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Today (14 July 2020) is the 101st birth anniversary of Sagat Singh (14 july 1919- 26 September 2001). He had nothing to do with HFM, but I am discussing him today. why ? Because I think that he deserves to be known to all of us. His name should occupy a pride of place among the great sons of India.

Sagat Singh started his military career in pre independence era as a JCO (Naik) with Bikaner Ganga Risala (army of the riyasat of Bikaner). Later he was promoted as Naib Sebedar and then as second lieutenant.

On amalgamation of the State Forces into Indian Army in 1950 after independence, he joined Third Gorkha Rifles of Indian Army. He commanded the Second and Third Battalions of the Third Gorkha Rifles.

In September 1961, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier and he was posted as the brigade commander of India’s only parachute brigade, the 50th Parachute Brigade. Most army officers would scoff at joining Parachute brigade, but Sagat Singh joined it enthusiastically and became a paratrooper himself.

Goa liberation war 1961
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The first memorable event in Sagat Singh’s career came in december 1961 which was liberation of Goa. Though India had become independent on 15 August 1947, Goa continued to be under Portugal occupation. Portugal refused to leave Goa, claiming that Goa was not a colony but part of metropolitan Portugal and hence its transfer to India was non-negotiable, and that India had no rights to this territory because the Republic of India did not exist at the time when Goa came under Portuguese rule.

The public opinion in Goa was to join India, but these movements were being forcibly suppressed by Portuguese authorities. The relations between Goa and India became tense. On 24 November 1961, Sabarmati, a passenger boat passing between the Indian port of Kochi and the Portuguese-held island of Anjidiv, was fired upon by Portuguese ground troops, resulting in the death of a passenger and injuries to the chief engineer. The action was precipitated by Portuguese fears that the boat carried a military landing party intent on storming the island. The incidents lent themselves to fostering widespread public support in India for military action in Goa.

On receiving the go-ahead for military action and a mandate for the capture of all occupied territories for the Indian government, Lieutenant-General Chaudhari of the Indian Army’s Southern Command fielded the 17th Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth and the 50th Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh.

The operation for the liberation of Goa, code named ‘Vijay’, was planned for 14 December, 1961. In order to prevent international intervention, and reinforcements from Portugal reaching Goa, it was essential that the operation was quick, and decisive. After a quick appreciation, Chaudhury decided to mount a two pronged attack. The main force, comprising 17 Infantry Division, was to move into Goa from the East, while 50 Parachute Brigade, under Brigadier Sagat Singh, was to mount a subsidiary thrust from the North. Major General K.P. Candeth, GOC 17 Infantry Division, was placed in overall command of the task force.

It was decided during meeting in Delhi that 2 Para battalion of 50 para brigade would be air dropped by Air force in Goa. But airforce later backed off and this plan had to be abandoned. This 2 para moved to Belgaum where it was met by 1 para of 50 para brigade. 2 Sikh Light infantry (based at Madras) also joined them. They along with 7th cavalry and 8th cavalty were also put under the command of Sagat Singh. So in summary, Sagat Singh commanded 50th Para Brigade, which had as its units 1st para battalion, 2nd Para battalion, 2 Sikh Light Infantry battalion, 7th Light cavalry and 8th light cavalry.

The brigade moved to Savantvadi on 13 December, and thence to its assembly area East of Dodamarg on the 16th. Meanwhile, 17 Infantry Division had also commenced its move from Ambala on 2 December, and had concentrated in Belgaum by 12 December. A tactical headquarters was established by HQ Southern Command at Belgaum on 13 December, and the Army Commander with his staff began to function from here. D Day for the operation was initially decided as 14 December, but was later postponed, due to political reasons, in an attempt to avert the conflict, and resolve the problem by diplomatic means. It was finally decided that the operation would commence on the night of 18 December.

Three days before D Day, the COAS, General P.N. Thapar, accompanied by Lieut General P.P. Kumaramangalam, the Adjutant General, and Lieut General J.N. Chaudhury, the Army Commander, visited the brigade, and Sagat presented his plan for the operation. At the end of the presentation, the Army Commander expressed the view that Sagat’s timings were too optimistic, and had reservations about them being adhered to. Sagat then gave the timings in writing, and the party left, after wishing the brigade good luck. On return to his tactical HQ, The Army Commander conveyed his doubts to his staff. However, Air Vice Marshal Pinto, and the Chief of Staff, Major General P.O. Dunn, as well as Mr. G.N. Handoo, of the IB, who knew Sagat well, supported him, and he was allowed to proceed according to his plan. As it happened, Sagat had already kept a reserve of four hours, and was able to remain well ahead of the estimated timings, when the operations took place.

50 Parachute Brigade had been given a subsidiary task, of advancing from the North, primarily to tie down the Portuguese troops in that area. However, Sagat was not the type to be shackled by rigid orders, and had already visualised a larger role for himself. He had decided to move on a wide front on two axes, with a vehicle mounted battalion group on each, supported by armour and artillery. He reasoned that if he was held up on one axis, he would continue the advance on the other, and using the reserve battalion, advance deeper into Goa, either through Bicholim-Mapuca-Panjim Creek, or via Sanquelim-Usgaon-Ponda-Velha Goa, on to Panjim. 2 Sikh Light Infantry group, supported by a squadron of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8 Cavalry, was tasked to advance on the Bicholim axis. 2 Para, supported by rest of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8th Cavalry, was assigned the Sanquelim axis. 1 Para was kept in reserve.

Though the operation was to commence on the night of 18 December, Sagat had decided to launch fighting patrols the previous night, to overcome the border outposts, in order to facilitate the entry of the main column across the border the following morning. Accordingly, Sagat had tasked 1 Para to capture two border outposts, and 2 Para to proceed along the ‘smugglers route’ and capture the single span 110 feet long bridge over the Sanquelim river, on the previous night. As these preliminary operations were going on, All India Radio gave the game away, by announcing shortly after midnight, that Indian troops were crossing into Goa. This alerted the Portuguese, and the element of surprise, so important in such operations, was lost. One company of 2 Para, after a swift night approach, had reached within 200 yards of the bridge, when barking dogs alerted the defending troops, who quickly fired the demolitions and fled.

The Portuguese Governor General and C-in-C, Major General Vassalo De Silva, was from the Corps of Engineers, and had got demolition chambers made in all the bridges, with explosives attached, for rapid demolitions. However, the company of 2 Para found a crossing place, and secured the home bank, enabling the tanks, guns and vehicles to cross the river. The Portuguese had not been able to fire all the demolition charges, and only those at the two ends had exploded. The single span had fallen down but was undamaged. Using marine jacks, the span was lifted, and with the addition of abutments at both ends, the bridge was soon re-commissioned. 1 Para also managed to capture the villages of Ibrampur, Maulinguem and Doromaoga, by first light of 18 December, though it suffered some casualties.

The main force, viz 17 Infantry Division commenced from its assembly area South of Belgaum, at dawn on 18 December, with 63 Infantry Brigade in the lead. It was planned to advance up to Ponda, by way of Mollem. 48 Infantry Brigade, which was following, was to pass through at Ponda, and go for Panjim, which was the final objective. Due to the advance on foot and abnormally large bridging column which was following the leading brigade, 48 Infantry Brigade could not keep up its advance, and when it reached River Candepar in evening, it found it was already occupied by paratroopers. Two battalions of 50 Parachute Brigade, 2 Para and 2 Sikh LI, had also commenced their advance at first light, on 18 December. Moving on converging axes, they did not let the blown up bridges deter them and simply swam across. The absence of heavy equipment, and light opposition from the enemy, coupled with initiative of the leaders, made this possible. As a result, the para troopers made excellent progress, and achieved more than what was expected from them. By 8.30 a.m. 2 Sikh LI had taken Bicholim and by 10.30 a.m. 2 Para reached Sanquelim, and by 5.30 p.m., occupied Ponda. This was done in spite of two major obstacles, in the form of the rivers Usgaon and Candepar, which were crossed by means of improvised rafts and fording.

After the crossing of the wide Usgaon river, Sagat felt that there was now no need to hold 1 Para in reserve, and he ordered them to head straight for Banasterim, after crossing the ferry at Piligao. According to his initial plan, on reaching Panjim, 2 Para was to establish a firm base close to the city, and 1 Para would be tasked to clear the expected resistance in the built up area. The lack of enemy resistance, and speed of advance had altered the situation. Another development took place at tactical HQ of Southern Command, at Belgaum. A wireless intercept indicated that the Portuguese Governor General had called for a meeting next morning at 8 a.m., to consider surrender. The Army Commander, when informed of this, realised that the Portuguese had lost the battle. Seeing the slow progress of 17 Infantry Division, and the rapid advance of 50 Para Brigade, he decided to change the plan. The task of capturing Panjim, which had been earlier assigned to 17 Division, was now given to the paratroopers, who were asked resume advance during the night. Due to break down in signal communications, this order could not be passed to HQ 17 Infantry Division, which had ordered 50 Para Brigade to firm in at Ponda, and tasked 48 Brigade to capture Panjim. However, Lieut-General Chaudhury personally spoke to the Brigade Major of 50 Para Brigade, and passed these instructions, since Sagat was away from his headquarters, visiting 2 Para, at that time. Incidentally, 50 Para Brigade was able to maintain contact with Belgaum throughout the operation, thanks to a radio relay detachment, which Sagat had managed to get from Major General R.N. Batra, the Signal Officer-in-Chief, on the ‘old boy’ net.

The advance of 2 Sikh LI was initially slow, even though it was led by the squadron of 7 Cavalry, and a troop of AMX tanks. Sagat felt that they had a tendency to hug the ground, and this accounted for their slow progress. He had to personally push them hard, before they speeded up their advance, and reached the Betim ferry, on the Panjim Creek, by last light. By this time, 1 Para had reached the outskirts of Panjim. With two battalions around Panjim by the evening of 18 December, 50 Para Brigade was now poised to capture the town, from the East as well as the North. However, it was almost dark, and Sagat did not want to enter the built up area of Panjim by night. He ordered 1 Para and 2 Sikh LI to halt, and establish harbours, for the night.

On the morning of 19 December, using the Betim ferry, some troops of 2 Sikh LI crossed the Panjim Creek, and arrived in Panjim at 8 am. Shortly afterwards, 1 Para also reached Panjim. Except for some firing from the customs house, there was no effective resistance, and the city was in Indian hands by 9 a.m. By a remarkable coincidence, the COs of both battalions had the same name. 1 Para was being commanded by Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh, VrC, MC, while the CO of 2 Sikh LI was Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh. It was the latter who won the race by an hour, and had the honour of accepting the surrender of the Portuguese troops, who had assembled in the officers mess. Major General Vassalo De’ Silva, the Governor General and C-in-C, escaped to Marmagao, and surrendered later. The Navy had already taken Anjidiv island the previous day, and also sunk the Portuguese frigate ‘Albuquerque’. At 11 a.m., Lieut-General Chaudhury, accompanied by Air Vice Marshal Pinto arrived in a helicopter, and got the tri-colour hoisted on the Secretariat building. Goa had been liberated, in an operation which lasted a little over 24 hours.

So, one can say that Goa was supposed to be liberated by 17st Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth, with 50th. Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh supposed to play a supporting role. But it was the other way round. Sagat Singh’s 50th Parachute Brigade reached Panjim and accepted surrender of Goan authority, while 17th Infantry Division was still struggling to reach Panjim.

Though the result of the operations in Goa was along expected lines, the speed of the Indian advance surprised many observers. The credit for this goes to Sagat, and his troops, who exceeded their brief, and managing to reach Panjim, which they had not been asked to do. The fact that 17 Infantry Division, in spite of the vastly superior resources at their disposal, and almost no opposition from the enemy, could make little headway, goes to show that the going was not easy. If the paratroopers succeeded, it was because of better fighting spirit, morale and leadership. The ability to take risks, and seize fleeting opportunities is the hall mark of a successful military leader, and Sagat proved beyond doubt that he had these qualities in ample measure.

Bangladesh Liberation War 1971
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In 1971 war, time was of essence. As soon as Pakistan started the war, on 3 December 1971 (by carrying out what they thought was an Israeli style bombing on Indian airfields), India retaliated and Pakistan ran to the UN on 4 December 1971 (in a very un Israel like manner), requesting UN to intervene and order ceasefire. Pakistan was supported by USA and China, while USSR vetoed the proposal, Britain and France abstained. So, India had limited time in which to achieve their task before Pakistan could manage to get ceasefire, like how they had managed to force India, then on the verge of defeating Pakistan soundly, into ceasefire in 1965, thanks to Chinese aggression at Sikkim.

In 1971, The task of liberating Bangla Desh, then called East Pakistan, was given to Lieut General Jagjit Singh Aurora, GOC-in-C Eastern Command. He had four corps under him, namely- 2 Corps, commanded by Lieut General (later General) T.N. Raina; 33 Corps, commanded by Lieut General M.L. Thapan; 4 Corps, commanded by Lieut General Sagat Singh; and 101 Communication Zone Area, commanded by Major General G.S. Gill.

