Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 2010s (2011 to 2020)’ Category


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4455 Post No. : 15928

Today is 35th birthday of Ranbir Kapoor, son of Rishi Kapoor and Neetu Singh, grandson of Raj Kapoor and great-grandson of the formidable Prithvi Raj Kapoor.

Talking of Prithvi Raj Kapoor, reminds of Mughal-e-Azam, where the first generation of Kapoorkhandaan as Shehenshah Akbar, over shadowed his mild crown prince Salim, played by a demure Dilip Kumar. Right, as a friend commented, Dilip Kumar looked like a mouse in front of Prithvi Raj Kapoor.

So Ranbir Kapoor is the chashm-e-chiraag, the fourth generation of Kapoor clan, to make a name and fame in the film industry. Critically acclaimed actor in his own right, some say he is the best actor in the whole family. That may be true. But I may not be qualified to be a judge of that. I have seen some very old movies of Prithvi raj Kapoor, like Sikandar-e-azam and Pukaar, where he looks exactly like Shashi Kapoor. Back in the 80’s when Sohrab Modidied, the Bombay Doordarshan had shown some of his movies, so I got to see those two historical costume drama movies. I have seen some of the famous and non-famous movies of Raj Kapoor mainly on TV and cable TV, Teesri Kasam, Sangam, Awara, Chhalia etc. to name a few. Films like Shree 420 and Barsaat I have seen later on youtube. I have seen many movies of Rishi Kapoor again on Cable TV and some in the theatre. The last movie of Rishi Kapoor I remember watching in theatre is “Damini”.

Coming to the 4th generation, I can say that I have loved his film “Ajab Prem ki Gajab Kahaani”. Seen a few more films like ‘Wake up Sid” “Rockstar” etc or a few more partly. Sometime in 2011-12 or some time before that I have disconnected my home cable connection. It once got disconnected, we got used to it and we don’t miss the “Ehmaq Dabba”(Idiot box) at all. I go to parents place, where if the TV is on, it sounds like noise pollution to me. Looks also like visual pollution, I can’t help it.

So this way, my connection with new films is severed. What we don’t know, we don’t miss. It is important to keep track of the known things, rather than worrying about the unknown, right!

I have managed to keep the lid on overload of conventional media, and social media in general, but than whatsapp became unavoidable. I can hear the fans of modern technology, shouting “caught you”.

Whatsapp to peechha nahi chhodtaa….

Few years ago, when I read about Facebook book paying multiple bucks and buying over Whatsapp, I wondered what is the source of income of whatsapp, and why would someone pay to buy it. I asked many people, but there was no answer. I googled the question, but there is no satisfactory explanation there too.

A few months ago, my brother shared the links of a song from ‘Money Hiest” of a song called ‘Bella Ciao”. The original, is an Italian revolutionary song, the link is here. Without even knowing what it meant, it was a stirring song. I have heard it a few times since, and it grows on me as I learn more about it.

This is the translation I found with one of the links:

One morning I woke up
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
one morning I woke up and
I found the invader.

Oh partisan take me away
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
oh partisan take me away for
I feel like I’m dying.

And if I die as a partisan
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
and if I die as a partisan
you must bury me.

And you will bury me up there, on the mountain
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
you will bury me up there on the mountain
under the shadow of a beautiful flower.

And all the people passing by
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
and all the people passing by will tell me:
what a beautiful flower!

And this is the flower of the partisan
goodbye my beautiful, goodbye
and this is the flower of the partisan
who died for freedom.

Last week after doing this post, I wondered, if there is a hindi film song inspired by Bella ciao. In fact I have a few such songs listed, which I want to write a post about. So one of those projects was finding a song which is copied, lifted or inspired by “Bella ciao”. The search was a short one and google immediately gave this song from the film Besharam(2013). The music is credited to Lalit Pandit(of Jatin-Lalit fame) and lyricist is Rajeev Banwal. The singer is Sujeet Shetty, but the dialogues in between is in the voice of the actors.

As the songis on Ranbir Kapoor, in the movie, so this is the song for the occasion.
As per Peevesie’s Mom, this song reminds peevesie of the song “hum thhe wot hhi” from “chalti ka naam gaadi”. I checked the song and also if it is mentioned in itwofs.com. It turns out the inspiration behind this S D Burman song is the song ‘The Watermelon song’ (1957), by Tennessee Ernie Ford.

Video :

Song-Love ki ghanti baj gayi meri (Besharam)(2013) Singers-Sujeet Shetty, Lyrics-Rajeev Barnwal, Music Director-Lalit Pandit
Ranbir Kapoor, Amitosh Nagpal

Lyrics

Love ki ghanti
baj gayi meri
dekhaa ussko
pyaar huaaaa
aankhen phat gayi
tabeeyat nipat gayi
dil meraa kood padaa
pehle ladki
thoda sa bhadki
boli aaye ho tum kyun yahaan
main bola
mera hai good luck
mujhe laayi yehaan
teri maan

(conversation)

haan us ski baatien
nukkad ki chaye
thhodi meethhi thhodi garam
jaise teekhe pyaazi pakode
mirchi dhaniya ka dam m m
gusse mein chamki
di mujhko dhamki
main tas se mas na huaaaa
gaalon pe usske
de daali pappi
dil uss ka phool huaaaa
uuoouuoo

(conversation)

wo khadi thhi
main khadaa thha
nazren takraayee
paas aayi
baahen thhamen
thhoda sharmaayeeee
pyaar se phir
uss ne mujhko
shirt pehnaayaaaa
touch kiya to
dil mein jaise
gudgudi chhaayeeee
heehee
shirt bhi badal daali
ye to setting ho gayi hai
seene se mere
phir wo lipat gayi
aisa zor ka jhatka lagaaaa
mere dil ke radio par
sa re ga ma pa bajne lagaaaa
kaanon mein mere
dheere se bolee
mere hero thhe abtak haan an
main rapat gayaa
wahi salat gayaa
chali pyar ki mast hawaaaa
Love ki ghanti
baj gayi meri
dekhaa ussko
pyaar huaaaa
aankhen phat gayi
tabeeyat nipat gayi
dil meraa kukukood padaa
ookukukuooo
koodaaaa
dil koodaaa
dil bhaagaa
teraa dil bhaagaa
dil bhaagabhaaga
dil bhaagabhaaga
dil bhaagaaaaa
dil koodaa meraa
dil koodaa dil meraa
koodaaaa
dil jhooma jhooma
dil jhooma mera dil
jhoomaaaaaa
dil kudaa meraa dil
jhooma mera dil
bhaagaaaaa

lalalala
lalalalala
lalala
lalala
lala
laaaaa
lalalala
lalalalala
lalala
lalala
lalalala
laalaalaalaa
lalalala
lalalalala
lalala
lalala
lalalala
laalaalaalaa

lalalala
lalalalala
lalala
lalala
lala
laaaaa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4388 Post No. : 15750 Movie Count :

4342

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films: 35

‘Gumnaami’ (2019) is a Bangla film with fairly good parts of dialogues in Hindi and English. The film is produced under the banner of Shri Venkatesh Films and is directed by Srijit Mukherjee. The main star cast consists of Prosenjit Chatterjee (as Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose and later as Gumnaami Baba), Anirban Bhattacharya (as journalist, Chandrachur Dhar), Tanushri Chakraborty (as Ronita Dhar), Surendra Rajan (as Mahatma Gandhi), Sanjay Gurubuxani (as Jawaharlal Nehru) etc. The film was released on October 2, 2019. Being a recent release, as of now, the movie is not available on video sharing platforms.

I watched the film on one of the OTT platforms. The film is not a biopic on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. It is based on later events, relating to the investigations by Mukherjee Commission, which was set up by Government of India in 1999 to probe the death of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. The Commission was assigned the task to tackle the three broad theories surrounding the alleged mysteries and unanswered questions related to Netaji’s death. First, Netaji died in a plane crash while taking off from an airport in Taiwan. Second, he staged a fake plane crash to escape to Russia where he died in prison. Lastly, Netaji staged a plane crash, escaped to Russia and returned to India as a sanyasi (monk) known as ‘Bhagwan ji’ or ‘Gumnaami Baba’ who died in September 1985 in Faizabad.

Film starts with Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru advising Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, who was the then Congress President, that he should support the British Government during World War II. They also advocate non-violent methods for attaining India’s freedom from the British Rule. Netaji disagrees by saying that freedom is to be snatched from Britishers rather than demanding from them. Due to his differences with Congress High Command, he resigns from the Indian National Congress. He goes abroad to make allies with Japan and Germany who are at war with Great Britain and the Allied forces. He sets up Indian National Army with the support of Japan.

After the surrender of Japan to allied forces in Burma, Netaji shifts his forces to Singapore and then to Bangkok. He advises his forces to surrender while he with Rahman will go to Tokyo for onward escape to Soviet Union which, according to his view, would become anti-British after the war. He can then fight for India’s independence from there. While travelling to Soviet Union, Netaji’s plane catches fire and he dies after a few hours of the accident due to burn injury on August 18, 1945. He is cremated and his ashes are taken to Tokyo.

There have been many commissions and reports to inquire about the circumstances of Netaji’s death but there still remains uncertainty and the doubts have been raised in various quarters about the death of Netaji from time to time. In 1999, Government of India decides to set up the Mukherjee Commission go into the mysteries behind Netaji’s death afresh.

In 2003, a journalist, Chandrachur Dhar is given an independent assignment by his employer, Indiatimes to make a research-based study on the mystery of Netaji’s death. Chandrachur believes that all the myths surrounding Netaji’s death are hoaxes. Nevertheless, he takes up the assignment and spends much of his time in gathering evidences. During this period, his entire thinking about Netaji’s life changes. The study and research on the Netaji’s life becomes his obsession to such an extent that he neglects his personal life. His wife, Ronita feels that she is living with a husband who is unstable, crazy and unpredictable. In a fit of anger, she ransacks all the papers and documents which Chandrachur had collected in the course of his reasearch. She files for a divorce and gets it. In frustration, Chandrachur resigns his job. Instead, he forms a passionate group of his friends called ‘Mission Netaji’ to study and research to solve the mystery of Netaji’s death.

Based on extensive studies and research, Chandrachur makes presentations before the Mukherjee Commission with evidences to prove that Netaji did not die in plane crash but escaped to Russia by staging a fake plane crash. From Russia, he came to India via Tibet as a wandering monk and stayed in Lucknow. He submits 19 evidences in support of his contention.  In 2005, Mukherjee Commission presented the report to the Government of India. The Report was presented to Lok Sabha and was publicly released.

Chandrachur and his friends of ‘Mission Netaji’ have assembled in his house to read the Commission’s report. Ronita, his ex-wife has come to wish her best to Chandrachur. While Commission has come to the conclusion that Netaji has not died in the plane crash based on the various evidences including the DNA report of his remains which have been kept in Tokyo, which was identified as that of a Japanese soldier. However, due to absence of any concrete evidence, the Commission is unable to come to the conclusion whether Netaji escaped to Russia. Further, the DNA test of Gumnaami Baba did not match with that of Netaji.  The Government of India rejected the report without giving any reasons.

The rejection of the Commission’s report affected Chandrachur so much that he locks himself in a room full of the books, and documents collected over the last 3 years for his ‘Mission Netaji’. He starts burning every documents, files and books connected with his research so much so the entire room engulfs with fire. Ronita calls his friends and gets the door broken to rescue Chandrachur. The film ends with Ronita convincing Chandrachur to keep on fighting for the truth of Netaji’s death. Hence, the fight must go on until an end to the mystery.

Before I started watching this film, I did not have a very high expectation from the film because, there has been many films on the life of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. Furthermore, I was one of the believers that Netaji died in the plane crash in August 1945 and the talks thereafter about the mystery of his death were all myths and conjectures. But once I completed watching the film in one sitting, I must admit that the director, Srijit Mukherjee has managed to present the film in a way which made me to rethink about the controversies surrounding Netaji’s death. This film is a class by itself putting it on a different pedestal.

Prosenjit Chatterjee, in the role of Netaji as well as Gumnaami Baba has given an excellent performance which was a pleasant surprise for me as most of his roles in Bangla films are that of a romantic hero. His performance as a Gumnaami Baba looks so real that for once, I started feeling that Gumnaami Baba could really be Netaji in disguise. As Netaji, almost all of his dialogues are in Hindi and English. It is only when he turns to act as Gumnaami Baba, his dialogues are in Bangla.

Another roll of honor in the film goes to Anirban Bhattacharya, who in the role of Chandrachur Dhar, has given the superb performance as a journalist. His submissions to the Mukherjee Commission and the crazy reactions to the news that the Commission’s reports have been rejected by the Government are his top-most performances in the film. In fact, he has an equal presence in the film if not more than Prosenjit Chatterjee.

The film is a mix of black & white and colour. The scenes involving Netaji in pre-1945 period are in black & white while scenes representing Gumnaami Baba, Chandrachur Dhar, the journalist and the proceedings of the Mukherjee Commission are in colour. The film has dialogues in Bangla, Hindi, English and few dialogues in Japanese. These combinations in the film give a feel of a period atmosphere as well as the natural proceedings of the story in the film.

While on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, it is incidental and interesting to note that today, July 23rd,is the Remembrance Day of one of Netaji’s closest aides who led  INA’s Women Wing named the Rani Jhansi Regiment. She is Captain (Dr) Lakshmi Sehgal (24/20/1914 – 23/07/2012) of INA born as Lakshmi Swaminathan. She had barely completed her MBBS and arrived in Singapore, where she met with Netaji and got immersed in the Azad Hind movement.

During the surrender of Singapore by British to the Japanese, Dr Lakshmi helped heal the wounded soldiers of prisoners of war, many of whom were Indians. They desired to form the Azad Hind Fauj. After the arrival of Netaji in Singapore in July 1943, Dr. Lakshmi met Netaji who was keen to take women into INA. Thus she became Captain Lakshmi Swaminathan of Rani Jhansi Regiment of INA.

In Burma operations, INA joined Japanese in December 1944 but by March 1945, Japanese were on the losing ground. INA decided to beat a retreat from Burma. While crossing into Imphal, Captain Lakshmi was arrested in Burma by the British Forces and held in prison in Burma until March 1946 when she was sent to Delhi for trials as a war criminal. However, on the eve of India getting independence,  Captain Sehgal and many of the INA facing trials were set free.

In March 1947, Captain Lakshmi married Prem Kumar Sehgal and shifted to Kanpur. She continued her medical practice in Kanpur. She became a Rajya Sabha member in 1971. During the Bangla Desh crisis in 1971, she set up relief and medical camps for refugees from East Pakistan in Kolkata. During the Bhopal gas tragedy in December 1984, she led a medical team to look after those affected by the gas. She was active as a medical practitioner until the age of 92.

