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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Lyrics by Sudhir’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3983 Post No. : 15072

Today’s song is from film ‘Kaarwaan’ (1956), a costume drama, made by Shahkaar productions, Bombay. Produced by Dev Jolly, it was directed by Rafiq Rizvi – whose career as a director came to a close with this film. His 6 films began with ‘Waayda’ (1940). The music was by S Mohinder. The lyricists were Tanvir Naqvi, Pt. Bhushan and Saarshaar Sailani.

S Mohinder aka Bakshi Mohinder Singh Sarna, was one of the very few Sikh composers in Hindi films (only 3 till 1970. Sardul Kwatra, GS Kohli and S Mohinder). For this film, he had 2 assistants. One was Inderjeet Singh, who was the maternal Uncle (mamma) of today’s singer Daler Mehndi and the other was Pt Kishen who was Husnlal and Bhagatram’s nephew (sister’s son). These two assistants were working with S Mohinder till 1961, after which both died one after another.

S Mohinder was born on 24-2-1925 in a small town called Silanwali in Montgomery District of un-divided Punjab. His full name was Bakshi Mohinder Singh Sarna.  His father Sujan Singh Bakhshi was a sub-inspector in police. Soon the family moved to a comparatively larger city Lyallpur, where young Mohinder around 1935 came in contact with an accomplished Sikh religious vocalist Sant Sujan Singh. He honed his skills for several years in classical music in the tutelage of Sant Sujan Singh. Initially he wanted to be a singer. The family moved to Sheikhupura , close  to Nankana Sahib, the birth place of Guru Nanak and S Mohinder got his further training in classical music from legendry Sikh religious musician Bhai Samund Singh. Frequent transfers of his father kept the family on the move. Since S Mohinder’s education was suffering badly, durIng early forties, he was enrolled in Khalsa High School in village Kairon in Amritsar District.

In 1947, the rest of the family too moved to East Punjab in India. The love for classical music brought S Mohinder to Benares. After a couple of years of grooming in classical music in Benares, the Mecca of Indian classical music, S Mohinder, came to Bombay, the leading center of film industry. His first successful film was ‘Neeli’ (1950), which was musically a hit but not successful on the box office. S Mohinder took a regular job of music director with Filmistan Studios, which was churning out movies like factory. He composed music for Filmistan for half a decade. It was a great experience.

After a successful relationship as a music director with Filmistan Studios, S Mohinder composed music for Chandu Lal Shah’s (Ranjit Movietone) film ‘Zameen Ke Taare’ (1960). It became a hit. After that he composed the music for Wadia Brothers film ‘Reporter Raju’ (1962) and producer Roop K Shori’s film ‘Ek Ladki Saat Ladke’ (1961). He gave music for unreleased film ‘Do Dost’ also.

S Mohinder says that during the sixties, when only Hans Raj Behl and Sardul Singh Kwatra were in the field of composing music for Punjabi films, he also tried his hand at Punjab films. The response was good. His music for his first Punjabi film ‘Pardesi Dhola’ was a hit. After that he mainly devoted his attention on composing music for Punjabi films only. His music for ‘Chambe Di Kali’ also became a hit. Inderjit Hassanpuri, a friend of S Mohinder, made a Punjabi film ‘Daaj’ for which S Mohinder composed very emotional tunes. Later on during the late seventies S Mohinder composed music for some non-film Punjabi albums too and the singers included the best in the Punjabi music business, Surinder Kaur and Asa Singh Mastana. These private albums were also instant hits.

In 1960, S Mohinder composed music for the film ‘Mehlon Ke Khwaab’ produced by Madhubala. The film did quite well at the box office and its music became a hit. The untimely death of Madhubala in 1969, during the prime of her youth deeply saddened S Mohinder. He came to the conclusion that the field of composing music for Hindi films was getting a lot of new players and the melody was slowly yielding place to noisy heavy metal music. So he decided to go back to his roots and switch to composing music for Punjabi movies.

Ram Maheshwari and Panna Lal Maheshwari, originally from Amritsar, decided to make a movie in Punjabi based on Sikh religious sentiments. The film was titled ‘Nanak Naam Jahaaz Hai’. S Mohinder got the contract to compose the music. The story of the film required some scenes to be picturized in the Golden Temple. S Mohinder thought that the music for those scenes was a very sensitive subject and must be performed by the finest exponent of Sikh Religious classical music. So he requested Bhai Samund Singh to sing the Shabads. Bhai Samund Singh was also the mentor of S Mohinder during his early training in classical music. Initially Bhai Samund Singh hesitated, but eventually he agreed to sing for the movie. S Mohinder believes that what Bade Ghulam Ali Khan’s singing was to the great movie ‘Mughal e Azam’, the shabads sung by Bhai Samund Singh are to Punjabi film ‘Nanak Naam Jahaaz Hai’. As we all know film ‘Nanak Naam Jahaaz Hai’ has been an all time hit Punjabi movie. Its music was also as big a success.

The runaway success of ‘Nanak Naam Jahaaz Hai’ ushered in an era of for making well meaning movies based on Sikh religious stories. S Mohinder composed the music for most of these Sikh religious movies.’Dukh Bhanjan Tera Naam’ (1974) featuring Shaminder Singh as the hero was the next film, it was also quite successful. Then came two more namely ‘Man Jeete Jag Jeet’ (1973) and ‘Paapi Tare Anek’ (1976). Both were successful at the box office. All these movies were made during the decade of seventies. S Mohinder also composed some of his most memorable music for these movies.

During the decade of nineteen seventies, S Mohinder composed music for some private albums also including some featuring Sikh devotional music and some featuring the folk music of Punjab. Legendry Punjabi singer Surinder Kaur was prominently featured on some of these albums. He gave music to 36 Hindi films, composing 243 songs. He also sang 3 songs in 3 films.

S Mohinder left India for the USA in October 1982, when he was at the peak of his career as a music composer. The last film featuring his music was named ‘Maula Jatt’, with Dara Singh in the male lead role. Even in US, he did lot of work in Music – like recording songs, running a music school etc. (Adapted, with thanks, from an article in apnaorg.com)

Today’s song is written by Tanvir Naqvi. Tanvir Naqvi (real name – Syed Khursheed Ali) was born on 16th February 1919, at Lahore. His father was a jaagirdar and elder brother was ADC to a nawab. Tanvir went to Persia, along with father, where he was educated in Urdu and Persian. From the age of 14 years, he started writing poetry and participated in various mushairas. He published a book of poetry, titled ‘Suhaane Sapne. By chance, AR Kardar read it and called Tanvir to Bombay to write for his film ‘Swami’ (1941), made by CIRCO Productions.

In his next film, ‘Nai Duniya’ (1942), Suraiya sang his song as her first song. His films ‘Anmol Ghadi’ (1946) and ‘Jugnu’ (1947) became hits and all his songs were appreciated much. He had earned a good name. However, after film ‘Parda’ (1949), he migrated to Pakistan. In 1954, K Asif invited him to India to write songs for his film ‘Mughal e Azam’, but by that time, Naushad had built his own team and he declined to take Tanvir Naqvi. From 1954 to 1959, Tanvir did many films. He also joined S Mohinder and wrote songs for his 7 films.

In 1959, Tanvir Naqvi shifted again to Pakistan, but this time for good. There also he wrote for many films, like ‘Koel’, ‘Jhoomar’, ‘Salma’, ‘Gulfam’, ‘Elaan’etc. He wrote also for Punjabi films. He had married Idaan – elder sister of actress singer Nurjehan. However, since he had no children from her, so he married again and had 2 children.  He died in Lahore on 1-11-1972. In India, he wrote 224 songs for 48 films. Some of his songs are popular even today.

The cast of the film consisted of Shakila, Mahipal, Heeralal, Gope, Yashodhara Katju, Randhir, Satish, Sheila Vaz, Helen, Cuckoo and others. All the usual actors for a C grade costume drama. I find that most main actors are the subject matters of many articles, but actors like Heeralal are left out. I reproduce below a brief biosketch of Heeralal that I have earlier posted for the song “Main Hoon Bhaiya Dim Timkar“.

Heeralal is a familiar face to every fan of vintage Bollywood as he played countless character parts, often as the villain, in literally hundreds of films both big and small. He was born Heeralal Thakur, on March 14, 1912 in Lahore (now part of Pakistan) and began his career in silent films with AR Kardar’s ‘Safdar Jung’ which was released in 1930. Incidentally, his second film, ‘Daughters of Today’, actually made it to movie theaters first, in 1929. He was under contract to United Players Corporation and made several silent pictures for them before making the transition to talkies and moving on to other studios for films like ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932), ‘Seeta’ (1934), and ‘Blood Feud’ (1935).

Some of his notable fantasy, sci-fi and horror films include ‘Khooni Jaadugar’ (1939), ‘Arabian Nights’ (1946), ‘Mehbooba’ (1954), ‘Hatimtai Ki Beti’ (1955), ‘Roop Basant’ (1955), ‘Sakhi Hatim’ (1955), ‘Shah Behram’ (1955), ‘Indra Sabha’ (1956), ‘Shaan e Hatim’ (1958), ‘Dr. Z’  (1959), ‘Dr. Shaitan’ (1960),  ‘Jadoo Mahal’ (1962), ‘Flying Man’ (1965), ‘Gumnaam’ (1965), ‘Sindbad, Alibaba and Alladin’ (1965), ‘Love And Murder’ (1966), ‘Sheba And Hercules’ (1967), and ‘Alibaba’ (1976). Hiralal worked continuously until his death on June 27, 1982.

He had worked in 203 films. His first film was ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932) and last film was ‘Kaalia’ (1981).

Today’s song is actually a very sweet song and had been a popular song in its time. This is a duet of Lata and GM Durrani. The mukhda says – “Ae Saarbaan, Saarbaan. . .”. The word saarbaan means actually ‘camel handler’, but in Persian language it also means the caravaan leader. I liked this song very much. In fact, many of the songs composed by S Mohinder are very good, but somehow he never became an A grade composer.

 

Song – Ae Saarbaan Saarbaan, Kis Raah Ka Raahi Hai Tu (Kaarwaan) (1956) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, GM Durrani, Lyrics – Tanveer Naqvi, MD – S Mohinder

Lyrics

ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan

kis raah ka raahi hai tu
hai tujhko kiski justju
hogi teri manzil kahaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan

teri meri manzil nahin
manzil hai manzil ka nishaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan

mujhko ko bhi apne saath le. . .
de haath mera haath le
de haath mera haath le
mushkil bahut hain raaste
aasaan hain mere waste
aasaan hain mere waste
raste ki sab dushwaariaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan

gar tujhko khud pe hai yakeen. . .
mushkil koi mushkil nahin
mushkil koi mushkil nahin
ghat’ta rahega har khatar
kat’ta rahega ye safar
kat’ta rahega ye safar
badhta rahega kaarwaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan

badh kar na thehren phir kadam. . .
ye shauk ka dastoor hai
ye shauk ka dastoor hai
teri mohabbat ke liye
sab kuchh mujhe manzoor hai
sab kuchh mujhe manzoor hai
le chal mujhe chaahe jahaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan
ae jaan e jaan jaan e jaan

ae saarbaan saarbaan
ae saarbaan saarbaan

———-———————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ

किस राह का राही है तू
है तुझको किसकी जुस्तजू
होगी तेरी मंज़िल कहाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ

तेरी मेरी मंज़िल नहीं
मंज़िल है मंज़िल का निशां
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान

मुझको भी अपने साथ ले॰ ॰ ॰
दे हाथ मेरा हाथ ले
दे हाथ मेरा हाथ ले
मुश्किल बहुत हैं रास्ते
आसाँ है मेरे वास्ते
आसाँ है मेरे वास्ते
रस्ते की सब दुश्वारीयाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान

गर तुझको खुद पे है यकीं॰ ॰ ॰
मुश्किल कोई मुश्किल नहीं
मुश्किल कोई मुश्किल नहीं
घटता रहेगा हर ख़तर
कटता रहेगा हर सफर
कटता रहेगा हर सफर
बढ़ता रहेगा कारवां
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान

बढ़ कर ना ठहरें फिर कदम॰ ॰ ॰
ये शौक का दस्तूर है
ये शौक का दस्तूर है
तेरी मोहब्बत के लिए
सब कुछ मुझे मंजूर है
सब कुछ मुझे मंजूर है
ले चल मुझे चाहे जहां
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान
ए जान ए जान जान ए जान

ए सारबाँ सारबाँ
ए सारबाँ सारबाँ

 

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3979 Post No. : 15065

Today’s song is from film ‘Aaj Ki Baat’ (1955).

In one of his earliest posts, Atul ji had said that the Indian people like to talk about 3 things – politics, films and cricket. How true it was. . . till Whatsapp and Facebook became an obsession for most people in India. Now you see different, sometimes even strange topics being discussed with taste. Additionally, there are wise people to give you free doses of a variety of knowledge. In all this crowd, sometimes one finds even a few intelligent posts too !

Recently, I saw a video by National Geographic. It showed how a mother bear saves her wayward baby bear, from almost certain clutches of a hungry lion. Motherly love or love for children is a common factor among animals and humans. While animals try to protect their babies from enemies, starvation and life threatening situations, human parents try to provide the goodies of life and a paying career line to their children.

Film people are no different in this. Almost every successful star wishes that his children join this line and be famous and successful. However, they forget that in their own case they had struggled hard to earn their place in the life and more importantly they forget that talents are not necessarily hereditary !

When I chose today’s Talat song from film ‘Aaj Ki Baat’, I realised that this was the launching film for Ajit Chitnis – son of ace actress Leela Chitnis. Unfortunately, the film career of Ajit Chitnis never took off beyond his first and the only film. Actually, Ajit was a qualified commercial pilot, but he could not get a job in any air line. Consequently, he became a victim of alcoholism and was spoiled further. To help him settle in life, his mother-Leela Chitnis tried to bring him in film line. When she noticed her contemporary, Shobhana Samarth produced a film ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950), to launch her daughter Nutan, Leela too decided to produce a film to launch one of her two sons as an actor. She chose Ajit as he was elder and needed help. Manvendra (Leela used to call him as ‘Meena’) was not launched ceremoniously, but later he acted in 4 films in side roles. In his last film,’Ramu To Deewana Hai’ (1980) he even shared the credits with his mother. The history of most star sons in films is not very encouraging. In fact, success and failure ratio may be 10 to 90 percent in success and failures.

It is said that ‘No tree can grow under a Banyan tree’. This is absolutely true and applicable in film industry. Except in cases like the Kapoor family, i.e. Raj, Shammi and Shashi,who made their bright careers despite the shadow of their father and other brothers, we find that many of the sons, daughters, brothers or sisters of many popular and famous film stars were failures and never made it big in Hindi cinema.

We know cases like Suneil Anand, Nasir Khan, Tony Walker, Naina Sahu, Meera Joglekar, Ajit Chitnis, Rajendranath, Narendranath, Anoop Kumar, Mallika, Khursheed Jr., Simple Kapadiya, Shivangi Kolhapure,  Preeti Ganguly and many more. In spite of having all the backing of the famous family member, these and such many others just did not make it, because Talents are not always hereditary !