East Pakistan had three major rivers and that divided it into four major territories. Each of the corps was given the task of capturing one territory each. The part south of river Padma (that is known as Ganga in India) was to be captured by Corps II, advancing from West (viz from West Bengal). The part between Padma (Ganga in India) and Jamuna (known as Brahmputra in India) was to be captured by Corps XXXIII, advancing from North west. Another major river is river Meghna (combination of Barak river and Kushtia river, both originating in Assam), which flows south west and joins Padma (which is already merged with Jamuna by then). The mighty river that thus gets formed is known as Meghna from then onwards and it flows into bay of Bengal. Sagat Singh’s corps 4 was given the task of capturing the territory east of River Meghna, attacking from east. The fourth territory, viz the northern territory between Jamuna and Meghna rivers was to be captured by 101 Communication Zone Area, attacking from north.

Bangladesh is a territory full of rivers. Crossing them is tough because there are very few bridges on them.

Pakistan had three infantry divisions, comprising about 42 battalions of regular troops, and five squadrons of armour, for the defence of the region, and more than 2000 kilometres of border. Lieut General A.A.K. Niazi, who was commanding the Eastern Command of the Pakistan Army, had appreciated that the Indian advance would have to be along the major road axes, and had deployed his troops accordingly. Strong points had been created along the likely axes, and it was visualised that unless these were cleared, the advancing enemy could make little headway.

Lt General Niazi’s hunch was correct as far as corps II, corps XXXIII and 101 communication zone were concerned. They advanced in the conventional way along the predicted route where Pakistani forces awaited them. Fighting them and defeating them consumed precious time of these corps of Indian Army. As a result, these corps fell way behind schedule in achieving their targets. Time was important because the longer the war prolonged, more was the possibility that UN would force a ceasefire and like in 1965, it would end up in a stalemate, with nothing to show for by India.

Just when it looked gloomy for Indian forces, Sagat Singh employed some unconventional strategies that no military strategist had ever thought of. Realising that time was important and using the same conventional method of advancing on land was time consuming, he decided to air drop his troops across river Meghna. He had antique helicopters which were not meant for this purpose, but he made them fly hundreds of sorties, and in each sortie 17 troops were carried (about 5 more than the carrying capacity). It was a risky gamble, and these helicopters were shot at by Pakistani troops. On one occasion, one helicopter was hit by these shots. The bullets hit the pilot and grazed past Sagat Singh, also flying in the helicopter. Sagat Singh was playing for broke, and his gamble paid off big time.

When his Corps had reached the Meghna River and he was trying to cross the river to advance to Dacca, Aurora tried to restrain him. Sagat told him that he was surprised at his reluctance when he was not only fulfilling the task given to him but achieving task plus. Hesuccessfully conducted an ad hoc and impromptu river crossing operation across one of the widest rivers of the world.

The air lift began on the afternoon of December 9, and continued for the next 36 hours. A total of 110 sorties were flown, from a stadium, and crossed the Meghna, which was 4,000 yards wide, to land at helipads which had been marked by torches, with their reflectors removed. During day, the troops were landed in paddy fields, with helicopters hovering low above the ground. The first battalion of 311 Mountain Brigade, 4 Guards, was landed in Raipura. while 9 Punjab crossed the river using country boats.

Next day, the troops were landed directly at Narsingdi. Meanwhile, 73 Brigade had started to cross, using boats, which had been rounded up. The ferrying of artillery and tanks was a serious problem, and required considerable ingenuity on the part of the Engineers. By 11 December, both 311 and 73 Mountain Brigade had crossed the Meghna, and were ordered to advance to Dacca, on different axes. Using all modes of transport, including bullock carts and cycle rickshaws, both brigades advanced rapidly, and on December 14, the first artillery shell was fired on Dacca. Meanwhile, 101 communication zone too advanced towards Dacca from north. This, as well as other units that began arriving towards Dhaka were put under the command of Sagat Singh on 15 December. Shelling commenced and the message for Pakistan Army was clear, surrender or perish. One way or the other, Dacca was bound to fall to Indian forces on 16 December 1971.

Niazi surrendered on 16 december 1971. Unlike in 1965, when Pakistan avoided a humiliating defeat, this time, Pakistan could not save face. On 12 December, with Pakistan facing imminent defeat, the United States requested that the Security Council be reconvened. Pakistan’s Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was rushed to New York City to make the case for a resolution on the cease fire. The council continued deliberations for four days. By the time proposals were finalised, Pakistan’s forces in the East had surrendered and the war had ended, making the measures merely academic. Bhutto, frustrated by the failure of the resolution and the inaction of the United Nations, ripped up his speech and left the council. 🙂

So, Sagat Singh’s unconventional tactics bamboozled Pakistani army and Pakistani rulers alike. Pakistan was forced to surrender several days before than they had expected. Some “experts” thought that Niazi should have deferred his decision by another one day. But these experts forget that Niazi had no choice. There was no way he would have left Dacca alive without Indian forces’ protection. Even if there was ceasefire, Indian troops would have just handed him over to Mukti Bahini. So surrendering before Indian army was an offer that Niazi could not refuse. 🙂

Here is that famous surrender photo. Sagat Singh is seen standing immediately behind Niazi.

So, one can see that Sagat Singh caused liberation of Goa on 19 december 1961 and liberation of Bangladesh on 16 december 1971. It was almost a “ten year liberation challenge” (dec 1961-dec 1971) as far as he was concerned ! 🙂

But, neither of these two feats were the biggest achievements of his career, in my opinion. His biggest achievement, in my opinion, that had far reaching implications for India, and therefore world affairs, came about in 1967 and ironically, very few people know about it and even talk about it. and that was :-

1967 India China War
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I have mentioned it earlier that India was winning against Pakistan decisively in 1965 when China, in a bid to save Pakistan, opened a front at Sikkim, and accused India of provocation and made some unreasonable demands on India. Indian government got nervous and declared ceasefire when on the verge of victory against Pakistan. This saved Pakistan big time. On the negotiating table, Pakistan got back everything that it had lost in the war. India not only surrendered all the gains of the war, even its PM Lal Bahadur Shashtri died mysteriously at Tashkant, where this meeting was taking place. So to many Indians it felt as if the entire world ganged up against India and India was stabbed in the back for the misdeed of Pakistan and Pakistan got away scot free.

Among the threats made by China while opening the Sikkim front with India, was the unreasonable demand that India vacated the two passes that were under Indian occupation, claiming that they were Chinese territories. These passes were Nathu La pass and Jelep La pass.

Nathu La was under mountain division 17 (headed by its Division Commander Major General Sagat Singh) while Jelep La was under mountain division 27 (headed by another Major General ). Both were under Lt Gen G G Bewoor, Corps commander of corps XXXIII.

In the opinion of Corps Commander Lt Gen Bewoor, the main defences of 17 Mountain Division were at Changgu, while Nathu La was only an observation post. Likewise In the adjoining sector, manned by 27 Mountain Division, Jelep La was also considered an observation post, with the main defences located at Lungthu. In case of hostilities, the divisional commanders had been given the authority to vacate the posts, and fall back on the main defences. Accordingly, orders were issued by Corps HQ to both divisions to vacate Nathu La and Jelep La.

Sagat did not agree with the views of the Corps HQ. Nathu La and Jelep La were passes, on the watershed, which was the natural boundary. The MacMahon Line, which India claimed as the International Border, followed the water shed principle, and India and China had gone to war over this issue, three years earlier. Vacating the passes on the watershed would give the Chinese the tactical advantage of observation and fire, into India, while denying the same to our own troops. Nathu La and Jelep La were also important because they were on the trade routes between India and Tibet, and provided the only means of ingress through the Chumbi Valley. Handing it over to the enemy on a platter was not Sagat’s idea of sound military strategy. Sagat also reasoned that the discretion to vacate the posts lay with the divisional commander, and he was not obliged to do so, based on instructions from Corps HQ.

As a result of orders issued by Corps HQ, 27 Mountain Division vacated Jelep La, which the Chinese promptly occupied. However, Sagat refused to vacate Nathu La, and when the Chinese became belligerent, and opened fire, he also opened up with guns and mortars, though there was a restriction imposed by Corps on the use of artillery. Lieut-General (later General) G.G. Bewoor, the Corps Commander, was extremely annoyed, and tried to speak to Sagat, to ask him to explain his actions. But Sagat was not in his HQ, and was with the forward troops. So it was his GSO 1, Lieut Colonel Lakhpat Singh, who bore the brunt of the Corps Commander’s wrath.

The Chinese had installed loudspeakers at Nathu La, and warned the Indians that they would suffer as they did in 1962, if they did not withdraw. However, Sagat had carried out a detailed appreciation of the situation, and reached the conclusion that the Chinese were bluffing. They made threatening postures, such as advancing in large numbers, but on reaching the border, always stopped, turned about and withdrew. They also did not use any artillery, for covering fire, which they would have certainly done if they were serious about capturing any Indian positions. Indian defences at Nathu La were strong. Sagat had put artillery observation posts on adjoining high features called Camel’s Back and Sebu La, which overlooked into the Yatung valley for several kilometres, and could bring down accurate fire on the enemy, an advantage that the Chinese did not have. It would be a tactical blunder to vacate Nathu La, and gift it to the Chinese.

During the crisis, the Chinese had occupied Jelep La, but had gained nothing in the sector under Sagat’s division. This was galling for them, and they continued their pressure on the Indians, and making threatening gestures. In December 1965, the Chinese fired on a patrol of 17 Assam Rifles, in North Sikkim, at a height of 16,000 feet, killing two men. The patrol was in Indian territory, but the Chinese claimed that it had crossed over to their side. They made regular broadcasts from loudspeakers at Nathu La, pointing out to Indian troops the pathetic conditions in which they lived, their low salaries and lack of amenities, comparing these to that of officers. It was a form of psychological warfare in which the Chinese were adept, and had to be countered. Sagat had similar loud speakers installed on our own side, and tape recorded messages, in Chinese language, were broadcast every day. However, he was not satisfied with this, and kept looking for a chance to avenge the death of the Indian soldiers who had fallen to Chinese bullets.

Throughout 1966, and early 1967, Chinese propaganda, intimidation and attempted incursions into Indian territory continued. The border was not marked, and there were several vantage points on the crest line which both sides thought belonged to them. Patrols which walked along the border often clashed, resulting in tension, and sometimes even casualties.

In 1967, Sagat discussed the problem with the new Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora. He suggested that the border at Nathu La should be clearly marked, to prevent such incidents, and offered to walk along the crest line, to test the Chinese resolve. If they did not object, the line along which he walked could be taken to be acceptable to them. This was agreed to, and Sagat, accompanied by an escort, began walking along the crest. The Chinese commander also walked alongside, accompanied by a photographer, who kept taking pictures. However, there was no confrontation, and the ‘walk’ ended peacefully.

Sagat then obtained the concurrence of the Corps Commander to mark the crest line, along which he had walked. He ordered a double wire fence to be erected, from Nathu La towards the North and South Shoulders. However, as soon as work began on the fence, on 20 August 1967, the Chinese became agitated, and asked the Indians to stop. One strand of wire was laid that day, and two more were added over the next two days. On 6 September, a patrol of 2 Grenadiers, the battalion which was holding defences at Nathula, was going towards the South Shoulder, when it was surrounded by about seventy Chinese, and threatened. The next day, the Chinese physically tried to interfere with the construction of the fence, and there was a scuffle. However, work continued on the next two days, and was almost completed on the 10th.

Since the Chinese appeared determined to prevent completion of the fence, it was decided to start early on 11th, and finish the job before first light. All available manpower, including a platoon of Engineers and another of Pioneers, was deployed for the task. A company of 18 Rajput was also brought in, to reinforce the position, and protect the men who were to construct the fence. As soon as work commenced, the Chinese came upto the fence, and tried to stop the work. There was a heated discussion between the Chinese commander, who was accompanied by the political commissar, and Lieut Colonel Rai Singh, CO 2 Grenadiers. Sagat had foreseen this eventuality, and told Lieut Colonel Rai Singh not to expose himself, and remain in his bunker, where the Brigade Commander, Brigadier M.M.S. Bakshi, was also present. But this was not heeded, and the CO, with an escort, came out in the open, to stand face to face with the Chinese officers. As the arguments became more heated, tempers rose, but both sides stood their ground. Suddenly, the Chinese opened fire, causing several casualties among the troops working on the wire fence. Lieut Colonel Rai Singh was hit by a Chinese bullet, and fell down.

Seeing their CO fall, the Grenadiers became mad with rage. In a fit of fury, they came out of their trenches, and attacked the Chinese post, led by Captain P.S. Dagar. The company of 18 Rajput, under Major Harbhajan Singh, and the Engineers working on the fence had been caught in the open, and suffered a few casualties from the Chinese firing. Realising that the only way to neutralise the Chinese fire was a physical assault, Harbhajan shouted to his men, and led them in a charge on the Chinese position. Several of the Indian troops were mowed down, by Chinese machine guns, but those who reached the Chinese bunkers used their bayonets, and accounted for many of the enemy. Both Harbhajan and Dagar lost their lives in the action, which developed into a full scale battle, lasting three days. Sagat had asked for some medium guns, and these were moved up to Kyangnosa La, at a height of over 10,000 ft.

Those day, authority to use artillery was only with Army Chief. Sagat Singh asked for permission to use artillery. His commanding officer sent the request to Delhi where the request went tthrough various channels in a proper bureaucratic manner. Seeing that it would be too late if he kept waiting for the orders from Delhi, Sagat Singh ordered firing of artillery on his own.