‘Gumnaami’ (2019) has 5 songs of which 3 are in Hindi. All songs have been used in the film as background songs. I am presenting “Shubh Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barse” rendered by Babul Supriyo and chorus. There is an interesting history behind this song.

After the establishment of the provisional Government in exile of INA in 1943, Netaji decided to have a National Anthem for his Government. He himself selected Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s “Jan Gan Man Adhinayak Jai He” and asked Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani of INA to translate it into Hindustani so that it becomes easy to understand the meaning to all. He selected Captain Ram Singh Thakur to composed in the martial music so that the listeners would be awaken. It is significant to note that on the day of India’s independence on August 15, 1947, Jawaharlal Nehru unfurled the Tricolour on the ramparts of the Red Fort after which Captain Ram Singh Thakur of INA conducted the orchestra with his musicians, playing the tune of the National Anthem of INA.

In the film, this song appears towards the end of the film, incorporating the flashback of what has happened in the life of Netaji from 1940-45 and the efforts made by the journalist to unlock the mystery of Netaji’s death. The credit title of the film gives credit to Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani as lyricists and the music to Captain Ram Singh Thakur. However, I feel that Rabindranath Tagore should also get the credit since the tune was originally composed by him for “Jan Gan Man Adhinayak Jai He”. The audio clip of the song has one extra stanza.

It is the song which reminds us with moist eyes, the fond memory of Netaji of his sacrifice for the freedom of the motherland.

Video

Audio

Song – Shubh Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barse (Gumnaami) (Bangla) (2019) Singer – Babul Supriyo, Lyrics – Mumtaz Hussain, Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani , MD – Captain Ram Singh Thakur
[Note on MD – The original score of this song is created by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore, the creator of the “Jan Gan Man. . .” anthem.]
Chorus

Lyrics

shubh sukh chain ki barkha barse
bharat bhaag hai jaaga
punjab, sindh, gujarat, maratha
draavid, utkal, banga
chanchal sagar, vindh, himaalaya
neela yamuna, ganga
tere nit gun gaaye
tujh se jeewan paaye
har tan paaye asha
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai jai jai ho..o
bharat naam subhaaga
 
sab ke dil mein preet basaaye
teri meethi baani
har subey ke rahne waale
har mazhab ke praani
sab bhed aur farak mita ke
sab god mein teri aa ke
goondhe prem ki maala
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai  jai  jai ho…o
bharat naam subhaaga
 
subah savere pankh pakheru
tere hi gun gaayen
baas bhari bharpur hawaayen
jeewan mein rut laayen
sab mil kar hind pukaaren
jai azad hind ke naare
pyaara desh hamaara
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai jai jai ho…o
bharat naam subhaaga…aa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
शुभ सुख चैन की बरखा बरसे
भारत भाग है जागा
पंजाब सिंध गुजरात मराठा
द्राविड़ उत्कल बंग
चंचल सागर विंध्य हिमाला
नीर यमुना गंगा
तेरे नित गुण गाये
तुझ से जीवन पाये
हर तन पाये आशा
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय जय जय जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
भारत नाम सुभागा

सबके दिल में प्रीत बसाये
तेरी मीठी बानी
हर सूबे के रहने वाले
हर मज़हब के प्राणी
सब भेद और फर्क मिटा के
सब गोद में तेरी आ के
गूँधे प्रेम की माला
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय जय जय जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
भारत नाम सुभागा

सुबह सवेरे पंख पखेरू
तेरे ही गुण गायें
बास भरी भरपूर हवाएं
जीवन में रूत लाएँ
सब मिल कर हिन्द पुकारें
जय आज़ाद हिन्द के नारे
प्यारा देश हमारा
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय जय जय जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
भारत नाम सुभागा

 


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4379 Post No. : 15724 Movie Count :

4335

Today (14 July 2020) is the 101st birth anniversary of Sagat Singh (14 july 1919- 26 September 2001). He had nothing to do with HFM, but I am discussing him today. why ? Because I think that he deserves to be known to all of us. His name should occupy a pride of place among the great sons of India.

Sagat Singh started his military career in pre independence era as a JCO (Naik) with Bikaner Ganga Risala (army of the riyasat of Bikaner). Later he was promoted as Naib Sebedar and then as second lieutenant.

On amalgamation of the State Forces into Indian Army in 1950 after independence, he joined Third Gorkha Rifles of Indian Army. He commanded the Second and Third Battalions of the Third Gorkha Rifles.

In September 1961, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier and he was posted as the brigade commander of India’s only parachute brigade, the 50th Parachute Brigade. Most army officers would scoff at joining Parachute brigade, but Sagat Singh joined it enthusiastically and became a paratrooper himself.

Goa liberation war 1961
————————————

The first memorable event in Sagat Singh’s career came in december 1961 which was liberation of Goa. Though India had become independent on 15 August 1947, Goa continued to be under Portugal occupation. Portugal refused to leave Goa, claiming that Goa was not a colony but part of metropolitan Portugal and hence its transfer to India was non-negotiable, and that India had no rights to this territory because the Republic of India did not exist at the time when Goa came under Portuguese rule.

The public opinion in Goa was to join India, but these movements were being forcibly suppressed by Portuguese authorities. The relations between Goa and India became tense. On 24 November 1961, Sabarmati, a passenger boat passing between the Indian port of Kochi and the Portuguese-held island of Anjidiv, was fired upon by Portuguese ground troops, resulting in the death of a passenger and injuries to the chief engineer. The action was precipitated by Portuguese fears that the boat carried a military landing party intent on storming the island. The incidents lent themselves to fostering widespread public support in India for military action in Goa.

On receiving the go-ahead for military action and a mandate for the capture of all occupied territories for the Indian government, Lieutenant-General Chaudhari of the Indian Army’s Southern Command fielded the 17th Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth and the 50th Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh.

The operation for the liberation of Goa, code named ‘Vijay’, was planned for 14 December, 1961. In order to prevent international intervention, and reinforcements from Portugal reaching Goa, it was essential that the operation was quick, and decisive. After a quick appreciation, Chaudhury decided to mount a two pronged attack. The main force, comprising 17 Infantry Division, was to move into Goa from the East, while 50 Parachute Brigade, under Brigadier Sagat Singh, was to mount a subsidiary thrust from the North. Major General K.P. Candeth, GOC 17 Infantry Division, was placed in overall command of the task force.

It was decided during meeting in Delhi that 2 Para battalion of 50 para brigade would be air dropped by Air force in Goa. But airforce later backed off and this plan had to be abandoned. This 2 para moved to Belgaum where it was met by 1 para of 50 para brigade. 2 Sikh Light infantry (based at Madras) also joined them. They along with 7th cavalry and 8th cavalty were also put under the command of Sagat Singh. So in summary, Sagat Singh commanded 50th Para Brigade, which had as its units 1st para battalion, 2nd Para battalion, 2 Sikh Light Infantry battalion, 7th Light cavalry and 8th light cavalry.

The brigade moved to Savantvadi on 13 December, and thence to its assembly area East of Dodamarg on the 16th. Meanwhile, 17 Infantry Division had also commenced its move from Ambala on 2 December, and had concentrated in Belgaum by 12 December. A tactical headquarters was established by HQ Southern Command at Belgaum on 13 December, and the Army Commander with his staff began to function from here. D Day for the operation was initially decided as 14 December, but was later postponed, due to political reasons, in an attempt to avert the conflict, and resolve the problem by diplomatic means. It was finally decided that the operation would commence on the night of 18 December.

Three days before D Day, the COAS, General P.N. Thapar, accompanied by Lieut General P.P. Kumaramangalam, the Adjutant General, and Lieut General J.N. Chaudhury, the Army Commander, visited the brigade, and Sagat presented his plan for the operation. At the end of the presentation, the Army Commander expressed the view that Sagat’s timings were too optimistic, and had reservations about them being adhered to. Sagat then gave the timings in writing, and the party left, after wishing the brigade good luck. On return to his tactical HQ, The Army Commander conveyed his doubts to his staff. However, Air Vice Marshal Pinto, and the Chief of Staff, Major General P.O. Dunn, as well as Mr. G.N. Handoo, of the IB, who knew Sagat well, supported him, and he was allowed to proceed according to his plan. As it happened, Sagat had already kept a reserve of four hours, and was able to remain well ahead of the estimated timings, when the operations took place.

50 Parachute Brigade had been given a subsidiary task, of advancing from the North, primarily to tie down the Portuguese troops in that area. However, Sagat was not the type to be shackled by rigid orders, and had already visualised a larger role for himself. He had decided to move on a wide front on two axes, with a vehicle mounted battalion group on each, supported by armour and artillery. He reasoned that if he was held up on one axis, he would continue the advance on the other, and using the reserve battalion, advance deeper into Goa, either through Bicholim-Mapuca-Panjim Creek, or via Sanquelim-Usgaon-Ponda-Velha Goa, on to Panjim. 2 Sikh Light Infantry group, supported by a squadron of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8 Cavalry, was tasked to advance on the Bicholim axis. 2 Para, supported by rest of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8th Cavalry, was assigned the Sanquelim axis. 1 Para was kept in reserve.

Though the operation was to commence on the night of 18 December, Sagat had decided to launch fighting patrols the previous night, to overcome the border outposts, in order to facilitate the entry of the main column across the border the following morning. Accordingly, Sagat had tasked 1 Para to capture two border outposts, and 2 Para to proceed along the ‘smugglers route’ and capture the single span 110 feet long bridge over the Sanquelim river, on the previous night. As these preliminary operations were going on, All India Radio gave the game away, by announcing shortly after midnight, that Indian troops were crossing into Goa. This alerted the Portuguese, and the element of surprise, so important in such operations, was lost. One company of 2 Para, after a swift night approach, had reached within 200 yards of the bridge, when barking dogs alerted the defending troops, who quickly fired the demolitions and fled.

The Portuguese Governor General and C-in-C, Major General Vassalo De Silva, was from the Corps of Engineers, and had got demolition chambers made in all the bridges, with explosives attached, for rapid demolitions. However, the company of 2 Para found a crossing place, and secured the home bank, enabling the tanks, guns and vehicles to cross the river. The Portuguese had not been able to fire all the demolition charges, and only those at the two ends had exploded. The single span had fallen down but was undamaged. Using marine jacks, the span was lifted, and with the addition of abutments at both ends, the bridge was soon re-commissioned. 1 Para also managed to capture the villages of Ibrampur, Maulinguem and Doromaoga, by first light of 18 December, though it suffered some casualties.

The main force, viz 17 Infantry Division commenced from its assembly area South of Belgaum, at dawn on 18 December, with 63 Infantry Brigade in the lead. It was planned to advance up to Ponda, by way of Mollem. 48 Infantry Brigade, which was following, was to pass through at Ponda, and go for Panjim, which was the final objective. Due to the advance on foot and abnormally large bridging column which was following the leading brigade, 48 Infantry Brigade could not keep up its advance, and when it reached River Candepar in evening, it found it was already occupied by paratroopers. Two battalions of 50 Parachute Brigade, 2 Para and 2 Sikh LI, had also commenced their advance at first light, on 18 December. Moving on converging axes, they did not let the blown up bridges deter them and simply swam across. The absence of heavy equipment, and light opposition from the enemy, coupled with initiative of the leaders, made this possible. As a result, the para troopers made excellent progress, and achieved more than what was expected from them. By 8.30 a.m. 2 Sikh LI had taken Bicholim and by 10.30 a.m. 2 Para reached Sanquelim, and by 5.30 p.m., occupied Ponda. This was done in spite of two major obstacles, in the form of the rivers Usgaon and Candepar, which were crossed by means of improvised rafts and fording.

After the crossing of the wide Usgaon river, Sagat felt that there was now no need to hold 1 Para in reserve, and he ordered them to head straight for Banasterim, after crossing the ferry at Piligao. According to his initial plan, on reaching Panjim, 2 Para was to establish a firm base close to the city, and 1 Para would be tasked to clear the expected resistance in the built up area. The lack of enemy resistance, and speed of advance had altered the situation. Another development took place at tactical HQ of Southern Command, at Belgaum. A wireless intercept indicated that the Portuguese Governor General had called for a meeting next morning at 8 a.m., to consider surrender. The Army Commander, when informed of this, realised that the Portuguese had lost the battle. Seeing the slow progress of 17 Infantry Division, and the rapid advance of 50 Para Brigade, he decided to change the plan. The task of capturing Panjim, which had been earlier assigned to 17 Division, was now given to the paratroopers, who were asked resume advance during the night. Due to break down in signal communications, this order could not be passed to HQ 17 Infantry Division, which had ordered 50 Para Brigade to firm in at Ponda, and tasked 48 Brigade to capture Panjim. However, Lieut-General Chaudhury personally spoke to the Brigade Major of 50 Para Brigade, and passed these instructions, since Sagat was away from his headquarters, visiting 2 Para, at that time. Incidentally, 50 Para Brigade was able to maintain contact with Belgaum throughout the operation, thanks to a radio relay detachment, which Sagat had managed to get from Major General R.N. Batra, the Signal Officer-in-Chief, on the ‘old boy’ net.

The advance of 2 Sikh LI was initially slow, even though it was led by the squadron of 7 Cavalry, and a troop of AMX tanks. Sagat felt that they had a tendency to hug the ground, and this accounted for their slow progress. He had to personally push them hard, before they speeded up their advance, and reached the Betim ferry, on the Panjim Creek, by last light. By this time, 1 Para had reached the outskirts of Panjim. With two battalions around Panjim by the evening of 18 December, 50 Para Brigade was now poised to capture the town, from the East as well as the North. However, it was almost dark, and Sagat did not want to enter the built up area of Panjim by night. He ordered 1 Para and 2 Sikh LI to halt, and establish harbours, for the night.

On the morning of 19 December, using the Betim ferry, some troops of 2 Sikh LI crossed the Panjim Creek, and arrived in Panjim at 8 am. Shortly afterwards, 1 Para also reached Panjim. Except for some firing from the customs house, there was no effective resistance, and the city was in Indian hands by 9 a.m. By a remarkable coincidence, the COs of both battalions had the same name. 1 Para was being commanded by Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh, VrC, MC, while the CO of 2 Sikh LI was Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh. It was the latter who won the race by an hour, and had the honour of accepting the surrender of the Portuguese troops, who had assembled in the officers mess. Major General Vassalo De’ Silva, the Governor General and C-in-C, escaped to Marmagao, and surrendered later. The Navy had already taken Anjidiv island the previous day, and also sunk the Portuguese frigate ‘Albuquerque’. At 11 a.m., Lieut-General Chaudhury, accompanied by Air Vice Marshal Pinto arrived in a helicopter, and got the tri-colour hoisted on the Secretariat building. Goa had been liberated, in an operation which lasted a little over 24 hours.