They all were given a fair opportunity to display their talent on the screen , but unfortunately despite their honest effort  their skill could not come out  & the viewers were left unimpressed . They were selected by big banners and well experienced directors were there to guide them. But  their talent remained hidden inside them and with their nonexistent artistry they disappointed their mentors. Non-actor Sohan Kapila was in the romantic lead of Filmistan’s ‘Babar’, which was released in 1960. This film was directed by Hemen Gupta, the distinguished director, who earlier had directed ‘Anand Matth’ (1952) for Filmistan. The film, also had the winning combination of Sahir and Roshan.  Dependable character actor Gajanan Jagirdar played the role of the great Mughal Emperor Babar . But the movie flopped, as the new hero failed pathetically to register  any emotion on his face. A big jolt for Seth Tola Ram Jalaan, who was already facing financial problems. Mr. Kapila appeared in 2-3 movies in inconsequential roles and disappeared from scene for ever. His daughter Padmini Kapila also pursued a career in films, but could not achieve much success .

There were many other actors like him, who got a chance to appear opposite illustrious heroines, unfortunately their effort did not make any impact on the cine loving public. Watching their miserable performance on the screen, no film maker came forward to sign them.  Out of sight is out of mind, it was matter of time when public as well as film industry forgot them.

‘Malhaar’, as the name suggests, is a musical film produced by the great singer Mukesh in 1951 . It had story by veteran actor SK Prem and its evergreen music was composed by Roshan. The movie had new comers Arjun and Shammi (Nargis Rabaadi). Arjun did get another chance in ‘Daku Ki Ladki’ (1954) to please the viewers with his emoting before the camera, but could not succeed and it was end of his career.

Rattan Chopra, the lucky boy was selected for films, among hundreds of aspirants. Mohan Kumar had suffered a huge set back when ‘Aman’ flopped. He  took the newcomer for ‘Mom Ki Gudia’ (1972) opposite Tanuja, with great hopes.  Unfortunately, the film failed to dispel the gloom and sank to the rock bottom. Acting was not his cup of tea, Rattan Chopra understood and wisely opted out of the race of stardom.

Director Amarnath introduced new comer Vijay Kumar in his 1954 offering ‘Alif Laila’ opposite Nimmi and Asha Mathur.  Sohan Kapila and Vijay Kumar had impressive physique, but had no clue about acting. The movie had lilting music by Shyam Sunder, which was his last contribution towards film industry. Helen for the first time got a chance to perform solo in the movie and for many decades she remained on top. But for Vijay Kumar it was his first & last chance.

Another non actor Premendra was introduced by old timer Vijay Bhatt in ‘Holi Aayee Re’ (1970), which was directed by his younger sibling Harsukh Bhatt.  It was pathetic to watch Premendra unsuccessfully trying to show case his imaginary ability in the field of acting .The movie flopped phenomenally and a huge investment made by Bhatt Brothers went up in a cloud of smoke.

There were some more like Pratibha Sinha, Archan Gupta, Jayant Gupta, Ashok Sharma,  Nusrat Kardar, Rajeev Kapoor, Manish Kumar, Navin Chandra, Aroop Kumar, Prashant, Shalini, Kaycee Mehra, Vikram, Shekhar Suman, Deepak Kumar, Ajay, Som Dutt and many more. Among them, some film names which I remember off hand are Deepak Kumar in ‘Aabroo’ (1968), ‘Ajay’ in ‘Wapas’ (1969), Som Dutt in ‘Mann Ka Meet’ (1968), Vikram in ‘Julie’ (1975), Rajeev Kapoor in ‘Raam Teri Ganga Maili (1985), Shekhar Suman in ‘Utsav’ (1984), Kaycee Mehra in ‘Chhabilee’ (1960) and Mem Didi (1961), Prashant in ‘Sehra’ (1963), Ashok Sharma in ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961), Ajit Chitnis in ‘Aaj Ki Baat’ (1955), Nusrat Kardar in ‘Dard’ (1947), Manish in ‘Saraswati Chandra’ (1968), Rajiv in ‘Nayi Umar Ki Nayi Fasal’ (1965), Aroop Kumar in ‘Bezubaan’ (1962) etc. There could be more such examples. Readers can give their comments.

According to what Leela Chitnis wrote in her autobiography, ‘Chanderi Duniyet’ (‘चंदेरी दुनियेत’), during the period 1952-53 she was in a very bad financial position. Her health had worsened due to a wrong operation and then a corrective surgery. Valuable time and all money was lost in this. To come out of this situation, she planned to produce a film launching Ajit. As the luck would have it, the film started in 1953, but took 2 years to complete. The rights were sold to a distribution company. They released the film first in Punjab, where it flopped miserably. Then it was not released anywhere at all and went into the cans forever. This was a great shock to Chitnis family.

The film had 8 songs. 2 songs are already discussed here. This is the 3rd song, sung by Talat Mehmood. Written by Raj Baldev Raj, it was composed by the ‘Gentleman Maestro’ – Snehal Bhatkar.

White full shirt, ironed white Pyjama, spectacles with big powerful lenses and the trademark white Gandhi Topi. He could easily be mistaken for a ‘Pandharpur Warkari‘ (a regular pilgrim to Pandharpur) or a member of a ‘Bhajani Mandali’ or simply a middle class ‘Marathi Manoos’. Such was the appearance of one of Hindi filmdom’s talented yet not so famous, music maestro VASUDEV GANGARAM BHATKAR or Snehal Bhatkar as we all love to know him.

In Hindi film music field, there were some talented composers like Ghulam Mohd, Mohd Shafi, Iqbal Qureshi, Daan Singh, C Arjun, Ramlal, Sardar Malik, Ajit Merchant, Jamaal Sen, Dattaram, Ganesh, Snehal Bhatkar etc., who could never reach the peaks of their careers. They really deserved this, but luck did not favour them. Big Banners never approached them and the losers were the lovers of music in India. They did not know, perhaps, how to sell their art. May be, they never wanted to enslave the music to gain name and fame, instead they preferred to settle for service to the music!

Bhatkar was one such composer. ‘Simple living and high thinking’ – never worked in this mayanagari, but he had no regrets. Till the end he was contented with whatever God gave him, whatever name and success he achieved. He was born into a family and grew in such atmosphere which was surrounded by traditional devotional music all around. In the lower middle class, the people had their entertainments in singing bhajans and doing keertans in temples en masse.

He was born on 17-7-1919. Vasudev G. Bhatkar knew at least 100 Bhajans by heart by the time he was in his 10th class. He was invited to sing in Ganesh Melas and other celebrations and soon became a well known name in the locality. Because of his singing and skills in playing harmonium and other instruments, he got a job in HMV in Bombay. Here he used to give accompaniment on harmonium to renowned classical singers. At the same time, taking cognizance of his singing skills, many Marathi bhavgeets and bhajans were recorded by HMV in those days. Some of them are popular in Maharashtra even today.

All the while, Bhatkar was looking for opportunity to compose in films. Sudhir Phadke, who too served in HMV and recorded some songs from 1943 to 1945, joined hands with Bhatkar and made a pair – Vasudev-Sudhir. They got a film of Baburao Painter ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’ in 1946 for music direction. The problem was due to his service in HMV, he could not openly work outside, hence he only gave his name as Vasudev. After this film the pair separated and Phadke went to give music to films like ‘Gokul’, ‘Aagey Badho’ etc. Due to financial constraints Bhatkar was unable to leave the job also.

In 1941, Bhatkar had come to know Kidar Sharma while recording songs for his film ‘Chitralekha’, which he was making for Ranjit Studios. Sharma had just come from Calcutta, to establish himself in Bombay. He had a knack of identifying talents. He gave chance to Bhatkar first to sing some songs with Leela Sawant in his film ‘Kaliyan’ (1944). After ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’, Kidar Sharma gave him his first break as independent composer in his ‘Neel Kamal’ in 1947. For this film, Bhatkar used the name  B Vasudev. Kidar Sharma had launched Raj Kapoor and Madhubala in adult roles as the lead pari in this film. It also launched Bhatkar, albeit in a pseudo-name. In the subsequent years Bhatkar used different names for different films-

  • ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948) – as Snehal
  • ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1948) – as VG Bhatkar (he sang 6 songs also)
  • ‘Thes’ (1949) – as Snehal
  • ‘Sati Ahilya’ (1949) – as VG Bhatkar
  • ‘Pagle’ (1950) – as VG Bhatkar

After completing ‘Thes’ and ‘Sati Ahilya’, Bhatkar resigned from HMV.

He and Kidar Sharma were very good friends. Kidar gave him ‘Neki Aur Badi’ in 1949. He started the work. Meanwhile, Kidar Sharma met Roshan Nagrath in some musical event. Sharma was terribly impressed with Roshan and wanted to give him a break in his film. At that point of time, Kidar had just started work on ‘Neki Aur Badi’. He had a heart to heart talk with Bhatkar and Bhatkar gladly left the film for Roshan. Thus Roshan got his break with this film. Roshan never forgot Bhatkar’s magnanimity in his life and always respected Bhatkar.

In return Kidar Sharma gave ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950) to Bhatkar.  As he was a free bird now, Bhatkar started using the name Snehal Bhatkar from this film onward. Snehal was the short form of Snehalata, his daughter. Snehal Bhatkar did many Marathi films and recorded many bhajans in Marathi, which are ever popular. He did 27 films in Hindi and 12 films in Marathi. Out of 27 Hindi films, 9 were made by Kidar Sharma.

The song which made Mubarak Begum and Bhatkar famous in India was “Kabhi Tanhayion Mein, Hamari Yaad Aayegi” from the film ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961). (This film was was originally named ‘Jawaan Muhabbat’). Actually this song was to be done by Lata Mangeshkar. Lata had already recorded two songs for this film. Due to her extremely busy schedule she was unable to do this song, so she suggested the name of Asha Bhosle. However, already upset over Lata’s refusal, Kidar Sharma opted for Mubarak Begum and the rest is history-as they say. She made a gold of this song with her special voice.

After 1960, the musical scene in India was undergoing drastic changes and there was no space for composers like Bhatkar, who used minimum orchestra and dwelt upon melody. His films came after long intervals. Even Kidar Sharma left him after ‘Fariyad’ (1964) (only to return in ‘Pehla Kadam’ in 1980). Finally Bhatkar did his last film ‘Sehme Huye Sitaare’ in 1994, which featured his son Ramesh Bhatkar-who was already a popular hero in Marathi film, stage and TV. This obscure film did nothing good to Bhatkar.

After retirement Bhatkar devoted his time for children’s welfare and his original love – bhajan mandali singing.

Snehal or Vasudev Gangaram Bhatkar, together with cousin Devji Bhatkar and Panchambuwa Pandurang Shivalkar, was the founder member of ‘Vishwambhar Prasadik Bhajan Mandal’ in Dadar. It is still in operation after 50 years, with new set of singers. Bhatkar was very kind hearted. Every year, during Ganapati festival he used to visit his ancestral village ‘Bhate’ in Ratnagiri district and participate in singing bhajans.

Lata, Talat and Mukesh were his favourite singers. Talat, though has not sung many songs for him, his song “Zindagi Kis Mod Pe Laayee Hamein” from ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ (1956) was very popular. When rehearsals for this song were being done, Bhatkar had used only tabla and sitar for the practice session. The producer who chanced upon this rehearsal was so much impressed with this that he insisted recording the song only with minimum instruments. So, this song has only tabla, Sitar and another instrument for accompaniment.

Though there were many melodious songs composed by Bhatkar like, Khusro’s “Lakhi Baabul More Kaahe Ko Deeni Bides” sung soulfully by Mukesh in ‘Suhag Raat’ (1948); “Ro’oge Pachhtaoge” by Mukesh and Rajkumari in ‘Thes’ (1949); Lata’s “Chanda Tumko Laaj Na Ayee” from ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951); Suman Kalyanpur’s “Haal e Dil Un Ko Sunaana Tha” from ‘Fariyaad’ (1964), except Kidar sharma no other big banner producer opted for Snehal Bhatkar. May be, his compositions were not so simple for common man to hum or sing, although they were quality songs.

Inspite of several melodious songs Bhatkar was never counted among the 1st line composers. Kidar Sharma also returned to him in 1980, but by that time Snehal Bhatkar was already on a descending track.

Snehal Bhatkar, a talented but not much applauded music director died peacefully on 29-5-2007 at his Dadar home.

Here is the song by Talat Mehmood from film Aaj ki baat-1955.

(My thanks to Shri MN Sardana ji for his post in ‘Voh Din Yaad Karo’ on Facebook, from which some information has been used herein.)

Song – Pyaar Ki Nazron Se Un Ko Dekhta Jaata Hai Dil (Aaj Ki Baat) (1955) Singer – Talat Mehmood, Lyrics – Raj Baldev Raj, MD – Snehal Bhatkar

Lyrics

aaaaaa aaaaaa
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaaa

pyaar ki nazron se un ko
dekhta jaata hai dil
pyaar ki nazron ki nazron se un ko
dekhta jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

kya hua mujhko
hai mere dil ki dhadkan tez tez
kya hua mujhko
hai mere dil ki dhadkan tez tez
thaamna mujhko ke seene se
uda jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

aaye hain wo zindagi
aaye hain wo zindagi
kadmon mein un ke daal de
kadmon mein un ke daal de
dil ko samjhaati hain nazren
mujhko samjhaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

ho gai shaayad mohabbat
ho gayi un se mujhe
ho gai shaayad mohabbat
ho gayi un se mujhe
jab khayaal aata hai un ka
khud behal jaata hai dil
baat un ke saamne kehne se
ghabraata hai dil

———-———————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

आsssss आsssss
आsss आssss आsssss
आsssss आsssss आssssss
आsss आsss आsss आsssss

प्यार की नज़रों से उनको
देखता जाता है दिल
प्यार की नज़रों से उनको
देखता जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

क्या हुआ मुझको
है मेरे दिल की धड़कन तेज़ तेज़
क्या हुआ मुझको
है मेरे दिल की धड़कन तेज़ तेज़
थामना मुझको के सीने से
उड़ा जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

आए हैं वो ज़िंदगी
आए हैं वो ज़िंदगी
कदमों में उनके डाल दे
कदमों में उनके डाल दे
दिल को समझाती हैं नज़रें
मुझको समझाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल

हो गई शायद मोहब्बत
हो गई उनसे मुझे
हो गई शायद मोहब्बत
हो गई उनसे मुझे
जब खयाल आता है उनका
खुद बहल जाता है दिल
बात उनके सामने कहने से
घबराता है दिल


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3928 Post No. : 14999 Movie Count :

4106

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Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 9
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The other day, I read one quote, ‘My grand kids believe, I am the oldest thing in the world. And after spending 2 to 3 hours with them, I believe it too !”

I liked it very much and I immediately copy-pasted it in several WA groups where I am a member-including a group of Atulites.

For most people, after a certain age and after retirement, spending time is a big problem. Especially for those, who have no hobby, reading habits or a friend circle of same age group. This was never a problem for me, not because of anything written above. I retired in 1998, i.e. about 21 years ago. After doing a roaring consultancy for 5 years, I got fed up and left everything completely.