The artillery observation posts, which Sagat had sited earlier, proved their worth in bringing down effective fire on the Chinese. Because of lack of visibility, and the steep incline West of Nathu La, most Chinese shells fell behind the forward defences, and did not harm the Indians. Indian artillery shelling caused heavy damage on Chinese. Based on their observation of meek Indian behaviour so far, Chinese forces had never expected such a furious response.

The Indian casualties in the action were just over two hundred – 65 dead and 145 wounded. The Chinese are estimated to have suffered about three hundred casualties. Though the action taken by Sagat, in marking the border with a wire fence, had the approval of higher authorities, the large number of casualties suffered by both sides created a furore. The casualties to Indian troops would not have occurred if they had remained in their defences, and not exposed themselves by coming out of their trenches and rushing at the Chinese post. This happened in the heat of the moment, because seeing their CO fall, the troops lost their cool, and rushed forward under the orders of a young officer, who lost his life in the action.

The Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora, visited Nathu La, to assess the situation. Sagat was advised to prevent further escalation of hostilities, and avoid casualties to Indian troops.

The Chinese had already announced that it was the Indians who started the conflict, and the large number of Indian bodies, and wounded Indian soldiers, in their possession, seemed to support their claim. However, Sagat was not perturbed. For the last two years, the Chinese had been instigating him, and had killed several Indian soldiers. The specter of Chinese attack, of 1962, still haunted the military and political leadership in India and had prevented them from taking effective action against them. This was the first time the Chinese got a bloody nose, and the myth of their invincibility was broken.

This was not the end of the face-off with the Chinese. They had suffered more than 300 casualties and seemed unwilling to let the watershed cool down. On 1 Oct, a confrontation ensued between the Chinese and 7/11 Gorkha Regiment at Chola, a pass west of Nathu La and under the responsibility of 63 Brigade. The Gorkhas had that very day taken over the post at Pt 15450 from 10 J&K Rifles. A scuffle ensued between the JCO post commander and his Chinese counterpart over a boulder which was on the watershed. The Chinese bayoneted the JCO and his men retaliated with the deadly use of the khukhri. A fierce hand to hand struggle ensued and a neighbouring post came under attack. The Gorkhas were unwilling to start their tenure with a defeat and got clearance from the Brigade Commander to raise the stakes. Pt 15450, which had been taken by the Chinese, was vigorously attacked with close quarter khukhri work and the Chinese were evicted. This was a clear signal to them that the Indians would not surrender an inch of territory and the area around the watershed stabilised, ultimately being designated as the Line of Actual Control.

These two incidents were so unexpected and demoralising for the Chinese that there has been no firing on the LAC from that time in 1967 till today (2020). They kept threatening Indian even later, but the mental scars left on them in 1967 have not healed. That has acted as a brake on Chinese aggression.

Had India surrendered Nathu La under pressure of China then China would have had a free passage to Sikkim (then an Indian protectorate). China would have occupied Sikkim in no time. From Sikkim, cutting off Indian North East through Siliguri Corridor (aka Chicken neck) would have been a piece of cake for China. Occupying Sikkim would have enabled them to occupy the entire North East part of India. And all that before 1970. So there would have been no Bangladesh war and no win for India in that war. All this was avoided just because India had the right man at the right time as the incharge of protecting the borders at Nathu La during 1965 to 1967. And he took a decision in national interest that was at variance with the decision of his superior. Obeying that wrong decision cost India Jelep La pass, but Sagat Singh ensured that he would not surrender Nathu La. And two years later, he gave China a bloody nose, once again, by taking a decision that was against rules but in national interest.

His feat at Nathu La has been downplayed and its long term significance in ensuring the morale of Indian armed forces, and also in ensuring the unity and integrity of the nation, has not been fully appreciated.

During 1971 war, China did not interfere by opening another front, unlike what they had done in 1965. For that India must be thankful to Sagat Singh. The bloody nose that Chinese had received in 1967 was only too fresh in Chinese minds, so they stayed out of this conflict even though China Sikkim border was quite close to the war zone in East Pakistan !

One army officer, who has followed his career closely rightly observed that Sagat Singh was one of the greatest army commanders of all times. He is comparable to German Army commander Rommel and US army commander George Patten. Like Patten, Sagat Singh too found his war expoits being overlooked by his superiors, but Sagat Singh would not let that stop him from giving his best for the nation.

Just as this episode of Indian forces giving China a bloody nose in 1967 has been carefully shoved under the carpet, even Hindi movies have not covered this glorious chapter of Indian Army. Or so I thought. I came to know a few months back that a movie “Paltan”(2018) has been made on this event. But unlike other war movies, few moviegoers seem to have watched it. The movie seemingly flopped, which is a great pity.

The movie is available on zee5, and I especially subscribed to zee5 to watch this movie. The movie was directed by J P Datta. It had Jackie Shroff, Arjun Rampal, Sonu Sood, Harshvardhan Rane, Esha Gupta, Sonal Chauhan etc in it. Jackie Shroff plays Sagat Singh in the movie.

Here is a song from “Paltan” (2018) in honour of Late Lt Gen (Retd)Sagat Singh, the hero of Goa Liberation war, Bangladesh liberation war and the person who gave Indians the belief that Chinese armymen were not invincible, unlike what we were told since 1962.

The song is sung by Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II and Divya Kumar. Jawed Akhtar is the lyricist. Anu Malik is the music director. Knowing Anu Malik’s reputation, it should come as no surprise if his tunes turn out to be “inspired” tunes. Here it is lifted from the theme music of “The bridge on the river Kwai”.

The picturisation of the song is just two minutes long. The audio version is six minutes long.

Video

Audio full


Song-Paltan o paltan (Paltan)(2018) Singers-Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II, Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
ik saathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
ik sathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
hatein na hum jo kisi morche par datt jaayein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

tez nigaahein tez dhadkanein tez kadam hain
hilta hai aakaash bhi jab yoon chalte hum hain
pairon ko chhoone aati hain khud hi raahein
har manzil hai milti humse khole baahein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

aangaaron ki baarish ho ya aag ke saagar
hum badhhte hi jaate hain in sab ko o bujhaa kar
josh bhi hai aur hosh bhi hai aur taakat bhi hai
har dushman se takraane ki himmat bhi hai
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tan mann
o sathi o
o sathi o
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
vande maataram
vande maataram
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande ae maataram
vandee ae maataram


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4315 Post No. : 15599

Today is 11 may 2020. In my opinion, 11 may is one of the most important dates in the history of modern India. It is on this date that India threw away the self imposed shackles of being an apologetic, suffering from inferiority complex, indecisive and weak nation which was being regarded as a pushover by one and all. Even tiny countries like Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh were beginning to mess with India with impunity.

It was on this day in 1998 that India announced to the world in no uncertain terms that enough was enough. India was not a nation to be trifled with. India is not a mouse. It is an elephant and it has decided to take its rightful place in the world. It will no longer act timid when faced with monkeys and hyenas. The world better get used to it.

What exactly did India do on 11 may 1998 ?

It was on this day that India, despite severe pressure from the entire world, and despite high tech surveillance on its activities, successfully conducted nuclear tests (3 nuclear tests on this day, followed by two more tests two days later).

The PM of India, Mr Atalbihari Vajpayee, who had authorised these tests as soon as he came to power, then announced to the world that India was “now a full fledged nuclear state”.

The haves of the nuclear technology as well as the first world wanted India to sign the discriminatory treaties like NPT and CTBT and give up all attempts at developing nuclear capabilities, while the existing nuclear powers were free to carry out their nuclear weapons programme.

They were bullying India for several years. The fact that India was a very weak and vulnerable country those days, beginning from 1990s meant that India was being regarded as a third world country not worthy of being taken seriously or given respect. Indians who were still around during 1980s will recall that any technology that India wanted to acquire from the west was scuttled by USA. India wanted to buy supercomputers for weather forecast but USA prevented its sale giving the excuse that India would use it for its nuclear activities. When India wanted cryogenic engines for its space explorations, USA not only denied this technology to India, it also arm twisted Russia into not giving this technology to India.

India, showing self respect, developed its own supercomputers and well as its own cryogenic engine.

The fact that India had adopted a disastrous economic policy since its independence meant that India was a begging bowl country right from its independence, and no attempt was made to address this fact. In 1991, with India being in dire straights, politically, economically and in many other ways, India faced the ignominy of having to mortgage its gold to secure an IMF bailout package to save Indian economy !

This incident led to an uproar among Indian public. Fortunately, a right man found himself at the helm at the right moment. This man, Mr P V Narsimha Rao, reformed Indian economic policy. The results of this reform took time to show, but they began to show with time. This was another example to show that Indians had self respect, and they would go to great lengths to protect their self respect.

These two events, one being the opening of India economy (the date was 24 july 1991) and other being the nuclear tests on 11 may 1998, are as important in the history of modern India as 15 august 1947 and 26 january 1950. As far as the world was concerned, these two dates are of far more significance than they are to India. Opening of the Indian economy found India becoming an attractive destination of foreign investment and becoming a vast market as well.

When India exploded its nuclear devices on 11 may 1998, the world, which was largely anti India, condemned it. Most major countries imposed sanctions of India.

As noted earlier, India was already used to anti India conduct of USA and their friends. Even the “aid” that India used tyo receive from USA was in millions whereas someone like Pakistan used to receive aid in billions of dollars. So the tiny amount of a few million dollars of American aid did not hurt India much. Curiously, countries like Germany, France and UK could see what USA had not seen, that India was becoming a big market to do business with, and so they neither condemned Indian tests not imposed any sanctions on India. USA and Japan, alongwith China were the most vocal against Indian tests. And unsurprisingly, Pakistan.

Indians knew that Pakistan had acquired nuclear technology clandestinely from China. Threat from China and Pakistan was one of the major reasons why India felt compelled to become an nuclear power. Pakistan felt the urge to match India. They were pressurized by their public (also egged on and mocked at by Indian PM and home minister) into conducting their nuclear tests, wghile USA warned Pakistan against it. Pakistan succumbed to its domestic pressure and conducted its nuclear tests on 28 may 1998. This vindicated Indian accusation that Pakistan had already acquired the nuclear technology clandestinely with Chinese help. Pakistan had to come clean on its nuclear capabilities.

Like India, Pakistan too were slapped with economic sanctions.

What followed in the aftermath of these tests changed the course of International relations. India did not give a damn to USA sanctions but Pakistani economy crumbled. To save Pakistan, an ally of USA, USA looked for a face saving formula and removed the sanctions on the two countries, and at the same time hastily arranged for IMF loans to bail out Pakistani economy.

Soon enough, USA realized that India was a potential economic power and a vast market. And that India had the manpower to develop its own technologies if foreign technologies were denied to them. These realization, plus the knowledge that Indian nuclear programme was indigenous and not based on stealing, unlike Pakistan, meant that USA grudgingly began to give respect to India. Meanwhile tiny neighbors like Nepal and Sri Lanka also learnt to respect the new found assertiveness of India.

Today, in 2020, youngsters who find India being in good terms with USA and other major nations, can barely believe what I have written above. Today India can assert itself and is respected worldwide by the same countries that scorned and scoffed at India till 1998. All this change happened as a result of two major events of 1990s, namely opening of economy and conducting nuclear tests.

This second event took place on 11 may 1998 (viz on this day 22 years ago. Ever since, this date is observed in India as National Technological day. To my mind, it was much more than that. As far as I am concerned this day can as well be called “National Self Respect day.”

It was from this day onward that India became a self respecting and assertive nation. And this self respect and assertiveness began to show in different fields. For instance, India began to become a cricketing powerhouse, at a cricketing as well as at financial level. Indians began to shine in several areas. The area of IT, a new sector which did not exist back then in 1990s, is a sector that is today a sector where Indians thrive.

Today India is world’s fifth largest economy and looks set to become world’s third largest economy in one decade.

All the above feats have been achieved after Indians gained self confidence and self esteem. And that day was 11 may 1998. India has not looked back since.

“Parmaanu”(1998) is a movie that is based on the Pokharan nuclear tests of 1998 that changed the world. This is a very interesting movie. This movie was directed by Abhishek Verma for Zee Studios and JA Entertainment. The movie had John Abraham, Diana Penty, Boman Irani, Aditya Hitkari, Vikas Kumar, Yogendra Tiku, Ajay Shankar, Anuja Sathe, Darshan Pandya, Zachary Coffin, Mark Bennington, Satinder Singh Gahlot, Praveena Deshpande etc in it.

A dialogue of the movie, is my favorite dialogue. It should be the favorite dialogue of all self respecting Indians:-

ab ham dar ke shaant nahin baithhenge
kar ke shaant baithhenge

I watched this movie and loved it. I have covered two songs from this movie in the past. The second of these songs was covered on this date one year ago.

On the occasion of this great day in modern Indian history, here is a song from “Parmaanu”(1998). This song is sung by Divya Kumar. Vayu is the lyricist. Music is composed by Sachin Jigar.