So, one can say that Goa was supposed to be liberated by 17st Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth, with 50th. Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh supposed to play a supporting role. But it was the other way round. Sagat Singh’s 50th Parachute Brigade reached Panjim and accepted surrender of Goan authority, while 17th Infantry Division was still struggling to reach Panjim.

Though the result of the operations in Goa was along expected lines, the speed of the Indian advance surprised many observers. The credit for this goes to Sagat, and his troops, who exceeded their brief, and managing to reach Panjim, which they had not been asked to do. The fact that 17 Infantry Division, in spite of the vastly superior resources at their disposal, and almost no opposition from the enemy, could make little headway, goes to show that the going was not easy. If the paratroopers succeeded, it was because of better fighting spirit, morale and leadership. The ability to take risks, and seize fleeting opportunities is the hall mark of a successful military leader, and Sagat proved beyond doubt that he had these qualities in ample measure.

Bangladesh Liberation War 1971
—————————————————-

In 1971 war, time was of essence. As soon as Pakistan started the war, on 3 December 1971 (by carrying out what they thought was an Israeli style bombing on Indian airfields), India retaliated and Pakistan ran to the UN on 4 December 1971 (in a very un Israel like manner), requesting UN to intervene and order ceasefire. Pakistan was supported by USA and China, while USSR vetoed the proposal, Britain and France abstained. So, India had limited time in which to achieve their task before Pakistan could manage to get ceasefire, like how they had managed to force India, then on the verge of defeating Pakistan soundly, into ceasefire in 1965, thanks to Chinese aggression at Sikkim.

In 1971, The task of liberating Bangla Desh, then called East Pakistan, was given to Lieut General Jagjit Singh Aurora, GOC-in-C Eastern Command. He had four corps under him, namely- 2 Corps, commanded by Lieut General (later General) T.N. Raina; 33 Corps, commanded by Lieut General M.L. Thapan; 4 Corps, commanded by Lieut General Sagat Singh; and 101 Communication Zone Area, commanded by Major General G.S. Gill.

East Pakistan had three major rivers and that divided it into four major territories. Each of the corps was given the task of capturing one territory each. The part south of river Padma (that is known as Ganga in India) was to be captured by Corps II, advancing from West (viz from West Bengal). The part between Padma (Ganga in India) and Jamuna (known as Brahmputra in India) was to be captured by Corps XXXIII, advancing from North west. Another major river is river Meghna (combination of Barak river and Kushtia river, both originating in Assam), which flows south west and joins Padma (which is already merged with Jamuna by then). The mighty river that thus gets formed is known as Meghna from then onwards and it flows into bay of Bengal. Sagat Singh’s corps 4 was given the task of capturing the territory east of River Meghna, attacking from east. The fourth territory, viz the northern territory between Jamuna and Meghna rivers was to be captured by 101 Communication Zone Area, attacking from north.

Bangladesh is a territory full of rivers. Crossing them is tough because there are very few bridges on them.

Pakistan had three infantry divisions, comprising about 42 battalions of regular troops, and five squadrons of armour, for the defence of the region, and more than 2000 kilometres of border. Lieut General A.A.K. Niazi, who was commanding the Eastern Command of the Pakistan Army, had appreciated that the Indian advance would have to be along the major road axes, and had deployed his troops accordingly. Strong points had been created along the likely axes, and it was visualised that unless these were cleared, the advancing enemy could make little headway.

Lt General Niazi’s hunch was correct as far as corps II, corps XXXIII and 101 communication zone were concerned. They advanced in the conventional way along the predicted route where Pakistani forces awaited them. Fighting them and defeating them consumed precious time of these corps of Indian Army. As a result, these corps fell way behind schedule in achieving their targets. Time was important because the longer the war prolonged, more was the possibility that UN would force a ceasefire and like in 1965, it would end up in a stalemate, with nothing to show for by India.

Just when it looked gloomy for Indian forces, Sagat Singh employed some unconventional strategies that no military strategist had ever thought of. Realising that time was important and using the same conventional method of advancing on land was time consuming, he decided to air drop his troops across river Meghna. He had antique helicopters which were not meant for this purpose, but he made them fly hundreds of sorties, and in each sortie 17 troops were carried (about 5 more than the carrying capacity). It was a risky gamble, and these helicopters were shot at by Pakistani troops. On one occasion, one helicopter was hit by these shots. The bullets hit the pilot and grazed past Sagat Singh, also flying in the helicopter. Sagat Singh was playing for broke, and his gamble paid off big time.

When his Corps had reached the Meghna River and he was trying to cross the river to advance to Dacca, Aurora tried to restrain him. Sagat told him that he was surprised at his reluctance when he was not only fulfilling the task given to him but achieving task plus. Hesuccessfully conducted an ad hoc and impromptu river crossing operation across one of the widest rivers of the world.

The air lift began on the afternoon of December 9, and continued for the next 36 hours. A total of 110 sorties were flown, from a stadium, and crossed the Meghna, which was 4,000 yards wide, to land at helipads which had been marked by torches, with their reflectors removed. During day, the troops were landed in paddy fields, with helicopters hovering low above the ground. The first battalion of 311 Mountain Brigade, 4 Guards, was landed in Raipura. while 9 Punjab crossed the river using country boats.

Next day, the troops were landed directly at Narsingdi. Meanwhile, 73 Brigade had started to cross, using boats, which had been rounded up. The ferrying of artillery and tanks was a serious problem, and required considerable ingenuity on the part of the Engineers. By 11 December, both 311 and 73 Mountain Brigade had crossed the Meghna, and were ordered to advance to Dacca, on different axes. Using all modes of transport, including bullock carts and cycle rickshaws, both brigades advanced rapidly, and on December 14, the first artillery shell was fired on Dacca. Meanwhile, 101 communication zone too advanced towards Dacca from north. This, as well as other units that began arriving towards Dhaka were put under the command of Sagat Singh on 15 December. Shelling commenced and the message for Pakistan Army was clear, surrender or perish. One way or the other, Dacca was bound to fall to Indian forces on 16 December 1971.

Niazi surrendered on 16 december 1971. Unlike in 1965, when Pakistan avoided a humiliating defeat, this time, Pakistan could not save face. On 12 December, with Pakistan facing imminent defeat, the United States requested that the Security Council be reconvened. Pakistan’s Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was rushed to New York City to make the case for a resolution on the cease fire. The council continued deliberations for four days. By the time proposals were finalised, Pakistan’s forces in the East had surrendered and the war had ended, making the measures merely academic. Bhutto, frustrated by the failure of the resolution and the inaction of the United Nations, ripped up his speech and left the council. 🙂

So, Sagat Singh’s unconventional tactics bamboozled Pakistani army and Pakistani rulers alike. Pakistan was forced to surrender several days before than they had expected. Some “experts” thought that Niazi should have deferred his decision by another one day. But these experts forget that Niazi had no choice. There was no way he would have left Dacca alive without Indian forces’ protection. Even if there was ceasefire, Indian troops would have just handed him over to Mukti Bahini. So surrendering before Indian army was an offer that Niazi could not refuse. 🙂

Here is that famous surrender photo. Sagat Singh is seen standing immediately behind Niazi.

So, one can see that Sagat Singh caused liberation of Goa on 19 december 1961 and liberation of Bangladesh on 16 december 1971. It was almost a “ten year liberation challenge” (dec 1961-dec 1971) as far as he was concerned ! 🙂

But, neither of these two feats were the biggest achievements of his career, in my opinion. His biggest achievement, in my opinion, that had far reaching implications for India, and therefore world affairs, came about in 1967 and ironically, very few people know about it and even talk about it. and that was :-

1967 India China War
————————————–

I have mentioned it earlier that India was winning against Pakistan decisively in 1965 when China, in a bid to save Pakistan, opened a front at Sikkim, and accused India of provocation and made some unreasonable demands on India. Indian government got nervous and declared ceasefire when on the verge of victory against Pakistan. This saved Pakistan big time. On the negotiating table, Pakistan got back everything that it had lost in the war. India not only surrendered all the gains of the war, even its PM Lal Bahadur Shashtri died mysteriously at Tashkant, where this meeting was taking place. So to many Indians it felt as if the entire world ganged up against India and India was stabbed in the back for the misdeed of Pakistan and Pakistan got away scot free.

Among the threats made by China while opening the Sikkim front with India, was the unreasonable demand that India vacated the two passes that were under Indian occupation, claiming that they were Chinese territories. These passes were Nathu La pass and Jelep La pass.

Nathu La was under mountain division 17 (headed by its Division Commander Major General Sagat Singh) while Jelep La was under mountain division 27 (headed by another Major General ). Both were under Lt Gen G G Bewoor, Corps commander of corps XXXIII.

In the opinion of Corps Commander Lt Gen Bewoor, the main defences of 17 Mountain Division were at Changgu, while Nathu La was only an observation post. Likewise In the adjoining sector, manned by 27 Mountain Division, Jelep La was also considered an observation post, with the main defences located at Lungthu. In case of hostilities, the divisional commanders had been given the authority to vacate the posts, and fall back on the main defences. Accordingly, orders were issued by Corps HQ to both divisions to vacate Nathu La and Jelep La.

Sagat did not agree with the views of the Corps HQ. Nathu La and Jelep La were passes, on the watershed, which was the natural boundary. The MacMahon Line, which India claimed as the International Border, followed the water shed principle, and India and China had gone to war over this issue, three years earlier. Vacating the passes on the watershed would give the Chinese the tactical advantage of observation and fire, into India, while denying the same to our own troops. Nathu La and Jelep La were also important because they were on the trade routes between India and Tibet, and provided the only means of ingress through the Chumbi Valley. Handing it over to the enemy on a platter was not Sagat’s idea of sound military strategy. Sagat also reasoned that the discretion to vacate the posts lay with the divisional commander, and he was not obliged to do so, based on instructions from Corps HQ.

As a result of orders issued by Corps HQ, 27 Mountain Division vacated Jelep La, which the Chinese promptly occupied. However, Sagat refused to vacate Nathu La, and when the Chinese became belligerent, and opened fire, he also opened up with guns and mortars, though there was a restriction imposed by Corps on the use of artillery. Lieut-General (later General) G.G. Bewoor, the Corps Commander, was extremely annoyed, and tried to speak to Sagat, to ask him to explain his actions. But Sagat was not in his HQ, and was with the forward troops. So it was his GSO 1, Lieut Colonel Lakhpat Singh, who bore the brunt of the Corps Commander’s wrath.

The Chinese had installed loudspeakers at Nathu La, and warned the Indians that they would suffer as they did in 1962, if they did not withdraw. However, Sagat had carried out a detailed appreciation of the situation, and reached the conclusion that the Chinese were bluffing. They made threatening postures, such as advancing in large numbers, but on reaching the border, always stopped, turned about and withdrew. They also did not use any artillery, for covering fire, which they would have certainly done if they were serious about capturing any Indian positions. Indian defences at Nathu La were strong. Sagat had put artillery observation posts on adjoining high features called Camel’s Back and Sebu La, which overlooked into the Yatung valley for several kilometres, and could bring down accurate fire on the enemy, an advantage that the Chinese did not have. It would be a tactical blunder to vacate Nathu La, and gift it to the Chinese.

During the crisis, the Chinese had occupied Jelep La, but had gained nothing in the sector under Sagat’s division. This was galling for them, and they continued their pressure on the Indians, and making threatening gestures. In December 1965, the Chinese fired on a patrol of 17 Assam Rifles, in North Sikkim, at a height of 16,000 feet, killing two men. The patrol was in Indian territory, but the Chinese claimed that it had crossed over to their side. They made regular broadcasts from loudspeakers at Nathu La, pointing out to Indian troops the pathetic conditions in which they lived, their low salaries and lack of amenities, comparing these to that of officers. It was a form of psychological warfare in which the Chinese were adept, and had to be countered. Sagat had similar loud speakers installed on our own side, and tape recorded messages, in Chinese language, were broadcast every day. However, he was not satisfied with this, and kept looking for a chance to avenge the death of the Indian soldiers who had fallen to Chinese bullets.

Throughout 1966, and early 1967, Chinese propaganda, intimidation and attempted incursions into Indian territory continued. The border was not marked, and there were several vantage points on the crest line which both sides thought belonged to them. Patrols which walked along the border often clashed, resulting in tension, and sometimes even casualties.

In 1967, Sagat discussed the problem with the new Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora. He suggested that the border at Nathu La should be clearly marked, to prevent such incidents, and offered to walk along the crest line, to test the Chinese resolve. If they did not object, the line along which he walked could be taken to be acceptable to them. This was agreed to, and Sagat, accompanied by an escort, began walking along the crest. The Chinese commander also walked alongside, accompanied by a photographer, who kept taking pictures. However, there was no confrontation, and the ‘walk’ ended peacefully.

Sagat then obtained the concurrence of the Corps Commander to mark the crest line, along which he had walked. He ordered a double wire fence to be erected, from Nathu La towards the North and South Shoulders. However, as soon as work began on the fence, on 20 August 1967, the Chinese became agitated, and asked the Indians to stop. One strand of wire was laid that day, and two more were added over the next two days. On 6 September, a patrol of 2 Grenadiers, the battalion which was holding defences at Nathula, was going towards the South Shoulder, when it was surrounded by about seventy Chinese, and threatened. The next day, the Chinese physically tried to interfere with the construction of the fence, and there was a scuffle. However, work continued on the next two days, and was almost completed on the 10th.

Since the Chinese appeared determined to prevent completion of the fence, it was decided to start early on 11th, and finish the job before first light. All available manpower, including a platoon of Engineers and another of Pioneers, was deployed for the task. A company of 18 Rajput was also brought in, to reinforce the position, and protect the men who were to construct the fence. As soon as work commenced, the Chinese came upto the fence, and tried to stop the work. There was a heated discussion between the Chinese commander, who was accompanied by the political commissar, and Lieut Colonel Rai Singh, CO 2 Grenadiers. Sagat had foreseen this eventuality, and told Lieut Colonel Rai Singh not to expose himself, and remain in his bunker, where the Brigade Commander, Brigadier M.M.S. Bakshi, was also present. But this was not heeded, and the CO, with an escort, came out in the open, to stand face to face with the Chinese officers. As the arguments became more heated, tempers rose, but both sides stood their ground. Suddenly, the Chinese opened fire, causing several casualties among the troops working on the wire fence. Lieut Colonel Rai Singh was hit by a Chinese bullet, and fell down.

