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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Lyrics by Sudhir’ Category


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3927 Post No. : 14996

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Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 6
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Carl Sagan, in his book, ‘Pale Blue Dot’ talks about the picture taken by Voyager I before it left the solar system. Planet Earth, the only home we have known so far appears less than a fraction of a pixel in the picture. It’s on this speck of dust like object in the vast cosmos lived every human, plant and animal we ever know and every civilization.

On this planet the greatest men in a wide variety of fields have left behind their legacies both good and bad. Their lives however great or condemnable have been spent here.  In the vastness of time and space, a few years spent by great men may mean nothing. However, the legacy left behind by such men are recognized and appreciated for generations.

Theatre and entertainment arenas have also seen many a great men and women contribute their art and expertise to mankind. Quite a few are well known and many others are often not credited to the extent to which they should be.

Narrowing down to a movie and further restricting ourselves to Hindi film and non-film songs, the essence of this blog, we are now at the doorsteps of 15 thousand representations.

By these 15k representations, we all have tried to contribute our little efforts in bringing to the fore, the works of film artists – popular, less known and unknown. Amongst the main contributors, the nearly impossible tasks are taken up more experienced and knowledgeable such as Arunkumar ji, Sudhir ji, Sadanand ji etc.  The painstaking efforts in collecting accurate information from various sources and contacts and posting in a concise manner is definitely not an easy task.

Then, there are specialists such as Nalini ji for reminding us of the artist’s anniversaries and Prakash ji for identifying lesser known actors on the screen. Raja ji, whose marathon posts never bore us and we have Avinash ji who pours his heart out in the posts. We have Bharat ji with his expertise and first-hand experience.

There have many others who were more contended with sending only lyrics and a few who keep giving home-works to others. 🙂 A few are more than happy to suggest corrections to the posts and lyrics etc. in the comments section. Then, there are also contributors who vanish for a while and re-appear for special occasions (pun about self intended). 🙂

And, finally we have Atul ji, the fulcrum of our activities and the force that binds us together. Atul ji marches along from one milestone to another. And when he reaches the next milestone, we are all automatically teleported there. 🙂

I never planned for any special song for this occasion. (That again, the leaders will have a plan). But seeing that a great gem of an even greater singer is yet to be posted, I decided to go for his solo.

The singer is Talat Mahmood, of whom quite a lot has already been written on the blog.

My father, an avid fan Talat saab often says that his voice is for royal people. By royal, he means to say people with special taste and I can’t agree with him more. Talat Saab’s melancholic songs sung in blue mood are a class apart, the likes of which one will never get to hear from any other singer.

There are several such songs of Talat Saab which one can hear multiple times and can only admire the grace and dignity in his voice for songs pertaining to even dejection.

The list seems to be endless, but it’s a fact that he sang quite fewer songs compared to his other well-known contemporaries. However, Talat Saab’s voice will always be the triumph of quality over quantity.

The present song which I had not heard in the recent past is also amongst my many favourites of Talat Mahmood. There are stars and the moon in the song in case people are wondering what Carl Sagan had to do with this song in the first place. 🙂 (Kya karein, some starting problems in writing this post)

I pray for the continued longevity on the blog, active participation of all the contributors and readers as well.

Hearty Congratulations to one and all on this great achievement.

Song – Aao Baadal Chain Se Royen (Aawaara Ladki) (1967) Singer – Talat Mehmood, Lyrics – Rajnikant, MD – Dhaniram

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

baa..aadal aa..aaawo

baadal aawo

aawo baadal aawo. . .

aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen
jalti dhoop
jalti dhoop
jalti dhoop mein main hoon akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

khush rahen
khush rahen. . .
khush rahen ye duniya waale
khush rahen ye duniya waale
khatm hua mera mela
khatm hua mera mela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

armaan the dil mein mere kitne
chanda ke
haaye chanda ke saathi taare jitne
haaye chanda ke saathi taare jitne
dooba dil armaan bhi doobe
dooba dil armaan bhi doobe
toofaan ka dekha rela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

din the chaar jo beet gaye mere
din the chaar jo beet gaye mere
honge dukh ke ab derey
honge dukh ke ab derey
darr nahin par hanse bhi kaise
darr nahin par hanse bhi kaise
gham se ab tak khela
main hoon aaj akela
aao baadal chain se royen
aao baadal chain se royen

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

बा॰॰दल आ॰॰आवो

बादल आवो

आवो बादल आवो॰ ॰ ॰

आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
जलती धूप
जलती धूप
जलती धूप में मैं हूँ अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

खुश रहें
खुश रहें॰ ॰ ॰
खुश रहें ये दुनिया वाले
खुश रहें ये दुनिया वाले
खत्म हुआ मेरा मेला
खत्म हुआ मेरा मेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

अरमान थे दिल में मेरे कितने
चंदा के
हाए चंदा के साथी तारे जितने
हाए चंदा के साथी तारे जितने
डूबा दिल अरमान भी डूबे
डूबा दिल अरमान भी डूबे
तूफाँ का देखा रेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

दिन थे चार जो बीत गए मेरे
दिन थे चार जो बीत गए मेरे
होंगे दुख के अब डेरे
होंगे दुख के अब डेरे
डर नहीं पर हँसे भी कैसे
डर नहीं पर हँसे भी कैसे
ग़म से अब तक खेला
मैं हूँ आज अकेला
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ
आओ बादल चैन से रोएँ

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3919 Post No. : 14982

 

Today’s song is from film ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944).

Hindi film makers seem to have an attraction for Mughal Empire. Films were made on life events of right from Babar to Bahadurshah Zafar- the first to the last Mughal kings. I do not know what the film makers found so magnetic in their lives. Not only Mughal kings, but also the Mongol king Changez khan, Nadir Shah and generals like Behram Khan also became the subject matters of films. May be the producers found lot of scope to show big palaces, big armies, wars, dances and songs, beautiful women etc. in such films which attracted the audience.

More than any other Mughal king, it is Babar, who has been in public discussion in India , since about 20-30 years, for well known reasons for which we are not concerned here. Babar was born as Zaheeruddin Mohammed, on 14-2-1483 in Fergana valley in what is known today as Uzbekistan. He was a direct descendant of Taimurlane. At the age of 12 years he ascended his father’s thrown and faced rebellion. Next few years were spent on fighting to save his kingdom. Having lost, and won and again lost the valley of Fergana and Samarkand three times, Babar decided to go to India.

He marched with his army towards India, which was ruled by Ibrahim Khan Lodhi that time. Babar’s army was tired and tried rebellion till they reached India. In the battle of Panipat, he defeated Lodhi and became the Emperor of India. Later he fought with several Rajput kings and won also. Babar married several times and had several children too. His 3 sons were main and Humayun was his dearest son. Babar established the Mughal Empire in 1526 at Delhi. It was Humayun, who succeeded Babar when he died on 26-12-1530.

‘Shahenshah Babar’ is a depiction of his life from childhood to death, but most part of the film is about the love affair and sickness of Humayun. After his death Babar was first buried in Agra, but later his remains were buried again in Kabul. Babar is considered a national hero in Uzbekistan and Kergystan. In India Babar is not known for such good things.

This film was made by Ranjit Movietone, calling it a historical film. It was directed by Wazahat Mirza Changezi (20-4-1908 to 4-8-1990). He directed 5 films, namely, ‘Swaminath’ (1942), ‘Jawaani’ (1942), ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944), ‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945) and ‘Nishaana’ (1950). He wrote lyrics in films like ‘Watan’ (1938), ‘Hum Tum Aur Woh’ (1938), ‘Bahen’ (1941), ‘Roti’ (1942) and ‘Jawaani’ (1942). Later he became famous as a screenplay and dialogue writer. Some of his famous films are ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Shikast’ (1953), ‘Mother India’ (1957), ‘Yahudi’ (1958). ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960), ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961), ‘Leader’ (1964), ‘Palki’ (1967) etc.

The music director was Khemchand Prakash and lyricists were Pt. Indra, Munshi Aziz and Munshi Shums. Out of the 9 songs, today’s song is 5th song to be discussed here. The cast of the film was Khurshid, Sheikh Mukhtar, Sushil Kumar, Yakub, Majid, Anwari, Agha and others.

Religious, mythological or historical stories have some characters who are with extra ordinary strength or even Rakshasas. Such characters maintained the equilibrium of entertainment in those films and made them more interesting with their actions. In the Hindi film industry, some actors fitted this requirement. Some of them were BM Vyas, Ramayan Tiwari, Sheikh Mukhtar, Dara Singh, Dev kumar etc. Sheikh Mukhtar fitted into these roles perfectly, for example as ‘Nadir Shah’ in film ‘Nadir Shah’ (1968), as Changez Khan in film ‘Changez Khan’ (1957), or as Sher Afghan in film ‘Noor Jehan’ (1967). In social films, roles of police officers and in action/stunt films as dacoit, drunkard, gambler etc. In some of the films directors used to make him do unimaginable and unbelievable acts like in film ‘Roti’ (1942), he brings down an aircraft with his spear throw ! As a police officer, he would hold 5-6 criminals by their scruff in his extra large hands or run barefoot after a speeding jeep and stop it !

His real name was Mukhtar Ahmed Siddiqi. He was from old Delhi. His father was a senior police officer. He was Bollywood`s first ‘hunk’ – one who would have put today`s WWF hulks to shame. Exceptionally tall and frighteningly hefty, he was endowed with an immense physique. His face was a roadmap of crisscrossing muscles. A sharp jaw line added to the dimensions of his rock-hard face. Hardly `star` material compared to the Hrithiks and Salmans of today. Yet, this rugged man was once a hero.

Those were the days when a limp-wristed hero, who could not even unlock the mysteries of the lush curls of his beloved, was universally adored in cinema halls. In such times, Sheikh Mukhtar adorned the garb of a hero. This feat was achieved by movie monarch Mehboob Khan. In ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (aka ‘The Only Way’), a film directed by Mehboob Sb for Sagar Movietone way back in 1939, Sheikh Mukhtar was one of the three heroes. The other two were Arun Ahuja (matinee idol Govinda`s father) and a certain Harish (who later directed films such as ‘Burma Road’, he was Tara Harish). Though billed as male lead, Sheikh Mukhtar never fitted into the `romantic` mold. And why should he? He portrayed an uncouth lover, almost a pre-Neanderthal man, in Mehboob Khan`s ‘Roti’ with sensuous Sitara Devi as his beloved. In that film, Sheikh would bring down an aircraft with the mere strike of his spear. When thirsty, he would empty an entire bucket down his throat in one go. Soppy dialogues oozing with maudlin emotions such as love and romance, did not come forth from the super-hunk.

In Wadia`s ‘Krishnabhakt Bodana’ (1944), Sheikh Mukhtar was the Lord`s devotee. In ‘Bahen’ (1941), he portrayed the role of Nalini Jaywant’s brother. His imposing personality fitted well into period films which dabbled in history. He played the role of Shahenshah Babar; went on to become Chengez Khan and then donned the mantle of Sher Afghan in ‘Noor Jehan’, a film which he produced. He was often teamed with Begum Para, the bewitching beauty of that era. The pair hit it off exceedingly well on the screen. For countless cinema aficionados, the Sheikh Mukhtar-Begum Para pair was a classic case of the beauty and the beast. With pint-sized Mukri, Sheikh Mukhtar had a successful celluloid partnership. Sheikh Mukhtar produced a string of Hindi films, such as ‘Dada’, ‘Dara’, ‘Ustad Pedro’, ‘Toote Taare’, ‘Mr. Lambu’, ‘Annadaata’, ‘Mangu’ (with another beauty, Nigar Sultan), ‘Do Ustaad’, and ‘Noor Jehan’, among others.

He wove into his films a variety of songs, from “Bahaaron Ke Dole Mein Aayi Hai Jawaani”, a romantic number from ‘Annadaata’, to naughty ditties, such as “Dil Ka Ye Injan Seetiyaan Maare” from ‘Ustaad Pedro’, and “Namaste, Doctor Baaro, Hum Ko Bhi Ek Injection Maaro”. Sheikh Mukhtar`s pair of shoes, of twelve number size, (in ‘Do Ustaad’), summed up his big time existence. His role in this film was widely appreciated. Sheikh Mukhtar showcased his acting talents in the concluding scene of ‘Do Ustaad’ when he holds his long-lost brother and son to his bosom.