Song-Ke mainu aisa lageya lageya (Parmaanu)(2018) Singer-Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Vayu, MD-Sachin Jigar

Lyrics

chorus

lageya lageya mainu lageya lageya mainu
lageya lageya mainu lageya lageya mainu

sabse pehle sabse badhke
dil mein mere hai ye mera watan
aasmaan bhi haar jaaye kar le koi jatan
sabse badhke dil mein mere hai ye mera watan
aasmaan bhi haar jaaye kar le koi jatan
mainu laggeya
ho mainu laggeya
ho mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya laagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
mainu lageya laegeya mainu lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang

zid pe jo ad jaayenge
jag se bhi lad jayenge
aabru iski rakhne ko
ab to main waari jaawaan ye jivan
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang

chorus

apna loha maane duniya ye banaaya hai man
saara dum kham daal ke hum poora kar dein vachan
apna loha maane duniya ye banaaya hai man
sara dum kham daal ke hum poora kar dein vachan
darr se upar uthh gaye sar
hausle hain buland
is iraade ko hila de
har kisi mein kahaan hai itna dum
mainu laggeya
o ho mainu laggeya
ho mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya lagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya lageya lagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
mainu lageya lageya mainu lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya lageya lagi lageya kasumbi rang

zid pe jo ad jayenge
jag se bhi bhid jayenge
aabru iski rakhne ko ab to main waari jaawaan ye jeevan
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
laagi lageya laegeya laagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
laagi lageya laegeya laagi lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
mainu lageya laegeya mainu lageya kasumbi rang
ki aisa mainu lageya lageya
lagi lageya laegeya laagi lageya kasumbi rang


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4176 Post No. : 15353 Movie Count :

4232

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 13
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

A great day today. The remembrance day of one of most recognized icons of the Golden Era of Hindi film music. Rafi Sb. The name says it all. It is our own compulsions that drive us to write again and again about him, but yes, the name says it all. The mere mention brings to mind spontaneously, the journey spanning four decades, and thousands of rich gems that he rendered and bequeathed to us. The one voice that makes loving this music oh so easy.

We already have two posts today, enriching his memory, and talking about his work and his personality. The adjectives and epithets have all been used, time and again, so one is at a loss to say new things about him. There is a celebration gathering that happens at this residence today. Many devoted fans from across the country are in Bombay for this occasion. Our dear Bakshi ji is there today – have to hear from him his account of the visit to Rafi Mansion today.

Besides Bakshi ji, there are two more very good friends who are there today. Both of them are in the category of devotion beyond definition. It is a devotion that takes on the form of worship, which in of itself is a quality to be appreciated. Their life is all about Rafi Sb, their work is all about trying to perpetuate his memory. My meeting with them individually was through other friends, who introduced us. And it did not take any time to acknowledge and understand – this is going to be a lifelong association. I will briefly talk about them today.

Ahsan Qasim is a resident of Hapur, a small town that is about one a half hour’s drive from Delhi. He runs a small restaurant in his neighborhood, and has also setup a small coaching school for basic teaching of English and computers. He is an avid searcher and collector of anything that relates to Rafi Sb. As of now, we are quite much at the limits of Rafi Sb’s recorded songs. Yes, some numbers are still not accounted for, and I dare say, some numbers are still to be identified, given the gap in information available for some untraceable films of the era. But that does not limit his search. He is continuously searching for recordings of live programs, sitting through complete films looking to find out snippets of Rafi Sb’s voice used for items that do not qualify as complete songs, and hence have not been part of 78 rpm or LP releases. The verses sung in the film ‘Pyaasa’ (1957) are quite well known. But there are dozens of more such snippets that Ahsan Bhai has searched out.

He also collects videos of Rafi Sb’s songs, and hence he also continuously digging to locate films that are not yet in public domain. He has a channel on YouTube by his own name. He continuously adds to it – rare audios and videos of Rafi Sb songs. Recently he has uploaded a small video segment of a Rafi Sb song from the film ‘Kahin Aur Chal’ (1968), a film that decidedly has been categorized as lost, for now.

He has made a detailed listing of all the stars, and many who do not qualify as stars, to whom Rafi Sb has given playback. Rafi Sb never shied away from singing for completely new and unknown actors, as well as on screen characters. Ahsan Bhai’s drive is to identify such actors – he has a list and video clips of many totally unknown faces who are lip syncing Rafi Sb’s voice. And to say the least, his endeavor to dig out old films has been so beneficial for armchair collectors like me. 🙂 He is the person who was finally able to acquire ‘Karvaan e Hayaat’ and shared with me. Like so, he has dug out many other rare films, which we know that are not available in public domain.

The second person I wish to talk about today is another dear friend – Arun Gautam. The name plate outside his door reads as ‘Rafi Arun Gautam’. He is a resident of Delhi. When I visited his home for the first time, I was amazed to see – he has one room completely devoted to Rafi Sb. The room is almost like a museum, and also a room where he hosts his friends for listening sessions. The walls of the room are adorned with portraits and photographs of Rafi Sb, some are absolutely rare. All the shelves are full of books, cassette tapes, 78 rpm records and LPs. In between spaces are full of small and large memorabilia that relates to Rafi Sb. There is a harmonium, although not the original, but an exact replica of the one owned by Rafi Sb. There is telephone instrument, with Rafi Sb’s home phone number written on it – once again an exact replica of the original. There are two small cars (toy cars actually) – one a white Ambassador, and the second one a red Fiat, complete with the actual numbers on the number plates. The cars models and numbers are exactly the ones owned by Rafi Sb. There is a small statue of Rafi Sb. There are road signs – place of birth of Rafi Sb, his residence area in Bombay etc. I mean, it is a real treat for the fans of Rafi Sb. And Arun ji has such a childlike pleasure as he shows us visitors around the room.

There is an old gramophone player – the original HMV 102. If any of the readers have heard this sound they will understand. And for those who haven’t, I recommend them to listen to one if possible. Arun ji has a Philips player also – which is electronic. He played the same records on both the machines. The sound from the 102 – it shook my inside. Never ever have I heard such a complete and such a rich sound being reproduced from a 78 rpm record. Yes, we all know that the 78 rpm recording and reproduction is the ultimate. But that day, listening on the 102 was an unsurpassed, never before experience. A machine that is just cranked by hand, no electric or electronics involved. Just a very good sound box and a very good needle. The sound filled the room as I have never heard before. And with the same childlike eagerness, Arun ji played so many rare records. Not that we have not heard the audio before. But the records themselves are so rare, only one or maybe a few acknowledged copies to be existing in public domain. It was a memorable session we had that day, on my first visit. And of course, followed up later with more such sessions.

Arun ji also played some very rare and unheard snippets. Do you know that Rafi Sb has sung two lines of the immortal ghazal of Saigal Sb from ‘Shahjehan’ – “Gham Diye Mustaqil. . .”. This snippet is hidden away in the film ‘Reporter Raju’ (1962); it is not on any record, and only someone painstakingly searching for such things will be fortunate enough to locate it. And then, at the end of the session, as we were preparing to say goodbye, he asked us to wait for a minute. He went inside, and returned with a small plastic package. Opening it, he showed us a necktie – an original worn by Rafi Sb at recordings. Around the room he pointed out to a couple of photographs wherein Rafi is sporting that very necktie. We find out that it is presented to Arun ji by Rafi Sb’s daughter herself, when she visited Delhi and also came to Arun ji’s home. That was the most exhilarating close encounter for me.

And one more thing about Arun ji. He is the convener of the group that is petitioning for the Bharat Ratna award for Rafi Sb.

The most endearing thing about these two gentlemen – very soft spoken, very friendly, extremely humble, and a heart that will share anything you ask of them. True and devoted lovers of music, I must say. And I am fortunate to be in their circle of friends.

Memories of Rafi Sb, shaken and enlivened by these reminiscences.

The song today – although it is a Rafi song, but today’s presentation is not in his own voice. This song, “Badan Pe Sitaare. . .”, originally from the film ‘Prince’ (1969) – Rafi Sb giving playback for Shammi Kapoor, has got repeated in the film ‘Fanney Khan’ from 2018. Yes, so recent. The magic of the golden era lives on and on. This version is sung by Sonu Nigam, and performed on screen by Anil Kapoor.

This song comes to us courtesy of Peevesie’s Mom – the lady is always on the lookout to combine events and anniversaries. Today, 24th is the birth anniversary of Rafi Sb. And it is also the birth anniversary of actor Anil Kapoor. She located this song, and then graciously called me to take it on and present it as part of the ‘repeat songs’ series. Of course, with a short notice (like less than 24 hrs 🙂 ), and a opportunity to combine celebrations that is very difficult to pass. The song had to, has to come today, and today only. Of course, the pleasure of rewards is quite commensurate with the bait proffered. 😀

As I mentioned, the singing voice is Sonu Nigam – a sound that is quite close to Rafi Sb’s singing, as per many opinions. I am retaining the original credits of lyrics and music composition. On screen, we see Anil Kapoor, a part time vocalist in a local orchestral group in the film, attempting a ‘Shammisque’ perfromance. How far successful, I leave it to the readers to judge. For one, Shammi Kapoor would never have a set of dancers around him, in the manner in which the latter day dances are choreographed.

Some other links that come to mind. The dance starts with the rapid shaking of a hand by Anil Kapoor – memories of the dance in the song “Aa Ja Aa Ja, Main Hoon Pyaar Tera” (‘Teesri Manzil’, 1966). Then, we have the initial ‘alaap’ sounds, so to say. The first “lallalllallaaa, la llarrall lallaa lallallaaa” reminds one of the famous Rajesh Khanna performance of “Gulaabi Aankhen Jo Teri Dekhin. . .” (‘The Train’, 1970). Then there is a second piece that goes like “la ra la la la ra la la la ra la la la ra laa” – I am not able to decipher its ‘hear-alike’ source. Then there is the 3rd piece “pappaa pa pappaa pa” – if I am not mistaken, it reminds one of the opening sounds of “Duniya Mein, Logon Ko. . .” (‘Apna Desh’ 1972). Request readers to please add to or comment on these observations.

So a song with many entanglements. Original Rafi Sb song, rendered by a Rafi Sb ‘hear alike’. Original song performed by a Kapoor, now performed by another Kapoor. And the two anniversaries to add to the mix. Quite an interesting addition to the repeat song series. Thanks Peevesie’s Mom ji.

Happy and healthy wishes to Anil Kapoor – goodness, he turns 63 today. Last year he was 62. My, my. 🙂

And long live the memories of Rafi Sb. The best thing that God gave to Hindi films. Unforgettable.

Song – Badan Pe Sitaare Lapete Huye  (Fanney Khan) (2018) Singers – Sonu Nigam, Lyrics – Hasrat Jaipuri, MD – Shankar Jaikishan

Lyrics

lallalllallaaa
la llarrall lallaa lallallaaa
la llarrall lallaa lallallaaa
la llarrall lallaa lallallaaa
 
la ra la la la ra la la la ra la la la ra laa
la ra la la la ra la la la ra la la la la laa
la ra la la la ra la la la ra la la la ra laa
 
paraa pappaa
paraa pappaa
paraa pappaa
paraa pappaa
 
pappaa pa pappaa pa
pappaa pa pappaa pa
pabbaa ba babbaa ba
babbaa ba babbaa ba
 
riul rham jham
jhamriul rham jham
jhamriul rham jhalurum

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

लल्ल लल्ल लल्ल ला
ला लारल्ल लल्ला लल्ललल्ला
ला लारल्ल लल्ला लल्ललल्ला
ला लारल्ल लल्ला लल्ललल्ला

ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला रा ला
ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला ला ला
ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला रा ला ला ला रा ला

परपप्पा
परपप्पा
परपप्पा
परपप्पा

पप्पा पा पप्पा पा
पप्पा पा पप्पा पा
पब्बा बा बब्बा बा
बब्बा बा बब्बा बा

रीउल रह्म झम
झमरीउल रह्म झम
झमरीउल रह्म झालूरम

बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जाने तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो॰॰ओ॰॰ओ
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये

बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जाने तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये

है बनने सँवरने का जब ही मज़ा
कोई देखने वाला फन्ने तो हो
नहीं तो ये जल्वे हैं बुझते दिये
कोई मिटने वाला इक फन्ने तो हो
बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जाने तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये

बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जाने तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये

[तुरही वादन]

बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जाने तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ तो चैन आ जाये

 


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4112 Post No. : 15263 Movie Count :

4194

Today’s song is from film 102 Not Out-2018.

Readers who identify me as a writer on old films, may be shocked, as I am about to write on a New Era song, as new as not even 1 year old ! But honestly, when I accidentally bumped into this song’s credit, which said that Amitabh Bachhan was the Music Composer of this song, I was myself surprised. Out of curiosity, I found out that song on You Tube and heard/saw it. Frankly, I was not only impressed but even I liked the song. Of course, much of the liking came from seeing the wonderful video of the song- which is just superb !

Amitabh Bachhan (AB for short please) is my favourite actor. I have been seeing many films since late 40s up to the end of the year 1963 – when I began my career in Pharma Marketing. In the beginning of 1971, I heard about film Anand-71, whose songs had already mesmerised me. I went to see the film. More than Rajesh Khanna, I was bowled over by the acting of the lanky New comer (it was AB’s just 7th film) – Amitabh Bachhan. Next I saw him when I was travelling in Goa, where I saw his film Bombay to Goa-72. This was a remake of Tamil film ” Madras to Pondecherry”-66. (Remakes were made in Marathi and Kannada also.) By now, AB had taken over my senses completely and I started seeing his films-but selectively.