Seeing their CO fall, the Grenadiers became mad with rage. In a fit of fury, they came out of their trenches, and attacked the Chinese post, led by Captain P.S. Dagar. The company of 18 Rajput, under Major Harbhajan Singh, and the Engineers working on the fence had been caught in the open, and suffered a few casualties from the Chinese firing. Realising that the only way to neutralise the Chinese fire was a physical assault, Harbhajan shouted to his men, and led them in a charge on the Chinese position. Several of the Indian troops were mowed down, by Chinese machine guns, but those who reached the Chinese bunkers used their bayonets, and accounted for many of the enemy. Both Harbhajan and Dagar lost their lives in the action, which developed into a full scale battle, lasting three days. Sagat had asked for some medium guns, and these were moved up to Kyangnosa La, at a height of over 10,000 ft.

Those day, authority to use artillery was only with Army Chief. Sagat Singh asked for permission to use artillery. His commanding officer sent the request to Delhi where the request went tthrough various channels in a proper bureaucratic manner. Seeing that it would be too late if he kept waiting for the orders from Delhi, Sagat Singh ordered firing of artillery on his own.

The artillery observation posts, which Sagat had sited earlier, proved their worth in bringing down effective fire on the Chinese. Because of lack of visibility, and the steep incline West of Nathu La, most Chinese shells fell behind the forward defences, and did not harm the Indians. Indian artillery shelling caused heavy damage on Chinese. Based on their observation of meek Indian behaviour so far, Chinese forces had never expected such a furious response.

The Indian casualties in the action were just over two hundred – 65 dead and 145 wounded. The Chinese are estimated to have suffered about three hundred casualties. Though the action taken by Sagat, in marking the border with a wire fence, had the approval of higher authorities, the large number of casualties suffered by both sides created a furore. The casualties to Indian troops would not have occurred if they had remained in their defences, and not exposed themselves by coming out of their trenches and rushing at the Chinese post. This happened in the heat of the moment, because seeing their CO fall, the troops lost their cool, and rushed forward under the orders of a young officer, who lost his life in the action.

The Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora, visited Nathu La, to assess the situation. Sagat was advised to prevent further escalation of hostilities, and avoid casualties to Indian troops.

The Chinese had already announced that it was the Indians who started the conflict, and the large number of Indian bodies, and wounded Indian soldiers, in their possession, seemed to support their claim. However, Sagat was not perturbed. For the last two years, the Chinese had been instigating him, and had killed several Indian soldiers. The specter of Chinese attack, of 1962, still haunted the military and political leadership in India and had prevented them from taking effective action against them. This was the first time the Chinese got a bloody nose, and the myth of their invincibility was broken.

This was not the end of the face-off with the Chinese. They had suffered more than 300 casualties and seemed unwilling to let the watershed cool down. On 1 Oct, a confrontation ensued between the Chinese and 7/11 Gorkha Regiment at Chola, a pass west of Nathu La and under the responsibility of 63 Brigade. The Gorkhas had that very day taken over the post at Pt 15450 from 10 J&K Rifles. A scuffle ensued between the JCO post commander and his Chinese counterpart over a boulder which was on the watershed. The Chinese bayoneted the JCO and his men retaliated with the deadly use of the khukhri. A fierce hand to hand struggle ensued and a neighbouring post came under attack. The Gorkhas were unwilling to start their tenure with a defeat and got clearance from the Brigade Commander to raise the stakes. Pt 15450, which had been taken by the Chinese, was vigorously attacked with close quarter khukhri work and the Chinese were evicted. This was a clear signal to them that the Indians would not surrender an inch of territory and the area around the watershed stabilised, ultimately being designated as the Line of Actual Control.

These two incidents were so unexpected and demoralising for the Chinese that there has been no firing on the LAC from that time in 1967 till today (2020). They kept threatening Indian even later, but the mental scars left on them in 1967 have not healed. That has acted as a brake on Chinese aggression.

Had India surrendered Nathu La under pressure of China then China would have had a free passage to Sikkim (then an Indian protectorate). China would have occupied Sikkim in no time. From Sikkim, cutting off Indian North East through Siliguri Corridor (aka Chicken neck) would have been a piece of cake for China. Occupying Sikkim would have enabled them to occupy the entire North East part of India. And all that before 1970. So there would have been no Bangladesh war and no win for India in that war. All this was avoided just because India had the right man at the right time as the incharge of protecting the borders at Nathu La during 1965 to 1967. And he took a decision in national interest that was at variance with the decision of his superior. Obeying that wrong decision cost India Jelep La pass, but Sagat Singh ensured that he would not surrender Nathu La. And two years later, he gave China a bloody nose, once again, by taking a decision that was against rules but in national interest.

His feat at Nathu La has been downplayed and its long term significance in ensuring the morale of Indian armed forces, and also in ensuring the unity and integrity of the nation, has not been fully appreciated.

During 1971 war, China did not interfere by opening another front, unlike what they had done in 1965. For that India must be thankful to Sagat Singh. The bloody nose that Chinese had received in 1967 was only too fresh in Chinese minds, so they stayed out of this conflict even though China Sikkim border was quite close to the war zone in East Pakistan !

One army officer, who has followed his career closely rightly observed that Sagat Singh was one of the greatest army commanders of all times. He is comparable to German Army commander Rommel and US army commander George Patten. Like Patten, Sagat Singh too found his war expoits being overlooked by his superiors, but Sagat Singh would not let that stop him from giving his best for the nation.

Just as this episode of Indian forces giving China a bloody nose in 1967 has been carefully shoved under the carpet, even Hindi movies have not covered this glorious chapter of Indian Army. Or so I thought. I came to know a few months back that a movie “Paltan”(2018) has been made on this event. But unlike other war movies, few moviegoers seem to have watched it. The movie seemingly flopped, which is a great pity.

The movie is available on zee5, and I especially subscribed to zee5 to watch this movie. The movie was directed by J P Datta. It had Jackie Shroff, Arjun Rampal, Sonu Sood, Harshvardhan Rane, Esha Gupta, Sonal Chauhan etc in it. Jackie Shroff plays Sagat Singh in the movie.

Here is a song from “Paltan” (2018) in honour of Late Lt Gen (Retd)Sagat Singh, the hero of Goa Liberation war, Bangladesh liberation war and the person who gave Indians the belief that Chinese armymen were not invincible, unlike what we were told since 1962.

The song is sung by Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II and Divya Kumar. Jawed Akhtar is the lyricist. Anu Malik is the music director. Knowing Anu Malik’s reputation, it should come as no surprise if his tunes turn out to be “inspired” tunes. Here it is lifted from the theme music of “The bridge on the river Kwai”.

The picturisation of the song is just two minutes long. The audio version is six minutes long.

Video

Audio full


Song-Paltan o paltan (Paltan)(2018) Singers-Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II, Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
ik saathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
ik sathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
hatein na hum jo kisi morche par datt jaayein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

tez nigaahein tez dhadkanein tez kadam hain
hilta hai aakaash bhi jab yoon chalte hum hain
pairon ko chhoone aati hain khud hi raahein
har manzil hai milti humse khole baahein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

aangaaron ki baarish ho ya aag ke saagar
hum badhhte hi jaate hain in sab ko o bujhaa kar
josh bhi hai aur hosh bhi hai aur taakat bhi hai
har dushman se takraane ki himmat bhi hai
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tan mann
o sathi o
o sathi o
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
vande maataram
vande maataram
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande ae maataram
vandee ae maataram


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4373 Post No. : 15712 Movie Count :

4331

Hullo Atuldom

I don’t remember when was the last birthday post that I wrote for the sweet, chulbuli, very bright, charming and ever smiling Neetu Singh who made her debut in Bollywood as Baby Sonia in the double role of twin sisters, in ‘Do Kaliyan’ (1968).

But my thoughts and appreciation about her are there in the post for the song “Phoolon Ki Duniya Se Taaron Ki Duniya Mein“.

In there I had mentioned that she had appeared in 2013 in a movie called ‘Besharam’ which was directed by Abhinav Kashyap. She played a constable of the Delhi Police going by the name ‘Bulbul Chautala’ who is shown assisting Inspector ‘Chulbul Chautala’ (Rishi Kapoor) in tracking down a car thief Babli (Ranbir Kapoor). I saw this movie recently and realized that I still adore this pyari jodi  who had been a craze till Neetu Singh got married and settled to look after her family.

Today’s song plays with the end credits of the movie and is sung by Mika Singh, Daler Mehndi and Sunidhi Chauhan where we have the young couple Rishi and Neetu dancing along with Ranbir and Pallavi Sharda. The song is written by Kumaar which is the mononym for Rakesh Kumar- a lyricist who has been active in Bollywood for a few years now. The music director is Lalit Pandit who used to form a team with his brother Jatin Pandit and gave us some chart-buster songs in movies like ‘Yes Boss’ (1997), ‘DDLJ’ (1995) etc.

The song has the evergreen pair shaking a leg to the beats of a very modern song which is neither a bhangra nor a disco. I must admit that it must have taken lots of guts to take to the dance floor after a gap of thirty years. The last movie where she had danced had come in 1983 ‘Ganga Meri Maa’ which if my guess is right would have been one that released long after it was completed.

Wishing this sweet charming and smiling on her 62nd birthday though I feel she may not celebrate this year. But I think we can still wish her health and happiness.

Song – Chal Hand Utha Ke Nachchen  (Besharam) (2013) Singer – Mika Singh, Daler Mehndi, Sunidhi Chauhan, Lyrics – Kumaar, MD – Lalit Pandit

Lyrics 

nau baj gaye 
hum saj gaye
do peg lagey angrei
ho nau baj gaye 
hum saj gaye 
do peg lagey angreji
jo chadh gayi 
to addh gayi
yeh cheez badi hai creji
aaja thumkon ki.. limit badha le
hain jeb mein jitne.. note udaa de
hum dheet hain jitne
sweet hain utne
to bachche
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
chal band bajaa ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
tu hoga
bada hero 
par hum bhi nahi kachche
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
chal band bajaa ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen

ab rukne ka time nahin hai
khul ke nachna crime nahin hai
mike pakad ke aaj macha de halla halla
ho o ab rukne ka time nahin hai
khul ke nachna crime nahi hai
mike pakad ke aaj machha de halla halla
dil vil apne phenk huye hain
rahu-ketu theek huye hain
pakad ke finger tu pehna de chhalla chhalla
nainon se zara tu
neat pila de
phir badan soniye
beat hila de
hum desi jitne dude bhi utne hain sachche
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal band bajaa ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
tu hoga
bada hero 
par hum bhi nahi kachche
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
chal band bajaa ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen

chal back hila ke
nachchen
chal taang utha ke
nachchen
chal aag laga ke
nachchen
chal feet badha ke
nachchen
chal pila pila ke
nachchen
chal hila hila ke
nachchen
oye fikr chhod ke sharam faad ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen
chal band bajaa ke nachchen
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen 
chal hand uthaa ke nachchen

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

नौ बज गये
हम साज गये
दो पैग लगे अँग्रेजी
हो नौ बज गये
हम साज गये
दो पैग लगे अँग्रेजी
जो चढ़ गई
तो अढ़ गई
ये चीज़ बड़ी है क्रेजी
आजा ठुमकों की॰॰ लिमिट बढ़ा दे
हैं जेब मैं जीतने॰॰ नोट उड़ा दे
हम ढीठ हैं जीतने
स्वीट हैं उतने
तो बच्चे
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल बैंड बजा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
तू होगा
बड़ा हीरो
पर हम भी नहीं कच्चे
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल बैंड बजा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें

अब रुकने का टाइम नहीं है
खुल के नचना क्राइम नहीं है
माइक पकड़ के आज मचा दे हल्ला हल्ला
हो ओ अब रुकने का टाइम नहीं है
खुल के नचना क्राइम नहीं है
माइक पकड़ के आज मचा दे हल्ला हल्ला
दिल विल अपने फेंक हुये हैं
राहू केतू ठीक हुये हैं
पकड़ के फिंगर तू पहना दे छल्ला छल्ला
नैनों से ज़रा तू
नीट पिला दे
फिर बदन सोनिए
बीट हिला दे
हम देसी जीतने ड्यूड भी उतने हैं सच्चे
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल बैंड बजा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
तू होगा
बड़ा हीरो
पर हम भी नहीं कच्चे
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल बैंड बजा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें

चल बैक हिला के
नच्चें
चल टांग उठा के
नच्चें
चल आग लगा के
नच्चें
चल फीट बढ़ा के
नच्चें
चल पिला पिला के
नच्चें
चल हिला हिला के
नच्चें
ओय फिकर छोड़ के शरम फाड़ के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल बैंड बजा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें
चल हैंड उठा के नच्चें


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4372 Post No. : 15710

The date today is 7 july 2020. From the HFM point of view, birth anniversaries of Anil Biswas (born 1914) and Saraswati Kumar Deepak (born 1918) falls today. We have already honoured the two artists in two articles earlier today.

Some other important non HFM related things also happened on this day. It was on this day in 1928 that sliced bread was forst sold by Chillicothe Baking Company of Chillicothe, Missouri, USA. Their product, “Kleen Maid Sliced Bread was advertised as “the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped. This gave rise to the popular idiom “greatest thing since sliced bread”. 🙂

It was on this day in 1985 that Boris Becker became the youngest male player in history to win a major tennis singles title. He was 17 years, 7 months and 15 days old when he lifted the Wimbledon singles title. This record was later broken by Michael Chang (does anyone remember him today ?) in 1989 French Open. I had watched this match on TV in the hostel with likeminded sports lovers where Boris Becker defeated South Africa’s Kevin Curren (not to be confused with Zimbabwe cricketer Kevin Curran).

Back home, this date is important for Indian cricket lovers. It was on this day in 1981 that Mahendra Singh Dhoni was born !

I need not remind our fellow Indian cricket lover what Dhoni has done for Indian cricket. In my opinion, India had a few cricketers (five in number) who to my mind enabled Indian cricket to shift to higher gears. These higher gears did not exist before the advent of these cricketers. The first of them was MAK Pataudi, who gave Indian cricketers the first dose of self belief in their abilities. Then the next was Sunil Gavaskar, who with his rock solid batting against the best pace attacks of the world gave Indians the belief that they too could hold their own and occasionally win too. Then came Kapildev. Before him, it was believed that Indians could not bowl fast. He could not only bowl fast, he could be said to have changed the fortunes of Indian cricket and also world cricket, with his exploits in 1983 World Cup. This title win was a fluke, but this fluke win could not have been achieved without the additional gear that Kapildev had brought to Indian cricket. This win brought an enormous change in balance of cricketing powers. Indian, from being an also ran, began to become title contenders in future world cups. In addition, BCCI, the Indian cricket board, began to have an increasing say in running world cricket.