Sheikh Mukhtar invested all his hard-earned money on ‘Noor Jehan’, his dream project. However, the period film bombed miserably at the box office. And with the film collapsed this mighty man. Debts began to pile up. Income Tax arrears kept multiplying in geometrical progression. Unable to resolve this crisis, Sheikh Mukhtar, who was adored in Bollywood for his integrity and for his firmness to keep vices of every variety at bay, fled to Pakistan with the alacrity of a small-time house burglar. He took with him the prints of his films. But, sadly, the Pakistan film industry offered him no succor. He kept running from pillar to post, visiting government offices with a plea that he be allowed to release his films.

He was not at all welcomed by Pak film industry. As it is Indian films were already banned there. When all efforts failed, he met General Zia ul Haq. He was a great fan of Sohrab Modi. When he learnt that Sohrab Modi was acting in this film, he allowed the film’s release. However, the Pak film industry went to Supreme court against this order. The case dragged on and finally on 11th may 1980 he won the case. While hee was returning to Lahore with his son Sheikh Moinuddin, Mukhtar got a severe heart attack in the flight. He was immediately taken home and doctor was called. Strangely no doctor came to help him. Finally by the time he was taken to hospital, he died on the way.

‘Noor Jehan’, which was released in Pakistan after Sheikh Mukhtar died, on 23rd may 1980, kept the box office registers ringing with cash. In his 40 years’ career he acted in 70 films and under the banner of his own Omar Khayyam Films, he produced 8 films. (Some information from articles by Shirish Kanekar and Jawed Hamid is used here with thanks).

Singer actress Khurshid played the heroine Hameeda’s role and sang good songs too. Here is an edited interview of Khursheed, taken in 1992,by Pakistani journalist, Navid Rasheed (Thanks to Cineplot)..

Khursheed Bano was born as Irshad Begum in Lahore, on 14th April 1914. As a child she resided in the Bhatti Gate area next to Allama Iqbal’s house. The two families were pretty close. Khursheed was a child then. There was no ambition of joining the showbiz bandwagon then and it was by chance that led her to this arena.

Khursheed was very still young when she became an actress in the early 30’s. The era of the silent movies had already ended with the release of ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931 and the Indian film industry was going through a revolution. What set her apart from other heroines were her attractive face and certain flamboyance owing to which she made her presence felt. And then she was very good actress who could be melodramatic and happy-go-lucky with equal ease.

Each star then was required to playback for themselves and Khursheed was lucky to have a good voice. Hence started the brilliant era of some timeless classical and exemplary numbers like “Panchhi Baawraa Chaand Se Preet Lagaaye”.

The graceful and decent actress was luckier to secure some of the best films including ‘Sitaara’, ‘Shaadi’, ‘Musafir’, ‘Pardesi’, ‘Bhagat Surdas’, ‘Dekha Jayega’, ‘Shehanshah Babar’ and ‘Tansen’. ‘Pardesi’ had a very famous soundtrack comprising of memorable numbers by the late actress. In ‘Tansen’ she played the protagonist Tani with Kundan Lal Saigal as Tansen. Together they made indelible performances and the role took her to great heights. She even transcended Saigal with her strong performances and pretty looks and her fans started calling her Tani after that. Her leading men in those days apart from Saigal were Motilal, Ishwar Lal, Nazeer and Sadiq Ali. She made a successful pair with Motilal the most. Her female contemporaries included actresses of caliber like Kanan Bala, Devika Rani, Leela Chitnis, Suraiya, Swaranlata and Noor Jehan. The last three were her juniors.

Khursheed said that there was no such thing as rivalry in those days and actresses worked in close coordination. Abusing, backbiting or gossiping was not amongst their traits. Even the male stars with whom she worked treated her with great respect and there were no scandals.

Though she was an accomplished singer, acting remained her forte and first love. “Singing was a requirement to be a heroine in those days”, she said, “and even heroines with not too good voices were forced to sing if they were to act. But the composers were so good that they managed to get the best out of them then. Each song was recorded after several rehearsals. But I was an actress first and singing was just to complement that.”

Khursheed was not too happy with the way films shaped up in the years to come. So much so that she never wanted to see films anymore. In the interview she expressed her displeasure, “In spite of the resources and much higher budget, there is not a single film maker in the entire sub continent who could make a film even half as good as the films made in my era. Ours were simple films but treated well and had strong content. Plus the hard work and honesty of each unit member reflected in the entire film. This thing is missing now. A film is not only about technique, rather the issue, sensitivity and sincere dedication too.

Following partition in 1947, Khursheed opted to move to Pakistan. She worked in two Pakistani films too – ‘Mandi’ and ‘Fankaar’. But then she decided to quit and tied the knot with a Karachi – based businessman Yousaf Bhai Mian. They had one daughter who lived in the US when the interview was conducted. She then concentrated on her marriage alone and emerged equally successful on the home front as much as she was in films. She was happy that she quit films before their standards declined .

Khursheed died on 18-4-2001 at Lahore.

Khursheed Bano sang about 170 songs in about 40 films in India. Her life and career would have been like any other actor/singer, but for the controversy of her initiation into films as ‘SHEHLA’ ( HFGK writes this name as SHAILA ) at Calcutta between 1931 and 1935. It was finally and conclusively proved by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji, that Khurshid and Shehla were different and two separate individuals.

The story of film Shahenshah Babar,

The film starts with the march of Babar’s army to India in 1526, with flashbacks of his childhood and activities as an young man. Defeating Ibrahim Khan Lodhi in the battle of Panipat, Babar becomes Emperor of India.

One of his knights Sardar Sheikh has a daughter Hameeda. She and Babar’s son Humayun fall in love and meet often. When Babar comes to know this, he takes a promise from Humayun that he will forget Hameeda. Humayun promises and leaves Hameeda. Heart broken Hameeda is taken by her father to their native place .

Humayun falls ill and is on death bed. To save his life Babar prays to God that he saves Humayun and instead give death to Babar. In addition, he himself goes and brings back Hameeda to Humayun. In few months Humayun gets well, but Babar dies.

I distinctly remember, when I was studying in 5th or 6th standard, we had a lesson “The Power of Prayer” and in this lesson Babar and Humayun’s story was told, how Babar sacrifices his life for son’s life by praying to God. The film too has the same theme. It seems this story is there in ‘Humayun-Nama’ written by Gulbadan Begum, half sister of Humayun. I have not seen this film.

Today’s song is a duet of Zohrabai and Munshi Aziz. The song is written by Pt. Indra.

(Some information has been used, with thanks, from book ‘Forgotten movies on Muslim Culture 1933-1947’, by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji.)

Song – Hamen Bhool Mat Jaiyo Raja Ji  (Shahenshah Babar) (1944) Singer – Zohrabai, Munshi Aziz, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

ho raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
o raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
ulajh mat jaee
ulajh mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
ho raja ji
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
paagal na ban jaiyo
ho paagal na ban jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dil to rahega paas tumhaare
dil to rahega paas tumhaare
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
o rani ji
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
ho raja ji
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
machal mat jaiyo
haaye machal mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo o rani ji
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

हो राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस

राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस
उलझ मत जइ
उलझ मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
हो राजा जी
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
पागल ना बन जइयो
हो पागल ना बन जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
ओ रानी जी
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
हो राजा जी
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
मचल मत जइयो
हाए मचल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो ओ रानी जी
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3909 Post No. : 14967

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Blog Ten Year Challenge (2009-2019)-Song number 25
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This is my First song post for ‘The 10 year Challenge’ series. Today, 10 years ago, on this day, 6 songs were posted. They were 1 song each for films ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954), ‘Marine Drive’ (1955), ‘Naag Devta’ (1962), ‘Bees Saal Baad’ (1962), ‘Prince’ (1969) and ‘Lootmaar’ (1980).

From the day it started, I was keen on participating, but everyday that I checked I found films either belonging to the 60s to 80s or films which were already Yippeee’d. I became helpless. Not that I can not or don’t want to write on songs of films of 70s and beyond, but they are not of my liking. Further I like to write only on songs or films, where I have something substantial to offer to our readers.

Finally, I found one film from 1st April 2009, which had some scope for me. The song is from film ‘Bahut Din Huye’. First, out of the 17 songs only 3 songs are posted on the blog and hence lot of choice to choose a song from remaining 14 songs, and secondly, the background of the film, the stars, the producer/director, the company etc were matters where I could elaborate to my will. So, I opted for this film’s song today.

The film is from the southern giant – Gemini Pictures. The film title sounds almost like a translation of ‘Once upon a time…’. It is a very apt title too, because the film is based on a folk tale of south. I like such films made in south and also their mythological films. When I see these films, the costumes of all the actors as well as their palaces etc remind me of similar pictures that used to appear in Chandamama magazines.

Chandamama (Chandoba in Marathi) magazines vied with my childhood craze of seeing films and reading books. Like many of my age group, our childhood had an important segment covered by Chandamama (in 13 Languages, including English and Sanskrit) readings. I strongly believe that  either the south film actors copied costumes from Chandamama pictures or the vice versa, but they resembled each others, for sure !

As expected, ‘Bahut Din Huye’ was a remake of Gemini’s own block buster ‘Bala Nagamma’ from 1942. Gemini Studios was the best known Madras studio in the 1940s for redefining the concept of mass entertainment with ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), the first Madras film to break successfully into the Hindi cinema circuit. SS Vasan started Gemini as a distribution agency, the Gemini Pictures Circuit, distributing and partly financing films by K Subramanyam’s Motion Picture Producers Combine. When the Combine went bankrupt, Vasan bought the studio in 1939 at public auction for a mere Rs 86,427-11 (annas)-9 (paise) (according to Randor Guy). The studio’s début feature was probably Balkrishna Narayan Rao’s ‘Madanakamarajan’ (1941), but it only took off when cameraman-scenarist K Ramnoth joined it along with his Vauhini partner, art-director AK Sekhar. This team made most of Gemini’s early features: ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943), ‘Kannamma En Kadhali’ (1945) and ‘Miss Malini’ (1947) before the ‘Chandralekha’ blitz catapulted it on to the national stage.

In the early days, the most important event in the studio was Uday Shankar’s dance extravaganza ‘Kalpana’ (released 1948) which also provided training for most of Gemini’s technicians as well as providing the model for an Orientalist dance idiom later associated with influential Tamil choreographers like Hiralal and Chopra Master. A few minor hits followed ‘Chandralekha’ before the studio’s second major onslaught on the national box office with ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’ (1949), a trilingual that established the studio’s dominance in the genre of the costumed adventure movie. Although its Hindi version ‘Nishan’ was not a major success, Vasan continued making Hindi films, often signing up major stars of Hindi films himself: e.g. the Dilip Kumar and Dev Anand film ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955), Vyjayanthimala’s ‘Raj Tilak’ (1958) and ‘Paigham (1959) starring Dilip Kumar, Raaj Kumar and Vyjayanthimala. They also made the mega-budget Tamil classic ‘Avvaiyyar’ (1953). An important later production was ‘Motor Sundaram Pillai’ (1966), Sivaji Ganesan’s only film at this studio. In 1958 the studio expanded into the Gemini Colour lab, licensed by Eastman color Kodak film. After Vasan’s death, his son SS Balasubramanyam produced the unsuccessful ‘Ellorum Nallavare’ (1975). Gemini’s productions declined in the 70s, although it remained successful as a studio and equipment rental business now taken over by the Anand Cine Services.

The unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ into all India market, Subramaniam Srinivasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He  established the popular Tamil magazine ‘Anand Vikatan’, and owned Gemini studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film. In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a  success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’ (1950). Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. ‘Mangala’ was remade in Sinhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955 and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao (later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh), and Jamuna.

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu Version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ in 1950 followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ in 1951. They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 1960s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to novels of writers like Chetan Bhagat. And thanks to modernization.

‘Bahut Din Huye’ had a cast consisting of Madhubala, Ratan Kumar, Agha, Kailash, Savitri (debut film in Hindi), Lalita Pawar, Pushpvalli (mother of Rekha), Kanhaiya Lal etc. Ratan Kumar had a big role in this film. Another film of 1954, ‘Jagriti’ also had a pivotal role for Ratan Kumar.