Zanjeer-73 (15th film) made him a star. I enjoyed his films like Sholay-75, Deewar-75, Chupke Chupke-75, Amar Akbar and Anthony-77, Trishul-78, Don-78, Satte pe Satta-82 and Coolie-83. In early 80s, I stopped seeing films in Theatres or on TV, due to my job. After that till today, I have not visited a Theatre. I do not know how a Multiplex looks like from inside. I am not proud of this, but it underlines a fact that I had lost interest in seeing the New age films and that I had low level patience. Sometimes I saw films on VCP and later Video player. The last film of Amitabh I saw was Baadbaan-2003. My most favourite film of Amitabh is Trishul-78. I had even bought its Video cassette that time.

Amitabh Harivansh Bachchan, best known as Amitabh Bachchan, was born in Allahabad, India on October 11, 1942. India was still a British colony at the time, and would not achieve independence until five years later. Bachchan’s father was the renowned Hindi poet Dr. Harivansh Rai. His mother, Teji Bachchan, was a Sikh socialite. He has one younger brother, named Ajitabh.

Bachchan went to Sherwood College boarding school before enrolling in Delhi University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree. Once he graduated, he became a freight broker in Calcutta. After a few years in Calcutta, Bachchan was ready for a change. He decided to move to Bombay and take a stab at Bollywood show business. By this time, India had been independent for nearly two decades, and Hindi cinema was thriving.

In 1969, Bachchan made his film debut in Saat Hindustani. Although the movie tanked at the box office, Bachchan still managed to capture the attention of directors. Soon enough, the offers started rolling in.

By the early 1970s, Bachchan had garnered popularity with audiences as the “angry young man” in a series of successful Hindi feature films. His starring role in Zanjeer was particularly instrumental in launching him to stardom as an action-movie hero. Bachchan’s performances in films like Laawaris, Coolie, Naseeb, Silsila, Shaarabi and Jaadugar continued to enamor fans of the tall and handsome action hero, and also landed him multiple Fanfare Awards. From the 1970s through the early 1980s, the swashbuckling Bachchan appeared in more than 100 films. He seized opportunities to work with India’s most acclaimed directors, such as Prakash Mehra, and dominated the silver screen with films like Trishul, Sholay and Chashme Buddoor. In addition to acting, Bachchan’s roles often required him to sing.

In 1982, Bachchan had a serious accident while filming. Fans prayed for his recovery. Bachchan survived the accident, but it prompted him to change career paths. In 1984, he traded his Bollywood stardom for a seat in the Indian Parliament. His political aspirations proved to be short-lived; in 1987, he left his seat due to unexpected controversy.

By the 1990s, the limelight surrounding Bachchan had begun to fade. But his decision to start his own entertainment production company, Amitabh Bachchan Corporation Limited, and make himself CEO, put him back in the headlines. Bachchan followed his true calling and returned to the silver screen in 1997 with the film Mrityudaata, produced by ABCL. In 2000, he also started hosting the Indian version of the television game show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?. Despite a few box-office failures in the 1990s, in the 2000s, Bachchan climbed his way back up to stardom as a film actor, earning additional Filmfare and International Film Award nominations for his work on films like Baghban (2003), Khakee (2004) and Paa (2009).

Bachchan married movie actress Jaya Bhaduri in 1973. The couple have two children, a daughter and a son. Their daughter, Shweta Bachchan Nanda, is married to industrialist Nikhil Nanda, whose grandfather was the film director Raj Kapoor. Bachchan and Bhaduri’s son, Abhishek Bachchan, is also an actor and is married to actress Aishwarya Rai.

In addition to being a father and an actor, Bachchan devotes his time to charitable causes. In 2003 he was appointed a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). He has won several awards and recently the Dadasaheb Phalke award too. (biography.com).

In my recent post, I had done the analysis of Ashok Kumar’s work pattern. In that article, I had said that may be AB would overtake Ashok kumar’s statistics and the pattern. This was because both of them had a long career period – 61 years for AK and 50 years for AB, and both commanded market demand in their old age, long after their prime times in films. Today, let us see how AB fares….

Period Aproximate age Number of films done
1969-70 27-28 2 First film- Saat Hindustani-69
1971-80 29-38 62
1981-90 39-48 43
1991-2000 49-58 20
2001-2010 59-68 58
2011-2019 69-77 47

From 1981 to 2000 (20 years) he acted only in 63 films. In 1982 he met with a serious accident during shooting of Coolie film. Then in 1984, he joined Politics and became an M.P., He quit politics in 1987 and rejoined films. But by 1990, his limelight started fading and films were hard to come by. He formed his own company Amitaqbh Bachhan Corporation Limited (ABCL). In the year 2000, his fortune took a turn. He was selected to conduct a game show on TV- Kaun Banega Karodpati. This proved to be an extraordinary successful venture and his popularity soared. This also reflected in his films From 20 films in the decade of 1991 to 2000, he shot to 58 films in 2001 to 2010 period.

He remains one of the most respected actor in the film industry and is in full demand for films. AB has so far acted in 232 films. He has sung 64 songs in 44 films – though none of his songs have become a craze or popular. His first song came in film Kabhie Kabhie-76 and latest song is for film Badla-2019. I feel his golden period was when he worked with Manmohan Desai, Prakash Mehra and Hrishikesh Mukherjee. He was also benefited when he worked with 15 Screenplays and stories by Salim-Javed. it would have been 17 films, but he refused Hasth ki safai-74 and Mr.India-87 – both films were Box office Hits. Another thing. I read on Internet about his 1969 film ” Ek tha Chander, Ek thi Sudha ” starring AB, Jaya and Rekha. Was there any such film ? If anybody knows anything, please let me know. There is no mention of this film anywhere else.

Today morning (19th), I read in news that AB was admitted in Nanavati Hospital since 15th October for a Liver problem. Luckily, while I am typing this post,I learnt that he has been discharged in the morning only. I wish him good health and like this film’s title let him be 102 Not Out !!!

The film was directed by Umesh Shukla. It was based on a Gujarati story by Soumya Joshi. His next 3 films are ready for release in 2020 – Gulabo-Sitabo, Chehre and Bramhastra. This film had 6 songs. 3 were composed by Salim Suleimani, 1 each was composed by Amitabh Bachhan, Hiralal Bramhabhatt and Rohan Vinayak. The lyrics were by Amitabh Bhattacharya, who has written 308 songs in 82 films. He sang 31 songs in 18 films also. The film was released on 4-5-2018 and earned Rs 102 crores for an investment of Rs. 35 crores only. The story of the film, as per wiki, is….

Dattatraya Vakharia (Amitabh Bachchan) is a 102-year-old who enjoys life in jovial ways. Babulal Vakharia (Rishi Kapoor), his 76-year-old son, is the opposite, and believes that he is now too old to enjoy life, and detests how his father acts. Dhiru (Jimit Trivedi) is an employee at a medical shop who delivers medicine to the Vakharias. Dhiru likes Dattatraya for his attitude and is scared of Babulal because of his grumpy nature.

Dattatraya seeks to break the record of the oldest living person. and thus he seeks to avoid negative people. Therefore, he threatens to send his son to a elderly care facility unless he achieves certain conditions. While Babulal is hesitant, he accepts with Dhiru as a witness. Firstly, Babulal writes a love letter to his deceased wife. Next, he accuses his doctor of being a thief so that he stops going to the clinic daily for a checkup. While rejecting to cut holes in his childhood blanket, Babulal visits a playground and a church that remind him of childhood memories. He becomes sorrowed and distributes cake to young children in the streets with his father.

Babulal begins to appreciate his father’s outlook on life. However, Babulal receives a call from his estranged son Amol informing Babulal that he will visit India. While Babulal is ecstatic hearing the news, Dattatraya is certain that Amol’s motive is to claim their property as their heir. So he gives Babu his last task: to kick Amol out of the house for all his negligence towards his family. They argue and Babulal stops talking to Dattatraya. Even Dhiru, for the first time, supports Babulal and feels that Amol should be given a chance. Dattatraya reveals that Babu had spent all his savings to educate Amol and send him to the United States. However, Amol ignored them, telling nothing about his new family life in America. Dattatraya also tells his son he has cancer, living happily so that Babulal can live like him.

Days later, Amol arrives in India, where Babulal humiliates him in public, calling him to return home. Dattatraya passes away at 102 years of age. Babulal finds a recording of his father predicting that the record of the oldest man will be broken by Babulal himself.

When you will see this video song,I am sure you too will like it. With this song, film 102 Not out and AB as a Music Director make a Debut on the Blog.

This song reiterates, what I always say,” Not all that was made before 70 was good,same as, Not all that is made after 70s is bad”. There is always some good everywhere !


Song-Hey Pyaare chehre pe baaraa mat bajaa re (102 Not Out)(2018) Singers- Amitabh Bachhan, Rishi Kapoor, Lyrics- Amitabh Bhattacharya, MD- Amitabh Bachchan
Chorus

Lyrics

hey pyaare
chehre pe baarah mat baja re
satrangi lamhon ke gubbaare
khuli hawaaon mein uda re

hey
yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba zumba
badumba zumba
yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba zumba

comeon
sar se gira de
hey
fikar ka bojha
hey
kamar hila ke
ho
happy happy hoja
kehna tu maan le mera
yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba zumba
hey
har dum har dam tu hai pareshan
frustration ki tu hai dukaan
teri sab samasya ka no samaadhaan
tu dukhi hai
haha
tu dukhi hai
dukhi hai
tu hai dukhi aat aatma
maan shrimaan sar per tension ka taany taany bomb
sad rehna hai tera kaam
kaam

teri life
teri life ek website ka form
naam hai jiska chinta ka form
chinta ka form
chinta ka form

haan budhiya
haan budhiya
rehne de churan waali pudiya
pudiya
apna le nuskha mera badhiya
badhiya
tan man mein chhootengi phuljhadiyaan
aha ha

yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba-zumba
khataak
sar se gira de
fikar ka bojha
kamar hila ke
happy-happy hoja
kehna tu maan le mera
yara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba zumba
paas paas bababa
paas paas bababa
paas paas bababa

re pappa
bas bhi kar tera la ra lappa
jo bhi tu bole
kyun main maanoon
teri naseehat bilkul dabba
teri umar ka takaaza
kya jaane tumba
shobha na de ye zumba-zumba
badumba zumba
teri umar ka takaaza
kya jaane tumba
shobha naa de ye zumba-zumba
chal ghar jaake
palang pe so ja
pehan ke muffler
shirt aur moza
kehna tu maan le mera aa aa

teri umar ka takaaza kya jaane tumba
shobha na de ye zumba-zumba
badumba zumba
teri umar ka takaaza kya jaane tumba
shobha na de ye zumba-zumba

samjhe dada pappa

gibbesrish lyrics

pyaare
chehre pe baarah mat baja re

satrangi lamhon ke gubbaare
khuli hawaaon mein uda re
comeon
yara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba-zumba
badumba zumba
ho
yara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba-zumba

aaye haaye
yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba-zumba

come on everybody
yaara samajh le ishaara
kya bole tumba
masti mein jee le zumba-zumba


This article is written by Peevesie, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4045 Post No. : 15174

What kind of relationship must one have with their country? This is a question I have been pondering lately. There is no doubt one feels a sense of kinship and pride for the perseverance and accomplishments and bravery its people show on a near everyday basis. But then aren’t all these accomplishments a result of someone questioning some kind of status quo that existed in this country.

The world is feeling like a strange place. Ours isn’t the only country in the grips of a wave of nationalism that is based on a sense of othering and homogenizing our culture. But weren’t we taught ‘Unity in Diversity’  as one of our strengths in school? Independence day involved so many symbolic displays of things like ‘One Country, Many Cultures’; “Hindu Muslim Sikh Isaai, sab hai yahan bhai bhai”. One of my favourite lines to do the cringy school dances to was “Koi Punjab Se, Koi Maharashtra Se” one from the song “Ae Watan Ae Watan” (film ‘Shaheed’, 1965) – (though I hated the word Madrasi that was used in such displays, I am not from Madras!). And suddenly we have a country where questioning the status quo is being against the country.

Can’t one love the country and still dislike / disagree with somethings in it? We love our family and friends the same way no? The love is unconditional but there are things like maybe their lateness or forgetfulness that annoys us? Isn’t that what patriotism should be? An unconditional love that pushes us to work hard to improve our country so we are truly the best country in every metric?

Last year I saw a film called ‘Raazi’. It is based on the true story of an Indian spy who married into a Pakistani military family to help the Indian war efforts. Two plot points in the movie left a deep impression on me and on my patriotic sentiments. The first was when the ‘spy’ and her spouse have a conversation about why they both do what they do. And they both realize that they will always choose their birth country over their spouse. It’s just that their birth countries are different. The second point is this song I want to showcase in this post on independence day today. Incidentally this song is also titled “Ae Watan” .