The next influential cricketer was Saurabh Ganguly. Under his captaincy, India cricket team grew a spine and killer instinct which was lacking in Indian cricket prior to him.

And that brings us to our fifth and final Indian cricket influencer extraordinaire, viz M S Dhoni.

MSD Made his debut into the Indian team during Indian team’s Bangladesh tour of 2004. And it was quite a forgettable start. He was run out for zero in his first batting innings. In the second ODI, India were 131/5 in 33. 2 overs. needing a further 99 runs at an asking rate of 5.8 runs. Dhoni joined Kaif in the centre. Those who had watched his exploits at India A level had high hopes on him. Dhoni was only able to score 12 off 11 deliveries and he was the sixth wicket to fall at 155 at 37.2 overs. Wickets kept falling at regular intervals and India had the ignominy of losing to Bangladesh by 15 runs.

Badly stung, India approached the third and final ODI in a murderous mood. Everyone scored runs and India piled on 348. Dhoni got to bat for two deliveries where he scored seven in two deliveries, including a six, the first six of his ODI career.

Though Dhoni did not do much of note in his debut series, he was retained in home series against Pakistan. Coming to bat in the slog overs with India well placed, he once again failed to capitalise and made a disappointing 3 for 7 deliveries.

After four disappointing matches, Dhoni’s fate was hanging by a thin thread. The second ODI at Vishakhapatnam was a make or break match for Dhoni. Luckily for Dhoni and for world cricket, Ganguly, the captain, decided to give Dhoni another chance. Not just that, Dhoni was sent at one down ! And the rest, as they say, is history. Dhoni announced his arrival at world cricket stage with 148 runs. This knock cemented his place in ODI and opened the doors to test selection as well.

By 2007, Dhoni was still a unior player in the team. shock exit of Indian team from 2007 World cup saw many heads roll in Indian cricket. A new form of cricket ,namely T20 cricket was thrust on the rest of thecricketing world by England. England had started ODI world cup back in 1975. They had failed to win any of these world cups. Introducing another world cup of a different format where England had the most experience was clearly an attempt by ECB to finally lift a world cup.

BCCI was unwilling and reluctant to participate in this T20 world cup. But ICC arm twisted BCCI into participating in it. BCCI, in protest, excluded all the seniors from the team and chose a team of younger players, who were expected to be no hopers in the tournament. And Dhoni , who had never captained even in school cricket, was made the captain of the team.

When the world cup ended, India emerged the surprise winner of the tournament. The reluctent BCCI, which wanted to have nothing to do with T20 suddenly saw so much potential in this format that they created IPL. It is something that revolutionised world cricket and brought far more money into cricket than what was the case before. So Indian surprise title win in T20 changed the game of cricket like how it had happened back in 1983.

This T20 win meant that Dhoni was identified as a leader of the team in all formats. And what results he produced ! India, under his captaincy won two more ICC titles , namely ODI world cup in 2011 at home and 2013 Champions Trophy in England. Dhoni became the only captain in history to have won all the three ICC tournaments. No other captain of no other country had come anywhere close.

Under Dhoni’s captaincy, Indian also rose up to become the number one test team. His cricket records are known to all. I will not repeat them here.

The influence that Dhoni had on Indain cricket is comparable to the influence of Kapildev. Both of them came from smaller unfashionable places. Prior to them, international cricket in India was considered the privilege of big city players. When India played their first ODI world cup in 1975, all but one players in the team were from metropolitan cities (Bombay, Delhi, Madras, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Baroda, one from Rajasthan). When Dhoni captained Indian in 2007 T20 tournament, there were players from unfashionable places like Ranchi (Jharkhand), Jullundhar (Punjab), Aligarh (UP), Rohtak (Haryana), Rae Bareli (UP), Kothamangalam (Kerala) etc. And these players did not just make up numbers, they were in the playing XI and added their weight to the team performance.

Dhoni gave plenty of self confidence to players comng from small places with no cricketing history. The fact that such excellent world class players, with such strong temperament can come from small places was a revelation to all. Their inclusion brought fresh ideas and fresh energy into the team composition. These palyers were not infected by the virus of complacency, lack of killer instinct and choking- that most players coming from big established places seemed afflicted from.

Dhoni’s appeal is India wide and for that matter global. In India, Chennai has adopted him as their favourite son in IPL, where he has served as the skipper right from the first IPL.

A biopic was made on Dhoni which was released in 2016. I found this movie quite rivetting and interesting. I have covered all the songs that appear in the movie with detailed writeups. It turns out that the movie also has a song that was ot picturised. And this song is the title song of the movie. This song was released only online in Youtube and was not part of the movie.

This song is a goosebump inducing song if you are an Indian cricket fan like me. This movie was released not just in Hindi, but in some other languages viz Marathi, Tamil, Telugu etc as well. I have listened to this song in all the languages and I love all the versions.

On the occasion of Dhoni’s 39th birthday today, here is this wonderful themw song cum title song from “M S Dhoni-the untold story”(2016). The Hindi version of the son is sung by Rochak Kohli who is also the music director of this song. One can also watch the Marathi, Tamil , and Telugu versions.

The video version is just two minutes long and makes you long for more. You can then listen to the audio version which is over 4 minutes long.

With this song, all the songs of “M S Dhoni-the untold story”(2016) are covered in the blog and the movie joins the list of movies that have been YIPPEED in the blog.

Audio (Hindi)

Video

Song-Har Gali mein Dhoni hai (M S Dhoni-the untold story)(2016) Singer-Rochak Kohli, MD-Rochak Kohli
Chorus

Lyrics

o o o o o
o o o o o
o o o o o

chalen chalen to kya chale hum
uden agar to baat hai
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
chalen chalen to kya chale hum
o o o o
uden agar to baat hai
jiye jiye to kya jiye hum
o o o o o
laden agar to baat hai

jaage hai chauraahe
kadmo ki ye thapkiyon se jaage hain
maidaanon khul jaao
aa rahe hain hum jo
khalbali to honi hai
har gali mein Dhoni hai
o o o o o
o o o o o

har gali mein Dhoni hai
o o o o
o o o o

har gali mein Dhoni hai ae ae ae ae ae
har gali mein Dhoni hai

ho o
ujaalon ki gar talaash hai
sooraj ka sahar paas hai ae
ujaalon ki gar talaash hai ae ae
sooraj ka sahar paas hai
aa chal ke hum juta len apne hisse ke ujaale
doobe ek sooraj to dusra uga len
kaafi hai apni khaatir yeh mutthi bhar iraade
chalne ke balboote pe hum duniya hila den aen aen aen
awaazo mil jaao
aa rahe hain hum jo
khalbali to honi hai ae
har gali me Dhoni hai
o o o o o
o o o o o
har gali mein dhoni hai
o o o o o
o o o o o
har gali mein dhoni hai ae ae ae ae
har gali me dhoni hai


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4365 Post No. : 15693 Movie Count :

4325

During my visits to Jorasanko Thakur Bari (Tagore family residence) in Kolkata and thereafter a full day visit to Shanti Niketan in 2012, I had often come across the name of Kadambari Devi who was supposed to have inspired Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore in his literary, musical and artistic pursuits. But at that time, it never occurred to me to know more about Kadambari Devi.

Last Sunday, while browsing one of the OTT platforms, I found a Bangla film ‘Kadambari’ (2015) where I read a two-liner summary of the film that connected me with Kadambari Devi. The film is a biopic on Kadambari Devi who was the wife of Jyotirindranath Tagore, the elder brother of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. The story of Kadambari Devi is a tragic one which is, in my view, is not less than Shakespearean tragedies. Let me first briefly discuss her biography before I set out her story as depicted in the film.

Kadambari Devi (1859-1884) was a daughter of an employee of Jorasanko Thakur Bari who was married to 21-year old Jyotindranath Tagore on July 5, 1868 when she was 9. In Thakur Bari, 7-year old Rabindranath Tagore, the youngest son of Debendranath Tagore, became Kadambari’s playmate as no other family members in the Tagore family were of their age group. Her husband was a multi-talented person interested in literature, music, theatre, painting, publications besides the family business. He made arrangements for home education of Kadambari Devi as also  for training in horse riding etc.

After the death of Rabindranath’s mother, Kadambari Devi’s childhood relationship with him was turned from playmate to that of a surrogate mother. The next relationship between Kadambari Devi and Rabindranath in their adulthood became more like platonic love. Everyday, Rabindranath would write poems which he would first recite to Kadambari Devi who would give her critical assessments. Gradually, an intellectual relationship developed between Rabindranath and Kadambari Devi.

The close relationship between Rabindranath and Kadambari Devi during their adulthoods were not liked by the elder family members. So, at the age of 17, Rabindranath was sent to England for further studies. During his short stay in England, he used to write letters to Kadambari Devi discussing about poems and literature and how he was missing her in his literary pursuit. He returned to India without completing his studies and once again their literary companionship started. Rabindranath got his letters to Kadambari Devi published in one of the Bengali magazines. Though these letters were high in their literary contents, the elders in the family read in-between the lines as to whom the emotions expressed in the letters were meant. Elders in the family were afraid that scandal could break out tarnishing the image of the family. So, they decided to get Rabindranath married at the age of 21 with a bride of 11 years who was named as Mrinalini Devi.

After the marriage of Rabindranath, the distance between Kadambari Devi and him widened. On the other hand, Jyotirindranath’s busy schedule with his businesses and other activities made her lonely. After about 4 months of Rabindranath marriage, Kadambari Devi committed suicide by taking an overdose of opium on April 21, 1884 at a young age of 25 years. There was no clue left as to why Kadambari Devi committed suicide.

The story of Kadambari Devi has all the ingredients of making a social drama film. The first Bengali film on this story was made by Satyajit Ray titled ‘Charulata’ (1971) which was based on Rabindranath Tagore’s Bengali novella ‘Nashtanirh’ (Broken Nest). Scholars believe that this novella may have been based on the relationship between Jyotirindranath Tagore, Kadambari Devi and Rabindranath Tagore himself which was published in 1901. The second film, ‘Chhelebela’ (2002) was made which was based on the Rabindranath Tagore’s novella of the same name which meant ‘My Boyhood Days’. Thereafter, two more films – ‘Chirosakhe He’ (2007) and ‘Jeewan Smriti’ (2011) were made in Bengali.

‘Kadambari’ (2015) is the latest Bangla film which is more like a biopic of Kadambari Devi.  The film is directed by Suman Ghosh. The film is based on the Bengali novel ‘Prothomo Alo’ by Sunil Gangopadhyay, ‘Kobir Bouthan’ by Mullika Sengupta and various writings of Rabindranath Tagore. The cast includes Konkana Sen Sharma (Kadambari Devi), Parambrata Chattopadhyay (Rabindranath Tagore), Kaushik Sen (Jyotirindranath Tagore), Sanjoy Nag (Debendranath Tagore), Titas Bhowmik, Srikanto Acharya, Srilekha Mitra etc.

Though the film is a biopic of Kadambari Devi, the director has taken some cinematic liberties in dramatizing some events in the life of the three main characters in the film. The story of Kadambari Devi in the film is as under:

The film starts with the suicide of Kadambari Devi in her bedroom with an overdose of opium. The patriarch of the Tagore family, Debendranath Tagore instructs all in the house not to leak the news of the suicide to outsiders as it is the question of reputation of the family. All the subsequent scenes in the film are shown as flashbacks of Kadambari Devi until her death like  her marriage to Jyotirendranath, Rabindranath as her childhood playmate etc. She feels lonely in the big house as she is the child and the other members of the household are adults. Same is true of Rabindranath as he is the youngest of the Tagore family (7 years). So naturally, both the loners find their relationship as  playmates rewarding.

After the death of Rabindranath’s mother, Kadambari Devi is assigned the duty of looking after him. She would supervise his meals after his return from school. She has become an expert cook and prepares delicious dishes for Rabindranath who, for the first time, feels that the food tastes better than those churned out by the cooks at Thakur Bari.

During the adulthood, Kadambari Devi becomes his literary companion. Rabindranath would recite his new poems first to her to get her feedback which, most of the time, would be adverse. At one point, she says to him that Banckhim Chandra Chattopadhyay writes better than him just to prop him up. There are literary soirees on the terrace of Thakur Bari in the night when there would be poetry recitations, music and singing when all the members of Tagore family would participate. Both of them bond well in all the stages of their relationship in which Rabindranath always addresses Kadambari Devi as ‘bouthan’ (sister-in-law). She is Rabindranath’s total support system all through her life.

The close relationships between Kadambari Devi and Rabindranath in their adulthood is resented by the elder women of the Tagore family. They instigate Debendranath (his father) to send him for study in England. He goes but returns quickly as he develops some illness. Then there are back-biting from the elder women of the family for Kadambari being issueless. She has ‘adopted’ her sister-in-law’s daughter, Urmila who dies in a freak accident in the house and the blame for her death falls on Kadambari Devi for her momentary neglect.

The elder women get upset when they come to know that Rabindranath has published his poems in a magazine which indirectly hint at his admiration for Kadambari Devi. So, the elders decide to get Rabindranath married to Mrilanali Devi. With this, Kadambari Devi has become once again a lonely lady already neglected by her elders in the family and her husband who, as usual, is busy with his businesses and theatre. There is also a hint in the film that Jyotirindranath is having affairs with an actress of one of his plays. With the death of Urmila, Kadambari Devi has gone into depression.

The triggering point for Kadambari Devi’s suicide is when her husband failed to turn up to pick her up from the Thakur Bari for the launching of his new ship at the port.  Even though, her husband has sent a horse cart to pick her up, she refuses to go as she has accidentally found a letter addressed to him by one of the actresses of his play informing him of his child taking shape in her womb. The film ends with Kadambari Devi drinking a liquid from a bottle and goes to sleep never to wake up.

‘Kadambari’ (2015) is the director’s film. He has full control over the main actors and also the fast-paced story telling. All the three main actors – Konkana Sen Sharma, Parambrata Chattopadhyay and Kaushik Sen have given the excellent performances of their roles. Despite a serious subject, there is not a single dull moment in the film. The film has been mostly shot in the houses of the Tagore family and estate lending the authentic period atmosphere.

It sounds strange as to why Debendranath Tagore who is regarded as a social and religious reformer and also an advocate of the girls’ education, got his sons, Jyotirindranath and Rabindranath married to child girls with wide age differences. Also, there is a hint in the film of the patriarchal family system where women have no voice in decision making in the Tagore family. There are dialogues in the film to that effect.