Ratan Kumar’s real name was Syed Nazar Ali (born 21-8-42 at Ajmer, passed away 12-12-2016 at California, USA). He started working as a child star when he was just 4 year old. His first film was Baburao Patel’s ‘Gwaalan’ (1946). He did 25 film roles before he acted in film ‘Jagriti’. He worked in many famous films like ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Malhaar’ (1951), ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Boot Polish’ (1953) etc. After doing film ‘Jalwa’ in 1955, he migrated to Pakistan in 1956, with his family, and remade ‘Jagriti’ in Pakistan, as ‘Bedaari(1957) – Urdu translation of the Hindi word Jagriti. This film used the same old tune for a film song in Pakistan, aimed at igniting a similar emotion and patriotic zeal, among the listeners. – “Aao Bachcho Tumhe Dikhayen Jhaanki Hindustan Ki… (come children let us show you glimpses of India), is a popular Hindi film song of the 1950s. “Aao Bachcho Sair Karaayen Tumko Pakistan Ki… (children, let us take you on a tour of Pakistan) is an equally hit song of the same period in Pakistan. The movie ‘Bedaari’ (1957) was produced by his elder brother Wazir Ali Rizvi.

He played a young boy’s role in many Pakistani films later. ‘Naagin (1959) was the first Pakistani film he played a lead actor opposite Neelo as the lead actress. Ratan Kumar’s success, as a lead actor, could not last long because his later films did not do well at the box-office and he eventually faded away.

In 1977, his 4 years old daughter died in an accident in Lahore, Pakistan. He was so emotionally upset after that accident that he decided to quit the Pakistani film industry. In 1979, Ratan Kumar left Pakistan never to return again. In the late 1960s, Ratan Kumar also got into the business of selling oriental carpets and had started travelling back and forth from Pakistan to Europe for this business. Eventually he ended up settling down permanently in the United States after 1979.

Ratan Kumar was living in California, in his old age, and was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia 10 days before his death on 12 Dec 2016. He had a long history of illness, though. In 1996, his lungs had collapsed twice in the same year. When they collapsed the third time in 2000, he was left paralyzed and went into a coma for eight days. Then he recovered in four to five months and became somewhat normal again. His survivors include 2 sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren .

Music for film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ is by a pair of BS Kalla and E Sankar Sastry. Many south Indian composers had tried their hand at giving music to Hindi films in the 50s decade. MDs like Ghantasala, BS Kalla, SD Parthasarathi, E Shankar, B Laxman, Vishwanathan, R Sudarshanam, SV Venkataramana, TR Ramanathan and TG Lingappa are few of the lesser known music directors from south, who composed music for Hindi films. They gave melodious music, but somehow they did not succeed here. One reason could be their use of southern singers, for whom acceptability was a problem here for Hindi songs. Names like Ramesh Naidu, Adi Narayana Rao and the pair of Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy were at least known names here. Their films like ‘Piya Milan’ (1955, MD – Ramesh Naidu), ‘Suvarna Sundari’ (1958, MD – Adi Narayana Rao) and ‘Naya Aadmi’ (1956, MD – Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy) had many popular songs.

The film had 17 songs, 7 of these were sung by Lata Mangeshkar and the remaining were either by chorus or unnamed male/female singers. The lyrics were by Pt. Indra. Let us now hear today’s chorus song and enjoy the song and dance video.

[Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Rajadhyaksha, HFGK, MuVyz, The Hindu, Wiki and my notes.]

Song – Swaagat Raajkumar Tumhaara, Swaagat Raajkumar  (Bahut Din Huye) (1954) Singer – Chorus, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – BS Kalla

Lyrics

aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aa aa aa aaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaa aaaaa

swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar
swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar

aaaa aaaa aaaa
ye akhiyan matwaali kab se
rahi hain baat nihaar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa

aao baitho ratan hindole
aaaa aaaa aaaa
ratan hindole
pawan veg se jhulo
tum pyaare mehmaan hamaare..ae..ae
aao sab kuchh bhulo
jhoola jhulo

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmmm mmmmm mmmm

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आ आ आ आssss
आ आ आ आ
आ आss आssss आssss
आsss आssss

स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार
स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार

आ आ आ
ये अखियाँ मतवाली कब से
रही हैं बाट निहार
आsss आsss आsssss आsss
आsss आsss आsss
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ

आओ बैठो रतन हिंडोले
आsss आsss आsss
रतन हिंडोले
पावन वेग से झूलो
तुम प्यारे मेहमान हमारे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आओ सब कुछ भूलो
झूला झूलो

आsss आsss आsss आsss
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3878 Post No. : 14901

Today’s song is from film ‘Doctor Z’ from 1959.

The title seems funny, isn’t it? Somehow, I find that the film makers give bizarre titles to their films sometimes. Films with prefix Mr. or Dr. were plenty. The earliest such a Talkie film was ‘Mr. 420’ made in 1937. Later, ‘Mr. X’ was made in 1938. This was repeated in 1957 and 1984. ‘Mr. X in Bombay’ was made in 1964. ‘Mr. India’ came in 1961 and also 1987. There was a ‘Mr. Bechara’ in 1996, ‘Mr. Chakram’ in 1956, ‘Mr, Jhatpat’ in 1943, ‘Mr John’ in 1959, ‘Mr. Lamboo’ in 1956. ‘Mr. Romeo’ in 1973 and 1999. ‘Mr. Q’ in 1958, ‘Mr.Bond’ in 1992, ‘Mr. Azad’in 1994, ‘Mr .Dynamite’ in 1947, ‘Mr. Murder’ in 1969, ‘Mr. Qartoon, M.A.’ in 1958, ‘Mr. Sampat’ in 1952, ‘Mr. Toofan’ in 1963, ‘Mr. 100%’ in 2005, ‘Mr. Badmash’ in 2009, ‘Mr. Bhatti on Chhutti’ in 2012, ‘Mr. Hot and Mr. Cool’ in 2007, ‘Mr. Lonely Miss Lovely’ in 2004, ‘Mr. Prime Minister’ in 2005, ‘Mr. Singh Mrs. Mehta’ in 2009, ‘Mr. White Mr. Black’ in 2007, ‘Mr. ya Mrs.’ in 2005, The most hilarious title in this category was ‘Mr. Khujli’ in 2007 !!!

Starting with ‘Dr. Madhurika’ (1935), it was ‘Dr. Ambedkar’ (1989 and 2000), ‘Dr. Kotnis Ki Amar Kahani’ (1946), ‘Dr. Kumar’ (1944), ‘Dr. Ramesh’ (1949), ‘Dr. Vidya’ (1962), ‘Dr. Z’ (1959) etc.

The decade of the 1940s and the 1950s was the period when stunt and action films were made in plenty. There were specialised actors, producers, directors, composers and even specialised audiences too for such films. Stunt and action films was a very sweeping name for a genre which included several types of sub-categories. When I started studying these films, I found one kind soul – Mike Burnum -who identified and classified stunt/action films made in India, into sub categories. For the information of our esteemed readers, the different types within the generalised stunt/action films are…(in descending order of number of films made….

  1. Fantasy and Arabian  Nights  -92 films
  2. Horror – 67
  3. Jungle Thrillers (Tarzan/Zimbo/Zambo/Zangbo/Zingara etc)
  4. New Century Horror films ( Horror films made after 2000)
  5. Science Fiction
  6. Chillers
  7. Spies and Detective
  8. Super heroes / heroines
  9. Murder and Mystery
  10. Sword Fighting and
  11. Naag Films etc.

Today’s film ‘Doctor Z’, falls under Science Fiction category. Though it was a C grade action film, HFGK mentions it as a ‘Social’ film. May be, as it was not exactly a stunt film, the film may have been classified as a social film. The story of this film was just a one line story, expanded at convenience as per needs of audiences. Mahipal – a Police officer is after a gang of anti-national criminals, who want to steal a formula from a scientist, which can destroy a big country like India in just 2 minutes. He (naturally, compulsorily and as per the director’s directions) falls in love with the scientist’s pretty daughter to sing songs, when not on duty. The film ends on expected Happy Notes.

The cast of the film was Shakila, Mahipal, Helen, Krishnakumari, Mirza Musharraf, Sunder, Tun Tun and a host of other junior actors. The film was made by Baliwala Films. It was produced and directed by its owner Jal. There were two lyricists and the 8 melodious songs were composed by Music Director Manohar Arora. Now this Manohar was a separate, different and independent composer. Most sites and blogs mistake him for being Manoharlal Sonik, of Sonik-Omi composer duo. This is NOT so. He was different. 2 songs from this film have been posted on this blog and both the times he was mentioned as Manoharlal Sonik. I must confess that I was responsible for this mix up. I had made a comment in 2011 that he was Manoharlal Sonik of the duo, which was a wrong statement. 3 years after that comment the real information about Manohar came up, hence I am making this clarification, at this opportunity. I feel sorry that I had followed the wrong info track that time.

The composer MANOHAR ARORA was a Punjabi music director who came from Sialkot to try his luck in Bombay. His first film was ‘Raees’ in 1948. Then came ‘Josh’ in 1950, ‘Rangeele Musafir’ (1950), ‘Bhoole Bhatke’ (1952), ‘Jingo’ (1952), ‘Usha Kiran’ (1952). His best remembered film was ‘Chingari’ (1955). Then came ‘Passing Show’ (1956), ‘Mister Q’ (1958), ‘Dr. Z’ (1959), ‘Choron Ki Baarat’ (1960) and last film was ‘Do Dushman’ (1967). His name is mostly written as ‘Manohar’ only. This created a misunderstanding that he was Manoharlal Sonik, which is NOT correct.

From the cast of this film, Krishna Kumari is another name which causes confusion. There was a Krishna Kumari in silent films and talkie films of the 1930s. Then there was another Krishna Kumari who was from South and featured in dubbed and remade films. She too is different. Actress Krishna Kumari who worked in  Hindi films from 1948 to 1968 was another one.

Krishna Kumari (not to be confused with the 1930s actress of the same name nor the south Indian actress T. Krishna Kumari) was born Rajinder Kaur in Rawalpindi, Punjab state (now part of Pakistan) on October 3, 1934. Occasionally playing the heroine in B-grade films including ‘Vanraj’ (1952), ‘Gorilla’ (1953), ‘Black Rider’ (1960), ‘State Express’ (1961) and ‘Khush Naseeb’ (1964) she is probably much better known as a temptress or villain in the likes of ‘Baghdad Ka Jaadu’ (1956), ‘Zimbo’ (1958), ‘Police Station’ (1959), ‘Lady Of The Lake’ (1960), ‘Jaadu Mahal’ (1962) or dozens of similar action, horror and fantasy films.

Her debut came in the film ‘Girls School’ (1949), which also featured newcomers Geeta Bali and Shashikala, after which she appeared in ‘Nao’, which actually ended up in theaters first, releasing in 1948, just two months after her film ‘Intezaar’ (1948) was released. Film ‘Girls School’ was stalled due to the dispute between Amiya Chakravarty and Anil Biswas.

Krishna Kumari’s career lasted 20 years, and during that time she managed to chalk up an impressive amount of credits, even if most of the pictures she made were not considered important by critics. She acted in 117 films. Her first film on screen was ‘Intezaar’ (1948) and last film was ‘Jung Aur Aman’ (1968).

Hiralal is a familiar face to every fan of vintage Bollywood as he played countless character parts, often as the villain, in literally hundreds of films both big and small.

He was born Hiralal Thakur on March 14, 1912 in Lahore (now part of Pakistan) and began his career in silent films with AR Kardar’s ‘Safdar Jung’ which was released in 1930, while his second film, ‘Daughters of Today’, actually made it to movie theaters first, in 1929. He was under contract to United Players Corporation and made several silent pictures for them before making the transition to sound and moving on to other studios for films like ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932), ‘Seeta’ (1934), and ‘Blood Feud’ (1935).

Some of his notable fantasy, sci-fi and horror films include ‘Khooni Jadugar’ (1939), ‘Arabian Nights’ (1946), ‘Mehbooba’ (1954), ‘Hatimtai Ki Beti’ (1955), ‘Roop Basant’ (1955), ‘Sakhi Hatim‘ (1955), ‘Shah Behram‘ (1955), ‘Indra Sabha’ (1956), ‘Shaan-e-Hatim’ (1958), ‘Dr. Z  (1959), Dr. Shaitan (1960),  Jadoo Mahal (1962), Flying Man (1965), Gumnaam (1965), Sindbad, Alibaba and Alladin (1965), Love and Murder‘ (1966), ‘Sheba and Hercules’ (1967), and ‘Alibaba’ (1976). Hiralal worked continuously until his death on June 27, 1982.