For next few years, I traveled quite a lot, with my wife. After that I settled to a steady, disciplined life. I revived my old love – love of old films and music. After a gap of almost 50 years, I remembered my diaries, which I had written after seeing every film till about 1960 or so. I opened those boxes and to my horror found that due to humidity in Bombay, white ants had attacked the diaries. I could, however, salvage majority of them – though in torn and faded conditions. . .  but still worth their weight in gold !

By then, I had crossed 70 years of age. I learned operating the computer and smart phones etc., from my grand children and started surfing. One day I struck gold. I came across THIS BLOG. I was impressed with the Blog and enjoyed old songs whenever posted on it. After about 2 years of only commenting and sharing information on the Blog, Atul ji motivated me to write a post here. My first post was the song “Surya Wahi Chandra Wahi“, from the film ‘Savitri’ (1937) and it came up on 1st October 2012. The rest is history, as they say.

This Blog changed my life totally. It provided a purpose of life to me. Through posting articles here, I reinforced my belief that “Sharing knowledge increases your knowledge”. Along with the Blog I too grew up and earned a name for myself in the social media. Like the Blog, I too celebrated my Milestones of 100, 500, and 700 articles. . . –  and the ride continues. . . 🙂

This Blog has given me new friends. Normally, it is difficult to cultivate new friends in old age, but contrary to this, I got very good friends, though none from my age group. Still, they accepted me heartily. Thank you Atulites. The Blog occupies a vital position in our lives now. Every Blog event is shared and celebrated. In this journey, few friends were left behind and some new ones came in, but the Band Wagon marches on… on… on and on…

The Blog is approaching one of the most important Milestones in recent times – achieving a record of 15000 songs, posted with full and correct lyrics, videos as well as lot of information woven around the songs, by Atul ji and his team of contributors. I feel proud that even my ‘Two Cents’ are there in this milestone. This Blog is unique, ATUL ji is an excellent leader and all contributors to posts, lyrics, comments, videos etc deserve CONGRATULATIONS !

True to my reputation, I have selected a song from an old film – in fact a film belonging to the first 5 years of talkie era – ‘Divine Sacrifice’ aka ‘Kimti Kurbani’ from 1935. The song, written by an unknown lyricist, is sung by Rajkumari Dubey and the music is given by Master Motilal Nayak.

During the early phase of the talkie films, most music directors came with either stage or classical background. The film people never crossed borders initially – at least for the first few years. Those who worked in Bombay remained here and those who worked in Calcutta stayed put there only. Motilal Nayak was one such MD, who gave music only to films made in Calcutta.

Calcutta’s New Theatres was like a family. It ran on systems. It became a way of life for people working in it. Since its establishment in 1930, competition increased consistently, in the number of film producing companies in Calcutta. By 1938, there were many Production houses in Calcutta alone. Some of them were- Arora Film Co., Shri Bharat Laxmi Pictures, Chitramandir, RBS Productions, Dev-Dutt Films, East India Film Co., Indu Movietone, Kali Films, Kamala Talkies, Madan Theatres, New Popular Pictures, Moti Mahal Theatres, Murli Pictures, Quality Pictures, Radha Film Co., Sonoray Picture Syndicate, Sunrise Film Co., M & SFD Company, and Tollywood Studio. (Interesting point here – Bombay film industry came to be known as Bollywood decades after this Calcutta studio – Tollywood – which continues till today for Bangla film industry). Only few of these were regular film production houses with own facilities. Most others were formed to produce occasional films, using facilities at the regular production studios.

Motilal Nayak gave music to only handful films – ‘Aankh Ka Tara’ – (1932, Madan Theatres), ‘Kanya Vikray’ – (1934, Pioneer Films), ‘Divine Sacrifice’ – (1935, M&SD Films), ‘Asmat Ka Moti’ – (1935, Pioneer), Noor E Wahadat’ – (1936, East India Film Co), ‘Bandit Of The Air’ – (1936, Modern India Talkies; this was also the debut and the only film where KN Singh was the hero). All these films were made at Calcutta only.

The cast of ‘Divine Sacrifice’ was Khalil, Miss Rose, Laxmi, Abbas Ali, Sheela, Amir Ali, Agha Jaani, Rajkumari etc.

Master Khalil Ahmed (variously mentioned as Khalil, Master Khalil, and Khalil Ahmed) was the first ever star of the silent era as well as talkie films from 1920 to 1940s. Born in 1903, he became a hero in Kohinoor’s ‘Gul E Bakavali’ (1924), opposite Zubeida. He was the first handsome and macho hero of those times. He acted with all top heroines of his time. Some of his 30 silent films are, ‘Kaala Naag’, ‘Kulin Kanta’, ‘Lanka Ni Laadi’, ‘Cinema Queen’ etc.

He featured in his first talkie film, ‘Draupadi’ (1931), made by Imperial, opposite Ermeline. Then came ‘Daulat Ka Nasha’ (1931), ‘Bharati Mata’ (1932), ‘Niti Vijay’ (1932), ‘Do Rangi Duniya’ (1933) and ‘Saubhagya Sundari’ (1933). In 1934 Khalil went to Calcutta on the invitation of East India Films. His first film in Calcutta was ‘Kismet Ki Kasauti’ (1934). Then he joined Tollywood Studio (Madon Theatres). Here his first film was ‘Gaibi Gola’ (1935), in which Baby Noorjehan made her debut as a child star.

He was in great demand in Bombay also, so Khalil started doing films in Calcutta and Bombay, by frequently travelling between the two cities. This caused a lot of stress on him, but he always kept his commitments. During this period, he also got married and got children. He settled in Calcutta and traveled often to Bombay to do films there.

Khalil did different roles, including Hindu Gods. He never changed his name. In those days very few Muslim actors kept their real names. Incidentally, during his peak time, there were two more artists named Khalil. One was Khalil Aftab, who was a lyricist and he acted in film ‘Dard E Dil’ (1934) and ‘The Mill’ (1934). This latter film was banned and was released later in 1936 as ‘Ghareeb Parwar’. The other actor was Khalil Khan, who had acted in film ‘Deepak Mahal’ (1940). In all, Khalil acted in 27 talkie films. He died quite young, on 28-11-1941, at Calcutta. Too much travelling and stress must have taken its toll on him. He was only 38 year old. He left behind one wife with 5 children.

Khalil did 13 films in Calcutta – ‘Kismet Ki Kasauti (1934), ‘Gaibi Gola’ (1935), ‘Miss Manorama’ (1935), ‘Jawaani Ka Nasha’ (1935), ‘Divine Sacrifice’ (1935), ‘Raj Dulari (1936), ‘Bulbul e Iran’ (1936), ‘Parivartan’ (1936), ‘Adarsh Mahila’ (1937), ‘Aflatoon’ (1937), ‘Karmaveer’ (1938), ‘Abla Ki Shakti’ (1941) and ‘Merchant Of Venice’ (1941).

In Bombay, he did 14 films – ‘Draupadi’ (1931), Daulat Ka Nash’ (1931), ‘Bharati Mata’ (1932), ‘Niti Vijay’ (1932), ‘Do Rangi Duniya’ (1933), ‘Saubhagya Sundari’ (1933), ‘Typist Girl’ (1935), ‘Shaitan Ka Paash’ (1936), ‘Khudai Khidmatgaar’ (1937), ‘Kiski Pyaari’ (1937), ‘Hamara Desh’ (1940), ‘Pyaar’ (1940), ‘Waayda’ (1940) and ‘Taj Mahal’ (1941).

Khalil acted with most of the leading heroines of his time like, Noorjehan (Sr), Jilloo (Zulekha Ibrahim – she was known by Jilloo Bai in her later career), Kajjan (6 films), Mushtari (3 films; she died too young, in her teens only), Miss Rose (2 films), Violet Cooper (2 films), Radha Rani, Ram Pyari, Begum Akhtar (she was then known as Akhtari Faizabadi), Sulochana, Ameena, Leela Desai, Indurani, Gulab, Ermeline and Sheela etc. Khalil was very good natured and a popular actor among his co stars and producers.

A Muslim by birth, he performed are variety of roles in films. His initial acting phase included roles of Shri Krishna and Shri Ram. Disenchanted by the communal riots during those times, he gave a speech in the Indian Motion Picture Congress, on 4th May 1939. Baburao Patel’s Film India published this extract from his speech-

“I have played Hindu Gods in films. I worked under Hindu producers only. I am disturbed by these riots. I am popular among Hindus and Muslims. We are the devotees of Art and Art has no religion.”

Indian Film Industry is perhaps the only industry which is truly a secular one, since its inception. Master Khalil Ahmed was an example of that.

The film was directed by BN Rao. His original name was Balkrishna Narayanan Nair. He was born in 1909 at Tellicherry in Kerala. His family shifted to Bombay because his father got a job in Bombay. By that time it was schooling age for Rao. One kind neighbor – a Marathi individual – helped him to get admission in a nearby school. While filling up the form the Marathi friend wrote his name as BN Rao. For this friend, every south Indian name must end with Rao only! And this name stuck to him till the end.

BN Rao directed only 2 Hindi films – ‘Veer Kumari’ and ‘Divine Sacrifice’ both in 1935. Later he became a very famous and successful Tamil and Telugu director, especially with Gemini Studios and SS Vasan. His best film was ‘Bal Nagamma’ (1942) – which he only completed, when the original director Pullayya pulled out halfway. However, the credits show Pullayya’s name as director. Hindi film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954) was a remake of this film. He had also written the screenplay of film ‘Chandralekha’ (1948). ‘Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema’ by Rajadhyaksha says this about BN Rao,

B.N.Rao – (b. 1909) Tamil director and actor born in Tellicherry, Kerala. Also worked in Hindi and in Telugu. Started acting at Imperial (1926); assisted R.S. Choudhury and the cameramen Adi and Rustom Irani. Went to East India Co. (1933) and later to Madan in Calcutta, where he débuted as director with Hindi films. In 1937, moved to the Central Studios in Coimbatore; then to Gemini in Madras (1940) where he directed what is taken to be the studio’s début feature, ‘Madanakamarajan’. Established himself as a successful director in the late 40s; then left to work for Shaws Malay Film Prod. (1953-6) making films starring P Ramlee, and for Cathay Keris Film Studio (1957-64) in Singapore, directing e.g. Maria Menado, Nordin Ahmad and Latifah Omar. Returned to India for one more feature and retired in Madras.

Today’s song is the only song of this film available. With this song, the film makes its debut on the Blog. Remember, this is a song almost 85 year old.

Once again, I CONGRATULATE Atul ji, Sudhir ji and all others for reaching the milestone of 15000 songs ! Jai Ho !!

Song – Kyon Na Looten Mazey Wasl e Yaar Ke (Divine Sacrifice) (1935) Singer – Rajkumari, Lyrics – Unattributed, MD – Master Motilal Nayak

Lyrics

kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaar ke

haan
kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaar ke
beete jaate hain ye din bahaar ke
haan
beete jaate hain ye din bahaar ke

ke hazaaron ki tabiyat machal jaayegi
dil laakhon ke ?? chheen kar jaayegi
jab wo niklegi seena ubhaar ke
haan
jab wo niklegi seena ubhaar ke
haan
jab wo niklegi seena ubhaar ke
haan
jab wo niklegi seena ubhaar ke
haan
kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaar ke

paan kha kar labon ko bachaane lagey
haan
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaaaaaa
aaaa aaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa
paan kha kar labon ko bachaane lagey
wo to hans hans ke naaz dikhaane lagey
jis mein gul ?? ?? anaar ke
haan
jis mein gul ?? ?? anaar ke
kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaar ke
haan
kyon na looten mazey wasl e . . .

teri aankhon ne to jaani ghazab kar diya
baaton baaton mein mera dil kyon le liya
khoob maari kataari sambhaar ke
haan
khoob maari kataari sambhaar ke
kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaar ke
haan
kyon na looten mazey wasl e yaa . . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
———————————————————-

क्यों ना लूटें मज़े वस्ल ए यार के
हाँ
क्यों ना लूटें मज़े वस्ल ए यार के
बीते जाते हैं ये दिन बहार के
हाँ
बीते जाते हैं ये दिन बहार के

के हजारों के तबीयत मचल जाएगी
दिल लाखों के ?? छीन कर जाएगी
जब वो निकलेगी सीना उभार के
हाँ
जब वो निकलेगी सीना उभार के
हाँ
जब वो निकलेगी सीना उभार के
हाँ
जब वो निकलेगी सीना उभार के
हाँ
क्यों ना लूटें मज़े वस्ल ए यार के

पान खा कर लबों को बचाने लगे
हाँ
आsss आssss आsssssss
आssss आssss आssssssssss आsssssss
पान खा कर लबों को बचाने लगे
वो तो हस हस के नाज़ दिखाने लगे
जिस में गुल ?? ?? अनार के
हाँ
जिस में गुल ?? ?? अनार के
क्यों ना लूटें मज़े वस्ल ए ॰ ॰ ॰

तेरी आँखों ने तो जानी ग़ज़ब कर दिया
बातों बातों में मेरा दिल क्यों ले लिया
खूब मारी कटारी संभार के
हाँ
खूब मारी कटारी संभार के
हाँ
क्यों ना लूटें मज़े वस्ल ए या॰ ॰ ॰


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3927 Post No. : 14996

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Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 6
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Carl Sagan, in his book, ‘Pale Blue Dot’ talks about the picture taken by Voyager I before it left the solar system. Planet Earth, the only home we have known so far appears less than a fraction of a pixel in the picture. It’s on this speck of dust like object in the vast cosmos lived every human, plant and animal we ever know and every civilization.

On this planet the greatest men in a wide variety of fields have left behind their legacies both good and bad. Their lives however great or condemnable have been spent here.  In the vastness of time and space, a few years spent by great men may mean nothing. However, the legacy left behind by such men are recognized and appreciated for generations.

Theatre and entertainment arenas have also seen many a great men and women contribute their art and expertise to mankind. Quite a few are well known and many others are often not credited to the extent to which they should be.

Narrowing down to a movie and further restricting ourselves to Hindi film and non-film songs, the essence of this blog, we are now at the doorsteps of 15 thousand representations.

By these 15k representations, we all have tried to contribute our little efforts in bringing to the fore, the works of film artists – popular, less known and unknown. Amongst the main contributors, the nearly impossible tasks are taken up more experienced and knowledgeable such as Arunkumar ji, Sudhir ji, Sadanand ji etc.  The painstaking efforts in collecting accurate information from various sources and contacts and posting in a concise manner is definitely not an easy task.

Then, there are specialists such as Nalini ji for reminding us of the artist’s anniversaries and Prakash ji for identifying lesser known actors on the screen. Raja ji, whose marathon posts never bore us and we have Avinash ji who pours his heart out in the posts. We have Bharat ji with his expertise and first-hand experience.

There have many others who were more contended with sending only lyrics and a few who keep giving home-works to others. 🙂 A few are more than happy to suggest corrections to the posts and lyrics etc. in the comments section. Then, there are also contributors who vanish for a while and re-appear for special occasions (pun about self intended). 🙂

And, finally we have Atul ji, the fulcrum of our activities and the force that binds us together. Atul ji marches along from one milestone to another. And when he reaches the next milestone, we are all automatically teleported there. 🙂

I never planned for any special song for this occasion. (That again, the leaders will have a plan). But seeing that a great gem of an even greater singer is yet to be posted, I decided to go for his solo.

