film. Irani decided to limit the number of songs in his film to save on time. Now they would have only 7 songs. Thus they saved on many days of shootings and recordings. Thus, while Alam Ara was released on 14-3-1931, Madon could only release their First Talkie film “Shirin Farhad” on 30-5-1931, a cool two and a half months later !

Similarly, Irani studied why Prabhat’s first colour film ‘ Sairandhri-33″ failed technically and decided to do all technical processes in India, for his colour film Kisan Kanya-37. Thus his colour film came out much better than Prabhat’s film.”Irani perhaps was the world’s first multilingual film maker,having made forays into English, Bengali, Marathi, Tamil, Persian, Burmese, Indonesian and Pashto. He is credited with launching the Talkie era in countries like Burma, Indonesia and Iran. He made nearly 120 Talkies in a span of just 8 years. He was also the first to establish a colour laboratory imported from Hollywood.

Irani made one hundred fifty-eight films in a long and illustrious career of twenty-five years, between the First and Second World Wars. He made his last film, Pujari, in 1945, under the banner of Ardeshir M. Irani Productions ltd. The film was shot in Jyoti Studios, ironically ( it was his own Imperial studios earlier). Irani was not compelled to live like Dadasaheb Phalke for he realised that the war was a time not suitable for film business and therefore he suspended his film business during that time. He died on 14 October 1969 at the age of eighty-two, in Mumbai, Maharashtra.

Noted film director Mehboob Khan had a little story about his connection with Imperial Film company. After the successful film Ek hi Raasta-39, Mehboob started work on Alibaba. He had made the beginning of his film career by acting in the silent film on Alibaba, at the Imperial film company. He was one of the 40 thieves ! By now, due to his continuous success, Sagar Movietone had benefited much and he was highly respected in the company.

Besides Mehboob, Sagar Movietone had a team of other directors like C M Luhar, Sarvottam Badami, Hiren Bose, Ramchandra Thakur etc. They too were making films for Sagar. However, their films were not as successful as those by Mehboob. In addition, the onset of the Second World War had a negative impact on Sagar and it went into loss. Soon, the owners decided to close the company.

By this time, Mehboob was ready with all the arrangements to start the shooting of Alibaba. Closing down of Sagar was a shock to him. He approached Ardeshir Irani of Imperial and asked for permission to shoot his film there. Irani was very happy. The novice ‘ extra ‘ who had worked in his company-without pay for the first five months- had now become an acclaimed top class successful Director. Irani was proud of Mehboob. He gladly permitted him to shoot his entire film there. (Thanks to wikipedia, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, The formative phase of Indian Cinema-Ashok Raj in Hero-I ,article by D.B.Samant, Shirish Kanekar, Bhai Bhagat’s book ‘ Teen bhintinchi Duniya ‘ (तीन भिंतींची दुनिया ) and my own notes. )

One of the names in the cast is peculiar- Jamshed ji. His full name was Jamshed ji Bairam ji, Khan Saheb. In some films, he was credited as Khan saheb also. He was born in Bombay in 1889 as a typical Parsee. He was one of the oldest and most experienced actors having worked with several directors and over 25 years of acting.

He started with Silent films like Pyari Mamta, Madhuri, Sohni Mahiwal, pooran Bhagat, Gulshan E Arab, Hoor E Baghdad and Indira. His first talkie films were Daulat ka nasha-31 and Noorjahan-31. He acted in about 50 films. His last known film was Andaz-1949.

Jamshed ji, also gave music to 3 films- Naya Zamana-35, Zaate Shareef-36 and Jagat kesari-37.

With today’s song by Rattanbai, film dhanwan-37 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Tum bhi kitne raseele (Dhanwaan)(1937) Singer- Ratanbai, Lyricist- Not known, MD- H C Bali

Lyrics

aa
haay aa aa haay
haay haay
haa aa aa haay haaay

tum bhi kitne ae ae raseele
haa aa aa aa aa
tum bhi kitne raseele
bane baabu raaja
bane baabu raaja
aa aa aa
tum bhi kitne raseele
haan aan aan aan
khade morey dwaare
haan aan aan aan
khade morey dwaare
bane baabu raaja
bane baabu raaja
aa aa aa
tum bhi kitne raseele
haan aan aan aan
malmal ka kurta
makhmal ki jaackit
haan haan
makhmal ki jaackit
haan
malmal ka kurta
makhmal ki jaackit
haan haan
makhmal ki jaackit
Lucknow ka palla pahne
han aan aan aan
Lucknow ka palla pahne
pahne baabu raaja
pahne baabu raaja
aa aa aaa
tum bhi kitne raseele

pahne baabu raaja
pahne baabu raaja
aa aa aa
tum bhi kitne raseele
haan aan aan aan
sone ka kangana
chaandi ki jhaanjhar
haan
chaandi ki jhaanjhar
haan aan aan
sone ka kangana
chaandi ki jhaanjhar
haan
chaandi ki jhaanjhar
laaye kahaan se gahne
haan
laaye kahaan se gahne
gahne baabu raaja
gahne baabu raaja
aan aan
tum bhi kitne raseele
haan aan aan aan
tum bhi kitne raseele