There are speculations in the literary circles as to what kind of relationship Rabindranath Tagore had with Kadambari Devi. Whether their love which was of an innocent and affectionate nature in their childhood had turned into an amorous one in their adulthood. It is difficult to get an answer. It is said that soon after the death of Kadambari Devi, the letters exchanged between Kadamabari Devi and Rabindranath Tagore were destroyed except those which were already published in a magazine. Probably, their relationship was  for companionship and the emotional solace. So, let their love remain as love without assigning any qualifier to it. That’s what Gulzar has said in one of his film songs – “Pyaar Ko Pyaar Hi Rehne Do Koi Naam Na Do.

Since ‘Kadambari’ (2015) is the story on the relationship between Rabindranath Tagore and Kadambari Devi, it is not surprising that almost all of the songs are based on Rabindra Sangeet. There is one song which was written by Maithili poet, Vidyapati which finds place in the film. It is said that Rabindranath Tagore liked this song so much that he set the song to the tune while reciting it in the company of Kadambari Devi. The song is “Bhara Baadar Maah Bhaadar, Shunya Mandir Mor’ – In the month of Bhadra, clouds are full of rains. but my mind is an empty shrine.

In the film, the situation is that after return from Tripura, Rabindranath meets Kadambari Devi in the garden of their estate on the banks of River Ganga. It has started raining and Rabindranath recites these verses of Vidyapati with impromptu tune composed by him.

The song is rendered by Ustad Rashid Khan on the tune set by Rabindranath Tagore. The orchestration of the song is conducted by Bickram Ghosh.

By the way, Aparna Sen also used these Vidyapati’s verses in her Bangla film, ‘Ghawre Bairey Alo’ (2019) in a different situation in the film.

Video

Audio

Song – Bhara Baadar Maah Bhadara, Shunya Mandir Mor (Kadambari) (2015) Singer – Ustad Rashid Khan, Lyrics – Vidyapati, MD – Rabindranath Tagore (Orchestration by Bickram Ghosh)

Lyrics

bhara baadar maah bhaadar
shunya mandir mo…r
bhara baadar
he ae ae ae aa
he ae ae ae ae
sa re  ae ae ae
ra ra ra ru ru
aa aa aaa
aaa aa aaa aaa aaa
ra ma…
bhara baadar maah bhaadar
shunya mandir mo…r
bhara baadar
bhara baadar maah bhaadar
shunya mandir mo…r
bhara baadar
 
jharjha ghan garjanti santati
bhuwan bhari barikhintiyaa
kaant paahun birah daarun
saghane khar shar hantiaa
kulisha shat shat paat modit
mayur naachat maatiaa aa
mayur naachat
mayur naachat
mayur naachat maatiyaa aa
matta daaduri daake daahuki
phaati yaawat chhatiyaa
 
timir dig bhari ghor yaamini
akhir bijurika paanthiyaa
Vidyapati kah kaiche gonaaibi
Hari vine din raatiaan aa
bhara baadar maah bhaadar
shunya mandir mo….r
bhara baadar


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4361 Post No. : 15685

Hindi Songs in Bangla Film – 32
———————————-

The folk singer I am discussing here is from Assam. She has no direct or indirect connection to the soils of Bihar, Jharkhand and Uttar Pradesh. Yet her fans from these states has given her the title of ‘Bhojpuri Queen’. It is not that she has consciously chosen to sing in Bhojpuri. The fact is that it is one of the music recording companies who made her to sing Bhojpuri songs.  Again, the title ‘Bhojpuri Queen’ to her would give an impression that she has restricted her singing mainly to Bhojpuri songs. But it is not so. She has been in her professional music scene since 2001 rendering nearly 9000 songs in 30 different languages/dialects of India. She has also done the playback singing in Hindi, Bhojpuri, Bangla, Assamese, Tamil and Marathi films, beside acting in some films. She is a folk musicologist and has done extensive research on the history of folk music especially in the Bhojpuri region.

I am referring to Kalpana Patowary (b. 27/10/1978) who has been endowed with a rich and powerful voice capable of singing in high octaves with ease. She was born in Sorbhog town in Barpeta district of Assam. Her father, Bipin Patowary, a folk singer himself and working for AIR (Aakashvani), Guwahati, gave Kalpana the initial training in Kamrupiya and Gaolporiya folk singing of Assam. She also learnt Baul singing from Naren Das. After completing her graduation in English literature from Cotton College, Guwahati, Kalpana enrolled in Bhatkhande College of Music, Lucknow from where she completed her Sangeet Visharad.

Even though Kalpana Patowary has been performing on the stage since her childhood, her professional music journey started in 2001 when after marrying Pervez Khan, her school-mate and neighbour in Assam, she shifted to Mumbai. She learnt Hindustani classical music from Ustad Ghulam Mustafa Khan of Rampur-Sahaswan Gharana in Mumbai. The first music album recorded by Kalpana Patowary was in 2001 which was a remix of popular Hindi songs. Her first Bhojpuri song album  “Na Hum Se Bhangiya Pisaai’ae Ganesh Ke Papa” released in 2002 made her very popular among the Bhojpuri speaking population. With this popularity, she sang for the first time in a Bhojpuri film, ‘Sasura Bada Paisewala’ (2004) after which she became a regular playback singer of Bhojpuri films. She expanded her command over Bhojpuri songs by singing non-film folk songs in Puria, Pachra, Kajri, Birha, Sohar, Chaita and Nautanki genres. She traveled extensively in Bhojpuri speaking regions to study the folklore of the region. She was the first woman singer to sing and record a Chhapraihiya Purvi folk style song which was hitherto a male preserve.

In June 2012, Kalpana Patowary launched her music cum documentary album ‘The Legacy of Bhikari Thakur’ which was released by a British recording company, Virgin EMI Records. It received popularity all over the world, especially from in those countries having a sizeable Bhojpuri speaking population. It was a sort of Kalpana Patowary’s tribute to Bhikari Thakur who is regarded as ‘Shakespeare of Bhojpuri literature’. In addition, she also recorded documentary musical albums like ‘The Sacred Scriptures of Monikut’ and ‘Anthology of Birha’. She is the first singer to sings a Khadi Birha folk song for Coke Studio.

Kalpana Patowary as a playback singer in Bhojpuri films has faced criticism from some quarters for popularising Bhojpuri film songs with raunchy lyrics. She has defended herself by saying that in the initial period of her career in Bhojpuri film music, she was not well-versed with Bhojpuri dialect and the meanings. Also, she has pointed out that it is the writers of the songs who have to take care of the raunchy wordings. Also, she says that if the song was obscene than how did the Censor Board not take objection?

One of the effects of such criticism on Kalpana Patowary seems to be that she has become more determined to study the folklore of Bhojpuri region and popularise such folk songs not only all over India but also all over the world. Hence, during the last five years or so, she has been devoting much of her time in folklores of not only the Bhojpuri region but also of Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, and North-Eastern States. She has also started her focus on devotional songs of these states.

It is in this background that Kalpana Patowary seems to have lapped up an opportunity by singing a devotional song “Chain Kahaan Prabhu Bin Manwa” in the film ‘Har Har Byomkesh’ (2015) which is picturised on herself.  The song is written by Sutapa Basu which is set to music by Bickram Ghosh. The song in the video clip is partial as picturised in the film. The audio clip has got the full song.

The details of the film and the story have been given in my earlier article on the song – “Roothe Sajan Kaise Manaawe Ho Rama“.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Acknowledgements: The profile and other information on Kalpana Patowary is based on her interviews which appeared in some newspapers, magazines and also on Rajya Sabha TV. Information on her musical journey is also based on info from her website, http://singerkalpana.blogspot.com/

 

Video

Audio

Song – Chain Kahaan Prabhu Bin Manwa (Har Har Byomkesh) (2015) Singer – Kalpana Patowary, Lyrics – Sutapa Basu, MD – Bickram Ghosh

Lyrics

chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
mann ki aankh se aansoo nikle
mann ki aankh se aansoo nikle
tan ki aankh rowe na
tan ki aankh rowe na
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
 
saagar paar kiya bajrangi..ee..ee
bajrangi ee..ee..ee
saagar paar kiya bajrangi
prabhu ke naam sahaayi
naam lewe to door ho peeda
naam lewe to door ho peeda
door howe kathinaayi
door howe kathinaayi
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
 
naam sahaare kaam sawaare..ae
naam sahaare kaam sawaare
mann ho mail kabhi na
main ho mail kabhi na
naam ke upar aur kachhu naahin
naam ke upar aur kachhu naahin
bhoole to ab nahin jeena
bhoole to ab nahin jeena
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa

mann ki aankh ke aansoo nikle
tan aankh rowe na
tan aankh rowe na
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa
chain kahaan prabhu bin manwa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
मन की आँख से आँसू निकले
मन की आँख से आँसू निकले
तन की आँख रोवे ना
तन की आँख रोवे ना
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा

सागर पार किया बजरंगी॰॰ई॰॰ई
बजरंगी॰॰ई॰॰ई॰॰ई
सागर पार किया बजरंगी
प्रभु के नाम सहाई
नाम लेवे तो दूर हो पीड़ा
नाम लेवे तो दूर हो पीड़ा
दूर होवे कठिनाई
दूर होवे कठिनाई
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा

नाम सहारे काम सवारे॰॰ए
नाम सहारे काम सवारे
मन हो मैल कभी ना
मन हो मैल कभी ना
नाम के ऊपर और कछु नाहीं
नाम के ऊपर और कछु नाहीं
भूले तो अब नहीं जीना
भूले तो अब नहीं जीना
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा

मन की आँख से आँसू निकले
तन की आँख रोवे ना
तन की आँख रोवे ना
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा
चैन कहाँ प्रभु बिन मनवा


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4360 Post No. : 15683 Movie Count :

4321

There are a few dates that every Indian knows by heart. For instance. Independence day (15 august), Republic day (26 january) and Mahatma Gandhi birth anniversary (2 october). India observes official holidays on these days.

There are some more important days in the history of India and most of them have to do with birth / death anniversaries of eminent persons. These dates are mostly associated with Indian freedom struggle followed by birth pangs of Independence.

The newly independent India was a desperately poor, undernourised, illiterate nation, lying in utter disarray and confusion. There were a few famous foreigners who were convnced that India as a nation was going to be shortlived.

The first few decades of independent India were very difficult. Indians had low self esteem and they had little to show for at the world level in any sphere.

Sports was considered a luxury that the poor nation could not afford. It was popularly believed that one who studied moved ahead in life whereas one who devoted time to sports was a slacker who would be a failure in his future life. -“Padhoge likhoge banoge nawaab Kheloge koodoge hoge kharaab”- it was a very popular saying in Hindi. There is even a song in a Hindi movie containing his idiom.

India had very few sporting achievements. Indians celebrated those few and far between sporting achievements quite hard. India was a powerhouse in Hockey and they used to win gold medals in Olympics continuously till 1956 Olympics. After that they began to get challenged, first by newly independent Pakistan (who won the gold in 1960 Olympics defeating India) and then by Europe and the downfall of Indian hockey began. 1964 Olympics gold and 1975 World cup title were exceptions rather than rule. After 1975, India never won any major international Hockey tournament.

India was no good in any other sports.

Cricket was very popular in India though this popularity did not translate into excellence. Cricket was popular among the “middle” class Indians. Majority of Indians considered themselves as “Middle” class those days. The reason why cricket was popular among “middle” class public had to to with its dress. While one needed to wear shorts to play other games which was considered infra dig by “middle” class Indians, cricket was played while wearing full pants, and so one felt like a sahab rather than a lowly individual while playing cricket. It was a “saala main to saahab ban gaya” kind of feeling for Indians who took to cricket.

Till mid 1970s, longer version of cricket, played in white dress, was the only form of cricket. Despite the popularity of cricket in India, Indian cricketers, with some honourable exceptions, were by and large quite mediocre at international level. The top players of England would not even tour India, and that gave India the opportunity to defeat a depleted English team in 1951-52, which was the first test win for India in test cricket. For next two decades, Indian registered some infrequent test wins, mostly against weak and / or new comer teams, viz Pakistan and new Zealand.

1971 to 1973 was a surprising purple patch for India when they managed to win three test series in a row, against West Indies in 1971, against England in 1971, and in home series against England during 1972-73. But this freak run against depleted sides was too good to last and India got soundly thrashed in their next test series against England in England during 1974.

During that disastrous tour, India played two limited overs match against England and lost tamely.

The first Limited overs world cup was played in England in 1975. Indian public as well as cricketers had no clue about the rules of the game. That was demonstrated rather dramatically during the opening match of that world cup. England piled on 334/ 4 in 60 overs. India in reply, crawled to 132/ 3. Gavaskar, opening the innings, scored 36 runs and remained not out ! He was perhaps trying to play out the overs and draw the match ! The fact that playing out overs and not scoring runs did not avoid defeat, unlike in test matches was not known to many.

In that world cup, India lost every match, except one which they played against a rag tag team of expatriates who represented a team called “East Africa”. East Africa was a collection of club level players from various African nations. India was able to record their only victory of the world cup against this team.

India did even worse in the next world cup in 1979. this time they lost all the matches. Their most humiliating defeat was against Sri Lanka, who at that time were an associate team, they were not yet a test team.

When the third world cup was held in England in 1983, then it was being considered yet another cakewalk for West indies, who had won both the world cups and whose team boasted of strong batting line up and a fearsome pace bowling quartet. They were so strong that other teams would write off their chances against West Indies and would concentrate on winning other matches.

Indian public as well as players were sure that it would be yet another forgettable world cup for them. Some cricketers had already planned to go visit USA on a sight seeing tour after the group stage matches.

This world cup had two groups of four teams each. In each group, the teams played each other twice. The top two teams qualified for the semi finals.

The first group match that India played was against West Indies ! Because of rain interruptions, this match was played over two days. India batting first scored a so so total of 262/8. Yashpal Sharma, with 89 runs, held the innings together where the second highest score was only 36 runs by Sandip Patil. West Indies, after a decent start, suddenly had a middle order collapse against the dibbly dobbly military medium bowling attack of Sandhu, Madanlal and Roger Binny who claimed 5 wickets among themselves. At 130/8 , West Indies were in big trouble, but their tail then began to wag valiantly. Just when it appeared like the tail were taking West Indies to a famous fighting win, Ravi Shashtri struck to claim the two vital tailender wickets. West Indies were bowled out for 228 ! It was a major upset. It was the first ever world cup defeat for West Indies, It was the first ever win for India against a test side (only the second win for them in world cup).