He had worked in 203 films. His first film was ‘Pavitra Ganga’ (1932) and last film was ‘Kaalia’ (1981).

Now let us enjoy the comedy song from film ‘Doctor Z’. This was filmed on Sunder and Nasreen. This duet is sung by Balbir and Geeta Dutt.

(Thanks to Mike Barnum ji, Harish Raghuwanshi ji, Flash Back, vol I-Isak Mujawar, HFGK, MuVyz and my notes.)

 

Song – Main Hoon Bhaiya Dim Timkar  (Doctor Z) (1959) Singer – Balbir, Geeta Dutt, Lyrics – Akhtar Romani, Music – Manohar
Balbir + Geeta Dutt

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

itna akad mat
arey mujh se jhagad mat
baat nahin ye achhi
dil ko jakad mat
mujh pe bigad mat
preet meri hai sachchi
zara muskaaye di ho
dil ko khilaaye di ho
zulm karat kyon dil par..rr
main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

pyaar jataa mat
zyaada mujhko banaa mat
matlab ki sab yaari
nazren phira mat
haaye re haaye dil ko jalaa mat
kuchh to dikha dildaari
mera naam lio nahin
aisa kabhi kio nahin
varna to jayi ho mar mar
main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

dil tera ghar hai
meri jaan tera hi jigar hai
tujh pe sab kurbaan
pyaar ka asar hai
jhoomti nazar hai
hanste hain armaan
aaj mera dil gaya
to se jaa ke mil gayaa
hui bina judaa dam bhar

main hoon bhaiya dim timkar
baap mera tee timtimkar
eh he dil gum hui gavaa
pyaar mein khui gavaa
ik tu samajh dilbar

main hoon madam rimjhimkar
maa meri thi simsimkar
nainwa chubhoi gavaa
jisko wo rui gavaa
tu ka hui rehat khabar

lar lar lallaa pam pam pam

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

इतना अकड़ मत
अरे मुझ से झगड़ मत
बात नहीं ये अच्छी
दिल को जकड़ मत
मुझ पे बिगड़ मत
प्रीत मेरी है सच्ची
ज़रा मुस्काए दी हो
दिल को खिलाये दी हो
ज़ुल्म करत क्यों दिल पर॰॰र्र
मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

प्यार जता मत
ज़्यादा मुझको बना मत
मतलब की सब यारी
नज़रें फिरा मत
हाय रे हाए दिल को जला मत
कुछ तो दिखा दिलदारी
मेरा नाम लियो नहीं
ऐसा कभी कियो नहीं
वरना तो जई हो मर मर
मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

दिल तेरा घर है
मेरी जान तेरा ही जिगर है
तुझ पे सब क़ुर्बान
प्यार का असर है\
झूमती नज़र है
हँसते हैं अरमान
आज मेरा दिल गया
तो से जा के मिल गया
हुई बिना जुदा दम भर

मैं हूँ भईया डीम टिमकर
बाप मेरा टी टिमटिमकर
एह हे दिल गुम हुई गवा
प्यार में खुई गवा
इक तू समझ दिलबर

मैं हूँ मैडम रिमझिमकर
माँ मेरी थी सिमसिमकर
नैनवा चुभोई गवा
जिसको वो रुई गवा
तू का हुई रहत खबर

लर लर लल्ला पम पम पम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3843 Post No. : 14854

Today’s song is from film ‘Bhedi Bangla’ (1949). This film was produced by Anand Subramanyam, under the banner of Jagriti films, owned by Master Bhagwan. The story, dialogues and songs were by Ehsaan Rizvi and music was by P Ramakant. This was a name used by C Ramchandra, because he was under contract with Filmistan and could not give music in his own name. It started with Raja Nene’s film Shadi Se Pehle’ in 1947, in which he first used his assistant’s name Paingankar (the joint MD was Karnad). His name was Ramakant Paingankar and was assisting Chitalkar for a long time. Later, for Bhagwan’s films like ‘Bhedi Bangla’, ‘Bhole Bhale’ (1949), ‘Babuji’ (1950), and ‘Bakshish’ (1950) also, Chitalkar used the pseudo name P Ramakant as MD (information from Marathi Chitrapat Sangeetkar Kosh by Madhu Potdar).

Master Bhagwan was a very hard working person. In the real sense, he brought in the wave of stunt films in the late 40s. After the films of Master Vithal and Fearless Nadia waned in their popularity by 1944-45, it was Master Bhagwan, who established his own Production house – Jagriti Films, and produced several stunt films. He had a set of actors and actresses, which included Baburao Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Azeembhai, Shanta Patel, Chanchal, Leela Gupte, Usha Shukla and Vitha Lokare.

The storyline for most of his films was also fixed. Two young vagabonds – Baburao Pehelwan and Bhagwan, come to Bombay in search of employment. One Sethji (Azeembhai) appoints them to protect him from the local criminal (Vasantrao Pehelwan). Sethji has a good looking daughter (one of the stock Heroines), who has a maid (another girl from the stock). Baburao loves Seth ji’s daughter and Bhagwan loves the maid. After lot many stunts and fighting scenes, the end would be happy. The same story with changed names and other minor changes was used in almost all his films like ‘Badla’, ‘Bahadur’, ‘Jalan’, ‘Madadgaar’, ‘Dosti’, ‘Shake Hand’, ‘Matlabi’, ‘Bach Ke Rehna’, ‘Bhole Bhale’, ‘Jeete Raho’ or such other films. The audience did not mind . They were happy with the stunts. (Did Nasir Hussain get inspiration from Bhagwan in this matter ?)

Master Bhagwan entered the film world with silent film ‘Bewafa Ashiq’ (1930). His first talkie film was ‘Himmat-e-Marda’ (1934). Initially, like all other heroes, even Bhagwan used to sing his own songs. Once he had gone to Columbia company for rehearsal and recording a song. While entering, he saw a young man sitting under a tree and writing something. After rehearsal, he saw that fellow again and even after recording the man was still writing something. Bhagwan went to him and asked with curiosity what was he writing. The man answered, I am writing songs and stories. He came to know that his name was Ehsaan Rizvi and that he too lives in Dadar like Bhagwan. He took Rizvi’s address and left.

In 1938, Bhagwan got his first film as a director- ‘Bahadur Kisaan’ (1938). He called Ehsan Rizvi and gave him the job of writing the story, dialogues and songs. From that day Ehsaan Rizvi became a part of his team. He wrote for at least 25 films of Bhagwan’s. Born in 1914, Rizvi wrote lyrics for 60 films, but most of them were B or C grade films. He however wrote dialogues and screenplay for some well known films like ‘Do Ustad’ (1959), ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960), ‘Woh Kaun Thi’ (1964), ‘Aan Milo Sajna’ (1971), ‘Gopichand Jasoos’ (1982) etc. He had shared the Filmfare award for dialogues of ‘Mughal e Azam’, with 3 other writers. He died on 16-1-1983.

Bhagwan and CR got introduced when Bhagwan was directing film ‘Bahadur Kisaan’ for producer Chandrarao Kadam. The MD was Meer Saheb and CR was his assistant. Of course, that time he was just Ram Chitalkar. Their friendship lasted for many more years. For film ‘Bahadur Kisaan’, the background music was composed by Naushad, CR and Sajjad Hussain. Naushad played piano, CR played organ and Sajjad played mandolin. Another person Prem, played clarinet. They were all struggling artistes then.

In 1942 Bhagwan directed ‘Sukhi Jeevan’, for which CR was the MD for the first time. Bhagwan and the producer Harishchandra Rao Kadam had some dispute on payments. Bhagwan decided to start his own production company and he started Jagriti Pictures. His first film was ‘Badla’ (1943). For this film he took 80,000 from a financier, with a condition of repaying one lakh rupees after the film is released. After this film Bhagwan churned out film after film in the stunt genre. In 1949, Bhagwan made film ‘Bhedi Bangla’, which was the first of its kind – a sort of horror cum mystery film. The film was a hit film. With this film Bhagwan had reached the zenith of his stunt films.

In this film, there were several scenes, where Bhagwan sees a ghost and his eyes widen and breath is held up. Due to the strain on the eyes, they became red and swollen and after some time, suddenly, he could not see anything. He thought that he has become blind. He shouted for his brother Shanker. Bhagwan was immediately taken to a hospital in Girgaon. The doctor examined him,gave him an injection and some tablets. That night he slept like a dead man, but after getting up on next day noon, he was happy that his eyesight was normal now.

Bhagwan had noticed that whenever his film’s trial show was arranged, a handsome young man would be present there. When he saw this man at the trial show of ‘Bhedi Bangla’ again, he inquired as to who he was. The young man told him that his name was Raj Kapoor and he was son of the great Prithviraj Kapoor. Bhagwan called him and asked him why he came. Raj kapoor said, “Sir, I like your stunt films. I am your fan. In my films, I copy your dance style. Why don’t you make a social film ?”. Few days later, even CR also pushed him hard to enter the social film genre now, so that CR can openly lend his name to Bhagwan’s films as MD and his film will get the benefit of his fame. Thereafter Bhagwan started thinking about it seriously and then ‘Albela’ happened. The rest is history, as they say! The story of Albela making, some other time. . .

The story of film Bhedi Bangla was,

Shyam (Baburao Pehelwan) and Manglu (Bhagwan) are friends and good for nothing. They come to Bombay to look for easy money. They pretend to be lame and blind and start begging. However, after few days, their secret is out and and the enraged public of Bombay gives them a sound thrashing. An onlooker calls them and asks if they would do a good job, instead of this nonsense. The agree and they are appointed as watchmen for a deserted haveli. It is owned by a Sethani (Tarabai – elder sister of Sitara Devi and mother of dancer Gopi Krishna). Her daughter is beautiful Prema (Leela Gupte). There is an estate manager also (Azeembhai – who later became a famous fight master in Hindi films), who does not like their coming there.

One day the friends find the dead body of the haveli’s maali (gardener) (Inamdar) in the premises of the haveli. The estate manager complains to the police. Police start investigations. Maali had a good looking daughter – Champa (Usha Shukla). While Manglu tries to take care of her, the estate manager tells police that he suspects this duo of murdering the maali. In absence of any proof, police do not arrest them but keep an eye on them.

Suddenly, the friends start seeing ghosts in the haveli. First few days, they are scared, but realise that this is all bogus and they try to reach the bottom of the matter. Finally, they unearth a plan of the estate manager to scare everybody, so that no one will remain there and he can conduct his gold smuggling business from there. He only has murdered the maali. After solid stunts and fighting scenes, the culprits are arrested and Shyam and Prema and Manglu and Champa are united. (658).

The film had 8 songs. Most songs are available on You Tube. 4 songs are already discussed here. Today’s song is the 5th song. It is a duet of Lata and Chitalkar. All in all, ‘Bhedi Bangla’ aka ‘The House of Mystery’ was a ‘paisa vasool‘ entertainment.

(Thanks to ‘Ek Albela’ by Isaq Mujawar and Mike Barnum’s Blog, for some information used here).