This song in the film is supposed to be an Indian patriotic song being taught to Pakistani school children for a school function. Even though the song contains the opening lines (“Lab Pe Aati Hai Duaa. . .“) which is the national prayer of Pakistan. It was penned in 1902 by the legendary poet, Allama Iqbal. But by its very nature it is country neutral. It is sung in schools in Pakistan, as well as in some states in India. That’s when it hit me. The object of your emotion of patriotism – that is an accident of nature. You have no control over this. But you have control over what you do with it. And how you use the opportunity to leave the place you were born into, better than when you arrived into it.

There is a multitude of amazing things being done by Indians that we can be proud of – from sustainable sanitary solutions, to the moon mission, to Dutee Chand fighting the Olympic committee and her village simultaneously on accepting everything she was born with. Whether it’s is a medical condition or who she loves. This is a beautiful country that gained its independence because people refused to accept the status quo. And I choose to be proud of it without losing sight of how much further we have to go.

There is another reason I love this song, because the video reminds me of the Independence day celebrations we had in school and all the ways we practiced for it. Truly brings a certain nostalgia back

This song is “Ae Watan” from ‘Raazi’ (2018) which is directed by Meghana Gulzar and produced by Junglee Pictures and Dharma Productions. Its based on a book by Harinder Sikka named ‘Calling Sehmat’. The film version of the song has Alia Bhatt, Vicky Kaushal, Amruta Khanvilkar. The song is composed by Shankar Ehsaan and Loy, while its lyrics are written by Gulzar. Its female version, which is the one featured in the film, is sung by Sunidhi Chauhan and the male version which was for promos is by Arijit Singh. Both versions have longer audio versions than video. The lyrics given below are according to the audio versions I have.

Happy Independence day to all readers! Enjoy!

Female Version

Male Version (Chorus Only)

Song – Ae Watan Watan Mere Aabaad Rahe Tu (Raazi) (2018) Singers – Sunidhi Chauhan, Arijit Singh, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Shankar Ehsaan Loy
Chorus

Lyrics

lab pe aati hai dua ban ke tammana meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaaya meri
lab pe aati hai dua ban ke tammana meri
 
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
 
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan 
 
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
 
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
labh pe aati hai dua banke tammanah meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaya meri
zindagi shamma ki surat ho khudaya meri
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan

Male Version

ae watan watan mere 
ae watan aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu

ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan

tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
tu hi meri manzil hai pehchaan tujhi se
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
pohunchun mein jahaan bhi meri buniyaad rahe tu
ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan 

tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
tujh pe koi gum ki aanch aane nahi doon
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu
qurbaan meri jaan tujhpe shaad rahe tu

ae watan watan mere aabaad rahe tu
main jahan rahun jahaan mein yaad rahe tu
ae watan
ae watan
mere watan
mere watan
ae watan
ae watan
mere watan
mere watan
ae watan mere watan
ae watan mere watan
aabaad rahe tu
aabaad rahe tu
ae watan mere watan
aabaad rahe tu


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3949 Post No. : 15024

15 august 1947 and 26 january 1950 are popularly regarded as two important days in the history of modern India. India got freedom from British rule on 15 august 1947 whereas India became a republic on 26 january 1950.

There were two more days in India that have escaped the attention of people, but they have had equally profound effect on India.

It was on 24 july 1991 that India liberalised its economy, and that was a game changing moment for the economy of India. From a struggling economy dependent on foreign aid, this day India achieved economical freedom. Today, 28 years later, India is the sixth largest economy in the world (in nominal terms) and it will become the third largest economy in the world in another decade.

Another game changing day came about on 11 may 1998, exactly 21 years ago. This day is now celebrated in India as National technology day. It was on 11 may 1998 that India, defying immense world wide pressure, carried out nuclear explosions in Pokharan and proudly, and unapologetically described India as a nuclear power.

A large population of India are mainly interested in own interests and are not bothered about bigger things like national interest, national pride etc. Those were the days when Indians suffered from low self esteem as well as inferiority complex. Reasons were not far to seek. One reason was ofcourse poor Indian economy. That matter was addressed in 1991, and the results of this belated step would begin to bear fruit only in the years to come.

Five nuclear powers had set up a discriminatory club of nuclear haves-they had made a discriminatory law that allowed them to do all the nuclear tests that they wanted but prohibited others to carry out any nuclear tests. India was againt this discrimination and felt that they too belonged to this exclusive group as and when they decided to become a nuclear state.

This discriminatory treaty ws called NPT (Non Proliferation treaty) which came into force in 1970. All the five nuclear powers at that time were given privileges vis a vis nuclear tests that were not available to other countries. Under this treaty, nuclear haves were not required to give up their nuclear weapons while the have nots were not allowed to have them.

Indian objection was that China, despite being a nuclear have and a signatory to NPT had violated it by passing nuclear know how to Pakistan. Indian objection to NPT was also because both China and Pakistan, its two intransigent neighbours had nuclear weapons (whether declared or clandestine) and so India, in their national interest was unwilling to sign this treaty.

In 1996, one more discriminatory treaty, viz CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban treaty) was created and all nations of the world were required to sign it. This treaty forbid countries to carry out any kinds of nuclear explosions. This was discriminatory because the nuclear haves had already carried out number of nuclear exposion tests whereas the nuclear have nots were being forbidden to do the same.

India did not sign NPT and CTBT. Pakistan too did likewise.

Despite these treaties, Self respecting Indians felt that India needed to assert themselves, no matter what the treaties prescribed. PV Narsimha Rao, the architect behind the economic liberalisation, decided that he would as well carry out the nuclear test. But USA, thanks to its satellites, got wind of the intentions and prevailed over India to stop it.

After the next elections, P V Narsimha Rao lost election, but his seccessor, Atal Bihari Vajpayee was determined to carry out this test. Learning from the earlier foiled attempt, he ensured that this time USA was unable to get wind of Indian intentions. USA became aware of Indian intention only after India had done their tests.

The date was 11 may 1998. Three explosions (one fusion bomb and two fission bomb) were exploded on this day. It was followd by two more fission explosion on 13 may 1998.

Atal Bihari Vajpayee announced that India was “now a full fledged nuclear state”.

How these tests were conducted keeping high tech USA spy satellites in the dark is the stuff of fiction and legend. Enough reading material is available on this topic. It is very interesting if you are the kind who love reading thrillers/ spy novels/ adventure novels etc. And to imagine that all this ACTUALLY happened. One USA senator described it as “the biggest failure of our intelligence gathering agencies in the past ten years or more”.

The aftermath of these tests, and how India dealt with them was even more impressive and awe inspiring if you are a self respecting Indian. The world condemned these tests and stringent economic sanctions were imposed on India by USA and Japan, among others. It was here that the well planned and thought out measures by Atal Bihari Vajpayee and others paid off. Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Lal Krishn Advani, after these tests began to mock Pakistan on a daily basis. This mocking and the increasing domestic pressure began too much for Pakistan and they too carried out their nuclear tests on 28 may 1998, despite international pressure. Sanctions were imposed on Pakistan as well.

Vajpayee had planned for the aftermath of these tests and so they were ready. But Pakistan, in trying to match India found itself in doldrums as a result of economic sanctions. Pakistan was in the good books of USA at that time, and so USA began to get worried about the economy of Paakistan and tried to find ways to lift the economic sanctions of Pakistan. Desperate to lift Pakistan sanctions, USA devised a way out and lifted the sanction on Pakistan by end of 1998. With that even Indian sanctions were lifted.

It may sound counter intuitive, but these tests enhanced Indian stature in the world. USA, the first to comdemn Indian and imposed sanctions on India began to realise that India was a responsible nuclear power. India gained acceptability from USA and other nations followed. It was a turning point in India’s engagement with the world- long overdue but still incomplete, investment in assuring Indian security.

India was a non signatory of NPT and CTBT still it was made member of three of four global non proliferation regimes, and got a waiver for the fourth viz NSG.

India were subjected to so many economic and technological sanctions from USA in the past that Indians had stopped bothering about them. These sanctions made them develop their own indigenous technologies. For instance, USA prohibited the sale of supercomputers to India in 1980s. India in response developed their own superomputer. USA in 1990s ensured that India would not be given cryogenic technology used for launching satellites. India developed their own cryogenic engine.

On this day in 1998, India also test fired Trishul missile successfully. Hansa-3, the first indigenously built aircraft was test flown on this as well. In recognition of these feats, 11 may is celebrated as “national Technological day”. But to my mind, this day should be regarded as national self respect day. It was on this day that made other nations begin to look at India with renewed respect and awe. Subsequently, growth of Indian economy has added to Indian clout considerably.

These tests, which are poularly known as “Pokharan II”, led to a movie being made on this topic in 2018. This movie called “Parmanu” (2018) was a nice imaginary take on this very important happening in modern Indian history. This movie was directed by Abhishek Verma for Zee Studios and JA Entertainment. The movie had John Abraham, Diana Penty, Boman Irani, Aditya Hitkari, Vikas Kumar, Yogendra Tiku, Ajay Shankar, Anuja Sathe, Darshan Pandya, Zachary Coffin, Mark Bennington, Satinder Singh Gahlot, Praveena Deshpande etc in it.

The movie was released on 5 may 2018. It was the first Hindi movie of 2018 that I watched and I quite liked it. I have already covered one song from this movie.

My favourite dialogue from the movie is:

ab ham dar ke shaant nahin baithhenge
kar ke shaant baithhenge

Today, on this Indian self respect day (my nomenclature), here is a song from “Parmanu”(2018). This song is sung by Divya Kumar and chorus. Vayu is the lyricist. Music is composed by Sachin Jogar.

The song is picturised as a background song in the movie.

Video

Audio

Song-Thaare waaste (Parmanu)(2018) Singer-Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Vayu, MD-Sachin Jigar

Lyrics

josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala
sar uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham

josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala
sar uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham

ho o
thaare waaste re
maadhi re ae ae
jaan lagaa denge ham
thaare waaste re
maadhi re ae ae
duniya hila denge ham
josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala
sar uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham

josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala
sar uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham

hmmmm
khwaabon ne jaise ki zanjeeren pahni thhhi
aasmaan se tha faasla
ab raah pakki hai
ye baat hakki hai
phir se uthha haai hausla
thaare waaste re
maadhi re
maadhi re
jaan lagaa denge ham
thaare waaste re
maadhi re ae ae
duniya hila denge ham
josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala
sar uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham

hmmmm
ik pyaas aadhi thhi
ik aas pyaasi thhi
ik karz dil pe thha rakhha
poora hua apna
toota sa wo sapna
chubhta jo aankhon mein aaya thha
ho o
thaare waaste re
maadhi re ae ae
jaan lagaa denge ham
thaare waaste re
maadhi re ae ae
duniya hila denge ham
josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala kar
uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham
josh mein jala
zalzalaa chala
ab rukengee na ham
dar mita chala kar
uthha chala
ab jhukenge na ham


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3734 Post No. : 14679 Movie Count :

4012

I was told by my mother that my father was very fond of Hindi films. He was a fan of V Shantaram and Shanta Apte. He would visit Mangalore (now Mangaluru) just to watch a newly released Hindi film. This was in early 40s, when travelling from my native place (Mulki) to Mangaluru – about 25 kms of distance – was itself an adventure. It used to take almost the whole day. So to watch a film in a theatre in Mangaluru, it was necessary to stay overnight in the city.

Our family shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) in around Diwali time in 1951 as my father had got a job in the city. On week days, he was busy with his office work. On Sundays, he would often visit the Fort area where some of his friends from the native place had also shifted. They were part of his amateur musical drama troop in the native place where my father was associated as a music composer. So almost on all Sundays, my father would be with his friends for rehearsal of songs for the musical plays in Konkani and Kannada languages which would be staged during some kind of festivities. So I had no occasion to see films with my parents during 1952-53.

Unfortunately, in July 1954, my father passed away at the age of 42 after a brief period of illness. So the entire responsibility for sustenance of the family fell on my mother. Spending money on watching the films in theatres was the least priority. But as a rule, my mother allowed us to see one film a year in the theatre. As a result, I remember the names of most of the films which I watched during 1954-64.

As far as my memory goes, the first Hindi film which I watched in a local theatre was ‘Samaaj’ (1954). I do not remember anything about the film except that I saw a big poster of the film as we entered the theatre premises. The next was ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955) which I saw in a local but different theatre. Again I do not remember much of the film except the Zippy, the ape and a song apni chhaaya mein bhagwan bithha le mujhe, sung on the screen by Dilip Kumar. I still remember that during the show, bed bugs in the theatre bothered us a lot.

1956 was a bonus year for me as I got opportunity to see two films – ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956) and ‘Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje’ (1955). I do not remember as to who took us for ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956). I remember most part of the film as well as some songs. I was impressed with Kishore Kumar’s acting and his song mera naam abdul rahman. But today, this would be my least preferred song compared to all other songs in the film. This was the film in which I started believing that Ashok Kumar was a drunkard in his ‘real life’ because of his drunkard’s acting in the film.

‘Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje’ (1955) was my first film which I saw in a theatre located in the city. My maternal uncle has taken me for this film at Metro theatre (Dhobi Talaao) where it had run for more than a year. We had gone for 3.00 – 6.00 pm show. It gave me a great feeling watching my first colour film.