The next match for India was against Zimbabwe, an associate team, and India won comfortably.

Then normal world cup service seemed to resume for India. They lost their next two matches tamely, by 162 runs (against Australia) and 66 runs (against West Indies).

After two wins and two losses, India played Zimbabwe again. While batting first, India were in dire straights at 17/5. Overconfidence by the entire batting line up plus good use of swinging and bouncy conditions by Zimbabwean bowlers had brought India on its knees. The entire top order, viz Gavaskar (0) , Srikkanth (0) , Mohinder Amarnath (5), Sandeep Patil (1) and Yashpal Sharma (9) were blown away. Only bowlers and wicktkeeper were left, who were not known for any great batting feats at international level.

Kapildev (the captain) and Roger Binny took the score to 77, when Binny fell for a gritty 22. Next man Shashtri fell for one, and India was 78/ 7 ! Next man in was Madanlal, he scored 17 and fell when the score was 140.

At 140/8, it appeared as if India was going to maintain its past record of losing to an associate team in the world cup. Incidentally, Zimbabwe had already defeated Australia in this world cup in their very first world cup match.

Kirmani, the wicket keeper was definitely the last hope because Sandhu after him was a perfect rabbit with the bat. Kirmani held his end intact and concentrated on protecting his wicket. He faced 56 balls and scored 24 not out.

All this while, Kapildev was going alone sedately. Coming in at 9/4, he saw off the rampaging opening bowers Rawson and Curran, who bowled bulk of their quota of overs in their opening spell.

After initial jitters, Kapildev began to open up. He had already reached into late 70s when the eighth wicket fell for 140. The eight batsmen who fell had contributed just 55 runs among themselves.

After the fall of eighth wicket, Kapildev started to throw his bat around. The boundary was short on one side and longer on the other, but most Kapildev sixes (six of them) were straight sixes over long on boundary where the boundary was long. Kapildev struck six sixes and 16 fours. When Rawson and Curran returned to finish off their balance quota of overs, they were pulverised, being struck at over ten runs per over.

Kapildev did not give any real chances. He chanced his arms and his hits fell on no man’s land. It was Kapildev’s day out on that day of 18 june 1983.

India reached a respectable looking 266/ 8, a total that looked impossible for most parts of the innings.

While chasing, Zimbabwe were off to a decent start. their first wicket fell at 44, but after that, Indian dibbly dobbly trundlers (Sandhu, Madanlal, Binny and Mohinder Amarnath) did all the damage, with Kapildev taking the final wicket. India had won by 31 runs. It was not a case of India getting out of jail, rather it was like India escaping from the gallows !

Suddenly, India, who looked like going home, were in the reckoning for a semi final spot. They were second in the group with 12 points behind West Indies. Final group match of India was with Australia who were third in the group with 8 points and they too had a chance to pip Indians to the post by defeating india by a decent margin and going through on equal points but better run rate.

This India vs Australia match was a virtual quarter final. India batting first scored what looked like a poorish total of 247 all out in 55. 5 overs.

While chasing, Australia lost their first wicket cheaply with the score on 3. It was the prized wicket of Trevor Chappel who was man of the match in their previous encounter in the tournament. But the second wicket began to score runs and started to look threatening. Just when I and my hostel mates began to despair, the second wicket fell at 46, then the third at 48, fourth at 52, fifth at 52, sixth at 67 etc etc. The trundling trio of Sandhu (2 wickets), Madanlal (4 wickets) and Binny (4 wickets) skittled Australia out for 129 and took India to semifinal. It was something that was looking out of question just two days back.

The day when India stormed into the semi final was 20 june 1983. I was in my hostel where it was a tradition that birthday boy of the day would treat entire hostel with Mithai. That day happened to be my birthday, and the mithai celebration turned out to be quite sweet and memorable for all concerned.

The memory of semi final was a blur. Most Indian wins (except one) came when India batted first. But this time India bowled first and restricted England to 213. India concentrated to keeping wickets in hand. India emerged a comfortable winner in the end in a chase that they executed well, though they gave anxious moments to Indian fans, apparently showing no urgency to score quickly in the middle overs.

Three matches in five days, and three wins. India were in the final of the world cup !

Three days later, it was another sunday. The date was 25 june 1983. The day of the final.

Those were the days when only Delhi and perhaps Bombay had TV. Most part of India only had Radio. Listening to cricket match commentary in a hostel with lots of like minded hostelmates was quite an experience. Everyone had radios, but majority of people would throng together to listen to the commentary on one single radio. If I recall correctly, that used to be the radio of a person who was a cricket enthusiast and claimed to be related to Sharmila Tagore based on the resemblance of his teeth with that of Sharmila Tagore. 🙂

We listened to the commentary of Indian batting, but there was not much to cheer about. India kept losing wickets at regular intervals and India was bowled out for a paltry 183. Chasing 183 was no big deal for West Indies. They were set a similar target in the semifinal against Pakistan and they had romped home with ease, winning by eight wickets with 11.2 overs to spare.

The innings break coincided with our dinner break in the hostel. After dinner, people would traditionally go on an after dinner walk towards the golf course located in front of the hostel some half a km away. West Indies innings had started by then. India claimed an early wicket, but that only brought Viv Richards to the crease. He was going hammer and tongs at the Indian bowling. All of us were reconciled to the fact that it was going to be a one sided match, with west indies winning comfortably.

Then, against the run of play, we gathered that a wicket had fallen, and it was the wicket of Richards ! A big sigh of relief. But West Indies was not a one batsman team. they has a long and strong batting line up. Even their wicket keeper and tailenders could score runs. Moreover he target was not much. A few hefty blows from some batsman, and the match would be decided.

While listening to the commentary, more in hope than real expectation, we found the fourth and fifth wickets falling at the same score, and the wickets were that of Larry Gomes and Clive Lloyd. At 76/6 , Bacchus, another thorn in Indian flesh was gone. Both of the had scored big double centuries against india in India.

Dujon and Marshal gave anxious moments to Indian bowlers. Then Dujon fell to Mohinder Amarnath . 119 for 7 ! Then 8 for 124. Marshal gone, he too to Mohinder Amarnath.

Finally, West Indies resistance came to an end at 140. A 43 run victory for India. So the world had a new champion, an out rightly unexpected champion. If West Indies was to be dethroned, one would expect any team other than India to achieve it. But it turns out that it was the Indian David that slayed the West Indian Goliath.

West Indies had won the earlier two world cups. Their title wins did nothing much for world cricket. But this unexpected fluke win of India against all odds changed the game of cricket ! Indian interest in the game suddenly moved on to the next higher gear. So much so that Indians began to invest far more in cricket. The Indian industry, far smaller and modest then than what it is now, began to take much more interest in cricket. So much so that the world cup which was always held in England and always sponsored by Prudential Bank of England,, was held the next time in Indian subcontinent. This time it was sponsored by an up and coming Indian business house called Reliance ! In 1983, India was considered an also ran, but by 1987, India was a strong title contender ! It is another matter than India lost in the semifinal itself.

1983 win was a fluke no doubt. But he future results showed that Indian cricket had arrived at world stage after this fluke world cup win. Two years later, there was a World Championship of cricket in Australia. India, because of its defeat at home to England in 1984-85 was being considered as a no hoper. Kapildev, the world cup winner in 1983, had lost his captaincy and Gavaskar was made the captain for this WCC. Once again, defying all predictions, India won all their matches, remained undefeated and lifted the WCC title. So it was like Fluke title won 1983 was followed by its sequel, fluke title win II ! Later there would be some ODI tournament wins for India. India began to be counted among favourites in all subsequent world cups.

That is not all. Indians began to take interest in running the administration of ICC (international cricket council) which was till then a preserve of British stiff upper lip Lords who were running it in a manner that was hardly helping popularise the game. Indian businessman, such as Jagmohan Dalmia, took over the running of ICC, and improved the financial condition of ICC beyond all recognition. Today ICC is one of the richest sporting body. It is richer than most sporting bodies where Indians do not take interest. For instance, Rugby is a sport in which cricket playing nations like England, Australia and New Zealand take interest, but India does not. Resul ! International body of Rugby earns far less than ICC.

Much of ICC riches (around 70 % of it) today comes from India. That is how much money Indian market contributes to world cricket. It is this Indian market that has made BCCI one of the richest sporting body of a cuntry, richer than ICC in fact. Seeds of all these giant Oak trees were sown on this day 37 years ago, thanks to that miraculous fluke title win on 25 june 1983 !

25 june 1983 gave Indians immense self confidence that they too can do it. And as mentioned above, they used this win to advance their cricket. Cricket academies sprung up all over India, and some of them were by private companies. For instance, a pace academy came up in Madras, called MRF pace academy. Fans of other countries mocked it, but if today Indian pace attack is considered one of the best pace attacks, then remember, it is the result of three decades of investment on training of pace bowlers in different academies spread all over India. And that started only after this great fluke event that took place on 25 june 198.

This win inspired not just India, but its neighbours too, who may not admit it openly but they look up to India and get inspired. Interest in cricket picked up in these nations too. Pakistan won the world cup in 1992 and Sri Lanka announced its arrival in cricket scene by unexpectedly winning the world cup in 1996. Three world cup title wins out of four between 1983 and 1996 ! All this was made possible because of that first title win in 1983 ! Even Bangladesh became a cricket crazy nation and started to play international cricket from 2000.

Other sports too benefited in India. Indian Sportsmen in other sports too began to have more self belief. One great example is that of Indian chess. Just like India was supposedly considered incapable to producing fast bowlers till 1970s, India was also considerd incapable of producing Chess grandmasters. Those days, India had just two international masters, that was all. AICF (All India Chess Federation) began to invest more in organising chess tournaments inviting strong chess players from abroad. India saw its first Grand master in 1987 in the form of Vishwanathan Anand in 1987. Later on, he became World Champon as well. He inspired whole lot of Indians to take up Chess. Today India has some 60 off Chess Grandmasters and based on average ELO raking of the top ten chess players in the world, India is among top four strongest chess playing nation in the world !

Likewise one can add the example of Indian Badminton too.

To mark this major major achievement of Indian sport in general and Indian cricket inparticular, here is a cricket song from “Ferrari Ki Sawaari”(2012). This film was produced by Vidhu Vinod Chopra and directed by Rajesh Mapuskar for ‘Vinod Chopra films’. This movie had Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritvik Sahore, Seema Pahwa, Aakash Dabhade, Deepak Shirke, Paresh Rawal, Satyadeep Mishra, Achyut Potdar, Bhalchandra Kadam, Vijay Nikam, Nilesh Diwekar and others, with a special appearance by Vidhya Balan.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala. He not only discovered this cricket song, he sent its lyrics to me specially tomark the occasion of Indian world cup win on 25 june 1983 ! He certainly keeps an eagle eye on important days in the annals of Indian history !

The song is sung by Sonu Nigam, Aishwarya Nigam, Rana Mujumdar and Ashish. Satyanshu Singh is the lyricist. Music is composed by Preetam. Video is partial. One needs to listen to the audio to savour the full song.

Here it is ! Let us once again savour the great moment in the history of India that took place this day 37 years ago.

Video (Partial)

Audio (Full)

Song-Maara re sixer maara re four (Ferrari Ki Sawaari)(2012) Singers-Sonu Nigam, Aishwarya Nigam, Rana Mujumdar, Ashish, Lyrics – Satyanshu Singh, Music– Pritam

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)(audio version)

hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaaraa
hey maaraa

hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa aa

aa haa
o ho
ae ae ae ae …
aa haa
o ho

maaraa re sixer
maaraa re four
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
maaraa re sixer
maaraa re four
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
arey public to public hai
run maange more
more
more
more
more
more ……
ye maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaraa
hey maaraa aa
aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae
aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae
umpire ke haath thhakne lage hain
fielder bhi saare tapakne lage hain
hook maar aisaa tu oo
hook maar aisaa tu
rocket ke jaisaa tu
bouncer pahunchaa de Laahore
o…… r…e

more
more
more
more ….
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaraa
hey maaraa aa

maaraa re sixer
maaraa re four
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
public to public hai
run maange more
more
more
more
more
more …..

aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae
aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae

ham sab ki aankhen tujhpe lagi hain
har dil mein phir se ummeeden jagi hai
public hai sang tere ae
oye oye oye oye ae
public hai sang tere ae
barsaa de rang tere
dikhlaa de balle ka zor
more
more
more
more ……

hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaaraa
hey maaraa

maaraa re sixer
maaraa re four
are dekho dekho
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score

maaraa maara re sixer
maaraa maara re four
are dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
maaraa maaraa maaraa sixer
maaraa maaraa maaraa four
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae
aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae

——————————-
Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)(video short version)
——————————-
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaaraa
hey maaraa

hey maaraa
hey maaraa aa

aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae

maaraa re sixer
maaraa re four
dekho to dekho to
apnaa ye score
public to public hai
run maange more
more
more
more
more
more …..
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaaraa
hey maaraa aa

aa haa
o ho
hey ae ae ae

ham sab ki aankhen tujhpe lagi hain
har dil mein phir se ummeeden jagi hai
public hai sang tere ae
oye oye oye oye ae
public hai sang tere ae
barsaa de rang tere
dikhlaa de balle ka zor
more
more
more
more ……

hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
hey maaraa
o maaaraa
hey maaraa aa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4355 Post No. : 15676 Movie Count :

4319

In Hindi film industry, there are very  few producer-directors who make the films out of their passion for bringing to the notice of the public at large,  the social issues which they consider to be important. The mainstream film makers would generally avoid in their films such subjects as they are not money spinners at the box office unless they add ‘spices’ to those social issues to make it the box office success.  I had earlier discussed such producers/directors like Nagesh Kukunoor and Sai Paranjpye. I guess, the main driving point for them in making socially relevant films is the creative satisfaction and probably the international recognition they may get. Showmanship in terms of top star actors, music directors, lyricists, costly sets and costumes and the marketing blitz before the release of the films do not fit into their budget.

‘Lakshmi’ (2014) was one socially relevant film based on a true story of child trafficking and prostitution. How did Nagesh Kukunoor got the idea of making ‘Lakshmi’ (2014)?

As revealed by Nagesh Kukunoor in a couple of interviews for the magazines, he was on a visit to a rescue shelter for child prostitutes run by a NGO, where he heard several stories of exploitation – both physical and emotional which were of very disturbing nature. But there was a story of one minor girl, Lakshmi who was kidnapped by a child trafficker and sold to a brothel. Despite all odds, she fought bravely, took the traffickers to the court and came out triumphant. All the rescued girls had only one wish list that such exploitation should not happen to other girls.  Nagesh Kukunoor found the experience very moving and decided to make a film on it.