The singer is Talat Mahmood, of whom quite a lot has already been written on the blog.

My father, an avid fan Talat saab often says that his voice is for royal people. By royal, he means to say people with special taste and I can’t agree with him more. Talat Saab’s melancholic songs sung in blue mood are a class apart, the likes of which one will never get to hear from any other singer.

There are several such songs of Talat Saab which one can hear multiple times and can only admire the grace and dignity in his voice for songs pertaining to even dejection.

The list seems to be endless, but it’s a fact that he sang quite fewer songs compared to his other well-known contemporaries. However, Talat Saab’s voice will always be the triumph of quality over quantity.

The present song which I had not heard in the recent past is also amongst my many favourites of Talat Mahmood. There are stars and the moon in the song in case people are wondering what Carl Sagan had to do with this song in the first place. 🙂 (Kya karein, some starting problems in writing this post)

I pray for the continued longevity on the blog, active participation of all the contributors and readers as well.

Hearty Congratulations to one and all on this great achievement.

Song – Aao Baadal Chain Se Royen (Aawaara Ladki) (1967) Singer – Talat Mehmood, Lyrics – Rajnikant, MD – Dhaniram

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

baa..aadal aa..aaawo

baadal aawo

aawo baadal aawo. . .

aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen
jalti dhoop
jalti dhoop
jalti dhoop mein main hoon akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

khush rahen
khush rahen. . .
khush rahen ye duniya waale
khush rahen ye duniya waale
khatm hua mera mela
khatm hua mera mela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

armaan the dil mein mere kitne
chanda ke
haaye chanda ke saathi taare jitne
haaye chanda ke saathi taare jitne
dooba dil armaan bhi doobe
dooba dil armaan bhi doobe
toofaan ka dekha rela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

din the chaar jo beet gaye mere
din the chaar jo beet gaye mere
honge dukh ke ab derey
honge dukh ke ab derey
darr nahin par hanse bhi kaise
darr nahin par hanse bhi kaise
gham se ab tak khela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

बा॰॰दल आ॰॰आवो

बादल आवो

आवो बादल आवो॰ ॰ ॰

आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
जलती धूप
जलती धूप
जलती धूप में मैं हूँ अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

खुश रहें
खुश रहें॰ ॰ ॰
खुश रहें ये दुनिया वाले
खुश रहें ये दुनिया वाले
खत्म हुआ मेरा मेला
खत्म हुआ मेरा मेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

अरमान थे दिल में मेरे कितने
चंदा के
हाए चंदा के साथी तारे जितने
हाए चंदा के साथी तारे जितने
डूबा दिल अरमान भी डूबे
डूबा दिल अरमान भी डूबे
तूफाँ का देखा रेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

दिन थे चार जो बीत गए मेरे
दिन थे चार जो बीत गए मेरे
होंगे दुख के अब डेरे
होंगे दुख के अब डेरे
डर नहीं पर हँसे भी कैसे
डर नहीं पर हँसे भी कैसे
ग़म से अब तक खेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3919 Post No. : 14982

 

Today’s song is from film ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944).

Hindi film makers seem to have an attraction for Mughal Empire. Films were made on life events of right from Babar to Bahadurshah Zafar- the first to the last Mughal kings. I do not know what the film makers found so magnetic in their lives. Not only Mughal kings, but also the Mongol king Changez khan, Nadir Shah and generals like Behram Khan also became the subject matters of films. May be the producers found lot of scope to show big palaces, big armies, wars, dances and songs, beautiful women etc. in such films which attracted the audience.

More than any other Mughal king, it is Babar, who has been in public discussion in India , since about 20-30 years, for well known reasons for which we are not concerned here. Babar was born as Zaheeruddin Mohammed, on 14-2-1483 in Fergana valley in what is known today as Uzbekistan. He was a direct descendant of Taimurlane. At the age of 12 years he ascended his father’s thrown and faced rebellion. Next few years were spent on fighting to save his kingdom. Having lost, and won and again lost the valley of Fergana and Samarkand three times, Babar decided to go to India.

He marched with his army towards India, which was ruled by Ibrahim Khan Lodhi that time. Babar’s army was tired and tried rebellion till they reached India. In the battle of Panipat, he defeated Lodhi and became the Emperor of India. Later he fought with several Rajput kings and won also. Babar married several times and had several children too. His 3 sons were main and Humayun was his dearest son. Babar established the Mughal Empire in 1526 at Delhi. It was Humayun, who succeeded Babar when he died on 26-12-1530.

‘Shahenshah Babar’ is a depiction of his life from childhood to death, but most part of the film is about the love affair and sickness of Humayun. After his death Babar was first buried in Agra, but later his remains were buried again in Kabul. Babar is considered a national hero in Uzbekistan and Kergystan. In India Babar is not known for such good things.

This film was made by Ranjit Movietone, calling it a historical film. It was directed by Wazahat Mirza Changezi (20-4-1908 to 4-8-1990). He directed 5 films, namely, ‘Swaminath’ (1942), ‘Jawaani’ (1942), ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944), ‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945) and ‘Nishaana’ (1950). He wrote lyrics in films like ‘Watan’ (1938), ‘Hum Tum Aur Woh’ (1938), ‘Bahen’ (1941), ‘Roti’ (1942) and ‘Jawaani’ (1942). Later he became famous as a screenplay and dialogue writer. Some of his famous films are ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Shikast’ (1953), ‘Mother India’ (1957), ‘Yahudi’ (1958). ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960), ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961), ‘Leader’ (1964), ‘Palki’ (1967) etc.

The music director was Khemchand Prakash and lyricists were Pt. Indra, Munshi Aziz and Munshi Shums. Out of the 9 songs, today’s song is 5th song to be discussed here. The cast of the film was Khurshid, Sheikh Mukhtar, Sushil Kumar, Yakub, Majid, Anwari, Agha and others.

Religious, mythological or historical stories have some characters who are with extra ordinary strength or even Rakshasas. Such characters maintained the equilibrium of entertainment in those films and made them more interesting with their actions. In the Hindi film industry, some actors fitted this requirement. Some of them were BM Vyas, Ramayan Tiwari, Sheikh Mukhtar, Dara Singh, Dev kumar etc. Sheikh Mukhtar fitted into these roles perfectly, for example as ‘Nadir Shah’ in film ‘Nadir Shah’ (1968), as Changez Khan in film ‘Changez Khan’ (1957), or as Sher Afghan in film ‘Noor Jehan’ (1967). In social films, roles of police officers and in action/stunt films as dacoit, drunkard, gambler etc. In some of the films directors used to make him do unimaginable and unbelievable acts like in film ‘Roti’ (1942), he brings down an aircraft with his spear throw ! As a police officer, he would hold 5-6 criminals by their scruff in his extra large hands or run barefoot after a speeding jeep and stop it !

His real name was Mukhtar Ahmed Siddiqi. He was from old Delhi. His father was a senior police officer. He was Bollywood`s first ‘hunk’ – one who would have put today`s WWF hulks to shame. Exceptionally tall and frighteningly hefty, he was endowed with an immense physique. His face was a roadmap of crisscrossing muscles. A sharp jaw line added to the dimensions of his rock-hard face. Hardly `star` material compared to the Hrithiks and Salmans of today. Yet, this rugged man was once a hero.

Those were the days when a limp-wristed hero, who could not even unlock the mysteries of the lush curls of his beloved, was universally adored in cinema halls. In such times, Sheikh Mukhtar adorned the garb of a hero. This feat was achieved by movie monarch Mehboob Khan. In ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (aka ‘The Only Way’), a film directed by Mehboob Sb for Sagar Movietone way back in 1939, Sheikh Mukhtar was one of the three heroes. The other two were Arun Ahuja (matinee idol Govinda`s father) and a certain Harish (who later directed films such as ‘Burma Road’, he was Tara Harish). Though billed as male lead, Sheikh Mukhtar never fitted into the `romantic` mold. And why should he? He portrayed an uncouth lover, almost a pre-Neanderthal man, in Mehboob Khan`s ‘Roti’ with sensuous Sitara Devi as his beloved. In that film, Sheikh would bring down an aircraft with the mere strike of his spear. When thirsty, he would empty an entire bucket down his throat in one go. Soppy dialogues oozing with maudlin emotions such as love and romance, did not come forth from the super-hunk.

In Wadia`s ‘Krishnabhakt Bodana’ (1944), Sheikh Mukhtar was the Lord`s devotee. In ‘Bahen’ (1941), he portrayed the role of Nalini Jaywant’s brother. His imposing personality fitted well into period films which dabbled in history. He played the role of Shahenshah Babar; went on to become Chengez Khan and then donned the mantle of Sher Afghan in ‘Noor Jehan’, a film which he produced. He was often teamed with Begum Para, the bewitching beauty of that era. The pair hit it off exceedingly well on the screen. For countless cinema aficionados, the Sheikh Mukhtar-Begum Para pair was a classic case of the beauty and the beast. With pint-sized Mukri, Sheikh Mukhtar had a successful celluloid partnership. Sheikh Mukhtar produced a string of Hindi films, such as ‘Dada’, ‘Dara’, ‘Ustad Pedro’, ‘Toote Taare’, ‘Mr. Lambu’, ‘Annadaata’, ‘Mangu’ (with another beauty, Nigar Sultan), ‘Do Ustaad’, and ‘Noor Jehan’, among others.

He wove into his films a variety of songs, from “Bahaaron Ke Dole Mein Aayi Hai Jawaani”, a romantic number from ‘Annadaata’, to naughty ditties, such as “Dil Ka Ye Injan Seetiyaan Maare” from ‘Ustaad Pedro’, and “Namaste, Doctor Baaro, Hum Ko Bhi Ek Injection Maaro”. Sheikh Mukhtar`s pair of shoes, of twelve number size, (in ‘Do Ustaad’), summed up his big time existence. His role in this film was widely appreciated. Sheikh Mukhtar showcased his acting talents in the concluding scene of ‘Do Ustaad’ when he holds his long-lost brother and son to his bosom.

Sheikh Mukhtar invested all his hard-earned money on ‘Noor Jehan’, his dream project. However, the period film bombed miserably at the box office. And with the film collapsed this mighty man. Debts began to pile up. Income Tax arrears kept multiplying in geometrical progression. Unable to resolve this crisis, Sheikh Mukhtar, who was adored in Bollywood for his integrity and for his firmness to keep vices of every variety at bay, fled to Pakistan with the alacrity of a small-time house burglar. He took with him the prints of his films. But, sadly, the Pakistan film industry offered him no succor. He kept running from pillar to post, visiting government offices with a plea that he be allowed to release his films.

He was not at all welcomed by Pak film industry. As it is Indian films were already banned there. When all efforts failed, he met General Zia ul Haq. He was a great fan of Sohrab Modi. When he learnt that Sohrab Modi was acting in this film, he allowed the film’s release. However, the Pak film industry went to Supreme court against this order. The case dragged on and finally on 11th may 1980 he won the case. While hee was returning to Lahore with his son Sheikh Moinuddin, Mukhtar got a severe heart attack in the flight. He was immediately taken home and doctor was called. Strangely no doctor came to help him. Finally by the time he was taken to hospital, he died on the way.

‘Noor Jehan’, which was released in Pakistan after Sheikh Mukhtar died, on 23rd may 1980, kept the box office registers ringing with cash. In his 40 years’ career he acted in 70 films and under the banner of his own Omar Khayyam Films, he produced 8 films. (Some information from articles by Shirish Kanekar and Jawed Hamid is used here with thanks).

Singer actress Khurshid played the heroine Hameeda’s role and sang good songs too. Here is an edited interview of Khursheed, taken in 1992,by Pakistani journalist, Navid Rasheed (Thanks to Cineplot)..

Khursheed Bano was born as Irshad Begum in Lahore, on 14th April 1914. As a child she resided in the Bhatti Gate area next to Allama Iqbal’s house. The two families were pretty close. Khursheed was a child then. There was no ambition of joining the showbiz bandwagon then and it was by chance that led her to this arena.

Khursheed was very still young when she became an actress in the early 30’s. The era of the silent movies had already ended with the release of ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931 and the Indian film industry was going through a revolution. What set her apart from other heroines were her attractive face and certain flamboyance owing to which she made her presence felt. And then she was very good actress who could be melodramatic and happy-go-lucky with equal ease.

Each star then was required to playback for themselves and Khursheed was lucky to have a good voice. Hence started the brilliant era of some timeless classical and exemplary numbers like “Panchhi Baawraa Chaand Se Preet Lagaaye”.

The graceful and decent actress was luckier to secure some of the best films including ‘Sitaara’, ‘Shaadi’, ‘Musafir’, ‘Pardesi’, ‘Bhagat Surdas’, ‘Dekha Jayega’, ‘Shehanshah Babar’ and ‘Tansen’. ‘Pardesi’ had a very famous soundtrack comprising of memorable numbers by the late actress. In ‘Tansen’ she played the protagonist Tani with Kundan Lal Saigal as Tansen. Together they made indelible performances and the role took her to great heights. She even transcended Saigal with her strong performances and pretty looks and her fans started calling her Tani after that. Her leading men in those days apart from Saigal were Motilal, Ishwar Lal, Nazeer and Sadiq Ali. She made a successful pair with Motilal the most. Her female contemporaries included actresses of caliber like Kanan Bala, Devika Rani, Leela Chitnis, Suraiya, Swaranlata and Noor Jehan. The last three were her juniors.

Khursheed said that there was no such thing as rivalry in those days and actresses worked in close coordination. Abusing, backbiting or gossiping was not amongst their traits. Even the male stars with whom she worked treated her with great respect and there were no scandals.

Though she was an accomplished singer, acting remained her forte and first love. “Singing was a requirement to be a heroine in those days”, she said, “and even heroines with not too good voices were forced to sing if they were to act. But the composers were so good that they managed to get the best out of them then. Each song was recorded after several rehearsals. But I was an actress first and singing was just to complement that.”

Khursheed was not too happy with the way films shaped up in the years to come. So much so that she never wanted to see films anymore. In the interview she expressed her displeasure, “In spite of the resources and much higher budget, there is not a single film maker in the entire sub continent who could make a film even half as good as the films made in my era. Ours were simple films but treated well and had strong content. Plus the hard work and honesty of each unit member reflected in the entire film. This thing is missing now. A film is not only about technique, rather the issue, sensitivity and sincere dedication too.

Following partition in 1947, Khursheed opted to move to Pakistan. She worked in two Pakistani films too – ‘Mandi’ and ‘Fankaar’. But then she decided to quit and tied the knot with a Karachi – based businessman Yousaf Bhai Mian. They had one daughter who lived in the US when the interview was conducted. She then concentrated on her marriage alone and emerged equally successful on the home front as much as she was in films. She was happy that she quit films before their standards declined .

Khursheed died on 18-4-2001 at Lahore.

Khursheed Bano sang about 170 songs in about 40 films in India. Her life and career would have been like any other actor/singer, but for the controversy of her initiation into films as ‘SHEHLA’ ( HFGK writes this name as SHAILA ) at Calcutta between 1931 and 1935. It was finally and conclusively proved by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji, that Khurshid and Shehla were different and two separate individuals.