When the show was over at 6.00 pm, we came out of the theatre and found that all the roads were deserted. There were many policemen on the roads. One policeman told my uncle that a curfew has been clamped in this area. We were permitted to walk on the left footpath of the road leading to VT (Chhtrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus) railway station. We came to know later that some people had died in a police firing on a big morcha of Sanyukta Maharashtra Samiti which was demanding a separate Maharashtra State.

My cousin (who was about 15 years elder to me) had got a good job in Mumbai. One day, he told us that he would sponsor to take our entire family as well as a few other relatives to a magnificent theatre to watch a film. The theatre was Liberty and the film was ‘Champakali’ (1957). It was really a magnificent theatre compared to all other theatres I had visited earlier. There was wall to wall carpet probably laid on some soft material as we felt that we were walking on foam mattresses. I do not recall much about the film except one song, chhup gaya koi re door se pukar ke.

I am not able to recall as to which films I saw in 1958 and 1959. Probably, I may not have got to see any film. By 1960, I, my brother and my two cousins had become the fan of Shankar-Jaikishan. Those days, we used to consider O P Nayyar as SJ’s ‘rival’. Now I feel that we ourselves had created this ‘rivalry’ in our mind. Those days, it was thought that the song, tin kanastar peet peet kar gala phaad kar chillaana composed by S-J was aimed at O P Nayyar and we all believed this to be true because it suited us being the fan of S-J. When I listened to this song recently, I felt that it was more of a general observation about copying western tunes with loud orchestration. In fact, this song can be treated as a satire on the current state of Hindi film music.

Anyway, 1960 our entire family went to see ‘Dil Apna Aur Preet Paraayi’ (1960) in a local theatre. I enjoyed not only the songs but the film itself. A couple of scenes got engraved in my mind while watching the film. First, I felt very sad about Meena Kumari’s predicament in the song, ajeeb daastaan hai ye. Second, it amused me when after the end of the dream sequence song, mera dil ab tera o sajna, Raj Kumar was holding the handle of the door of an ambulance and dancing as if he was holding the hand of Meena Kumari.

In 1961, it was ‘Roop Ki Rani Choron Ka Raja’ (1961), again S-J film. We have gone to see this film mainly for its songs. I do not remember about the story of the film. In 1962, I and my younger brother had gone to stay with our cousins during our summer vacation by which time they had shifted to a new resident at Byculla. S-J was still our favourite. We got permission from our aunt to see ‘Aashiq’ (1962) which was running at Ganesh Talkies at Lalbaug. We travelled from Byculla to Lalbaug by tram. The queue for the current ticket (3.00 – 6.00 pm show) was long. We stood in the queue. As we came nearer to the ticket window with just about 10 persons ahead of us, the ‘House Full’ board was displayed. We were hugely disappointed.

After some discussion, we decided to stand in the queue for the next show (6.00 – 9.00 pm). While taking this decision, we were oblivious of the fact that our aunt will get worried if we did not reach home by evening. We watched the film and enjoyed the songs. When we returned home at around 9.30 pm, our cousins got a good dressing down from my aunt. She thought that it was a handiwork of her younger son whereas in reality, it was a collective decision.

I am not able to recall as to which film I saw in 1963. It is quite possible that there was no occasion for me to see any film. In 1964, I got an opportunity to see ‘Sangam’ (1964) with one of my relatives in a local theatre. Except for o mehbooba tere dil ke pass hai and dost dost na raha, all other songs sounded a shade lower in quality than what S-J had composed for ‘Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai’ (1960). I also did not much enjoy watching the film.

By this time, I and my elder cousin had defected to Laxmikant-Pyarelal camp while my younger brother and younger cousin continued to be the fan of S-J. There used to a lot of musical discussion between us mainly on S-J versus L-P. Sometime it would reach a flashing point. In 1965, I had got a job. My elder cousin had shifted to Pune to complete his Engineering degree. With this, our L-P vs. S-J rivalry naturally came to an end.

‘Waqt’ (1965) was the first film which I saw from my own money as I had got a job. From 1965 and 1969, I had watched in the theatres one film almost every week-end (either afternoon show on Saturdays or Matinee show on Sundays). In Economics, there is a law of diminishing marginal utility. This law seemed to have applied to my week-end film watching. Over a period of time, I developed a diminishing interest in films and by 1972, I had almost given up visiting theatres for films. The reason could be that I had been seeing all types of films, many of them could be categorised as craps.

Since then, I visit theatres to watch only those films which my wife wished to see, which had good reviews and I have a liking for the subject of the film. In this process, now we end up watching on average 3-4 films in a year.

‘Raazi’ (2018) was the last film I and my wife saw in a multiplex sometime in May 2018. During the show, one of its songs overwhelmed me so much that it lingered in my mind for a long time. I felt that I should present this song as a part of the article. The song is ‘ungli pakad ke tune chalna sikhaaya thha na’ sung by Vibha Saraf, Harshdeep Kaur and Shankar Mahadeven.

This song takes me to the golden period of Hindi film music in terms of its composition, lyrics and picturisation .. Harshdeep Kaur’s soulful rendition of her part in the song brings out the emotional bond between a father and a daughter.

The song starts with a Kashmiri couplet which is a part of Kashmiri folk song of bidaai:

bae chhasay khanmaej koor
deu mey rukhsat myane bhaijaano

[I am your darling daughter. Come, it is time to bid farewell to me, o brother].

Music Directors, Shankar-Ehsan-Loy has used mostly Kashmiri musical instruments like rabab, dotara and esraj to give a feel of the song from the Kashmir valley.

This is the song which would make any father to shed tears after listening because of its soulful music and lyrics. After all, it has been written by Gulzar who must have had the same pain at the time of the marriage of his daughter, Meghna Gulzar, the director of the film.

Video Clip:

Song-Mudke na dekho dilbaro (Raazi)(2018) Singers-Harshdeep Kaur, Shankar Mahadevan, Vibha Saraf, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Shankar Ehsan Loy
Chorus
Harshdeep Kaur+Chorus

Lyrics

bae chhasay khanmaej koor
deu mey rukhsat myane bhaijaanon

bae chhasay khanmaej koor
deu mey rukhsat myane bhaijaano
bae chhasay khanmaej koor

ungli pakad ke toone
chalna sikhaaya thha na
dehleez oonchi hai ye
paar kara de
baba main teri mallika
tukda hoon tere dil ka
ikk baar phir se dehleez
paar karaa de
hmm hmm hmm
mudke na dekho dilbaro
dilbaro..o
mudke na dekho dilbaro
mudke na dekho dilbaro

dilbaro..o
mudke na dekho dilbaron

fasalein jo kaati jaayen
ugti nahi hain
betiyaan jo byaahi jaayen
mudti nahin hai
o o fasalein jo kaati jaayen
ugti nahi hain
betiyaan jo byaahi jaayen
mudti nahni hai
aisi bidaai ho to
lambi judaai ho to
dehleez dard ki bhi
paar kara de
baba main teri mallika
tukda hoon tere dil ka
ikk baar phir se dehleez
paar kara de

mere dilbaro…..on
barfein galengi phir se
mere dilbaro……on
fasalein pakengi phir se
tere paaon ke tale
meri duaa chale
duaa meri chale

baba main teri mallika
tukda hoon tere dil ka
ek baar phir se dehleez
paar kara de
mudke na dekho dilbaro
dilbaro..o
mudke na dekho dilbaro
mudke na dekho dilbaro
dilbaro..o
mudke na dekho dilbaro

mudke na dekho dilbaro
dilbaro..o
mudke na dekho dilbaro


This article is written by Pradeep Raghunathan, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3646 Post No. : 14476

ASAD 10th Anniversary Celebrations – 1
———————————————————————

I have not been active either on the blog, or on whatsapp groups for quite a while now. Earlier this year I developed a health issue and had to go through a surgical procedure. Things are fine now though 🙂 . Catching up on all the work pending for the last few months.

Let me now get to the post that I would like to contribute.

10 years, that is a decade. . . the “BIG X”. What a journey this has been! Still remember how one fine day, by sheer accident, I stumbled upon this amazing blog, and made my way to the first post that was made – the song “Miley Na Phool Toh Kaanton Se Dosti Kar Li” by Rafi sahab for the film ‘Anokhi Raat’ (1968), starring Parikshit Sahni. Then the next song if I remember correctly was “Tum Agar Mujhko Na Chaaho Toh Koi Baat Nahi” by Mukesh Sahab for the movie ‘Dil Hi To Hai’ (1963), sung on screen by Raj Kapoor and he sings it to the cute and gorgeous Nutan 🙂 .

One of my favourite bosses always used to tell us – there is one thing I find is the secret of being sane and that is to have a ROUTINE! He says, that it does not matter if you have your highs or your lows in life, never give up on your routine. If you have to walk in the morning, do that, come what may. If you have lunch at a particular time, do that regularly. Somehow with time, and how our priorities change, we give up on what once used to a routine / habit for us. But few people who we can get inspired by for being so committed and never gave up on their routine and dedication to the blog are Atul ji, Sudhir ji, Arunkumar ji, Bharat ji and the entire group of Atulites. What they have managed to do in these 10 years is more than monumental. This is going to be a treasure trove for generations to come. All this was not because it was a great startup idea or there was a motive behind it, it was just for sheer love of old hindi music and as Atul ji likes to call it ‘Labour of Love’.

I wish in the near future I am able to get back to my old routine and be more active on the blog (it does need a mention, that in spite of me being inactive, I have always been kept in the loop with emails, thank you Atulites). Have also spoken to Avinash ji, that Aparna, Avinash ji and I should get back to our Project YIPPEEEE!! (should get much more easy now with help from Sudhir ji).

To celebrate this wonderful milestone, I choose a very recent song, which I really like and also a song that my daughter plays in a loop every time she gets in the car 🙂 . The song is from the recently release movie ‘Sanju’, a movie on the life of actor Sanjay Dutt. The movie had mixed reactions and even I did feel that his life story was glorified, but what no one can refute is the fact that Ranbir Kapoor was a class act. He has portrayed Sanjay Dutt to the T, so much so that at some point of time into the movie, one forgets that he is Ranbir and start thinking he is Sanjay Dutt. The movie also makes one wonder how life would have been for the respected Sunil Dutt, having to lose his wife, Nargis to cancer and at the same time bring up a troubled child like Sanjay.

Coming to the song, it is a song that Sanjay Dutt imagines his mother egging him on to conquer anything. The song is titled “Kar Har Maidaan Fateh” and sung by one and only Sukhwinder Singh (his voice is a perfect fit for songs like these). And ably supported by another wonderful singer, Shreya Ghoshal. The tempo of the song is brilliant and it is like a shot in the arm and a morale booster to conquer any mountain.

Though 10 years is a big mountain that Team Atul have conquered, as Atul ji says, we have hardly scraped the surface, and there is a long journey to look forward to. Here is a BIG congratulation to Team Atul and wishing us all the very best for the next milestone round the corner 🙂 . So so blessed to be part of this journey 🙂 .


Song – Kar Har Maidaan Fateh (Sanju) (2018) Singers – Sukhwinder Singh, Shreya Ghoshal, Lyrics – Shekhar Astitwa, MD – Vikram Montrose
Chorus

Lyrics

pighla de zanjeerein
bana unki..ee.ee shamsheerein
kar har maidaan fateh o bandeya
kar har maidaan fateh

ghayal parinda hai tu
dikhla de zinda hai tu
baaki hai tujhmein hausla..aa..aa
tere junoon ke aage
ambar panaahein maange
kar daale tu jo faisla..aa..aa

roothi takdeerein to kya
tooti shamsheerein to kya
tooti shamsheeron se hi ho oo oo
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidaan fateh

in gardishon ke baadalon pe chadh ke
waqt ka girebaan pakad ke
poochhna hai jeet ka pata
jeet ka pata
in muthiyon mein chaand taare bhar ke
aasman ki hadd se guzar ke
ho ja tu bheed se judaa
bheed se judaa
bheed se judaa
kehne ko zarra hai tu
lohe ka chharra hai tu
tooti shamsheeron se hi ho oo oo
kar har maidaan fateh
(kar har maidaan fateh)
kar har maidaan fateh
(kar har maidaan fateh)
kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh o bandeya
har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidaan fateh

teri koshishein hi kaamyaab hongi
jab teri yeh zid aag hogi
phoonk dengi na-ummeediyaan
na-ummeediyaan
tere peechhe peechhe raaste ye chal ke
baahon ki nishanon mein dhal ke
dhoondh lenge apna aashiaan
apna aashiaan
apna aashiaan
lamhon se aankh mila ke
rakh de jee jaan lada ke
tooti shamsheeron se hi ho oo oo
kar har maidaan
har maidaan
har maidaan
har maidaan
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh o bandeya
har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh o bandeya
har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh
kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidaan fateh

kar har maidaan fateh re bandeya
har maidan fateh

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

पिघला दे ज़ंजीरें
बना उनकी॰॰ई॰॰ई शमशीरें
कर हर मैदान फतेह ओ बंदेया
कर हर मैदान फतेह

घायल परिंदा है तू
दिखला दे ज़िंदा है तू
बाकी है तुझ में हौसला॰॰आ॰॰आ
तेरे जुनूं के आगे
अम्बर पनाहें मांगे
कर डाले तू जो फैसला॰॰आ॰॰आ

रूठी तक़दीरें तो क्या
टूटी शमशीरें तो क्या
टूटी शमशीरों से ही हो ओ ओ
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह

इन गर्दिशों का बादलों पे चढ़ के
वक़्त के गिरेबाँ पकड़ के
पूछना है जीत का पता
जीत का पता
इन मुट्ठियों में चाँद तारे भर के
आसमां की हद्द से गुज़र के
हो जा तू भीड़ से जुदा
भीड़ से जुदा
भीड़ से जुदा
कहने को ज़र्रा है तू
लोहे का छर्रा है तू
टूटी शमशीरों से ही हो ओ ओ
कर हर मैदान फतेह
(कर हर मैदान फतेह)
कर हर मैदान फतेह
(कर हर मैदान फतेह)
कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह ओ बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह

तेरी कोशिशें कामयाब होंगी
जब तेरी ये ज़िद आग होगी
फूँक देंगी नाउम्मीदियाँ
नाउम्मीदियाँ
तेरे पीछे पीछे रास्ते ये चल के
बाहों के निशानों में ढल के
ढूंढ लेंगे अपना आशियां
अपना आशियां
अपना आशियां
लम्हों से आँख मिला के
रख दे जी जान लड़ा के
टूटी शमशीरों से ही हो ओ ओ
कर हर मैदान
हर मैदान
हर मैदान
हर मैदान
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह ओ बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह ओ बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह
कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
हर मैदान फतेह

कर हर मैदान फतेह रे बंदेया
कर हर मैदान फतेह


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Blog Day : 3615 Post No. : 14412

Since this is a song blog so it is natural that I visit song sites viz YT etc daily. I had vaguely noticed a video about a movie called “Parmanu” in the past in YT and I had not taken much notice, seeing that I am not interested in new movies.

Three days ago (friday), I saw that video again. I got interested and clicked on that link. I found that it was the trailer of the movie. From the trailer I found that this movie was based on the tale of Indian nuclear tests carried out in 1998. The trailer also mentioned that the movie was releasing on 25 may 2018.

We were already in june 2018, which meant that the movie must have been released already. But I did not have much information about it. But then how could I, as I was not much interested and aware about new movies.

Seeing that the movie was based on a real life happening, and that too a very important happening in the history of India, and also the world, I suddenly became very interested in the movie. The movie was released two weeks ago and I did not read anything about it on newspapers or online, so I guessed that the movie may not have done well at the box office. I wondered whether it was still playing in a movie hall near me, as they say in movie advertisements. When I checked up, I found that the movie was indeed playing in three nearby movie halls. It was friday, and I decided to watch it in the mall where it was being shown in noon show (13:30 PM). I was familiar with this mall because it is a favourite place for my wife whenever she visits me. 🙂

It was friday and the show timings coincided with my lunch break time. So I decided to forego my lunch that day and instead decided to watch the movie.

The nuclear tests of may 1998 are fairly well known to most regulars of this blog who all must have been well into their twenties or more at that time. But since I am very interested in such matters, I may have more in depth information on this topic than most people.

The real tale in brief is:

After the collapse of Soviet Union in early 1990s, India finds itself in a precarious position. Friendship with Soviet Union assured them of security in the past but that security umbrella had vanished. India found themselves increasingly bullied by USA and China, and Pakistan, an ally of USA and China stepped up its efforts to destabilise India through actions that self respecting Indians found highly provocative and humiliating. Forget Pakistan, even other tiny neighbouring countries began to needle India.

Public sentiment of nationalist Indians was that India needed to sent a strong message to the world that India could not be regarded as a pushover. So as soon as the nationalist government of BJP won vote of confidence in Parliament, it authorised nuclear testing. Three years ago, P V Narsimha Rao’s government had also contemplated it, but USA got wind of it and put intense pressure on India and that plan had to be dropped.

This time in 1998, Vajpayee government was determined that tests must be carried out. Learning from 1995, it was decided to carry out the preparation for the tests in secrecy so that USA did not get any clue and became aware of the fact only after the tests were carried out. Indians actually managed to carry out all their preparations in secrecy. USA, despite its spy satellites could not detect any unusual happenings. So this real tale, where preparation work was going on in plain sight (so to say) in a desert still spy satellites could not detect that, provided great plot for a thriller cum suspense movie. American CIA is considered a top notch spy agency, and they failed to detect what was going on- this makes for a great real life spy tale. And that is what this movie “Parmanu”(2018) is all about.

In real life, the push for the test had come from the political leadership and then the plan was carried out with great secrery and precision by real life people viz APJ Abdul Kalam, then scientific advisor to PM (and later President of India), R Chidambaram (Secretary Atomic energy commission) were the chief co ordinators. Nearly 80 scientists from Different departments, viz BARC, AMDER, DRDO etc were involved. 58th Engineers regiment, led by Gopal Kaushik were present at site, so that it looked like it was an army settlement. Work was mostly done during night, and equipment was returned to the original place to give the impression that it was never moved.

Bomb shafts were dug under camouflage netting and the dug-out sand was shaped like shaped dunes. Cables for sensors were covered with sand and concealed using native vegetation.

The movie uses the real life happenings as the base material, and then mixes it with imaginary incidences and stories to come up with an interesting movie that I found a nice watch.

In the movie, the idea that India, instead of being pushed around, needed to assert herself by acquiring nuclear capability, is put forward by a junior IAS officer, Ashwath Raina(John Abraham) in 1995. But his idea is implemented in a bothched up manner and USA gets wind of it. The plan has to be abanadoned and Ashwath is held responsible for the fiasco and he is dismissed from service.

In 1998, new government takes over. It is decided to carry out nuclear test. Himanshu Shukla, The Principal Secretary to PM (played by Boman Irani) locates the dismissed officer John Abraham again. His plan that his bosses during the previous government in 1995 had not gone through is explained by him. He informs Principal secretary that the major part of his plan, viz evading detection during preparation work, was not even understood by his seniors during 1995 and that is why that attempt had failed.

Ashwath assembles the leaders of his five teams from five different departments. They are given code names inspired from the five Pandavas of Mahabharat. Himashu Shukla gives Ashwath Raina the code name of Krishna. 🙂

It turns out that one of the five leaders viz the incharge of security is a female called Captain Ambalika Bandhopadhyay (Diana Penty). She is bemused when she finds the codename of Nakul being assigned to her. 🙂

Scientists are seen working at the time when satellites are not watching them. Every day their password is changed and the vehicle carrying them is allowed to pass only when they give the password for the day. The passwords seem to be set by an old Hindi movie songs lover, because they are mostly lines from old Hindi movie songs, such as “lag ja gale ke phir ye haseen raat ho na ho”. 🙂

Avoiding detection by CIA satellites, as well as keeping the project hidden from the prying eyes of CIA and ISI agents forms the bulk of the movie and is presented in an interesting manner. There are many roadblocks, interruptions, near mishaps etc and quite a bit of suspense. Even though it is just a movie and we know what actually happened, the movie still manages to keep you in suspense about what is going to happen next. 🙂

The movie ends as the nuclear tests are carried out successfully and Indian PM announces it on TV.

These tests were gamechangers in world geopolitics. What followed in the aftermath of these tests were far more interesting and significant. In my opinion, all the aims of India that were sought to be achieved by these tests were achieved spectacularly.

Here are my take on the developments that took place after the tests:-

1. There may be people who may point out that economic sanctions were imposed on India. Indeed that was the case. But Indians were prepared for that. Indians overwhelmingly welcomed the tests. As for the sanctions, Indian government did not react at all, which was as good as cocking a snook at the sanction imposers. As it is, India was already being kicked around and bullied by USA for last several years, and Indians had learnt to manage without USA. USA in the past had denied India supercomputers, cryogenic engines etc and Indians had subsequently developed them on their own. USA had very little leverage with India at that time and Indians were in no mood to listen to them, seeing that US was a blind supporter of Pakistan.

2. Reaction of Pakistan:- While most western countries condemned the tests and some of them imposed economic sanctions on India, Pakistan’s reaction was classic. Pakistanis expressed great ire and vowed to match India. Unlike India, who prepared for their tests in secrecy, Pakistanis openly prepared in full view of USA spy satellites at their Chagai site. USA pressurised Pakistan to desist from carrying out the test, but domestic pressure got the better of Pakistani rulers and Pakistan detonated six bombs on 28 may and 30 may 1998.

Pakistani public rejoiced just like Indian public had done. Comically, the same Pakistani public came out protesting against the same government a few weeks later when it became clear that Pakistani economy, unlike Indian economy, was unable to withstand economic sanctions of USA and it had reached the stage of virtual deathbed.

USA, realised that their sanctions, instead of hurting India, had ended up dealing a death blow to the economy of their “ally” Pakistan. So US president Bill Clinton, in an act of obscene hurry waived off sanctions of both countries on 9 november 1998. It was mainly to save Pakistan economy rather than to save arms race in the region, which was purported to be the reason for the waiver. In addition to waiving off the sanction, US officials were also authorised to support loans to Pakistan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank. 🙂

So, USA as well as Pakistan were badly rattled in the wake of Indian nuclear tests and they were forced to take extraordinary steps to deal with the situation while for most Indians it was business as usual.

So, knowing all these real life facts and then watching the movie made it quite an enjoyable experience for me. I know that there are more takers for movies like “Veere Di Wedding”, but this movie “Parmanu” deals with a very very important date in Indian history. I personally feel that 11 may 1998 was as red letter a day in Indian history as 15 august 1947 and 26 january 1950. This date is now observed as National Technology day in India. In my opinion, it should be regarded as National Self respect day. It is on this day that many Indians gained self respect by doing what they needed to do in their national interest. And as I have explained above, they were prepared to pay the price for asserting themselves, and as it turned out, they emerged far far stronger after the event. It sent a clear and firm message to the world that was urgently needed to be sent.

My favourite dialogue from the movie has to do with self respect as well:

ab ham dar ke shaant nahin baithhenge
kar ke shaant baithhenge

As I mentioned earlier, I quite loved the movie. This movie is not to be watched as one watches a normal masala movie. It has to be watched with the knowledge that we are watching an event that was a major and glorious turning point in the history of India.

I do not recall too many songs in the movie and whatever songs were these appeared to be just few seconds long each. But when I checked up, I found that the movie had as many as six songs in it. It appears to me that full songs are released in audio form and only small snatches of these songs are used in the movie.

Here is the theme song of “Parmanu”(2018). This song is sung by Keerti Sagathia and Jyotica Tangri, Vayu is the lyricist. Music is composed by Sachin Jigar.

The movie as well as the artists make their debut in the blog with this song. I have no idea who they are. I request our knowledgeable (in this case young) regulars to tell us more about them.

This song is the first song from 2018 to appear in the blog. And quite a befitting song from 2018 it is too.

Full song

Song-Shubh din aayo(Parmanu)(2018) Singers-Keerti Sagathia, Jyotica Tangri, Lyrics-Vayu, MD-Sachin-Jigar

Lyrics

he ae ae
sun hudas
sooraj ugiyo
aur chaaru mer huyi jhilmilaahat
aayo mhaara paavna aa aa aa aa
ke swaagat kara behisaab

hey ae ae
sajti raahen mangal gaawen
man upji phulwaari re
saaje gaaje baaje goonje
sapnori ye kilkaari re
ban upwan abhinandan karta
chhaayi ghata paniyaari re
shakkar phaanko
jhaanki jhaanko
hui jashan ki ye taiyyaari re
man harshaayo
ghan barsaayo
dhan sukhwaalo jee re
ee ae ae ae

aayo re shubh din aayo re ae ae
aayo re shubh din aayo re ae ae
aayo re shubh din aayo re ae ae

shubh din aayo
man’ne bhaayo
nayo nayo so rang le aayo
shubh din aayo
man’ne bhaayo
nayo nayo so rang le aayo
honthon pe muskaan gulaabi
laayo re
honthon pe muskaan gulaabi
laayo re
he ae
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae
o o o
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae

hey
hey
hey
hey
hey
chanda laavo deepak laaj
jagmag taare laijo jee
jagmag taare laijo laijo
jagmag taare laijo jee
jagmag taare laijo laijo
jagmag taare laijo jee

khushiyaan baantoon dil mein sabke
shaakar misri bhar do jee
arre ghoomar rasiya meethha meethha
gaayo re
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae
aayo re
shubh din aayo re ae ae

kesariyo rangeelo aayo
sooraj so chamkeelo aayo
kesariyo rangeelo aayo
sooraj so chamkeelo aayo
o din ye pyaaro
kismat waalo aayo re
din ye pyaaro
kismat waalo aayo re

hey hey
hey hey
hey hey
hey

padhaaro re ae ae
padhaaro jee ae

mangal gaao
shubh din aayo
bali bali jaao
shubh shubh din aayo
misri baanton
shubh din aayo
jhoomo naacho
shubh shubh din aayo
arre lok bulaao
shubh din aayo
rang udaao
shubh shubh din aayo
phool sajaao
shubh din aayo
khushi manaao
aayo ae ee
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din
shubh din aayo
shubh din (aayo re)
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din aayo
shubh din
jee


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1221
Total Number of movies covered =4362

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