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3700 Post No. : 14619

‘Ujaala’ (1942) was produced under the banner of Taj Mahal Pictures and was directed by K M Multani. The film was based on a story by M A Mughani whose name also appears as the ‘producer’ of the film. The screen play and dialogues were written by Kamal Amrohi. The star cast included Prithviraj Kapoor, Naseem Bano, Mubarak, Ratan Bai, Mirza Musharaf, Baby Vinod Kumari, Jhilani etc.

The film was the maiden venture of Taj Mahal Pictures which was set up by M. Ehsan. However, the film’s publicity materials mentioned M A Mughani, the story writer as the ‘producer’ of the film with M. Ehsan as Associate Producer. My guess is that after completing the college, Ehsan set up this film production company without having any experience in film production. So he may have given a greater role to M A Mughani in the film production who had earlier worked in Minerva Movietone. It was said that Ehsan was a childhood friend of Naseem Bano and she may have partly financed his film production company.

For Naseem Bano, it was her first film after she was released from her contract with Minerva Movietone by Sahorab Modi on her request in 1940. Till that time, she had acted in Minerva’s Movietone’s films like ‘Hamlet’ aka ‘Khoon Kaa Khoon’ (1935), ‘Khan Bahadur’ (1937), ‘Vasanti’ (1938), ‘Meetha Zahar’ (1938), ‘Divorce’ aka ‘Talaaq’ (1938), ‘Pukar’ (1939) and ‘Defeat’ aka ‘Main Haari’ (1940).

After Naseem Bano’s last released film in 1940, there was a gap of nearly 2 years before ‘Ujaala’ (1942) was released in February 1942. It is said that sometime during this interregnum, she accompanied her mother, Shamshad Begum, (a classical singer who was known as Chhamia in the music circle) to be the guest of the son of the Nizam of Hyderabad. There seems to be more to it than being merely the guest in Hyderabad. It was rumoured that Nizam’s prince was interested in marrying Naseem Bano. However, after spending sometime in Hyderabad, both mother and daughter did not like the environment in Hyderabad. So both returned to Bombay (Mumbai). ‘Ujaala’ (1942) was the first film Naseem Bano signed after returning to Bombay.

During the making of the film, a couple of things happened which could have affected the film’s publicity. First, some unscrupulous persons carried out propaganda against Naseem Bano by printing slanderous posters about her. People in the know felt that it was the handiwork of the supporters of the son of Nizam of Hyderbad who were in his payrolls, to tarnish the image of Naseem Bano. But soon, it died down. Probably the fans of Naseem Bano put more faith in her than in the slanderous propaganda.

Second, there were some creative differences between film’s dialogue writer, Kamal Amrohi and the film’s de-facto producer and story writer, M A Mughani. Both had become ‘heavy-weights’ in the film industry after the success of ‘Pukar’ (1939) in which Kamal Amrohi wrote dialogues and lyrics and Mughani was the Publicity Manager. The issues were amicably sorted out and the film was released on February 21 1942 at Lamington Theatre, Bombay (Mumbai).

I have attempted below, a gist of the film’s story based on the film’s review which appeared in April 1942 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine.

The story revolves around a theatre which is owned by Shyam (Prithviraj Kapoor). He is idealistic man, a learned musician and also a strict disciplinarian. Maya (Ratan Bai) is the star artist of the theatre who falls to the flattery showered by Tiwari (Mubarak), a wealthy man who is the frequent visitor to the theatre. Maya responds to Tiwari’s flirtations which results in her late hours for the theatre activities. Shyam admonishes her for breaking the theatre discipline resulting in frequent quarrels. One day, Maya, believing the numerous promises of Tiwari, walks out of the Theatre.

Shyam is on a look out for a new girl in place of Maya and find Saroj (Naseem Bano), a dancer. First, she refuses to see him. After listening to his sitar recital over the radio, she falls for him as a musician but refuses to work for him on the stage. Each of them becomes more obstinate than before whenever they meet.

To break down her obstinacy, Shyam takes a flat just below the flat occupied by Saroj. One day, he plays sitar non-stop. At first, Saroj ignores the music but the urge of music in her makes her to dance to the tune of Shyam’s sitar. She admits her defeat and agrees to join his stage show. But this time, Shyam refuses to accept her.