The biggest problem for Nagesh Kukunoor was that though he got the start and the end of Lakshmi’s real story, he was almost blank as to what happened in-between the start and end of the story. He felt that it was not proper to make the girl to relive the trauma she faced in the brothel. So, he relied on the inputs from NGOs as to how the girls were treated in the brothels and his own imagination to fill the gaps in the story. Hence, he calls his film ‘Lakshmi’ (2014) as ‘a fictional account of a true story’.

There was a problem in selecting the actor for the main role of Lakshmi who should be around 14 years of age. But it would be awkward for the director to discussed with a minor actor or with her parents, the scenes involving her activities in the brothel. So, Nagesh Kukunoor dropped the idea of making the film.

In a filmy party, Nagesh Kukunoor met the playback singer, Monali Thakur who was 21, but looked much younger because of her lean figure and small face. He thought that with proper costumes and hairstyles, she could be made to look like a 14-year girl. Fortunately for Negesh Kukunoor, Monali Thakur agreed to do the role of Lakshmi in the film though she had never acted earlier. So, the main actors for the film – Monali Thakur, Satish Kaushik, Shefali Shah besides Nagesh Kukunoor in the role of a pimp was finalised. Ram Kapoor acted in the role of an advocate for Lakshmi. The film was completed in 22 days of shootings which took place in around Hyderabad. The film faced some hurdles in the Censor Board but eventually got the certification for adult viewing.

I had watched the film on a video sharing platform a few years back but had left it half way as some of the scenes involving the crime and violence were very disturbing. Recently, I watched the film once again skipping disturbing scenes in-between but up to the end involving court-room scenes. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Lakshmi (Monali Thakur), a minor girl, is sold to Reddy Garu (Satish Kaushik) by her father.  Reddy is a child trafficker who runs a brothel in Hyderabad in the guise of a girls’ hostel as a ‘shelter for orphaned girls. He is assisted by Chinna (Nagesh Kukunoor) who is his front man for his brothel activities. But the kingpin for the immoral activities is a city corporator, Radha (Gulfam Khan). Initially, Reddy keeps Lakshmi in his house, giving her estrogen injections by his personal doctor in the name of injections for her weakness. After 3 weeks, she is sent to the brothel under the custody of Madam Jyothi (Shefali Shah) who is a tough both with her girls and clients but kind-hearted. Jyothi has a daughter who is studying engineering but she is not aware of her mother’s nature of job. Chinna often abuses Jyothi, both verbally and physically for not doing her job properly.

One day, Lakshmi runs away from the brothel and tries to register an FIR in the police station against the illegal activities going in the so called girls’ hostel. But instead of acting on her tip, the news is leaked out to Reddy who through Chinna catches her while on the run. He assaults her with his wooden club stubbed with nails. (did Chinese get the idea from this film!) so that she would not dare try to run away again. But she tells him that she would surely flee from brothel one day.

Since Reddy and Chinna get free every time there is a raid on the brothel, a social worker, Mohan (Ramkrishna Shenoy) sets a trap by becoming a bogus customer and record the activities in a room with a hidden camera with marked currency notes etc. A police raid on the brothel leads to the arrest of Reddy and Chinna along with Jyothi and girls. Girls are sent to the shelters run by Mohan for child prostitute. Both Reddy and Chinna get bail and the brothel is again opened.

Girls  are not happy in the shelter house as neither the work interests them nor their parents and the society honourably accept them. So, one by all girls are back to the brothel except Lakshmi who says to Mohan that she would fight the battle in the court. Encouraged by her stand, Mohan and another lady social worker take her to an advocate, Avinash (Ram Kapoor) who had stopped his practice some years back due to nervous breakdown which in turn was because of the unethical activities of his fellow advocates who could be bought by the interested parties and the manipulation of witnesses.

After listening to the case, Avinash, refuses to take up the case on behalf of Lakshmi as during his practice on Prevetion of Immoral Trafficking Act (PITA) cases, the complainers did not stand up to the uncomfortable questions put forward by the defense advocates and key witnesses became hostile. Thus, all the cases were dismissed. He further states that not a single case under PITA has gone in favour of the aggrieved parties since the introduction of the Act because of this reason as well as aggrieved parties taking back their complained either due to threat or with money power. Lakshmi says with conviction that she will not change her statement. Her firm commitment makes Advocate Avinash  to agree to fight the case on behalf of Lakshmi.

In the court, the defense lawyer asks Lakshmi very uncomfortable personal questions relating to her activities in the brothel so that she avoids answering which will make the case weak against the accused. The video footage of marked currency notes changing hands at the brothel did not carry weight as the defense lawyer says that the video could have been doctored. Also, being the girls hostel, the money could be changing hands due to legitimate activities of the hostel. in the absence of FIR and the medical report for rapes in the brothel at the material time, Advocate Avinash has no other proof to substantiate the charges made by Lakshmi.

The only proof which Mohan had with him was a long video footage of the room in which Lakshmi was raped in the brothel by 7 clients in the whole night which was recorded in a concealed close-circuit video camera which Mohan had installed with the connivance of Madam Jyothi. But the video footage is too personal to be displayed in the court room. But the urge in Lakshmi to punish Reddy and Chinna was so great that she agreed for the display of the video footage in the court. Also, the witness statement from the personal doctor of Reddy favouring Lakshmi’s contention and the video footage turned the court’s decision in favour of Lakshmi. Reddy, Chinna and Corporator Radha were found guilty under PITA and IPC and they were sentenced 10 years of imprisonment. Lakshmi’s father was also jailed for abatement of the crime.

Monali Thakur made a debut as an actor in the film and she has acted brilliantly though she could have been better trained in her dialogue delivery in Hyderabadi Hindi. She had displayed a very innocence face through out the film so much so that even after her bold decision to fight the case in the court, one never find aggressiveness in her face or in voice. She has played the role in a subtle way. Satish Kaushik in the role of Reddy has acted well but his dialogues with north Indian accents have let him down. On the other hand, Nagesh Kukunoor as Chinna the pimp, has excelled in his dialogues in Hyderabadi Hindi but was somewhat weak in his acting. Ram Kapoor as an advocate for Lakshmi has done excellent performance as an advocate.

As mentioned earlier, the film has some very disturbing scenes. The dialogues are raunchy. But these are expected in the film with the brothel having the central place in the story. Probably, on this background, Nagesh Kukunoor as a producer was not keen on releasing the film widely. The film was release in some select theatres all over India and mostly in the morning slots. However, the film was shown in International film festivals. In Palm Spring Film Festival, 2014, the film won the audience award for the best film among 191 films screened. The film was also shown free to many social organisations all over India.

‘Lakshmi’ has four songs – all as background songs. I am presenting the first song “Sun Ri Baawli Tu Apne Liye Khud Hi Maang Le Duaa” sung by Papon (real name: Angarag Mahanta). The song is written by an upcoming lyricist, Manoj Yadav which is set to music by Tapas Relia, also an upcoming music director from Gujarat.

I find the use of the words in lyrics interesting. The lyrics sounds like that 1960s and 1970s songs. A search in the internet gives me a profile of Manoj Yadav as the son of a mill worker of Mumbai who has spent his major life in Mumbai with summer holidays being spent in Gorakhpur, his native place. He says in one of the interviews that Gulzar’s jingles “Jungle Jungle Pata Chala Hai” which he had watched in his childhood influenced him to write poems. He started his career as a jingle writer for advertising films where Tapas Relia was one of the music directors. Then he gradually moved into Hindi films as song writer. So far, he has written lyrics for about 60 songs in 36 films since 2012.

The song under discussion is used as a background song in parts in 4 different situations in the film. Probably for this reason, the video clip of the song is not available. However, Tips, the owner of the music rights of the songs in the film has made a video clip of the song remixing some scenes from the film with the playback singer Papon while keeping intact the original sound track of the song in the video. The audio clip contains the elongated song.

Remixed Video

Audio

Song – Sun Ri Baawli Tu Apne Liye Khud Hi Maang Le Duaa (Lakshmi) (2014) Singer – Papon (aka Angarag Mahanta), Lyrics – Manoj Yadav, MD – Tapas Relia

Lyrics

ae aa aa ae aaa
o o o o o
uu uu uu uu
ha aa aa aa
re re re re re
la ra aa ra aa aa
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona
bejaar saa nazar aaye jo
tere saamne tera masihaa
wo tera na hona
tan kaa kamra man ki kothi
saanson kaa khel khilona aa aa
kesh mein suraj khos ke chalna
kabhi koi raat miley na aa aa
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona
 
ho o o
toothe taare uthaa le…
unse chanda bana le….ae..
toothe taare uthaa le
unse chanda bana le
thaam aanchal ka kona
usse tu aasmaan bana le
dhoop hai doli chhaavn hai dulhan
khud se preet chhodna
kesh mein suraj khos ke chalna
kabhi koi raat miley na aa aa
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona aa aa
 
ho o o
ud jaana jab
udne ka man ho.. ho…o o o
ud jaana jab 
udne ka man ho
bharose raai ke lena??
tu hi tera hausla ho
likhne de jo bhi likhta hai lamha
uske haath rok na aa
kesh mein suraj khos ke chalna
kabhi koi raat miley na aa aa
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona
bejaar saa nazar aaye jo
tere saamne tera masihaa
wo tera na hona
tan ka kamra man ki kothi
saanson kaa khel khilona aa
kesh mein suraj khos ke chalna
kabhi koi raat miley na aa
sun ri baawli tu apne liye
khud hi maang le duaa
koi tera na hona…
sun ri baawli ae ae ae
sun ri baa…wli ee ee
sun ri baawli ee ee
sun ri baawli  ae ae ae ae


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4354 Post No. : 15673 Movie Count :

4317

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 20
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

It is like cherry picking a hit parade – the repeat songs are almost always the popular hit songs that have made a serious mark on the collective memory of the audiences and lovers of Hindi films and film songs. And this song is no exception. Rather this song has been so popular – with its catchy lyrics and a very hummable melody – that one hears this song being used in many different avatars outside of the film frame – remixes, revival melodies, even background music for recorded dance performances. One can find such samples online on YT.

This iconic song, originally from the 1968 film – ‘Kismat’, has been reused in the 2011 film ‘Tanu Weds Manu’. Whereas the original song was a disguise cum diversion song, in a situation where the lead pair is trying to get away from a group of bad-men, in the newer film, this song is being used as a wooing-cum-proposal-making song. The occasion is a wedding of a friend of the leading lady. Tanuja (Kangana Ranaut) aka Tanu is trying to muster up courage to proposition Manu, who appears to be too shy and unprepared to take a step towards a relationship. Using the wedding scenario as an excuse, Tanu gets drunk (or appears to get drunk). The situation develops and reaches this song in a couple of minutes, and in the guise of this song, Tanu finally gets to speak her heart out to Manu,

kismat bana de meri
duniya basa de meri
kar le sagaai meri jaan

Please note that in this re-use, the original song has been presented as it is, the only one change is that two stanzas have been used instead of 3. So what we hear in this song are the original voices of Asha Bhosle and Shamshad Begum, the mukhda and antara lines suitably edited to present a shorter version.

The info about this reuse has been shared with me by Anekant ji. He has been a regular contributor and there is still a few more songs in my pending list for this series, that have been suggested by him.

The original song from the film ‘Kismat’ came on to this blog on 9th February, 2009. It can be accessed here – “Kajra Mohabbat Wala, Akhiyon Mein Aisa Daala“.

Check out this resue, and witness an energetic on screen performance by Kangana, who, under the supposed influence of alcohol, is desirous of presenting a Kanpuria dance for the occasion. And enjoy.

Song – Kajra Mohabbat Wala Akhiyon Mein Aisa Daala  (Tanu Weds Manu) (2011) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Shamshad Begum, Lyrics – SH Bihari, MD – OP Nayyar

Lyrics

kajra mohabbat waala
akhiyon me aisa daala
kajre ne le li meri jaan
haay re main tere qurbaan
duniya hai mere peeche
lekin main tere peeche
apna bana le meri jaan
haay re main tere qurbaan
kajra mohabbat waala
akhiyon me aisa daala
kajre ne le li meri jaan
haay re main tere qurbaan

aayi ho kahaan se gori
aankhon me pyaar le ke
aayi ho kahaan se gori

aankhon me pyaar le ke
chadhti jawaani ki ye pehli bahaar leke
dilli shahar ka saara
meena bazaar leke

dilli shahar ka saara
meena bazaar leke

jhumka bareli wala
kaano me aisa daala
jhumke ne le li meri jaan
hay re main tere qurbaan
duniya hai mere peeche
lekin main tere peeche
apna bana le meri jaan
haay re main tere qurbaan

motor na bangla maangoon
jhumka na haar maangoon
motor na bangla maangoon
jhumka na haar maangoon
dil ko jalaane waale dil ka qaraar maangoon
sainya bedardi mere
thoda sa pyaar maangoon

sainya bedardi mere
thoda sa pyaar maangoon

kismat bana de meri
duniya basa de meri
kar le sagaai meri jaan
haay re main tere qurbaan

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————

कजरा मोहब्बत वाला
अखियों में ऐसा डाला
कजरे ने ले ली मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान
दुनिया है मेरे पीछे
लेकिन मैं तेरे पीछे
अपना बना ले मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान
कजरा मोहब्बत वाला
अखियों में ऐसा डाला
कजरे ने ले ली मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान

आई हो कहाँ से गोरी
आँखों में प्यार ले के
आई हो कहाँ से गोरी
आँखों में प्यार ले के
चढ़ती जवानी की ये
पहली बहार ले के
दिल्ली शहर का सारा
मीना बाज़ार ले के
दिल्ली शहर का सारा
मीना बाज़ार ले के
झुमका बरेली वाला
कानों में ऐसा डाला
झुमके ने ले ली मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान
दुनिया है मेरे पीछे
लेकिन मैं तेरे पीछे
अपना बना ले मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान

मोटर ना बंगला माँगूँ
झुमका ना हार माँगूँ
मोटर ना बंगला माँगूँ
झुमका ना हार माँगूँ
दिल को जलाने वाले दिल का क़रार माँगूँ
सैंया बेदर्दी मेरे
थोड़ा सा प्यार माँगूँ
सैंया बेदर्दी मेरे
थोड़ा सा प्यार माँगूँ
किस्मत बना दे मेरी
दुनिया बसा दे मेरी
कर लै सगाई मेरी जान
हाय रे मैं तेरे क़ुर्बान


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16067

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1234
Total Number of movies covered =4388

Total visits so far

  • 13,996,753 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,921 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogadda

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
%d bloggers like this: