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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘P Bhanumati Solo Songs’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3800 Post No. : 14792

Today’s song is from film ‘Mangala’ (1950). This was a film made by Gemini Films of Madras and directed by its boss SS Vasan. The music was given by a team of Balkrishna Kalla, MD Parthasarathy and E Sankar Sastry. The cast of this film was P Bhanumathi, Ranjan, Agha, David, Badri Pershad, BS Kalla etc.

The film was a remake of the hit Tamil film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943). After the unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ (1948) into the All India market, Subramaniam Srini Vasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He had established the popular Tamil magazine “Anand Vikatan”, and owned Gemini Studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film . In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a great success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’.

Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. (This film was remade in Simhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955, and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao, later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh, and Jamuna).

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ (1950) followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ (1951). They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the Music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

Actually, the southern film activity, though as old as Hindi talkie films, is strictly limited to four southern states. It was only the adventurous SS Vasan who ventured into the bastion of Hindi film markets, by promoting his film ‘Chandralekha’. In fact this had encouraged other producers like AVM, Prasad, Vijaya etc. to tap the Hindi belt. While making a multilingual film, the south producers always called the Hindi artistes, be it actors, directors ,composers or singers to come to Madras, but they never went to Bombay. It was only through dubbed or remade films that south actors, composers or actors were exposed to the Hindi arena. Those days anyone from south was a ‘madrasi‘ and likewise anyone from other than south was a North Indian or a Punjabi ! No one from the North bothered to distinguish between Tamil, Telugu, Kannada or Malayalam – films or people. Everything was ‘madrasi‘.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 60s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to writers like Chetan Bhagat’s novels. Thanks to Modernization.

In the early times of the film industry, very few educated people used to join here. That is why graduates or postgraduates used to flaunt their degrees with pride – like Moti, BA – the lyricist (though he was actually MA), or Kavi Pradeep’s pseudo name – Miss Kamal BA or even singer Surendra as BA, LLB etc.

A highly qualified person and that too in an unrelated subject joining films was a wonder then. Thus, a young man with an unlikely name for a hero, like RAMNARAYAN VENKATRAMAN SARMA alias actor RANJAN was a novelty. Ranjan was born in Madras on 2-3-1918 in an orthodox Brahmin family. He did his BA with Physics and then completed M Litt in Carnatak music and dance, and became a Research Fellow for Ph.D. He also became the managing editor of ‘NATYAM‘ a magazine for dance, drama and music. In total contrast to his expertise in fine arts, he learnt fencing (sword fighting) after he saw it in the Olympic Games.

He was spotted by a Tamil producer and he made his debut in the film ‘Ashok Kumar’ (1941). After a few films in Tamil and Telugu he got the role of Shashank in the magnum opus film ‘Chandralekha’ in 1948. The drum dance and his fencing were the two main attractions in the film. The final sword fighting is considered the longest ever fencing fight in films till today ! The film was a hit and Ranjan became type cast in action films. Ranjan was a very poor actor, but his fencing skills were marvelous.

In 1949 came ‘Nishaan’, based on the Hollywood film ‘The Corsican Brothers’ – one good and one bad. It was a story of twins. The audience liked a scene from the film which showed that there were marks on one brother’s back if the other one was whipped ! The film, in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu, was a hit everywhere mainly for its fencing scenes. In ‘Mangala’ opposite Bhanumati, he was the villain and the hero too.

He was invited by New York University for a research fellowship, but Vasan did not leave him, so after ‘Mangala’, as soon as the contract was over, Ranjan came to Bombay.

‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) saw him with Rehana but as a romantic hero, he was worse than Bharat Bhushan or Pradeep Kumar ! He acted in ‘Sindbad The Sailor’ (1952),  ‘Nishan Danka’ (1952), ‘Kafila’ (1952), ‘Baaghi’ (1953), ‘Shahenshah’ (1953), ‘Baap Beti’ (1954), ‘Baghdad’ (1961), and a host of B and C grade films, many of them dubbed or remakes of southern films. He was known for only fencing. But he never became famous like Stewart Granger in ‘Scaramouche’ for his fencing. In the 1950s he acted in 23 films, in 1960s he did 18 films and in 1970s his tally was 17 films. A total of 58 films in Hindi.

After sword fighting became obsolete he shifted to writing. The story of film ‘Munim ji’ (1955) was written by him. After few years in south he was seen again in ‘Chor Chor’ (1974) and ‘Chaitali’ (1976). ‘Ram Balram’ (1980) was his last film.

He married a Muslim girl and she converted to Hinduism taking the name of Laxmi. Ranjan wrote 12 books on dancing and music. He shifted to USA to live with his son in New Jersey. He passed away 12-9-1983, due to a heart attack. He was so much forgotten that even the news of his death was not published in India.

The composers of ‘Mangala’ was a team of D Parthsarthi, Balkrishna Kalla and E Shanker. This team also gave music to few other films like ‘Sansaar’ (1951), ‘Mr Sampat’ (1952), ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954). Balkrishna Kalla with Mohd Shafi gave music to ‘Krishna Kanhaiya’ (1952). Independently he gave music to only one film – ‘Do Dulhe’ (1954). The southern composers gave music only to dubbed films or remakes.

In the original version of ‘Mangala’, which was ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ (1943), the heroine was Vasundhara Devi – mother of Vaijayantimala. In Hindi film ‘Mangala’, the heroine was P Bhanumathi, but the hero was same – Ranjan. There were some Hindi actors like Agha, David and Badriprasad. The composer of today’s song, Balkrishna Kalla also did a small role in this film. When Shamshad Begum sang songs for ‘Chandralekha’, her songs were recorded in Bombay, but for ‘Mangala’, Shamshad went to Madras first time and sang 9 songs out of its 15 songs. In this film the songs and dances of Carmen Miranda were freely copied in the Tamil, Telugu and Hindi versions.

The late 1940’s was marked in Bollywood with the remake of several super hit movies from south, especially from Tamil. The 1950 hit ‘Mangala’, produced by Gemini Pictures, was one such movie which was originally made in Tamil. SS Vasan was the director of the Hindi version. The newspaper, The Hindu, in its issue of 3-2-2013 has said this, about film ‘Mangala’,

Bhanumathi Ramakrishna was so bowled over by the performance of Vasundhara Devi (mother of yesteryear heroine Vyjayanthimala Bali) in Gemini’s blockbuster 1943 Tamil hit, Mangamma Sabadham , that she wished, if at all the film were to be remade in Telugu, she would act in it. In fact, the Tamil movie was released by Gemini supremo S.S. Vasan at a few centres in Andhra also and was well received there too. A few years later, Vasan decided to remake the movie in Telugu and Hindi under the title Mangala . Impressed by Bhanumathi’s performance in the Tamil film, Rajamukthi , he decided to sign her and approached her husband, Ramakrishna Rao. It was an opportunity she was waiting for and Bhanumathi immediately accepted the offer. She was paid a remuneration of Rs. 1 lakh for both the versions. Ranjan, who did the hero’s role in Mangamma Sabadham , was retained to play the lead role in both Telugu and Hindi versions. Popular editor of the time, Chandru (who had done commendable work as editor for Gemini’s earlier trilingual, Apoorva Sahodarulu) was entrusted with the job of directing the Telugu movie.

Based on a popular folklore, an engrossing narrative was weaved by Gemini’s story department. Mangala (Bhanumathi), the charming daughter of a rich farmer, is very haughty by temperament. When Prince Sugunapal (Ranjan) fails to win her love, he throws a challenge that he would marry her and then imprison her for life, denying her the marital bliss. She counter-challenges him that she would bear a child from him and make the child whip him in his court.

The prince marries her and puts her in a lonely palace. She makes her father (Doraiswamy) dig a tunnel from the palace to her village, sneaks through it to her house and learns dance. Disguised as a gypsy, she entices the Prince, secretly gives birth to a child, and when he grows up (Ranjan – dual role) gets her vow fulfilled through him. Realisation dawns on the Prince and the tale ends on a happy note.

All through it is Mangala’s show and Bhanumathi essayed it brilliantly. If Vasundhara Devi was admired for her nice dances in the Tamil version, Bhanumathi scored through her acting prowess. Ranjan made his presence felt in dual role.

The songs and dance sequences were all hits of that time. Music was composed by Partha Sarathi, Kalla and E Sankar Sastri. Two songs from this film were inspired by the famous Brazilian dancer Carmen Miranda’s classics. The song “Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma Mummy” was based on Carmen Miranda’s “Mama Yo Quiero” and “Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se” (today’s song) in which Bhanumathi is dressed like Carmen, was based on “I Yi Yi Yi Yi — I Like You Very Much”  from the film “That Night in Rio ” (1941), sung by Carmen Miranda herself.

Enjoy the dance and song video….

 


Song – Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se  (Mangala) (1950) Singer – P Bhanumati, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – MD Parthasarthy, BK Kalla, E Shankar Shastri

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na na naa
ta na na na na naa

taa na na naa raa nanna
naa raa nanna
naa raa nannaa
ta na na na na naa. . .
ch ch ch ch..ch

taa na na naa raa nanna
taa na na naa raa nanna
taa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na na na naa. . .
taa naa naa naa. . .

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
sainyyaan dekhe mohey pyaar se
aayi aayi raja torey paas re
piya se milan ki aas re
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

kaun jaane kaisa jaadu daal ke
chheen liya dil mora haaye
khili khili khili rahe chaandni
chanda sa ye much muskaaye
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . .
suno suno pyaare morey saajna
baaje morey dil ka sitar
gori gori chhori main to baalma
puchho reejho reejho hai kyon nikhar
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

meri chaal nihaar
kaisi thummakdaar
meri kamar nihaar
kaisi lachakdaar
mere nain nihaar
jaise tez kataar
meri nath nihaar
kaisi hai chammakdaar
ye bahaar
ye nikhaar
tum shikaar
main shikaar
phadak phadak
thadak thadak

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
haaye ri main to laajon mari
hanh hanh
ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
saayyaa ji jee
du du de de dor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
piya se milan ki aas re
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . . aa. . .

suno suno pyaare morey saajna
cha cha chu chu chu chu chaye chechor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
ta tta ta ti tu tu tuteyi tetor
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yayyi yayyi yaa. . .

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta na na naa raa naa
ta na na naa raa naa

ta na na naa raa nanna naa raa nanna naa raa nanna
taa naa naa naa raa. . .
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na naa raa nanna
ta na na na naa. . .
ta. . na. . na. . naa. . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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