In the meanwhile, Shyam’s theatre has been running into losses. One day, he decides to hand over the theatre to his Manager, Mirza (Mirza Musharaf) and devote his attention to music. Mirza manages a surprise and recruit a new girl, Sarojini for the stage show. Mirza convinces Shyam to attend the opening show. To his surprise, Shyam finds Sarojini is none other than Saroj.

With Saroj, all shows of the theatre become success. Shyam falls in love with Saroj which she reciprocates. Once again, Tiwari comes in to scene to lure Saroj for his personal pleasure. On the marriage day, Saroj is kidnapped by Tiwari and kept in his house. Shyam is distraught. Saroj jumps out of the window of the house where she was kept as prisoner and becomes permanently disabled. Tiwari gets reformed after seeing her pathetic conditions. After some more emotional drama, Shyam and Saroj are united.

Despite a favourable review by ‘Filmindia’, the film failed at the box office. Ehsan incurred heavy losses. He closed down Taj Mahal Pictures in March 1942. The only gain out of producing the film for Ehsan was that Naseem Bano married him and shifted to Delhi after the film’s release. She left the film industry when she was still ‘pari chehra’ (fairy face) for her fans.

But there are twists in the stories of Naseem Bano and the Taj Mahal Pictures. Before that, I need to mention about the system of license for a film production company which was introduced during World War-II. Without this license issued by the Government, the film production company could not import raw films for shooting.

A question was raised in the Central Legislative Assembly (akin to Lok Sabha now) by a legislator “on what grounds Taj Mahal Pictures of Bombay was given licence when the said concern had already closed its business in March 1942”. The Minister of Industry & Civil Supplies replied that “Taj Mahal Pictures did not stop their business. The Government was satisfied that in the absence of the licence, the company could not produce the film and a considerable hardship would be caused if a licence is not granted to them” (as verbatim reported in April 1945 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine).

I can now relate this piece of information as to why a dormant film production company like Taj Mahal Pictures got revived. This has also got a connection with the return of Naseem Bano to Bombay film industry in 1944.

Sometime in 1943, Shashdhar Mukherjee along with Rai Bahadur Chunnilal, Gyan Mukherjee, Ashok Kumar, Savak Vacha, Kavi Pradeep and others left Bombay Talkies due to differences with Devika Rani who had taken the reign of Bombay Talkies after the death of her husband, Himansu Roy. This group formed Filmistan Studio. Shashdhar Mukherjee wanted to produce a film on a scale of his box office success film ‘Kismet (1943) which would be his fitting reply to Devika Rani for her ill-treatment of his team.

Shashdhar Mukherjee hit upon an idea of casting Naseem Akhtar in his film ‘Chal Chal Re Naujawaan’ (1944). Since she had already left the film industry in March 1942, it was a difficult proposition to woo her to accept the role in his film. He travelled to Delhi and met M Ehsan, Naseem’s husband with his plan to cast his wife. After much persuasion and a visit by Rai Bahadur Chunnilal, Ehsan agreed on certain conditions. One of the important conditions in the contract was that Shashdhar Mukherjee would oversee the production of one more film under the banner of Taj Mahal Pictures.

It took a long time for ‘Chal Chal Re Naujawaan’ (1944) to be completed. Contrary to the general expectation, the film did not fare well on the box office front. However, as per the contract, Shashdhar Mukherjee was to oversee the production of another film for Ehsan. So the film ‘Begum’ (1945) was stared with most of the infrastructure and resources of Filmistan Studios. The film starred with Ashok Kumar and Naseem Bano in lead roles. With this film, Ehsan’s production company was revived which later produced films like ‘Mulaaqat’ (1947), ‘Chaandni Raat’ (1949), and ‘Ajeeb Ladki’ (1952). Ehsan migrated to Pakistan taking with him all the films he produced in India.

What an irony in Ehsan’s filmy career! When he lost money in ‘Ujaala’ (1942), he gained Naseem Bano. But when he earned a lot of money in Pakistan after releasing these films, he had lost Naseem Bano who was legally separated from him due to his migration to Pakistan.

Now let me present the first song from Ehsan’s first film ‘Ujaala’ (1942). The song is ‘main dekh rahi hoon duniya ke nazaare’ sung by Ratan Bai. The film had six songs, all set to music by Bashir Dehlvi. The lyricist of all the six songs in the film is unattributed. Going by the convention of most of the 1930s and early 1940s films when song writing was a part of dialogue writers, I guess that the song was written by Kamal Amrohi who was the dialogue writer for the film. Incidentally, Kamal Amrohi had written songs for the films ‘Jailor’ (1938), ‘Pukar’ (1939) and ‘Main Hari’ (1940) where he was also the dialogue writer.