The story of film Shahenshah Babar,

The film starts with the march of Babar’s army to India in 1526, with flashbacks of his childhood and activities as an young man. Defeating Ibrahim Khan Lodhi in the battle of Panipat, Babar becomes Emperor of India.

One of his knights Sardar Sheikh has a daughter Hameeda. She and Babar’s son Humayun fall in love and meet often. When Babar comes to know this, he takes a promise from Humayun that he will forget Hameeda. Humayun promises and leaves Hameeda. Heart broken Hameeda is taken by her father to their native place .

Humayun falls ill and is on death bed. To save his life Babar prays to God that he saves Humayun and instead give death to Babar. In addition, he himself goes and brings back Hameeda to Humayun. In few months Humayun gets well, but Babar dies.

I distinctly remember, when I was studying in 5th or 6th standard, we had a lesson “The Power of Prayer” and in this lesson Babar and Humayun’s story was told, how Babar sacrifices his life for son’s life by praying to God. The film too has the same theme. It seems this story is there in ‘Humayun-Nama’ written by Gulbadan Begum, half sister of Humayun. I have not seen this film.

Today’s song is a duet of Zohrabai and Munshi Aziz. The song is written by Pt. Indra.

(Some information has been used, with thanks, from book ‘Forgotten movies on Muslim Culture 1933-1947’, by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji.)

Song – Hamen Bhool Mat Jaiyo Raja Ji  (Shahenshah Babar) (1944) Singer – Zohrabai, Munshi Aziz, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

ho raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
o raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
ulajh mat jaee
ulajh mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
ho raja ji
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
paagal na ban jaiyo
ho paagal na ban jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dil to rahega paas tumhaare
dil to rahega paas tumhaare
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
o rani ji
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
ho raja ji
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
machal mat jaiyo
haaye machal mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo o rani ji
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

हो राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस

राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस
उलझ मत जइ
उलझ मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
हो राजा जी
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
पागल ना बन जइयो
हो पागल ना बन जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
ओ रानी जी
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
हो राजा जी
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
मचल मत जइयो
हाए मचल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो ओ रानी जी
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3909 Post No. : 14967

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Blog Ten Year Challenge (2009-2019)-Song number 25
—————————————————-

This is my First song post for ‘The 10 year Challenge’ series. Today, 10 years ago, on this day, 6 songs were posted. They were 1 song each for films ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954), ‘Marine Drive’ (1955), ‘Naag Devta’ (1962), ‘Bees Saal Baad’ (1962), ‘Prince’ (1969) and ‘Lootmaar’ (1980).

From the day it started, I was keen on participating, but everyday that I checked I found films either belonging to the 60s to 80s or films which were already Yippeee’d. I became helpless. Not that I can not or don’t want to write on songs of films of 70s and beyond, but they are not of my liking. Further I like to write only on songs or films, where I have something substantial to offer to our readers.

Finally, I found one film from 1st April 2009, which had some scope for me. The song is from film ‘Bahut Din Huye’. First, out of the 17 songs only 3 songs are posted on the blog and hence lot of choice to choose a song from remaining 14 songs, and secondly, the background of the film, the stars, the producer/director, the company etc were matters where I could elaborate to my will. So, I opted for this film’s song today.

The film is from the southern giant – Gemini Pictures. The film title sounds almost like a translation of ‘Once upon a time…’. It is a very apt title too, because the film is based on a folk tale of south. I like such films made in south and also their mythological films. When I see these films, the costumes of all the actors as well as their palaces etc remind me of similar pictures that used to appear in Chandamama magazines.

Chandamama (Chandoba in Marathi) magazines vied with my childhood craze of seeing films and reading books. Like many of my age group, our childhood had an important segment covered by Chandamama (in 13 Languages, including English and Sanskrit) readings. I strongly believe that  either the south film actors copied costumes from Chandamama pictures or the vice versa, but they resembled each others, for sure !

As expected, ‘Bahut Din Huye’ was a remake of Gemini’s own block buster ‘Bala Nagamma’ from 1942. Gemini Studios was the best known Madras studio in the 1940s for redefining the concept of mass entertainment with ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), the first Madras film to break successfully into the Hindi cinema circuit. SS Vasan started Gemini as a distribution agency, the Gemini Pictures Circuit, distributing and partly financing films by K Subramanyam’s Motion Picture Producers Combine. When the Combine went bankrupt, Vasan bought the studio in 1939 at public auction for a mere Rs 86,427-11 (annas)-9 (paise) (according to Randor Guy). The studio’s début feature was probably Balkrishna Narayan Rao’s ‘Madanakamarajan’ (1941), but it only took off when cameraman-scenarist K Ramnoth joined it along with his Vauhini partner, art-director AK Sekhar. This team made most of Gemini’s early features: ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943), ‘Kannamma En Kadhali’ (1945) and ‘Miss Malini’ (1947) before the ‘Chandralekha’ blitz catapulted it on to the national stage.

In the early days, the most important event in the studio was Uday Shankar’s dance extravaganza ‘Kalpana’ (released 1948) which also provided training for most of Gemini’s technicians as well as providing the model for an Orientalist dance idiom later associated with influential Tamil choreographers like Hiralal and Chopra Master. A few minor hits followed ‘Chandralekha’ before the studio’s second major onslaught on the national box office with ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’ (1949), a trilingual that established the studio’s dominance in the genre of the costumed adventure movie. Although its Hindi version ‘Nishan’ was not a major success, Vasan continued making Hindi films, often signing up major stars of Hindi films himself: e.g. the Dilip Kumar and Dev Anand film ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955), Vyjayanthimala’s ‘Raj Tilak’ (1958) and ‘Paigham (1959) starring Dilip Kumar, Raaj Kumar and Vyjayanthimala. They also made the mega-budget Tamil classic ‘Avvaiyyar’ (1953). An important later production was ‘Motor Sundaram Pillai’ (1966), Sivaji Ganesan’s only film at this studio. In 1958 the studio expanded into the Gemini Colour lab, licensed by Eastman color Kodak film. After Vasan’s death, his son SS Balasubramanyam produced the unsuccessful ‘Ellorum Nallavare’ (1975). Gemini’s productions declined in the 70s, although it remained successful as a studio and equipment rental business now taken over by the Anand Cine Services.

The unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ into all India market, Subramaniam Srinivasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He  established the popular Tamil magazine ‘Anand Vikatan’, and owned Gemini studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film. In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a  success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’ (1950). Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. ‘Mangala’ was remade in Sinhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955 and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao (later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh), and Jamuna.

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu Version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ in 1950 followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ in 1951. They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 1960s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to novels of writers like Chetan Bhagat. And thanks to modernization.

‘Bahut Din Huye’ had a cast consisting of Madhubala, Ratan Kumar, Agha, Kailash, Savitri (debut film in Hindi), Lalita Pawar, Pushpvalli (mother of Rekha), Kanhaiya Lal etc. Ratan Kumar had a big role in this film. Another film of 1954, ‘Jagriti’ also had a pivotal role for Ratan Kumar.

Ratan Kumar’s real name was Syed Nazar Ali (born 21-8-42 at Ajmer, passed away 12-12-2016 at California, USA). He started working as a child star when he was just 4 year old. His first film was Baburao Patel’s ‘Gwaalan’ (1946). He did 25 film roles before he acted in film ‘Jagriti’. He worked in many famous films like ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Malhaar’ (1951), ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Boot Polish’ (1953) etc. After doing film ‘Jalwa’ in 1955, he migrated to Pakistan in 1956, with his family, and remade ‘Jagriti’ in Pakistan, as ‘Bedaari(1957) – Urdu translation of the Hindi word Jagriti. This film used the same old tune for a film song in Pakistan, aimed at igniting a similar emotion and patriotic zeal, among the listeners. – “Aao Bachcho Tumhe Dikhayen Jhaanki Hindustan Ki… (come children let us show you glimpses of India), is a popular Hindi film song of the 1950s. “Aao Bachcho Sair Karaayen Tumko Pakistan Ki… (children, let us take you on a tour of Pakistan) is an equally hit song of the same period in Pakistan. The movie ‘Bedaari’ (1957) was produced by his elder brother Wazir Ali Rizvi.

He played a young boy’s role in many Pakistani films later. ‘Naagin (1959) was the first Pakistani film he played a lead actor opposite Neelo as the lead actress. Ratan Kumar’s success, as a lead actor, could not last long because his later films did not do well at the box-office and he eventually faded away.

In 1977, his 4 years old daughter died in an accident in Lahore, Pakistan. He was so emotionally upset after that accident that he decided to quit the Pakistani film industry. In 1979, Ratan Kumar left Pakistan never to return again. In the late 1960s, Ratan Kumar also got into the business of selling oriental carpets and had started travelling back and forth from Pakistan to Europe for this business. Eventually he ended up settling down permanently in the United States after 1979.

Ratan Kumar was living in California, in his old age, and was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia 10 days before his death on 12 Dec 2016. He had a long history of illness, though. In 1996, his lungs had collapsed twice in the same year. When they collapsed the third time in 2000, he was left paralyzed and went into a coma for eight days. Then he recovered in four to five months and became somewhat normal again. His survivors include 2 sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren .

Music for film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ is by a pair of BS Kalla and E Sankar Sastry. Many south Indian composers had tried their hand at giving music to Hindi films in the 50s decade. MDs like Ghantasala, BS Kalla, SD Parthasarathi, E Shankar, B Laxman, Vishwanathan, R Sudarshanam, SV Venkataramana, TR Ramanathan and TG Lingappa are few of the lesser known music directors from south, who composed music for Hindi films. They gave melodious music, but somehow they did not succeed here. One reason could be their use of southern singers, for whom acceptability was a problem here for Hindi songs. Names like Ramesh Naidu, Adi Narayana Rao and the pair of Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy were at least known names here. Their films like ‘Piya Milan’ (1955, MD – Ramesh Naidu), ‘Suvarna Sundari’ (1958, MD – Adi Narayana Rao) and ‘Naya Aadmi’ (1956, MD – Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy) had many popular songs.

The film had 17 songs, 7 of these were sung by Lata Mangeshkar and the remaining were either by chorus or unnamed male/female singers. The lyrics were by Pt. Indra. Let us now hear today’s chorus song and enjoy the song and dance video.

[Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Rajadhyaksha, HFGK, MuVyz, The Hindu, Wiki and my notes.]

Song – Swaagat Raajkumar Tumhaara, Swaagat Raajkumar  (Bahut Din Huye) (1954) Singer – Chorus, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – BS Kalla

Lyrics

aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aa aa aa aaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaa aaaaa

swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar
swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar

aaaa aaaa aaaa
ye akhiyan matwaali kab se
rahi hain baat nihaar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa

aao baitho ratan hindole
aaaa aaaa aaaa
ratan hindole
pawan veg se jhulo
tum pyaare mehmaan hamaare..ae..ae
aao sab kuchh bhulo
jhoola jhulo

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmmm mmmmm mmmm

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आ आ आ आssss
आ आ आ आ
आ आss आssss आssss
आsss आssss

स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार
स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार

आ आ आ
ये अखियाँ मतवाली कब से
रही हैं बाट निहार
आsss आsss आsssss आsss
आsss आsss आsss
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ

आओ बैठो रतन हिंडोले
आsss आsss आsss
रतन हिंडोले
पावन वेग से झूलो
तुम प्यारे मेहमान हमारे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आओ सब कुछ भूलो
झूला झूलो

आsss आsss आsss आsss
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3878 Post No. : 14901

Today’s song is from film ‘Doctor Z’ from 1959.

The title seems funny, isn’t it? Somehow, I find that the film makers give bizarre titles to their films sometimes. Films with prefix Mr. or Dr. were plenty. The earliest such a Talkie film was ‘Mr. 420’ made in 1937. Later, ‘Mr. X’ was made in 1938. This was repeated in 1957 and 1984. ‘Mr. X in Bombay’ was made in 1964. ‘Mr. India’ came in 1961 and also 1987. There was a ‘Mr. Bechara’ in 1996, ‘Mr. Chakram’ in 1956, ‘Mr, Jhatpat’ in 1943, ‘Mr John’ in 1959, ‘Mr. Lamboo’ in 1956. ‘Mr. Romeo’ in 1973 and 1999. ‘Mr. Q’ in 1958, ‘Mr.Bond’ in 1992, ‘Mr. Azad’in 1994, ‘Mr .Dynamite’ in 1947, ‘Mr. Murder’ in 1969, ‘Mr. Qartoon, M.A.’ in 1958, ‘Mr. Sampat’ in 1952, ‘Mr. Toofan’ in 1963, ‘Mr. 100%’ in 2005, ‘Mr. Badmash’ in 2009, ‘Mr. Bhatti on Chhutti’ in 2012, ‘Mr. Hot and Mr. Cool’ in 2007, ‘Mr. Lonely Miss Lovely’ in 2004, ‘Mr. Prime Minister’ in 2005, ‘Mr. Singh Mrs. Mehta’ in 2009, ‘Mr. White Mr. Black’ in 2007, ‘Mr. ya Mrs.’ in 2005, The most hilarious title in this category was ‘Mr. Khujli’ in 2007 !!!

Starting with ‘Dr. Madhurika’ (1935), it was ‘Dr. Ambedkar’ (1989 and 2000), ‘Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani’ (1946), ‘Dr. Kumar’ (1944), ‘Dr. Ramesh’ (1949), ‘Dr. Vidya’ (1962), ‘Dr. Z’ (1959) etc.

The decade of the 1940s and the 1950s was the period when stunt and action films were made in plenty. There were specialised actors, producers, directors, composers and even specialised audiences too for such films. Stunt and action films was a very sweeping name for a genre which included several types of sub-categories. When I started studying these films, I found one kind soul – Mike Burnum -who identified and classified stunt/action films made in India, into sub categories. For the information of our esteemed readers, the different types within the generalised stunt/action films are…(in descending order of number of films made….

  1. Fantasy and Arabian  Nights  -92 films
  2. Horror – 67
  3. Jungle Thrillers (Tarzan/Zimbo/Zambo/Zangbo/Zingara etc)
  4. New Century Horror films ( Horror films made after 2000)
  5. Science Fiction
  6. Chillers
  7. Spies and Detective
  8. Super heroes / heroines
  9. Murder and Mystery
  10. Sword Fighting and
  11. Naag Films etc.

Today’s film ‘Doctor Z’, falls under Science Fiction category. Though it was a C grade action film, HFGK mentions it as a ‘Social’ film. May be, as it was not exactly a stunt film, the film may have been classified as a social film. The story of this film was just a one line story, expanded at convenience as per needs of audiences. Mahipal – a Police officer is after a gang of anti-national criminals, who want to steal a formula from a scientist, which can destroy a big country like India in just 2 minutes. He (naturally, compulsorily and as per the director’s directions) falls in love with the scientist’s pretty daughter to sing songs, when not on duty. The film ends on expected Happy Notes.

The cast of the film was Shakila, Mahipal, Helen, Krishnakumari, Mirza Musharraf, Sunder, Tun Tun and a host of other junior actors. The film was made by Baliwala Films. It was produced and directed by its owner Jal. There were two lyricists and the 8 melodious songs were composed by Music Director Manohar Arora. Now this Manohar was a separate, different and independent composer. Most sites and blogs mistake him for being Manoharlal Sonik, of Sonik-Omi composer duo. This is NOT so. He was different. 2 songs from this film have been posted on this blog and both the times he was mentioned as Manoharlal Sonik. I must confess that I was responsible for this mix up. I had made a comment in 2011 that he was Manoharlal Sonik of the duo, which was a wrong statement. 3 years after that comment the real information about Manohar came up, hence I am making this clarification, at this opportunity. I feel sorry that I had followed the wrong info track that time.

The composer MANOHAR ARORA was a Punjabi music director who came from Sialkot to try his luck in Bombay. His first film was ‘Raees’ in 1948. Then came ‘Josh’ in 1950, ‘Rangeele Musafir’ (1950), ‘Bhoole Bhatke’ (1952), ‘Jingo’ (1952), ‘Usha Kiran’ (1952). His best remembered film was ‘Chingari’ (1955). Then came ‘Passing Show’ (1956), ‘Mister Q’ (1958), ‘Dr. Z’ (1959), ‘Choron Ki Baarat’ (1960) and last film was ‘Do Dushman’ (1967). His name is mostly written as ‘Manohar’ only. This created a misunderstanding that he was Manoharlal Sonik, which is NOT correct.

From the cast of this film, Krishna Kumari is another name which causes confusion. There was a Krishna Kumari in silent films and talkie films of the 1930s. Then there was another Krishna Kumari who was from South and featured in dubbed and remade films. She too is different. Actress Krishna Kumari who worked in  Hindi films from 1948 to 1968 was another one.

Krishna Kumari (not to be confused with the 1930s actress of the same name nor the south Indian actress T. Krishna Kumari) was born Rajinder Kaur in Rawalpindi, Punjab state (now part of Pakistan) on October 3, 1934. Occasionally playing the heroine in B-grade films including ‘Vanraj’ (1952), ‘Gorilla’ (1953), ‘Black Rider’ (1960), ‘State Express’ (1961) and ‘Khush Naseeb’ (1964) she is probably much better known as a temptress or villain in the likes of ‘Baghdad Ka Jaadu’ (1956), ‘Zimbo’ (1958), ‘Police Station’ (1959), ‘Lady Of The Lake’ (1960), ‘Jaadu Mahal’ (1962) or dozens of similar action, horror and fantasy films.

Her debut came in the film ‘Girls School’ (1949), which also featured newcomers Geeta Bali and Shashikala, after which she appeared in ‘Nao’, which actually ended up in theaters first, releasing in 1948, just two months after her film ‘Intezaar’ (1948) was released. Film ‘Girls School’ was stalled due to the dispute between Amiya Chakravarty and Anil Biswas.

Krishna Kumari’s career lasted 20 years, and during that time she managed to chalk up an impressive amount of credits, even if most of the pictures she made were not considered important by critics. She acted in 117 films. Her first film on screen was ‘Intezaar’ (1948) and last film was ‘Jung Aur Aman’ (1968).

Hiralal is a familiar face to every fan of vintage Bollywood as he played countless character parts, often as the villain, in literally hundreds of films both big and small.

He was born Hiralal Thakur on March 14, 1912 in Lahore (now part of Pakistan) and began his career in silent films with AR Kardar’s ‘Safdar Jung’ which was released in 1930, while his second film, ‘Daughters of Today’, actually made it to movie theaters first, in 1929. He was under contract to United Players Corporation and made several silent pictures for them before making the transition to sound and moving on to other studios for films like ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932), ‘Seeta’ (1934), and ‘Blood Feud’ (1935).

Some of his notable fantasy, sci-fi and horror films include ‘Khooni Jadugar’ (1939), ‘Arabian Nights’ (1946), ‘Mehbooba’ (1954), ‘Hatimtai Ki Beti’ (1955), ‘Roop Basant’ (1955), ‘Sakhi Hatim‘ (1955), ‘Shah Behram‘ (1955), ‘Indra Sabha’ (1956), ‘Shaan-e-Hatim’ (1958), ‘Dr. Z  (1959), Dr. Shaitan (1960),  Jadoo Mahal (1962), Flying Man (1965), Gumnaam (1965), Sindbad, Alibaba and Alladin (1965), Love and Murder‘ (1966), ‘Sheba and Hercules’ (1967), and ‘Alibaba’ (1976). Hiralal worked continuously until his death on June 27, 1982.

He had worked in 203 films. His first film was ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932) and last film was ‘Kaalia’ (1981).

Now let us enjoy the comedy song from film ‘Doctor Z’. This was filmed on Sunder and Nasreen. This duet is sung by Balbir and Geeta Dutt.

(Thanks to Mike Barnum ji, Harish Raghuwanshi ji, Flash Back, vol I-Isak Mujawar, HFGK, MuVyz and my notes.)

 

Song – Main Hoon Bhaiya Dim Timkar  (Doctor Z) (1959) Singer – Balbir, Geeta Dutt, Lyrics – Akhtar Romani, Music – Manohar
Balbir + Geeta Dutt

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

itna akad mat
arey mujh se jhagad mat
baat nahin ye achhi
dil ko jakad mat
mujh pe bigad mat
preet meri hai sachchi
zara muskaaye di ho
dil ko khilaaye di ho
zulm karat kyon dil par..rr
main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

pyaar jataa mat
zyaada mujhko banaa mat
matlab ki sab yaari
nazren phira mat
haaye re haaye dil ko jalaa mat
kuchh to dikha dildaari
mera naam lio nahin
aisa kabhi kio nahin
varna to jayi ho mar mar
main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

dil tera ghar hai
meri jaan tera hi jigar hai
tujh pe sab kurbaan
pyaar ka asar hai
jhoomti nazar hai
hanste hain armaan
aaj mera dil gaya
to se jaa ke mil gayaa
hui bina judaa dam bhar

main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

lar lar lallaa pam pam pam

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

इतना अकड़ मत
अरे मुझ से झगड़ मत
बात नहीं ये अच्छी
दिल को जकड़ मत
मुझ पे बिगड़ मत
प्रीत मेरी है सच्ची
ज़रा मुस्काए दी हो
दिल को खिलाये दी हो
ज़ुल्म करत क्यों दिल पर॰॰र्र
मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

प्यार जता मत
ज़्यादा मुझको बना मत
मतलब की सब यारी
नज़रें फिरा मत
हाय रे हाए दिल को जला मत
कुछ तो दिखा दिलदारी
मेरा नाम लियो नहीं
ऐसा कभी कियो नहीं
वरना तो जई हो मर मर
मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

दिल तेरा घर है
मेरी जान तेरा ही जिगर है
तुझ पे सब क़ुर्बान
प्यार का असर है\
झूमती नज़र है
हँसते हैं अरमान
आज मेरा दिल गया
तो से जा के मिल गया
हुई बिना जुदा दम भर

मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

लर लर लल्ला पम पम पम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3843 Post No. : 14854

Today’s song is from film ‘Bhedi Bangla’ (1949). This film was produced by Anand Subramanyam, under the banner of Jagriti films, owned by Master Bhagwan. The story, dialogues and songs were by Ehsaan Rizvi and music was by P Ramakant. This was a name used by C Ramchandra, because he was under contract with Filmistan and could not give music in his own name. It started with Raja Nene’s film Shadi Se Pehle’ in 1947, in which he first used his assistant’s name Paingankar (the joint MD was Karnad). His name was Ramakant Paingankar and was assisting Chitalkar for a long time. Later, for Bhagwan’s films like ‘Bhedi Bangla’, ‘Bhole Bhale’ (1949), ‘Babuji’ (1950), and ‘Bakshish’ (1950) also, Chitalkar used the pseudo name P Ramakant as MD (information from Marathi Chitrapat Sangeetkar Kosh by Madhu Potdar).

Master Bhagwan was a very hard working person. In the real sense, he brought in the wave of stunt films in the late 40s. After the films of Master Vithal and Fearless Nadia waned in their popularity by 1944-45, it was Master Bhagwan, who established his own Production house – Jagriti Films, and produced several stunt films. He had a set of actors and actresses, which included Baburao Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Azeembhai, Shanta Patel, Chanchal, Leela Gupte, Usha Shukla and Vitha Lokare.

The storyline for most of his films was also fixed. Two young vagabonds – Baburao Pehelwan and Bhagwan, come to Bombay in search of employment. One Sethji (Azeembhai) appoints them to protect him from the local criminal (Vasantrao Pehelwan). Sethji has a good looking daughter (one of the stock Heroines), who has a maid (another girl from the stock). Baburao loves Seth ji’s daughter and Bhagwan loves the maid. After lot many stunts and fighting scenes, the end would be happy. The same story with changed names and other minor changes was used in almost all his films like ‘Badla’, ‘Bahadur’, ‘Jalan’, ‘Madadgaar’, ‘Dosti’, ‘Shake Hand’, ‘Matlabi’, ‘Bach Ke Rehna’, ‘Bhole Bhale’, ‘Jeete Raho’ or such other films. The audience did not mind . They were happy with the stunts. (Did Nasir Hussain get inspiration from Bhagwan in this matter ?)

Master Bhagwan entered the film world with silent film ‘Bewafa Ashiq’ (1930). His first talkie film was ‘Himmat-e-Marda’ (1934). Initially, like all other heroes, even Bhagwan used to sing his own songs. Once he had gone to Columbia company for rehearsal and recording a song. While entering, he saw a young man sitting under a tree and writing something. After rehearsal, he saw that fellow again and even after recording the man was still writing something. Bhagwan went to him and asked with curiosity what was he writing. The man answered, I am writing songs and stories. He came to know that his name was Ehsaan Rizvi and that he too lives in Dadar like Bhagwan. He took Rizvi’s address and left.

In 1938, Bhagwan got his first film as a director- ‘Bahadur Kisaan’ (1938). He called Ehsan Rizvi and gave him the job of writing the story, dialogues and songs. From that day Ehsaan Rizvi became a part of his team. He wrote for at least 25 films of Bhagwan’s. Born in 1914, Rizvi wrote lyrics for 60 films, but most of them were B or C grade films. He however wrote dialogues and screenplay for some well known films like ‘Do Ustad’ (1959), ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960), ‘Woh Kaun Thi’ (1964), ‘Aan Milo Sajna’ (1971), ‘Gopichand Jasoos’ (1982) etc. He had shared the Filmfare award for dialogues of ‘Mughal e Azam’, with 3 other writers. He died on 16-1-1983.

Bhagwan and CR got introduced when Bhagwan was directing film ‘Bahadur Kisaan’ for producer Chandrarao Kadam. The MD was Meer Saheb and CR was his assistant. Of course, that time he was just Ram Chitalkar. Their friendship lasted for many more years. For film ‘Bahadur Kisaan’, the background music was composed by Naushad, CR and Sajjad Hussain. Naushad played piano, CR played organ and Sajjad played mandolin. Another person Prem, played clarinet. They were all struggling artistes then.

In 1942 Bhagwan directed ‘Sukhi Jeevan’, for which CR was the MD for the first time. Bhagwan and the producer Harishchandra Rao Kadam had some dispute on payments. Bhagwan decided to start his own production company and he started Jagriti Pictures. His first film was ‘Badla’ (1943). For this film he took 80,000 from a financier, with a condition of repaying one lakh rupees after the film is released. After this film Bhagwan churned out film after film in the stunt genre. In 1949, Bhagwan made film ‘Bhedi Bangla’, which was the first of its kind – a sort of horror cum mystery film. The film was a hit film. With this film Bhagwan had reached the zenith of his stunt films.

In this film, there were several scenes, where Bhagwan sees a ghost and his eyes widen and breath is held up. Due to the strain on the eyes, they became red and swollen and after some time, suddenly, he could not see anything. He thought that he has become blind. He shouted for his brother Shanker. Bhagwan was immediately taken to a hospital in Girgaon. The doctor examined him,gave him an injection and some tablets. That night he slept like a dead man, but after getting up on next day noon, he was happy that his eyesight was normal now.

Bhagwan had noticed that whenever his film’s trial show was arranged, a handsome young man would be present there. When he saw this man at the trial show of ‘Bhedi Bangla’ again, he inquired as to who he was. The young man told him that his name was Raj Kapoor and he was son of the great Prithviraj Kapoor. Bhagwan called him and asked him why he came. Raj kapoor said, “Sir, I like your stunt films. I am your fan. In my films, I copy your dance style. Why don’t you make a social film ?”. Few days later, even CR also pushed him hard to enter the social film genre now, so that CR can openly lend his name to Bhagwan’s films as MD and his film will get the benefit of his fame. Thereafter Bhagwan started thinking about it seriously and then ‘Albela’ happened. The rest is history, as they say! The story of Albela making, some other time. . .

The story of film Bhedi Bangla was,

Shyam (Baburao Pehelwan) and Manglu (Bhagwan) are friends and good for nothing. They come to Bombay to look for easy money. They pretend to be lame and blind and start begging. However, after few days, their secret is out and and the enraged public of Bombay gives them a sound thrashing. An onlooker calls them and asks if they would do a good job, instead of this nonsense. The agree and they are appointed as watchmen for a deserted haveli. It is owned by a Sethani (Tarabai – elder sister of Sitara Devi and mother of dancer Gopi Krishna). Her daughter is beautiful Prema (Leela Gupte). There is an estate manager also (Azeembhai – who later became a famous fight master in Hindi films), who does not like their coming there.

One day the friends find the dead body of the haveli’s maali (gardener) (Inamdar) in the premises of the haveli. The estate manager complains to the police. Police start investigations. Maali had a good looking daughter – Champa (Usha Shukla). While Manglu tries to take care of her, the estate manager tells police that he suspects this duo of murdering the maali. In absence of any proof, police do not arrest them but keep an eye on them.

Suddenly, the friends start seeing ghosts in the haveli. First few days, they are scared, but realise that this is all bogus and they try to reach the bottom of the matter. Finally, they unearth a plan of the estate manager to scare everybody, so that no one will remain there and he can conduct his gold smuggling business from there. He only has murdered the maali. After solid stunts and fighting scenes, the culprits are arrested and Shyam and Prema and Manglu and Champa are united. (658).

The film had 8 songs. Most songs are available on You Tube. 4 songs are already discussed here. Today’s song is the 5th song. It is a duet of Lata and Chitalkar. All in all, ‘Bhedi Bangla’ aka ‘The House of Mystery’ was a ‘paisa vasool‘ entertainment.

(Thanks to ‘Ek Albela’ by Isaq Mujawar and Mike Barnum’s Blog, for some information used here).

 

Song – Aansoo Na Bahaana, Ab Aansoo Na Bahaana  (Bhedi Bangla (aka House of Mystery)) (1949) Singer – Chitalkar, Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Ehsaan Rizvi, Music – P Ramakant (aka C Ramchandra)
Chitalkar + Lata Mangeshkar

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

mast pawan is  phulwari mein
kali kali khilaati hai
mast pawan is  phulwari mein
kali kali khilaati hai
usi chaman mein raen andhere
shabnam neer bahaati hai
usi chaman mein raen andhere
shabnam neer bahaati hai
tum kehte ho is jag mein
bas hansna aur hasaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

sukh mein to hansti hai duniya
sabka yehi haal hai
sukh mein to hansti hai duniya
sabka yehi haal hai
lekin dukh utha kar koi
hanse to phir ye kamaal hai
lekin dukh utha kar koi
hanse to phir ye kamaal hai
jag ki reet badal kar dekho
dukh ko bhi sukh banaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

sach poocho do dil ka milna
kaanta bhi hai phool bhi
pyaar ko sach maano to sach hai
bhool kaho to bhool bhi
sach poocho do dil ka milna
kaanta bhi hai phool bhi
pyaar ko sach maano to sach hai
bhool kaho to bhool bhi
lekin dil mein himmat ho to
khud badlega zamaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

मस्त पावन इस फुलवारी में
कली कली खिलाती है
मस्त पावन इस फुलवारी में
कली कली खिलाती है
उसी चमन में रैन अंधेरे
शबनम नीर बहाती है
उसी चमन में रैन अंधेरे
शबनम नीर बहाती है
तुम कहते हो इस जग में
बस हँसना और हँसाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

सुख में तो हँसती है दुनिया
सबका येही हाल है
सुख में तो हँसती है दुनिया
सबका येही हाल है
लेकिन दुख उठा कर कोई
हँसे तो फिर ये कमाल है
लेकिन दुख उठा कर कोई
हँसे तो फिर ये कमाल है
जग की रीत बदल कर देखो
दुख को भी सुख बनाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

सच पूछो दो दिल का मिलना
काँटा भी है फूल भी
प्यार को सच मानो तो सच है
भूल कहो तो भूल भी
सच पूछो दो दिल का मिलना
काँटा भी है फूल भी
प्यार को सच मानो तो सच है
भूल कहो तो भूल भी
लेकिन दिल में हिम्मत हो तो
खुद बदलेगा ज़माना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3825 Post No. : 14829

Wonder pe Thunder !

Today’s song is from film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (1971). When I found that this very popular and famous song of the early 70s was yet to be covered in the blog, my first reaction was to disbelieve it. I was almost sure that there was some mistake. I scanned the entire ‘H’ alphabet film list, bur could not see this song under any heading. Then I checked the year wise and MD wise lists – with same result. I was wondering how this song has escaped from the keen eyes of our contributors, who are specialists in the songs of the 70s ! At the end of it, I even checked with Atul ji, who confirmed that the song, indeed, was yet to be covered by us. This was a bonanza for me.

This is one of the songs of RD Burman, which I liked very much. Comparatively, he was one of the new composers in those times – in my opinion – though he had already done about 40 films before ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (HRHK). In last few years I had liked few songs from his earlier films like ‘Parichay’ (1972), ‘Seeta aur Geeta’ (1972), ‘Caravan’ (1971), ‘Kati Patang’ (1970) and ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966). However, he suffered in my hands, due to my biased view of film songs of the period of 70s and beyond and except few more songs of RD Burman, I never liked his music, which in general I felt, was too loud and mostly copied from other sources (see several U-Tube videos on this issue, as a proof). However, I concede that he was a worthy son of a worthy composer compared to some other composer-son composers and that his music was much better than theirs and that he lasted for a longer period, cut short only by his sudden death in 1994, at the age of 55 years.

Today’s song is sung by Asha Bhosle and chorus and its video shows that it was sung on screen by a Hippie Girl (Zeenat Aman) amidst a smoking Hippie crowd. Somewhere in the year 1966, I had visited Goa (Panaji) to participate in a conference. During my visit, we had 2 free days and we roamed around the beautiful beaches of Goa. Goa had been liberated from the Portuguese about 6 years back and the Indian tourists did not have enough time yet to spoil the beaches and cities of Goa. So we could really enjoy our trip. During our beach visits we saw many Hippie groups, behaving in a ‘who cares’ attitude on the beaches. No wonder, many of my colleagues took their photographs to show in their respective private circles. That was a time when the Hippie culture had spread around the world.

Hippie (also spelled hippy) people were members of a counter cultural movement during the 1960s and 1970s, that rejected the mores of mainstream American life. The movement originated on college campuses in the United States, and also spread to other countries. Hippies felt alienated from middle-class society, which they saw as dominated by materialism and repression, and they developed their own distinctive lifestyle. They favoured long hair and casual, often unconventional, attire, sometimes in ‘psychedelic’ colours.

Many males grew beards, and both men and women wore sandals and beads. Long flowing granny dresses were popular with women, and rimless granny glasses with both men and women. Hippies commonly took up communal or cooperative living arrangements, and they often adopted vegetarian diets based on unprocessed foods and practiced holistic medicine. Hippies tended to be dropouts from society, foregoing regular jobs and careers, although some developed small businesses that catered to other hippies.

Hippies advocated non-violence and love, a popular phrase being “Make love, not war,” for which they were sometimes called ‘flower children’. They promoted openness and tolerance as alternatives to the restrictions and regimentation they saw in the middle-class society. Hippies often practiced open sexual relationships and lived in various types of family groups. They commonly sought spiritual guidance from sources outside the Judeo-Christian tradition, particularly Buddhism and other Eastern religions. Hippies promoted the recreational use of hallucinogenic drugs, particularly marijuana and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), in so-called head trips, justifying the practice as a way of expanding consciousness.

By the mid-1970s the movement had waned, and by the 1980s hippies had given way to a new generation of young people who were intent on making careers for themselves in business and who came to be known as yuppies (young urban professionals). Nonetheless, hippies continued to have an influence on the wider culture, seen, for example, in more relaxed attitudes toward sex, in the new concern for the environment, and in a widespread lessening of formality.

Film HRHK was Dev Anand’s idea. Initially, he wanted Zahida to become its Heroine. She, however rejected the offer when she learnt that in the film, she would be Dev’s sister – Jasbir. Dev Anand also wanted SD Burman to do the music. When Dada heard the original story, in which Zeenat falls in love with Dev, not knowing that he was her brother, Dada flatly refused the film and also advised Dev to change the story, as Indian public would be averse to an incest story. Eventually RD Burman was selected as MD.

Similarly, this song – “Dum Maaro Dum” was originally to be a duet of Usha Uthup and Lata Mangeshkar. Possibly Asha Bhosle, who was on the verge of leaving OPN and joining RD Burman (who had applied for a divorce with Rita –  his wife) scuttled the plan and the song came to Asha as a solo and another duet with usha Uthup. RD burman then changed the whole tune of the song, using Asha’s skill of singing in higher pitches.

All songs of this film became popular, especially “Phoolon Ka Taaron Ka Sabka Kehna Hai” and “Dum Maaro Dum” were heard everywhere. The lyrics of the song “Dum Maaro Dum” were very apt to indicate and describe the philosophy and frustration of the younger generation in that period –

duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyun
sabne hamara kiya kya

All this clearly indicated what was eating the minds of young people.

Fortunately, 70s was the period when the Hippie culture was on decline worldwide. As such, this type of philosophy and such cult did not fit into the Indian mind set in any case. Therefore, this culture did not grow much here and had a natural end – like everywhere else in the world.

Two interesting anecdotes about this film. One, Dev Anand in his autobiography -“Romancing With Life “, published in 2007, had confessed that during this film, he had fallen in love with Zeenat. He was to make a confession to her, when he learnt that she had gone very close to Raj Kapoor. In one party, he also saw Raj kapoor hugging Zeenat and she was responding to him. Dev was disillusioned. He knew that Zeenat was keen to work in RK’s film ‘Satyam Shivam Sundaram’, and that all this was due to that only. He simply removed her thought from his mind.

Second is about the Burmans. In the program ‘Phool Khile Hain Gulshan Gulshan’, Pancham narrated that – “Papa used to go for morning walk everyday in Juhu. People recognised him and would say, look, SD Burman is going. One day he came back very excited. He told me, today people recognised me and said, Look RD Burman’s father is going. Papa was proud of me that my music in HRHK was famous and popular.”

Nandu Chawathe- a leading fiddler and violinist was associated with Pancham in those days. This person – Nandu Chawathe, was a guest in one of our get togethers of Atulites in Mumbai, thanks to one of our members Nitin ji Shah. He had played some songs on his violin in that meeting,  Chawathe says that Dev Anand was very much upset, when Asha replaced Lata and Pancham took time to compose the new tune for Asha Bhosle. The final product, however, pleased Dev Anand.

The story of the film, as given in wiki, is –

In the background of the rise of the International Hare Krishna movement in the 1970s, is a Montreal-based family of the Jaiswals, consisting of mom, dad, son, Prashant, and daughter, Jasbir. Due to differences, Mr and Mrs Jaiswal separate, leaving Jasbir with dad, and Prashant with his mom. Eventually Prashant and his mom travel to India, leaving father and daughter behind in Montreal. Mr. Jaiswal remarries, and brings his new wife to live in his home. Jasbir is told by her nanny that her mother & brother are dead. Back in India Prashant is sent to a boarding school and his father makes sure that none of Prashant’s letters reach Jasbir, so that it would be easy on her part to get over emotional trauma. Jasbir is upset with her inconsiderate step-mother and ignorant father who is deeply immersed in his business.

Years later, Prashant has grown up to be a pilot. He has received a letter from his dad that Jasbir, who had rebelled and left home, is now located in Kathmandu, Nepal, with a group of hippies. Prashant decides to find his sister and hopefully get her back to the family. When Prashant lands in Kathmandu he does not find Jasbir, but instead finds Janice, who is indeed his sister with a new name. Janice has no recollection of her childhood, and is always in the company of hippies spending most of her time consuming alcohol & drugs with them.

Janice lives with the hippies in the property rented out by local landlord Drona. Drona’s real business is stealing ancient artifacts from Kathmandu and selling it to foreign nationals. Michael, one of the hippies, is the one who does all the dirty work for him. Janice’s boyfriend Deepak misunderstands that Prashant is trying to woo Janice, hence they exchange a few blows every time they meet. Meanwhile, Drona has an eye on Shanti, a local salesgirl working in one of the shops owned by him. Shanti has feelings for Prashant which creates one more enemy for him. Later Prashant and Shanti elope and get married. At the same time a precious idol is stolen from local temple by Michael, which he hides in Janice’s house. Prashant secretly observes all this. Drona tries to frame Shanti for theft by secretly planting another stolen artifact in her house. Later he spreads the word that since the day Prashant has arrived idols are being stolen and he is stalking local girls.

The police commissioner is a friend of Prashant’s father, and has already received a letter stating the purpose of Prashant’s visit to Kathmandu. He suspects that Drona is trying to frame Prashant because he has married Shanti. He gets a search warrant for the entire property of Drona and recovers a diary which has contact details of his friends abroad who help him sell the stolen artifacts. The police also recover the stolen artifact from Shanti’s home, squarely blaming Prashant for it. Shanti is deeply hurt by this and looks around for Prashant. Prashant meanwhile is with Janice, trying to convince her that he is her brother, who she had been told dead long back. Michael overhears the conversation & conspires to put the blame on the brother-sister duo. Taking advantage of the situation Drona and Michael instigate the locals against Prashant by framing him for the theft and duping Shanti under pretext of marriage. The hippies and the locals are now ready to bash Prashant the moment they come across him.

When Prashant again tries to meet Janice, the hippies give him a solid thrashing. The police commissioner intervenes and Prashant is saved. At the same time the true face of Drona is uncovered and he meets his end trying to run away from police. Janice sees that both her parents have arrived to meet her and realizes that Prashant is indeed her brother. Janice is deeply hurt that her parents had to see her in this state. She runs away from them and commits suicide. In her suicide note she tells Prashant how deeply she loved him and she never intended him to find her in this state and suicide was the only way out for her.

‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (released on 9-12-1971) was a Landmark film for Navketan – a film production company, which could boast of a world record (yet unbeaten) that the company was run for 62 years by the same person who established it in 1949 ! The cult song “Dum Maaro Dum” became so popular that no function was complete without this song for the next 10 years! Enjoy this song here today…..

[Author’s Note: The article uses information from books ‘Gaata Rahe Mera Dil’ and ‘Music Beyond Boundaries’, Wiki, The Hindu and my notes].

Video (Partial)

Audio (Complete)

Song – Dum Maro Dum, Mit Jaayen Gham  (Hare Rama Hare Krishna) (1971) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, Music – RD Burman
Female Chorus
Male Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

hush..shh..shh..shh

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

pa..aa pa ra pa pa tu tu tu
aa..aa ee..ee
ta raa ta raa ta raa ta raa raa..aa

duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyon
sab ne hamaara kiya kya
duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyon
sab ne hamaara kiya kya

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaayen gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

hush..shh..shh..shh

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

chaahe jiyenge marenge
hum na kisi se darenge
hum ko na roke zamaana
jo chaahenge hum karenge

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaayen gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-
हश॰॰शश॰॰शश॰॰शश

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

पा॰॰आ प र पा पा तु तु तु
आ॰॰आ ई॰॰ई
त रा त रा त रा त रा रा॰॰आ

दुनिया ने हमको दिया क्या
दुनिया से हमने लिया क्या
हम सबकी परवाह करें क्यों
सब ने हमारा किया क्या

आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

हश॰॰शश॰॰शश॰॰शश

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

चाहे जिएंगे मरेंगे
हम ना किसी से डरेंगे
हमको ना रोके ज़माना
जो चाहेंगे हम करेंगे

आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3819 Post No. : 14817

Today’s song is from film ‘Ek Shola’ (1958). It is sung by Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt. The lyricist was Majrooh Sultanpuri and the music director was Madan Mohan. The film was produced by Deep and Pradeep Productions –  a joint venture of Deep Khosla and Pradeep Kumar. The film was directed by Chander Sehgal. Not much is known about Chander Sehgal, except that he directed only 2 films – ‘Ek Shola’ and ‘Mitti Mein Sona’ (1960). He died on 29-5-1960. The cast of the film is Pradeep Kumar, Mala Sinha, Jawahar Kaul, Leela Mishra, Nazir Hussain, Shubha Khote etc.

In Hindi films, there have been three actors who were very handsome and very lucky but zero in acting – Karan Dewan, Pradeep Kumar and Bharat Bhushan. They all appeared in leading roles opposite all leading actresses of their times. They had the best films, best songs and best roles. Karan Dewan had about 25 Silver Jubilees to his credit and was considered a lucky star. Bharat Bhushan had the most musical films to his credit like ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Shabaab’ (1954) and ‘Mirza Ghalib’ (1954) etc. Pradeep Kumar had ‘Anarkali’ (1953) and ‘Taj Mahal’ (1963).

All three had their brothers producing films for them. Gemini Dewan made films for Karan Dewan, R. Chandra made films for Bharat Bhushan and Kalidas for Pradeep Kumar. Unfortunately, in later years, all three lost everything and died in poverty and neglectful anonymity. Karan Dewan was a manager with BR Chopra’s production company. When he died no one came for his funeral except for Chandrashekhar and Manmohan Krishan from the Cine Artist’s Association. Bharat Bhushan even worked as a watchman in a film studio, in his last days. He too died unsung and only the men from the Association were present at the cremation.

Pradeep Kumar’s case is the saddest. He lay seriously ill in the ICU of a Calcutta nursing home, abandoned by his relatives. The hospital was not discharging him, unless the bills were paid. Luckily one Mr. Pradeep Kondaliya, an estate agent, recognised him, despite his grown beard. He paid the huge outstanding bill of the hospital and took Pradeep Kumar to his home, where he passed away after a few days. He was cremated by his fan. Such is the film industry – cruel and ruthless, where the recognition lasts only till one is successful, and even close relatives desert you in bad times.

Pradeep Kumar aka Sital Batabyal was born on 4 January 1925. When he was 17 years old, he started as assistant cameraman. Later he decided to take up acting. He started his film career in Bengali films. His notable roles in Bengali films were in ‘Alaknanda‘ (1947), directed by renowned filmmaker Debaki Bose, and in ’42 (1951). It was Debki Bose, who gave him the filmy name Pradeep Kumar.

Pradeep Kumar  then shifted to Bombay and Filmistan studios, and had an important role in the film ‘Anand Math (1952). He played the lead role with Bina Rai in ‘Anarkali’ (1953) and with Vyjayanthimala in ‘Nagin’ (1954). Both films were very popular and had songs that added to the movies’ success. He had a spate of releases in the second half of the 1950s. He did not enjoy as much success in the 1960s, though ‘Ghoonghat’ (1960), ‘Aarti’ (1962) & ‘Taj Mahal’ (1963) were successful. He worked with Meena Kumari in seven films; ‘Adil-E-Jahangir’, ‘Bandhan’ (1956), ‘Chitralekha’, ‘Bahu Begum’, ‘Bheegi Raat’, ‘Aarti’ and ‘Noorjehan’; and with Mala Sinha in eight films; ‘Naya Zamana’, ‘Hamlet’, ‘Baadshah’, ‘Detective’ (1958 movie), ‘Fashion’ (1959 film), ‘Ek Shola’, ‘Duniya Na Maane’, and ‘Mitti Mein Sona’.

He did not get to act in lead roles with the newer heroines of the 1960s such as Sadhana, Saira Banu, Babita or Sharmila Tagore, though he did work with Asha Parekh in ‘Ghoonghat’ and ‘Meri Surat Teri Aankhen and with Waheeda Rehman in ‘Raakhi (1963). In 1969, he moved to character roles with ‘Sambandh’ and ‘Mehboob Ki Mehndi’, but did not have many visible roles till ‘Jaanwar’ and ‘Razia Sultan’ in 1983.

He won the Kalakar Award-Lifetime Achievement Award (1999).

Pradeep Kumar died in Calcutta on 27 October 2001, at the age of 76. He is survived by his daughters Reena, Meena and Beena Banerjee who plays character roles in movies and TV serials including ‘Uttaran’, son Debiprasad and granddaughters Tanisha, Suparna, Riya and Hrishita. Beena Banerjee’s son Siddharth Banerjee worked as assistant director in Sajid Khan’s ‘Housefull 2’ (2012) and ‘Himmatwala’ (2013).

Mala Sinha was an educated, hard working actress. Though she worked with leading banners and was heroine to well known heroes, she was never counted among the class I heroines of her times. She worked with many newcomers, like Dharmendra etc. Her career spanned a long time but she never got a single Filmfare Award, though nominated 4 times.

Mala Sinha was born in a Bengali Nepalese Christian family in Calcutta, on 11-11-1936. Mala Sinha claimed herself a Bengali descent Nepali many years ago in a TV interview Her parents named her Alda. Her friends at school used to tease her by calling her Dalda (a brand of vegetable oil), so she changed her name to Mala. In her childhood she learnt dancing and singing. Although she was an approved singer of All India Radio, she has never done playback singing in films. But as a singer she has done stage shows in many languages from 1947 to 1975.

Mala started her career as child artist in Bengali films ‘Jai Vaishno Devi’ followed by ‘Shri Krishan Leela’, ‘Jog Biyog’ and ‘Dhooli’. Noted Bengali director Ardhendu Bose saw her acting in a school play and took permission from her father to cast her as a heroine in his film ‘Roshanara’ (1952) – Bangla film, her cinematic debut.

After acting in a couple of films in Calcutta, Mala had to go to Bombay for a Bengali film. There she met Geeta Bali, a noted Bollywood actress, who was charmed by her and introduced her to film director Kidar Sharma. It was Sharma who cast her as a heroine in his ‘Rangeen Ratein‘ (1956). Her first Hindi film was ‘Baadshah’ (1954) opposite Pradeep Kumar. Then came ‘Ekadashi’ (1955), a mythological film. Both failed, but her lead role in Kishore Sahu’s ‘Hamlet’ (1954), paired opposite Pradeep Kumar, fetched her rave reviews in spite of it failing at the box office. Films like ‘Lai Batti’ (ac­tor Balraj Sahni’s only directorial venture), ‘Nausherwan-E-Adil’ where she starred as the fair maiden Marcia in Sohrab Modi’s romance about forbidden love and ‘Phir Subah Hogi’, which was direc­tor Ramesh Saigal’s adapta­tion of Dosteovsky’s novel Crime and Punishment, established Mala Sinha’s reputation as a versatile actress who took the maximum career risks by accepting unconventional roles.

Mala was a singer of some repute and used to sing for All India Radio; she was not allowed to sing playback (even for herself) in the movies with the lone exception being 1972’s ‘Lalkar’. In the 1950s, she had string of hits opposite Pradeep Kumar like ‘Fashion’ (1957), ‘Detective’ (1958), ‘Duniya Na Maane’ (1959) though their first two ventures had failed. The films she did with Pradeep Kumar were men-oriented. In 1957, noted Bollywood actor and film director Guru Dutt (the husband of Geeta Dutt) cast Mala in his film ‘Pyaasa‘ (1957) in a role originally intended for Madhubala. Mala gave a memorable performance as the relatively unsympa­thetic part of an ambitious woman who chooses to marry a rich man (played by actor Rehman) and have a loveless marriage rather than a poor, unsuccessful poet and her impoverished lover (played by Guru Dutt) whom she ditches. ‘Pyaasa‘ remains to this day a classic in the history of Indian cinema and a turning point for Mala Sinha.

After ‘Pyaasa’ her major success were ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958) and Yash Chopra’s directorial debut ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ (1959) that elevated her into a major dramatic star. There was no looking back for Sinha then as she was part of many successful movies from 1958 to the early ’60s like ‘Parvarish’ (1958), ‘Ujaala’,’ Main Nashe Main Hoon’, ‘Duniya Na Maane’, ‘Love Marriage’ (1959), ‘Bewaqoof’ (1960), ‘Maya’ (1961), ‘Hariyali Aur Rasta’ and ‘Dil Tera Deewana’ (1962), ‘Anpadh’, ‘Bombay Ka Chor’ (1962). Critics believe her career best performance was in ‘Bahurani’ (1963), ‘Gumrah’, ‘Gehra Daag’, ‘Apne Huye Paraaye’ and ‘Jahan Ara’. Apart from pairing with Pradeep Kumar, her pairing opposite Raaj Kumar, Rajendra Kumar, Biswajit and Manoj Kumar in woman-oriented films were appreciated by audiences, with her films opposite Biswajit being the most popular.  She did 10 films with Biswajit. In 2007, they won the Star Screen Lifetime Achievement Award, calling them on stage together giving due respect to their popularity as a pair who have tasted box office success.

The most remarkable feature of career of Mala Sinha was that most of her 1960s and 1970s hits were fueled by her own star power as much as the heroes and most of the times her role was more powerful than the hero. Though she was pitted opposite her seniors like Raj Kapoor, Dev Anand, Kishore Kumar, Pradeep Kumar and when she acted opposite the emerging stars from late 1950s like Shammi Kapoor, Rajendra Kumar and Raaj Kumar, she made sure her role was as good as theirs.

In 1966, Sinha went to Nepal to act in a Nepali film called ‘Maitighar when the Nepali film industry was still in its infancy. This was the only Nepali film she did in her career. Her hero in the film was an estate owner called Chidambar Prasad Lohani. Soon after, Mala Sinha married CP Lohani with the blessings of her parents. From the beginning theirs was a long-distance marriage with Lohani based in Kathmandu to look after his business and Sinha living in Bombay with their daughter Pratibha. She continued acting after her marriage.

From 1974, she cut down on her assignments as the lead actresses. She accepted strong character roles in films like ’36 Ghante (1974), ‘Zindagi‘ (1976), ‘Karmayogi (1978), ‘Be-Reham’ (1980), ‘Harjaee’ (1981), ‘Yeh Rishta Na Tootay’, ‘Babu’ (film) and ‘Khel’, which were popular.

In the early ’90s Madhuri Dixit was promoted as new Mala Sinha in magazines. But, after 1994, she completely withdrew from industry and has given very few public appearances. In ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ and BR Chopra’s ‘Gumrah’, she played the first unwed mother and adulterous wife respectively in Hindi cinema. As she grew older, she gracefully moved on to doing character roles that befitted her age. She was last seen in ‘Zid’ (1994). Though Mala Sinha evinced as much interest in her daughter Pratibha’s career as her father did in her career, she was unable to achieve the same success for her daughter. (Adapted from wiki).

Mala Sinha came from Calcutta to make a career in Bombay films. In Calcutta she worked in a Bilingual film ‘Chitrangada’ (1954) in Bangla and Hindi. In 1954 again, she did her first film in Bombay, ‘Baadshah’ (1954), then came ‘Hamlet’ (1954), ‘Riyaasat’ (1955) and ‘Ekadashi’ (1955).

In all her interviews, Mala Sinha always quoted ‘Rangeen Raten’ (1956) with Shammi Kapoor as her first film in Bombay. She was ashamed of revealing that in film ‘Riyaasat’ (1955), her Hero was Mahipal and in film ‘Ekadashi’ it was Trilok Kapoor. She always hid this fact. There are many heroines who want to hide their struggling days. For example, in film ‘Professor’ (1962) Shammi Kapoor’s heroine was Kalpana. Though touted as her first film, her first film was ‘Pyar Ki Jeet-62’, opposite Mahipal – a fact which Kalpana always hid from everyone.

Similarly, A grade heroine Meena Kumari also had done several mythological and costume films before ‘Baiju Bawra’ took her high up and above other heroines. Films like ‘Veer Ghatotkach’ (1949), ‘Shri Ganesh Mahima’ (1950), ‘Laxmi Narayan’ (1951), ‘Hanuman Paataal Vijay’ (1951) and ‘Alladin aur Jadui Chirag’ (1953) had Mahipal as her Hero. In her later years, she always hid her earlier film Heroes.

Even comedian Johnny walker, who is supposed to have made a beginning with ‘Baazi’ (1951), had earlier worked in ‘The Last Message’ or ‘Aakhri Paigham’ (1949). However this fact is not told by anyone.

Not only actors, but even singers do this. They hesitate to tell that the first sang for C grade films. Take the case of Sudha Malhotra, who used to declare ‘Arzoo’ (1950) as her first film, under Anil Biswas. But she never told that earlier she had sung 3 songs in film ‘Aakhri Paigham’ (1949), under the baton of Abid Hussein Khan, composer.

It is very unfortunate that once the artiste becomes famous, he tends to forget his humble beginning with less known film or a composer. This is because they are ashamed of it. I feel the blame also goes to people who take their interview, because the interview takers do not do proper homework. Many times they do not know anything and simply note down whatever is told by the artiste.

There were 8 songs in the film ‘Ek Shola’. 3 songs are already discussed. This is the 4th song. It is a long song, recorded on one side each of 78 rpm record nos. N-52832 and 52833). We present here the full song covering both sides.

 


Song – Chanda Se Bhi Pyaara Hai, Akhion Ka Taara Hai  (Ek Shola) (1958) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Geeta Dutt, Lyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, Music – Madan Mohan

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmm mmm mmm mmm mmm mmmmmmm

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla
chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla

ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri
haaye.. apni dhun mein gaa

khushi se saagar jal chhalke
pakad chaley dil sambhal ke
kahen tarangen machal ke
zaraa mauj mein lehra haaye..
khushi se saagar jal chhalke
pakad chaley dil sambhal ke
kahen tarangen machal ke
zaraa mauj mein lehra haaye..
ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri
haaye.. apni dhun mein gaa

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa

jab mera nannha chhaiyan chhaiyan
thummak thummak doley
tuk tuk taakey
jhuk jhuk jhaanke
gudiya ghunghat kholey
jab mera nannha chhaiyan chhaiyan
thummak thummak doley
tuk tuk taakey
jhuk jhuk jhaanke
gudiya ghunghat kholey
ho gudde sa dulaara
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa

ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri..ee
apni dhun mein gaa

jo mastion mein jee’e hain
usey na ?? ?? ??
ye raaz tere liye hai magar
tu nahi samjha haaye..
jo mastion mein jee’e hain
usey na ?? ?? ??
ye raaz tere liye hai magar
tu nahi samjha haaye..
ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri..ee
apni dhun mein gaa

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa
A B C D
aleef bay pay
ka kha ga gha..aa..aa
A B C D
aleef bay pay
aur bhai ka kha ga gha
ab padhne askool chala hai
ye mera shehzaada
ab padhne askool chala hai
ye mera shehzaada
ho parion ne sanwaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla
aa..aa..aa
chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla

mmm mmm mmmmmm mmmm
mmm mmm mmmmmm mmmm
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aaa aaa

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-
मम्मम मम्ममम मम्मम
मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्ममममम

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला
चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला

घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

खुशी से सागर जल छलके
पकड़ चले दिल संभाल के
कहें तरंगें मचल के
ज़रा मौज में लहरा हाए॰॰
खुशी से सागर जल छलके
पकड़ चले दिल संभाल के
कहें तरंगें मचल के
ज़रा मौज में लहरा हाए॰॰
घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

जब मेरा नन्हा छइयाँ छइयाँ
ठुमक ठुमक डोले
टूक टूक ताके
झुक झुक झाँके
गुड़िया घूँघट खोले
जब मेरा नन्हा छइयाँ छइयाँ
ठुमक ठुमक डोले
टूक टूक ताके
झुक झुक झाँके
गुड़िया घूँघट खोले
हो गुड्डे सा दुलारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

जो मस्तीओं में जीए हैं
उसे ना ?? ?? ??
ये राज़ तेरे लिए है मगर
तू नहीं समझा हाए॰॰
जो मस्तीओं में जीए हैं
उसे ना ?? ?? ??
ये राज़ तेरे लिए है मगर
तू नहीं समझा हाए॰॰
घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी॰॰ई
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

ए बी सी डी
अलीफ बे पे
क ख ग घ॰॰अ॰॰अ
ए बी सी डी
अलीफ बे पे
और भई क ख ग घ
अब पढ़ने अस्कूल चला है
ये मेरा शहज़ादा
अब पढ़ने अस्कूल चला है
ये मेरा शहज़ादा
ओ परियों ने संवारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला
आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला

मम्म मम्म मम्मममम मम्मम
मम्म मम्म मम्मममम मम्मम
आ आ आ आ आ आ॰॰आ

 


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15070

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Movies with all their songs covered =1171
Total Number of movies covered =4135

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