With this song, ‘Ujaala’ (1942) makes its debut in the Blog.

Note: This article is based on some of the information gathered from the various issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazines and from the book, ‘Stars From Another Sky’ (2010) by Sadat Hasan Manto.

Audio Clip:

Song-Main dekh rahi hoon duniya ke nazaare (Ujaala)(1942) Singer-Ratan Bai, MD-Bashir Dehalvi

Lyrics

main dekh rahi hoon
oon oon oon
duniya ke nazaare
duniya ke nazaare
main dekh rahi hoon
oon oon oon
duniya ke nazaare
duniya ke nazaare

khilti huyi kaliyaan
jharnon ke kinaare
khilti huyi kaliyaan
jharnon ke kinaare
jharnon ke kinaare
main dekh rahi hoon
oon oon oon
duniya ke nazaare
duniya ke nazaare

bhanwre kaa machalna
daali kaa lachakna
bhanwre kaa machalna
daali kaa lachakna
gulshan kaa tamaasha
phoolon kaa mahakna
gulshan kaa tamaasha
phoolon kaa mahakna
rangeen ishaare
haan rangeen ishaare
main dekh rahi hoon
oon oon oon
duniya ke nazaare
duniya ke nazaare

ab jaise ye duniya
kuchh baaten karegi
ab jaise ye duniya
kuchh baaten karegi
chup reh na sakegi
chup reh na sakegi
hamse hi kahegi
afsaane hamaare
hamse hi kahegi
afsaane hamaare
afsaane hamaare
main dekh rahi hoon
oon oon oon
duniya ke nazaare
duniya ke nazaare


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3684 Post No. : 14586

“Lajwanti”(1942), alias “Radio Singer” was directed y Hiralal R Doctor for Shree Ganesh Pictures, Bombay. This “social” movie had Ratanbai, Anuradha, Wazir Mohammad Khan, Ashiq Hussain, Fakir Mohammad, Ratan Modi etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Singers and lyricists of these songs are not known.

Here is the first song from “Lajwanti”(1942) to appear in the blog. This song is a bhajan which is sung by an unknown female voice which sounds somewhat familiar. Lyricist is not known. Music is composed by Shyam Babu, who I assume is same as Shyam Babu Pathak.

I have an intuition that this female voice may be that of Ratanbai, the leading actor of this movie who was an actor singer. This blog has seven songs sung by her. On comparing the voice of this song with that of the seven Ratan Bai songs, I feel that the voice is same. So I have assumed this song to be sung by Ratan Bai.

I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the movie as well as on the identity of this voice.

With this rare song, “Lajwanti”(1942) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Teri mahima aprampaar tu hai jag ka paalanhaar(Lajwanti)(1942) Singer-Ratan Bai, MD-Shyam Babu Pathak

Lyrics

Teri mahima aprampaar
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar
teri mahima aprampaar
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar
sooraj chandr jo raushni dete
saagar sarita bahte bahte
saare jag ko mahima kahte
sooraj chandr jo raushni dete
saagar sarita bahte bahte
saare jag ko mahima kahte
saare jag ko mahima kahte
tu hai jag ka khewanhaar
tero koi na paawe paar
tu hai jag ka khewanhaar
tero koi na paawe paar

phal phool main kya chadhaaun
deepak ko main kyun jalaaun
phal phool main kya chadhaaun
deepak ko main kyun jalaaun
teri bhakti kaise dhyaaun
teri bhakti kaise dhyaaun
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar
tero sabhi to hai sansaar
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar
tero sabhi to hai sansaar
teri mahima aprampaar
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar
teri mahima aprampaar
tu hai jag ka paalanhaar


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

During the last two years or so, I have been working on a major exercise of presenting rare songs from films released in the 1940s on the Blog. In the process, I became aware of some of the productions houses (called banners), producers, directors, actors, singers, lyricists and music directors etc that were unknown to me earlier. One of the little known banners which I came to know about during the last few months was Sunrise Pictures. But I had no idea about the owner/s of this banner.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Sajjaad Hussain – a name that invokes a feeling of rare and precious stones. Treasures that are scarce, and extremely hard to come by. Treasures that are small in numbers to start with anyway. And treasures that are extremely valuable, like diamonds of unusual and endearing qualities. Diamonds imbued with qualities that invoke surprise in how the emotions blend with the words, that blend into the music, that is breathtaking at times. Treasures always number very few. Songs composed by Sajjaad Sb are such precious treasures, discoveries of the remaining few of which is always a titillating celebration for the aficionados.
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16600 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16615

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1280
Total Number of movies covered=4520

Total visits so far

  • 14,806,191 hits

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Category of songs

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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