 

Song – Aansoo Na Bahaana, Ab Aansoo Na Bahaana  (Bhedi Bangla (aka House of Mystery)) (1949) Singer – Chitalkar, Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Ehsaan Rizvi, Music – P Ramakant (aka C Ramchandra)
Chitalkar + Lata Mangeshkar

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

mast pawan is  phulwari mein
kali kali khilaati hai
mast pawan is  phulwari mein
kali kali khilaati hai
usi chaman mein raen andhere
shabnam neer bahaati hai
usi chaman mein raen andhere
shabnam neer bahaati hai
tum kehte ho is jag mein
bas hansna aur hasaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

sukh mein to hansti hai duniya
sabka yehi haal hai
sukh mein to hansti hai duniya
sabka yehi haal hai
lekin dukh utha kar koi
hanse to phir ye kamaal hai
lekin dukh utha kar koi
hanse to phir ye kamaal hai
jag ki reet badal kar dekho
dukh ko bhi sukh banaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana
aansoo na bahaana
ab aansoo na bahaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

sach poocho do dil ka milna
kaanta bhi hai phool bhi
pyaar ko sach maano to sach hai
bhool kaho to bhool bhi
sach poocho do dil ka milna
kaanta bhi hai phool bhi
pyaar ko sach maano to sach hai
bhool kaho to bhool bhi
lekin dil mein himmat ho to
khud badlega zamaana
kaanton bhari ye raah se hai
muskuraate jaana

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

मस्त पावन इस फुलवारी में
कली कली खिलाती है
मस्त पावन इस फुलवारी में
कली कली खिलाती है
उसी चमन में रैन अंधेरे
शबनम नीर बहाती है
उसी चमन में रैन अंधेरे
शबनम नीर बहाती है
तुम कहते हो इस जग में
बस हँसना और हँसाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

सुख में तो हँसती है दुनिया
सबका येही हाल है
सुख में तो हँसती है दुनिया
सबका येही हाल है
लेकिन दुख उठा कर कोई
हँसे तो फिर ये कमाल है
लेकिन दुख उठा कर कोई
हँसे तो फिर ये कमाल है
जग की रीत बदल कर देखो
दुख को भी सुख बनाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना
आँसू न बहाना
अब आँसू न बहाना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना

सच पूछो दो दिल का मिलना
काँटा भी है फूल भी
प्यार को सच मानो तो सच है
भूल कहो तो भूल भी
सच पूछो दो दिल का मिलना
काँटा भी है फूल भी
प्यार को सच मानो तो सच है
भूल कहो तो भूल भी
लेकिन दिल में हिम्मत हो तो
खुद बदलेगा ज़माना
काँटों भरी ये राह से है
मुसकुराते जाना


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3825 Post No. : 14829

Wonder pe Thunder !

Today’s song is from film ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (1971). When I found that this very popular and famous song of the early 70s was yet to be covered in the blog, my first reaction was to disbelieve it. I was almost sure that there was some mistake. I scanned the entire ‘H’ alphabet film list, bur could not see this song under any heading. Then I checked the year wise and MD wise lists – with same result. I was wondering how this song has escaped from the keen eyes of our contributors, who are specialists in the songs of the 70s ! At the end of it, I even checked with Atul ji, who confirmed that the song, indeed, was yet to be covered by us. This was a bonanza for me.

This is one of the songs of RD Burman, which I liked very much. Comparatively, he was one of the new composers in those times – in my opinion – though he had already done about 40 films before ‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (HRHK). In last few years I had liked few songs from his earlier films like ‘Parichay’ (1972), ‘Seeta aur Geeta’ (1972), ‘Caravan’ (1971), ‘Kati Patang’ (1970) and ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966). However, he suffered in my hands, due to my biased view of film songs of the period of 70s and beyond and except few more songs of RD Burman, I never liked his music, which in general I felt, was too loud and mostly copied from other sources (see several U-Tube videos on this issue, as a proof). However, I concede that he was a worthy son of a worthy composer compared to some other composer-son composers and that his music was much better than theirs and that he lasted for a longer period, cut short only by his sudden death in 1994, at the age of 55 years.

Today’s song is sung by Asha Bhosle and chorus and its video shows that it was sung on screen by a Hippie Girl (Zeenat Aman) amidst a smoking Hippie crowd. Somewhere in the year 1966, I had visited Goa (Panaji) to participate in a conference. During my visit, we had 2 free days and we roamed around the beautiful beaches of Goa. Goa had been liberated from the Portuguese about 6 years back and the Indian tourists did not have enough time yet to spoil the beaches and cities of Goa. So we could really enjoy our trip. During our beach visits we saw many Hippie groups, behaving in a ‘who cares’ attitude on the beaches. No wonder, many of my colleagues took their photographs to show in their respective private circles. That was a time when the Hippie culture had spread around the world.

Hippie (also spelled hippy) people were members of a counter cultural movement during the 1960s and 1970s, that rejected the mores of mainstream American life. The movement originated on college campuses in the United States, and also spread to other countries. Hippies felt alienated from middle-class society, which they saw as dominated by materialism and repression, and they developed their own distinctive lifestyle. They favoured long hair and casual, often unconventional, attire, sometimes in ‘psychedelic’ colours.

Many males grew beards, and both men and women wore sandals and beads. Long flowing granny dresses were popular with women, and rimless granny glasses with both men and women. Hippies commonly took up communal or cooperative living arrangements, and they often adopted vegetarian diets based on unprocessed foods and practiced holistic medicine. Hippies tended to be dropouts from society, foregoing regular jobs and careers, although some developed small businesses that catered to other hippies.

Hippies advocated non-violence and love, a popular phrase being “Make love, not war,” for which they were sometimes called ‘flower children’. They promoted openness and tolerance as alternatives to the restrictions and regimentation they saw in the middle-class society. Hippies often practiced open sexual relationships and lived in various types of family groups. They commonly sought spiritual guidance from sources outside the Judeo-Christian tradition, particularly Buddhism and other Eastern religions. Hippies promoted the recreational use of hallucinogenic drugs, particularly marijuana and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), in so-called head trips, justifying the practice as a way of expanding consciousness.

By the mid-1970s the movement had waned, and by the 1980s hippies had given way to a new generation of young people who were intent on making careers for themselves in business and who came to be known as yuppies (young urban professionals). Nonetheless, hippies continued to have an influence on the wider culture, seen, for example, in more relaxed attitudes toward sex, in the new concern for the environment, and in a widespread lessening of formality.

Film HRHK was Dev Anand’s idea. Initially, he wanted Zahida to become its Heroine. She, however rejected the offer when she learnt that in the film, she would be Dev’s sister – Jasbir. Dev Anand also wanted SD Burman to do the music. When Dada heard the original story, in which Zeenat falls in love with Dev, not knowing that he was her brother, Dada flatly refused the film and also advised Dev to change the story, as Indian public would be averse to an incest story. Eventually RD Burman was selected as MD.

Similarly, this song – “Dum Maaro Dum” was originally to be a duet of Usha Uthup and Lata Mangeshkar. Possibly Asha Bhosle, who was on the verge of leaving OPN and joining RD Burman (who had applied for a divorce with Rita –  his wife) scuttled the plan and the song came to Asha as a solo and another duet with usha Uthup. RD burman then changed the whole tune of the song, using Asha’s skill of singing in higher pitches.

All songs of this film became popular, especially “Phoolon Ka Taaron Ka Sabka Kehna Hai” and “Dum Maaro Dum” were heard everywhere. The lyrics of the song “Dum Maaro Dum” were very apt to indicate and describe the philosophy and frustration of the younger generation in that period –

duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyun
sabne hamara kiya kya

All this clearly indicated what was eating the minds of young people.

Fortunately, 70s was the period when the Hippie culture was on decline worldwide. As such, this type of philosophy and such cult did not fit into the Indian mind set in any case. Therefore, this culture did not grow much here and had a natural end – like everywhere else in the world.

Two interesting anecdotes about this film. One, Dev Anand in his autobiography -“Romancing With Life “, published in 2007, had confessed that during this film, he had fallen in love with Zeenat. He was to make a confession to her, when he learnt that she had gone very close to Raj Kapoor. In one party, he also saw Raj kapoor hugging Zeenat and she was responding to him. Dev was disillusioned. He knew that Zeenat was keen to work in RK’s film ‘Satyam Shivam Sundaram’, and that all this was due to that only. He simply removed her thought from his mind.

Second is about the Burmans. In the program ‘Phool Khile Hain Gulshan Gulshan’, Pancham narrated that – “Papa used to go for morning walk everyday in Juhu. People recognised him and would say, look, SD Burman is going. One day he came back very excited. He told me, today people recognised me and said, Look RD Burman’s father is going. Papa was proud of me that my music in HRHK was famous and popular.”

Nandu Chawathe- a leading fiddler and violinist was associated with Pancham in those days. This person – Nandu Chawathe, was a guest in one of our get togethers of Atulites in Mumbai, thanks to one of our members Nitin ji Shah. He had played some songs on his violin in that meeting,  Chawathe says that Dev Anand was very much upset, when Asha replaced Lata and Pancham took time to compose the new tune for Asha Bhosle. The final product, however, pleased Dev Anand.

The story of the film, as given in wiki, is –

In the background of the rise of the International Hare Krishna movement in the 1970s, is a Montreal-based family of the Jaiswals, consisting of mom, dad, son, Prashant, and daughter, Jasbir. Due to differences, Mr and Mrs Jaiswal separate, leaving Jasbir with dad, and Prashant with his mom. Eventually Prashant and his mom travel to India, leaving father and daughter behind in Montreal. Mr. Jaiswal remarries, and brings his new wife to live in his home. Jasbir is told by her nanny that her mother & brother are dead. Back in India Prashant is sent to a boarding school and his father makes sure that none of Prashant’s letters reach Jasbir, so that it would be easy on her part to get over emotional trauma. Jasbir is upset with her inconsiderate step-mother and ignorant father who is deeply immersed in his business.

Years later, Prashant has grown up to be a pilot. He has received a letter from his dad that Jasbir, who had rebelled and left home, is now located in Kathmandu, Nepal, with a group of hippies. Prashant decides to find his sister and hopefully get her back to the family. When Prashant lands in Kathmandu he does not find Jasbir, but instead finds Janice, who is indeed his sister with a new name. Janice has no recollection of her childhood, and is always in the company of hippies spending most of her time consuming alcohol & drugs with them.

Janice lives with the hippies in the property rented out by local landlord Drona. Drona’s real business is stealing ancient artifacts from Kathmandu and selling it to foreign nationals. Michael, one of the hippies, is the one who does all the dirty work for him. Janice’s boyfriend Deepak misunderstands that Prashant is trying to woo Janice, hence they exchange a few blows every time they meet. Meanwhile, Drona has an eye on Shanti, a local salesgirl working in one of the shops owned by him. Shanti has feelings for Prashant which creates one more enemy for him. Later Prashant and Shanti elope and get married. At the same time a precious idol is stolen from local temple by Michael, which he hides in Janice’s house. Prashant secretly observes all this. Drona tries to frame Shanti for theft by secretly planting another stolen artifact in her house. Later he spreads the word that since the day Prashant has arrived idols are being stolen and he is stalking local girls.

The police commissioner is a friend of Prashant’s father, and has already received a letter stating the purpose of Prashant’s visit to Kathmandu. He suspects that Drona is trying to frame Prashant because he has married Shanti. He gets a search warrant for the entire property of Drona and recovers a diary which has contact details of his friends abroad who help him sell the stolen artifacts. The police also recover the stolen artifact from Shanti’s home, squarely blaming Prashant for it. Shanti is deeply hurt by this and looks around for Prashant. Prashant meanwhile is with Janice, trying to convince her that he is her brother, who she had been told dead long back. Michael overhears the conversation & conspires to put the blame on the brother-sister duo. Taking advantage of the situation Drona and Michael instigate the locals against Prashant by framing him for the theft and duping Shanti under pretext of marriage. The hippies and the locals are now ready to bash Prashant the moment they come across him.

When Prashant again tries to meet Janice, the hippies give him a solid thrashing. The police commissioner intervenes and Prashant is saved. At the same time the true face of Drona is uncovered and he meets his end trying to run away from police. Janice sees that both her parents have arrived to meet her and realizes that Prashant is indeed her brother. Janice is deeply hurt that her parents had to see her in this state. She runs away from them and commits suicide. In her suicide note she tells Prashant how deeply she loved him and she never intended him to find her in this state and suicide was the only way out for her.

‘Hare Rama Hare Krishna’ (released on 9-12-1971) was a Landmark film for Navketan – a film production company, which could boast of a world record (yet unbeaten) that the company was run for 62 years by the same person who established it in 1949 ! The cult song “Dum Maaro Dum” became so popular that no function was complete without this song for the next 10 years! Enjoy this song here today…..

[Author’s Note: The article uses information from books ‘Gaata Rahe Mera Dil’ and ‘Music Beyond Boundaries’, Wiki, The Hindu and my notes].

Video (Partial)

Audio (Complete)

Song – Dum Maro Dum, Mit Jaayen Gham  (Hare Rama Hare Krishna) (1971) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, Music – RD Burman
Female Chorus
Male Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

hush..shh..shh..shh

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

pa..aa pa ra pa pa tu tu tu
aa..aa ee..ee
ta raa ta raa ta raa ta raa raa..aa

duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyon
sab ne hamaara kiya kya
duniya ne hum ko diya kya
duniya se hum ne liya kya
hum sab ki parvah karen kyon
sab ne hamaara kiya kya

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaayen gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

hush..shh..shh..shh

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaaye gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

chaahe jiyenge marenge
hum na kisi se darenge
hum ko na roke zamaana
jo chaahenge hum karenge

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa

dum maaro dum..mm..mmaaaa
mit jaayen gham..mm..mmaaaa
bolo subah shaa..aam
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram
hare krishn hare ram

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-
हश॰॰शश॰॰शश॰॰शश

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

पा॰॰आ प र पा पा तु तु तु
आ॰॰आ ई॰॰ई
त रा त रा त रा त रा रा॰॰आ

दुनिया ने हमको दिया क्या
दुनिया से हमने लिया क्या
हम सबकी परवाह करें क्यों
सब ने हमारा किया क्या

आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

हश॰॰शश॰॰शश॰॰शश

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम

चाहे जिएंगे मरेंगे
हम ना किसी से डरेंगे
हमको ना रोके ज़माना
जो चाहेंगे हम करेंगे

आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰ आ॰॰

दम मारो दम॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
मिट जाएँ ग़म॰॰मम्म॰॰मम्मआ॰॰आ
बोलो सुबह शा॰॰आम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम
हरे कृष्ण हरे राम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3819 Post No. : 14817

Today’s song is from film ‘Ek Shola’ (1958). It is sung by Asha Bhosle and Geeta Dutt. The lyricist was Majrooh Sultanpuri and the music director was Madan Mohan. The film was produced by Deep and Pradeep Productions –  a joint venture of Deep Khosla and Pradeep Kumar. The film was directed by Chander Sehgal. Not much is known about Chander Sehgal, except that he directed only 2 films – ‘Ek Shola’ and ‘Mitti Mein Sona’ (1960). He died on 29-5-1960. The cast of the film is Pradeep Kumar, Mala Sinha, Jawahar Kaul, Leela Mishra, Nazir Hussain, Shubha Khote etc.

In Hindi films, there have been three actors who were very handsome and very lucky but zero in acting – Karan Dewan, Pradeep Kumar and Bharat Bhushan. They all appeared in leading roles opposite all leading actresses of their times. They had the best films, best songs and best roles. Karan Dewan had about 25 Silver Jubilees to his credit and was considered a lucky star. Bharat Bhushan had the most musical films to his credit like ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Shabaab’ (1954) and ‘Mirza Ghalib’ (1954) etc. Pradeep Kumar had ‘Anarkali’ (1953) and ‘Taj Mahal’ (1963).

All three had their brothers producing films for them. Gemini Dewan made films for Karan Dewan, R. Chandra made films for Bharat Bhushan and Kalidas for Pradeep Kumar. Unfortunately, in later years, all three lost everything and died in poverty and neglectful anonymity. Karan Dewan was a manager with BR Chopra’s production company. When he died no one came for his funeral except for Chandrashekhar and Manmohan Krishan from the Cine Artist’s Association. Bharat Bhushan even worked as a watchman in a film studio, in his last days. He too died unsung and only the men from the Association were present at the cremation.

Pradeep Kumar’s case is the saddest. He lay seriously ill in the ICU of a Calcutta nursing home, abandoned by his relatives. The hospital was not discharging him, unless the bills were paid. Luckily one Mr. Pradeep Kondaliya, an estate agent, recognised him, despite his grown beard. He paid the huge outstanding bill of the hospital and took Pradeep Kumar to his home, where he passed away after a few days. He was cremated by his fan. Such is the film industry – cruel and ruthless, where the recognition lasts only till one is successful, and even close relatives desert you in bad times.

Pradeep Kumar aka Sital Batabyal was born on 4 January 1925. When he was 17 years old, he started as assistant cameraman. Later he decided to take up acting. He started his film career in Bengali films. His notable roles in Bengali films were in ‘Alaknanda‘ (1947), directed by renowned filmmaker Debaki Bose, and in ’42 (1951). It was Debki Bose, who gave him the filmy name Pradeep Kumar.

Pradeep Kumar  then shifted to Bombay and Filmistan studios, and had an important role in the film ‘Anand Math (1952). He played the lead role with Bina Rai in ‘Anarkali’ (1953) and with Vyjayanthimala in ‘Nagin’ (1954). Both films were very popular and had songs that added to the movies’ success. He had a spate of releases in the second half of the 1950s. He did not enjoy as much success in the 1960s, though ‘Ghoonghat’ (1960), ‘Aarti’ (1962) & ‘Taj Mahal’ (1963) were successful. He worked with Meena Kumari in seven films; ‘Adil-E-Jahangir’, ‘Bandhan’ (1956), ‘Chitralekha’, ‘Bahu Begum’, ‘Bheegi Raat’, ‘Aarti’ and ‘Noorjehan’; and with Mala Sinha in eight films; ‘Naya Zamana’, ‘Hamlet’, ‘Baadshah’, ‘Detective’ (1958 movie), ‘Fashion’ (1959 film), ‘Ek Shola’, ‘Duniya Na Maane’, and ‘Mitti Mein Sona’.

He did not get to act in lead roles with the newer heroines of the 1960s such as Sadhana, Saira Banu, Babita or Sharmila Tagore, though he did work with Asha Parekh in ‘Ghoonghat’ and ‘Meri Surat Teri Aankhen and with Waheeda Rehman in ‘Raakhi (1963). In 1969, he moved to character roles with ‘Sambandh’ and ‘Mehboob Ki Mehndi’, but did not have many visible roles till ‘Jaanwar’ and ‘Razia Sultan’ in 1983.

He won the Kalakar Award-Lifetime Achievement Award (1999).

Pradeep Kumar died in Calcutta on 27 October 2001, at the age of 76. He is survived by his daughters Reena, Meena and Beena Banerjee who plays character roles in movies and TV serials including ‘Uttaran’, son Debiprasad and granddaughters Tanisha, Suparna, Riya and Hrishita. Beena Banerjee’s son Siddharth Banerjee worked as assistant director in Sajid Khan’s ‘Housefull 2’ (2012) and ‘Himmatwala’ (2013).

Mala Sinha was an educated, hard working actress. Though she worked with leading banners and was heroine to well known heroes, she was never counted among the class I heroines of her times. She worked with many newcomers, like Dharmendra etc. Her career spanned a long time but she never got a single Filmfare Award, though nominated 4 times.

Mala Sinha was born in a Bengali Nepalese Christian family in Calcutta, on 11-11-1936. Mala Sinha claimed herself a Bengali descent Nepali many years ago in a TV interview Her parents named her Alda. Her friends at school used to tease her by calling her Dalda (a brand of vegetable oil), so she changed her name to Mala. In her childhood she learnt dancing and singing. Although she was an approved singer of All India Radio, she has never done playback singing in films. But as a singer she has done stage shows in many languages from 1947 to 1975.

Mala started her career as child artist in Bengali films ‘Jai Vaishno Devi’ followed by ‘Shri Krishan Leela’, ‘Jog Biyog’ and ‘Dhooli’. Noted Bengali director Ardhendu Bose saw her acting in a school play and took permission from her father to cast her as a heroine in his film ‘Roshanara’ (1952) – Bangla film, her cinematic debut.

After acting in a couple of films in Calcutta, Mala had to go to Bombay for a Bengali film. There she met Geeta Bali, a noted Bollywood actress, who was charmed by her and introduced her to film director Kidar Sharma. It was Sharma who cast her as a heroine in his ‘Rangeen Ratein‘ (1956). Her first Hindi film was ‘Baadshah’ (1954) opposite Pradeep Kumar. Then came ‘Ekadashi’ (1955), a mythological film. Both failed, but her lead role in Kishore Sahu’s ‘Hamlet’ (1954), paired opposite Pradeep Kumar, fetched her rave reviews in spite of it failing at the box office. Films like ‘Lai Batti’ (ac­tor Balraj Sahni’s only directorial venture), ‘Nausherwan-E-Adil’ where she starred as the fair maiden Marcia in Sohrab Modi’s romance about forbidden love and ‘Phir Subah Hogi’, which was direc­tor Ramesh Saigal’s adapta­tion of Dosteovsky’s novel Crime and Punishment, established Mala Sinha’s reputation as a versatile actress who took the maximum career risks by accepting unconventional roles.

Mala was a singer of some repute and used to sing for All India Radio; she was not allowed to sing playback (even for herself) in the movies with the lone exception being 1972’s ‘Lalkar’. In the 1950s, she had string of hits opposite Pradeep Kumar like ‘Fashion’ (1957), ‘Detective’ (1958), ‘Duniya Na Maane’ (1959) though their first two ventures had failed. The films she did with Pradeep Kumar were men-oriented. In 1957, noted Bollywood actor and film director Guru Dutt (the husband of Geeta Dutt) cast Mala in his film ‘Pyaasa‘ (1957) in a role originally intended for Madhubala. Mala gave a memorable performance as the relatively unsympa­thetic part of an ambitious woman who chooses to marry a rich man (played by actor Rehman) and have a loveless marriage rather than a poor, unsuccessful poet and her impoverished lover (played by Guru Dutt) whom she ditches. ‘Pyaasa‘ remains to this day a classic in the history of Indian cinema and a turning point for Mala Sinha.

After ‘Pyaasa’ her major success were ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958) and Yash Chopra’s directorial debut ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ (1959) that elevated her into a major dramatic star. There was no looking back for Sinha then as she was part of many successful movies from 1958 to the early ’60s like ‘Parvarish’ (1958), ‘Ujaala’,’ Main Nashe Main Hoon’, ‘Duniya Na Maane’, ‘Love Marriage’ (1959), ‘Bewaqoof’ (1960), ‘Maya’ (1961), ‘Hariyali Aur Rasta’ and ‘Dil Tera Deewana’ (1962), ‘Anpadh’, ‘Bombay Ka Chor’ (1962). Critics believe her career best performance was in ‘Bahurani’ (1963), ‘Gumrah’, ‘Gehra Daag’, ‘Apne Huye Paraaye’ and ‘Jahan Ara’. Apart from pairing with Pradeep Kumar, her pairing opposite Raaj Kumar, Rajendra Kumar, Biswajit and Manoj Kumar in woman-oriented films were appreciated by audiences, with her films opposite Biswajit being the most popular.  She did 10 films with Biswajit. In 2007, they won the Star Screen Lifetime Achievement Award, calling them on stage together giving due respect to their popularity as a pair who have tasted box office success.

The most remarkable feature of career of Mala Sinha was that most of her 1960s and 1970s hits were fueled by her own star power as much as the heroes and most of the times her role was more powerful than the hero. Though she was pitted opposite her seniors like Raj Kapoor, Dev Anand, Kishore Kumar, Pradeep Kumar and when she acted opposite the emerging stars from late 1950s like Shammi Kapoor, Rajendra Kumar and Raaj Kumar, she made sure her role was as good as theirs.

In 1966, Sinha went to Nepal to act in a Nepali film called ‘Maitighar when the Nepali film industry was still in its infancy. This was the only Nepali film she did in her career. Her hero in the film was an estate owner called Chidambar Prasad Lohani. Soon after, Mala Sinha married CP Lohani with the blessings of her parents. From the beginning theirs was a long-distance marriage with Lohani based in Kathmandu to look after his business and Sinha living in Bombay with their daughter Pratibha. She continued acting after her marriage.

From 1974, she cut down on her assignments as the lead actresses. She accepted strong character roles in films like ’36 Ghante (1974), ‘Zindagi‘ (1976), ‘Karmayogi (1978), ‘Be-Reham’ (1980), ‘Harjaee’ (1981), ‘Yeh Rishta Na Tootay’, ‘Babu’ (film) and ‘Khel’, which were popular.

In the early ’90s Madhuri Dixit was promoted as new Mala Sinha in magazines. But, after 1994, she completely withdrew from industry and has given very few public appearances. In ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ and BR Chopra’s ‘Gumrah’, she played the first unwed mother and adulterous wife respectively in Hindi cinema. As she grew older, she gracefully moved on to doing character roles that befitted her age. She was last seen in ‘Zid’ (1994). Though Mala Sinha evinced as much interest in her daughter Pratibha’s career as her father did in her career, she was unable to achieve the same success for her daughter. (Adapted from wiki).

Mala Sinha came from Calcutta to make a career in Bombay films. In Calcutta she worked in a Bilingual film ‘Chitrangada’ (1954) in Bangla and Hindi. In 1954 again, she did her first film in Bombay, ‘Baadshah’ (1954), then came ‘Hamlet’ (1954), ‘Riyaasat’ (1955) and ‘Ekadashi’ (1955).

In all her interviews, Mala Sinha always quoted ‘Rangeen Raten’ (1956) with Shammi Kapoor as her first film in Bombay. She was ashamed of revealing that in film ‘Riyaasat’ (1955), her Hero was Mahipal and in film ‘Ekadashi’ it was Trilok Kapoor. She always hid this fact. There are many heroines who want to hide their struggling days. For example, in film ‘Professor’ (1962) Shammi Kapoor’s heroine was Kalpana. Though touted as her first film, her first film was ‘Pyar Ki Jeet-62’, opposite Mahipal – a fact which Kalpana always hid from everyone.

Similarly, A grade heroine Meena Kumari also had done several mythological and costume films before ‘Baiju Bawra’ took her high up and above other heroines. Films like ‘Veer Ghatotkach’ (1949), ‘Shri Ganesh Mahima’ (1950), ‘Laxmi Narayan’ (1951), ‘Hanuman Paataal Vijay’ (1951) and ‘Alladin aur Jadui Chirag’ (1953) had Mahipal as her Hero. In her later years, she always hid her earlier film Heroes.

Even comedian Johnny walker, who is supposed to have made a beginning with ‘Baazi’ (1951), had earlier worked in ‘The Last Message’ or ‘Aakhri Paigham’ (1949). However this fact is not told by anyone.

Not only actors, but even singers do this. They hesitate to tell that the first sang for C grade films. Take the case of Sudha Malhotra, who used to declare ‘Arzoo’ (1950) as her first film, under Anil Biswas. But she never told that earlier she had sung 3 songs in film ‘Aakhri Paigham’ (1949), under the baton of Abid Hussein Khan, composer.

It is very unfortunate that once the artiste becomes famous, he tends to forget his humble beginning with less known film or a composer. This is because they are ashamed of it. I feel the blame also goes to people who take their interview, because the interview takers do not do proper homework. Many times they do not know anything and simply note down whatever is told by the artiste.

There were 8 songs in the film ‘Ek Shola’. 3 songs are already discussed. This is the 4th song. It is a long song, recorded on one side each of 78 rpm record nos. N-52832 and 52833). We present here the full song covering both sides.

 


Song – Chanda Se Bhi Pyaara Hai, Akhion Ka Taara Hai  (Ek Shola) (1958) Singer – Asha Bhosle, Geeta Dutt, Lyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, Music – Madan Mohan

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmm mmm mmm mmm mmm mmmmmmm

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla
chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla

ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri
haaye.. apni dhun mein gaa

khushi se saagar jal chhalke
pakad chaley dil sambhal ke
kahen tarangen machal ke
zaraa mauj mein lehra haaye..
khushi se saagar jal chhalke
pakad chaley dil sambhal ke
kahen tarangen machal ke
zaraa mauj mein lehra haaye..
ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri
haaye.. apni dhun mein gaa

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa

jab mera nannha chhaiyan chhaiyan
thummak thummak doley
tuk tuk taakey
jhuk jhuk jhaanke
gudiya ghunghat kholey
jab mera nannha chhaiyan chhaiyan
thummak thummak doley
tuk tuk taakey
jhuk jhuk jhaanke
gudiya ghunghat kholey
ho gudde sa dulaara
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa

ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri..ee
apni dhun mein gaa

jo mastion mein jee’e hain
usey na ?? ?? ??
ye raaz tere liye hai magar
tu nahi samjha haaye..
jo mastion mein jee’e hain
usey na ?? ?? ??
ye raaz tere liye hai magar
tu nahi samjha haaye..
ghata ka saaya hai zindagi
idhar se aai udhar chali
rukey na jeevan ki baansuri..ee
apni dhun mein gaa

chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla..aa..aa
A B C D
aleef bay pay
ka kha ga gha..aa..aa
A B C D
aleef bay pay
aur bhai ka kha ga gha
ab padhne askool chala hai
ye mera shehzaada
ab padhne askool chala hai
ye mera shehzaada
ho parion ne sanwaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla
aa..aa..aa
chanda se bhi pyaara hai
akhion ka taara hai
dil ka sahaara mera laadla

mmm mmm mmmmmm mmmm
mmm mmm mmmmmm mmmm
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aaa aaa

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-
मम्मम मम्ममम मम्मम
मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्म मम्ममममम

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला
चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला

घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

खुशी से सागर जल छलके
पकड़ चले दिल संभाल के
कहें तरंगें मचल के
ज़रा मौज में लहरा हाए॰॰
खुशी से सागर जल छलके
पकड़ चले दिल संभाल के
कहें तरंगें मचल के
ज़रा मौज में लहरा हाए॰॰
घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

जब मेरा नन्हा छइयाँ छइयाँ
ठुमक ठुमक डोले
टूक टूक ताके
झुक झुक झाँके
गुड़िया घूँघट खोले
जब मेरा नन्हा छइयाँ छइयाँ
ठुमक ठुमक डोले
टूक टूक ताके
झुक झुक झाँके
गुड़िया घूँघट खोले
हो गुड्डे सा दुलारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

जो मस्तीओं में जीए हैं
उसे ना ?? ?? ??
ये राज़ तेरे लिए है मगर
तू नहीं समझा हाए॰॰
जो मस्तीओं में जीए हैं
उसे ना ?? ?? ??
ये राज़ तेरे लिए है मगर
तू नहीं समझा हाए॰॰
घटा का साया है ज़िंदगी
इधर से आई उधर चली
रुके ना जीवन की बांसुरी॰॰ई
हाए॰॰ अपनी धुन में गा

चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला॰॰आ॰॰आ

ए बी सी डी
अलीफ बे पे
क ख ग घ॰॰अ॰॰अ
ए बी सी डी
अलीफ बे पे
और भई क ख ग घ
अब पढ़ने अस्कूल चला है
ये मेरा शहज़ादा
अब पढ़ने अस्कूल चला है
ये मेरा शहज़ादा
ओ परियों ने संवारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला
आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
चंदा से भी प्यारा है
अखिओं का तारा है
दिल का सहारा मेरा लाड़ला

मम्म मम्म मम्मममम मम्मम
मम्म मम्म मम्मममम मम्मम
आ आ आ आ आ आ॰॰आ

 


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3800 Post No. : 14792

Today’s song is from film ‘Mangala’ (1950). This was a film made by Gemini Films of Madras and directed by its boss SS Vasan. The music was given by a team of Balkrishna Kalla, MD Parthasarathy and E Sankar Sastry. The cast of this film was P Bhanumathi, Ranjan, Agha, David, Badri Pershad, BS Kalla etc.

The film was a remake of the hit Tamil film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943). After the unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ (1948) into the All India market, Subramaniam Srini Vasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He had established the popular Tamil magazine “Anand Vikatan”, and owned Gemini Studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film . In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a great success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’.

Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. (This film was remade in Simhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955, and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao, later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh, and Jamuna).

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ (1950) followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ (1951). They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the Music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

Actually, the southern film activity, though as old as Hindi talkie films, is strictly limited to four southern states. It was only the adventurous SS Vasan who ventured into the bastion of Hindi film markets, by promoting his film ‘Chandralekha’. In fact this had encouraged other producers like AVM, Prasad, Vijaya etc. to tap the Hindi belt. While making a multilingual film, the south producers always called the Hindi artistes, be it actors, directors ,composers or singers to come to Madras, but they never went to Bombay. It was only through dubbed or remade films that south actors, composers or actors were exposed to the Hindi arena. Those days anyone from south was a ‘madrasi‘ and likewise anyone from other than south was a North Indian or a Punjabi ! No one from the North bothered to distinguish between Tamil, Telugu, Kannada or Malayalam – films or people. Everything was ‘madrasi‘.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 60s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to writers like Chetan Bhagat’s novels. Thanks to Modernization.

In the early times of the film industry, very few educated people used to join here. That is why graduates or postgraduates used to flaunt their degrees with pride – like Moti, BA – the lyricist (though he was actually MA), or Kavi Pradeep’s pseudo name – Miss Kamal BA or even singer Surendra as BA, LLB etc.

A highly qualified person and that too in an unrelated subject joining films was a wonder then. Thus, a young man with an unlikely name for a hero, like RAMNARAYAN VENKATRAMAN SARMA alias actor RANJAN was a novelty. Ranjan was born in Madras on 2-3-1918 in an orthodox Brahmin family. He did his BA with Physics and then completed M Litt in Carnatak music and dance, and became a Research Fellow for Ph.D. He also became the managing editor of ‘NATYAM‘ a magazine for dance, drama and music. In total contrast to his expertise in fine arts, he learnt fencing (sword fighting) after he saw it in the Olympic Games.

He was spotted by a Tamil producer and he made his debut in the film ‘Ashok Kumar’ (1941). After a few films in Tamil and Telugu he got the role of Shashank in the magnum opus film ‘Chandralekha’ in 1948. The drum dance and his fencing were the two main attractions in the film. The final sword fighting is considered the longest ever fencing fight in films till today ! The film was a hit and Ranjan became type cast in action films. Ranjan was a very poor actor, but his fencing skills were marvelous.

In 1949 came ‘Nishaan’, based on the Hollywood film ‘The Corsican Brothers’ – one good and one bad. It was a story of twins. The audience liked a scene from the film which showed that there were marks on one brother’s back if the other one was whipped ! The film, in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu, was a hit everywhere mainly for its fencing scenes. In ‘Mangala’ opposite Bhanumati, he was the villain and the hero too.

He was invited by New York University for a research fellowship, but Vasan did not leave him, so after ‘Mangala’, as soon as the contract was over, Ranjan came to Bombay.

‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) saw him with Rehana but as a romantic hero, he was worse than Bharat Bhushan or Pradeep Kumar ! He acted in ‘Sindbad The Sailor’ (1952),  ‘Nishan Danka’ (1952), ‘Kafila’ (1952), ‘Baaghi’ (1953), ‘Shahenshah’ (1953), ‘Baap Beti’ (1954), ‘Baghdad’ (1961), and a host of B and C grade films, many of them dubbed or remakes of southern films. He was known for only fencing. But he never became famous like Stewart Granger in ‘Scaramouche’ for his fencing. In the 1950s he acted in 23 films, in 1960s he did 18 films and in 1970s his tally was 17 films. A total of 58 films in Hindi.

After sword fighting became obsolete he shifted to writing. The story of film ‘Munim ji’ (1955) was written by him. After few years in south he was seen again in ‘Chor Chor’ (1974) and ‘Chaitali’ (1976). ‘Ram Balram’ (1980) was his last film.

He married a Muslim girl and she converted to Hinduism taking the name of Laxmi. Ranjan wrote 12 books on dancing and music. He shifted to USA to live with his son in New Jersey. He passed away 12-9-1983, due to a heart attack. He was so much forgotten that even the news of his death was not published in India.

The composers of ‘Mangala’ was a team of D Parthsarthi, Balkrishna Kalla and E Shanker. This team also gave music to few other films like ‘Sansaar’ (1951), ‘Mr Sampat’ (1952), ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954). Balkrishna Kalla with Mohd Shafi gave music to ‘Krishna Kanhaiya’ (1952). Independently he gave music to only one film – ‘Do Dulhe’ (1954). The southern composers gave music only to dubbed films or remakes.

In the original version of ‘Mangala’, which was ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ (1943), the heroine was Vasundhara Devi – mother of Vaijayantimala. In Hindi film ‘Mangala’, the heroine was P Bhanumathi, but the hero was same – Ranjan. There were some Hindi actors like Agha, David and Badriprasad. The composer of today’s song, Balkrishna Kalla also did a small role in this film. When Shamshad Begum sang songs for ‘Chandralekha’, her songs were recorded in Bombay, but for ‘Mangala’, Shamshad went to Madras first time and sang 9 songs out of its 15 songs. In this film the songs and dances of Carmen Miranda were freely copied in the Tamil, Telugu and Hindi versions.

The late 1940’s was marked in Bollywood with the remake of several super hit movies from south, especially from Tamil. The 1950 hit ‘Mangala’, produced by Gemini Pictures, was one such movie which was originally made in Tamil. SS Vasan was the director of the Hindi version. The newspaper, The Hindu, in its issue of 3-2-2013 has said this, about film ‘Mangala’,

Bhanumathi Ramakrishna was so bowled over by the performance of Vasundhara Devi (mother of yesteryear heroine Vyjayanthimala Bali) in Gemini’s blockbuster 1943 Tamil hit, Mangamma Sabadham , that she wished, if at all the film were to be remade in Telugu, she would act in it. In fact, the Tamil movie was released by Gemini supremo S.S. Vasan at a few centres in Andhra also and was well received there too. A few years later, Vasan decided to remake the movie in Telugu and Hindi under the title Mangala . Impressed by Bhanumathi’s performance in the Tamil film, Rajamukthi , he decided to sign her and approached her husband, Ramakrishna Rao. It was an opportunity she was waiting for and Bhanumathi immediately accepted the offer. She was paid a remuneration of Rs. 1 lakh for both the versions. Ranjan, who did the hero’s role in Mangamma Sabadham , was retained to play the lead role in both Telugu and Hindi versions. Popular editor of the time, Chandru (who had done commendable work as editor for Gemini’s earlier trilingual, Apoorva Sahodarulu) was entrusted with the job of directing the Telugu movie.

Based on a popular folklore, an engrossing narrative was weaved by Gemini’s story department. Mangala (Bhanumathi), the charming daughter of a rich farmer, is very haughty by temperament. When Prince Sugunapal (Ranjan) fails to win her love, he throws a challenge that he would marry her and then imprison her for life, denying her the marital bliss. She counter-challenges him that she would bear a child from him and make the child whip him in his court.

The prince marries her and puts her in a lonely palace. She makes her father (Doraiswamy) dig a tunnel from the palace to her village, sneaks through it to her house and learns dance. Disguised as a gypsy, she entices the Prince, secretly gives birth to a child, and when he grows up (Ranjan – dual role) gets her vow fulfilled through him. Realisation dawns on the Prince and the tale ends on a happy note.

All through it is Mangala’s show and Bhanumathi essayed it brilliantly. If Vasundhara Devi was admired for her nice dances in the Tamil version, Bhanumathi scored through her acting prowess. Ranjan made his presence felt in dual role.

The songs and dance sequences were all hits of that time. Music was composed by Partha Sarathi, Kalla and E Sankar Sastri. Two songs from this film were inspired by the famous Brazilian dancer Carmen Miranda’s classics. The song “Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma Mummy” was based on Carmen Miranda’s “Mama Yo Quiero” and “Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se” (today’s song) in which Bhanumathi is dressed like Carmen, was based on “I Yi Yi Yi Yi — I Like You Very Much”  from the film “That Night in Rio ” (1941), sung by Carmen Miranda herself.

Enjoy the dance and song video….

 


Song – Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se  (Mangala) (1950) Singer – P Bhanumati, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – MD Parthasarthy, BK Kalla, E Shankar Shastri

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na na naa
ta na na na na naa

taa na na naa raa nanna
naa raa nanna
naa raa nannaa
ta na na na na naa. . .
ch ch ch ch..ch

taa na na naa raa nanna
taa na na naa raa nanna
taa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na na na naa. . .
taa naa naa naa. . .

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
sainyyaan dekhe mohey pyaar se
aayi aayi raja torey paas re
piya se milan ki aas re
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

kaun jaane kaisa jaadu daal ke
chheen liya dil mora haaye
khili khili khili rahe chaandni
chanda sa ye much muskaaye
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . .
suno suno pyaare morey saajna
baaje morey dil ka sitar
gori gori chhori main to baalma
puchho reejho reejho hai kyon nikhar
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

meri chaal nihaar
kaisi thummakdaar
meri kamar nihaar
kaisi lachakdaar
mere nain nihaar
jaise tez kataar
meri nath nihaar
kaisi hai chammakdaar
ye bahaar
ye nikhaar
tum shikaar
main shikaar
phadak phadak
thadak thadak

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
haaye ri main to laajon mari
hanh hanh
ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
saayyaa ji jee
du du de de dor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
piya se milan ki aas re
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . . aa. . .

suno suno pyaare morey saajna
cha cha chu chu chu chu chaye chechor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
ta tta ta ti tu tu tuteyi tetor
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yayyi yayyi yaa. . .

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta na na naa raa naa
ta na na naa raa naa

ta na na naa raa nanna naa raa nanna naa raa nanna
taa naa naa naa raa. . .
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na naa raa nanna
ta na na na naa. . .
ta. . na. . na. . naa. . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3792 Post No. : 14776

I was very fond of seeing movies and listening to the songs since childhood.Those days,children were not allowed to see films,unlike today. If at all a film is to be seen,the children had to go with their mother,aunt, grandmother or some such female relative and the film would invariably be something like Ram Ravan Yudh or Bakasur ki Maut.

Hyderabad state,where I spent my early years was ruled by a Muslim king-The Nizam(Ala Hazarat).There were some social customs,like Burkha,which reflected in the social lives of the citizen.

For example, in almost every theatre,there used to be a special class-“Zanana Class”.It was made out of the half of the Balcony class with a wall partition between them.The frontal portion facing the screen had a thick curtain,which was removed after the film started and covered again after the film ended,thus protecting the women spectators from the prying eyes of the public.

Same procedure was for Interval period also.Only women and small children were allowed in this subsidised class.A special ‘Curtain Mover’ used to be the in charge of this and the Zanana Class.

Usually a She -Male or a He -Female (don’t know which) was appointed for women’s safety.This type of arrangement was also available in other Muslim states like,Junagarh,Bhawalpur,Lucknow,Bhopal etc.Women used to make lot of noise and at times there were big quarrels,when the films were stopped,curtain moved, peace restored and the films were restarted.

I was lucky to start seeing films independently from the end of 40s. Usually,it was from the school directly. Every Friday to Sunday,there used to be a Morning show from 11 am. In this,the tickets were almost half rates, like 4 annas, 6 annas, 12 annas etc. Thus I was able to see many films of 30s and 40s, till about 1955-56 or so.

Once I went to college, then took up the job and other priorities of life,I saw less films,but never missing an opportunity to see older films and making notes. From 1980 onwards, I stopped seeing films, and when I retired in 1998, I dug out my old collections. I have not visited a theatre after 1980 and yet to see how a Multiplex looks like. I saw few films on TV and players.

In the initial era of Talkie films, Calcutta’s New Theatres and Poona’s Prabhat were the most well known film makers. They used to make films on social issues. Particularly, Prabhat was famous for keeping their films centred on the Reform themes like,Dowry, Child Marriage, Second Marriage, Cast difference etc.From the mid 30s one more company came into limelight and that was Bombay Talkies- founded by Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani. They also followed the trend and films on social issues like Untouchability, illiteracy etc were made. Today’s song is from a film made by Bombay Talkies- Jeewan Prabhat-37.

This was also a film dealing with Caste differences and second marriage. In this film,however, it was shown that the Caste difference stayed and the proposed second marriage got cancelled. I would say, it was quite a realistic depiction of the Indian mindset, because even after hundreds of years, the caste differences exist today, while the other social ills like child marriage, dowry, illiteracy etc are controlled to a greater extent. It would not be wrong to say that as long as the Reservation Policies exist, caste differences will continue to exist-with official support !

Film Jeewan Prabhat-37 was directed by the German Director Franz Osten. The Music Director was Saraswati Devi and lyrics and dialogues were by J.S.Casshyap. The screen play was by Niranjan Pal- Himanshu Rai’s friend since their London days. Kishor Sahu and Renuka Devi made their Debut in this film. Others in the cast were Mumtaz Ali,Prithwiraj kapoor, Maya Devi and M.Nazeer etc etc. The film was released on 2-11-1937 at Minerva Talkies in Bombay. Baburao Patel of Film India, in its December 1937 issue had not much good about this film. He, in fact, criticised both the Debutantes, for their acting calling them as ‘ disappointments ‘. However, the film did good business and ran for 17 weeks in Bombay.

Unlike Prabhat or New Theatres, Bombay Talkies produced their films in quick time. This film-Jeewan prabhat- was made in just 2 months. Their most popular film Achhut kanya-36 was made in 6 months. This was possible due to self sufficient facilities, good planning, modern equipment and total involvement of the staff. Franz Osten’s speed and his planning was such that in the span of just 4 years, Franz directed 16 films for Bombay Talkies !

The Debut making actress Renuka Devi was one of a kind. I am not only surprised,but awed and terribly impressed,when I went through her Autobiography ” A woman of substance-Begum Khursheed Mirza “.

Begum Khursheed Mirza is none other than the famous Heroine of the 30s and 40s-Renuka Devi ( 4-3-1918 to 8-2-1989 ). She was perhaps one of the most educated, upper class, sophisticated and highly cultured Muslim lady, who ever joined the film industry then. One more striking feature of Renuka Devi was that she was one of the very few actresses,who joined the films after their marriage. The other such examples I remember offhand is that of Meenakshi Shirodkar (Bramhachari-38 fame), Shobhana Samarth and actress Neena ( real name Shahida-wife of Mohsin Abdulla, brother of Renuka Devi and later wife of W.Z.Ahmed) in those times.

Renuka Devi had studied upto Masters degree in English Literature,from Aligarh Muslim University. The only other nearest example I remember offhand is that of actress Vanmala (real name Susheela Devi Pawar), who had done B.A and B.T. and was a Teacher in the college before joining films,at the behest of writer,journalist and Director P.K.Atre.

The story of Renuka Devi is quite interesting. Khursheed Jehan was born in Aligarh on 4-3-1918, to Shaikh Abdulla and his wife Waheed Jehan Beg. She was the 6th of the 7 siblings. Her father Shaikh Abdulla (1874-1965) was originally a Hindu. He was the son of a rich Jahagirdar and Landlord from Poonch,Kashmir. They were Kashmiri Brahmins. His name was Thakur Das. He embraced Islam in 1890, while studying in Aligarh. When his family learnt about it, he was disowned by them. He took the name Shaikh Abdulla.

He became a leading Advocate of Aligarh. After he married Waheed Jehan Beg,they both- being of progressive thinking- decided to work for the Muslim women’s education. They faced lot of resistance from the fundamentalists,but they established a Muslim women’s college in Aligarh. To provide students for this college,a school was also started for Muslim girls. soon the girls started joining the school and college. Shaikh Abdulla ensured that all his children were educated. One daughter became a Doctor,another Advocate and two daughters did master’s degrees and later on became Principals of the women’s college. Khursheed also studied upto masters but due to her marriage could not complete it. ( she completed her Masters in English Litterateur in 1963,at the age of 45 years,later).
Khursheed Jehan was married to Akbar Mirza,a Police Officer in Aligarh. Soon she gave birth to 2 sons also.

Her brother Mohsin Abdulla was working in Bombay Talkies,at Bombay. He used to describe how professional these studios were. Khursheed was 21 year old and beautiful. She desired to work in films. She wrote a letter to Devika Rani expressing her desire. This she did, without informing her husband. She received a letter from Devika Rani, inviting her to Bombay for an interview. Now she confided in her husband and he wholeheartedly supported her.

Thus started her acting career. She was 21 years,married and had 2 children too. Her first film was ‘ Jeewan Prabhat”-37. She was given the name RENUKA DEVI. This was a Debut film for Kishore Sahu. Bombay Talkies bosses were very happy with her performance and she was offered a Heroine’s role opposite Jairaj in film ” Bhabhi”-1939. Jairaj was also from a rich background,cultured and highly educated. Their tuning was excellent and the film was a grand success. Renuka also sang few songs in Bhabhi-39. ( when the news of her acting in films reached Aligarh,there was a hue and cry. Her mother wrote to Renuka,’not to visit Aligarh for now’. Renuka did not go to Aligarh for next 2 years).

She was invited to Calcutta By New Theatres to act in film, Badi Didi-39. Her other films were Naya Sansar-41 (Ashok kumar), Sahara-43 (S D Narang), Ghulami-45 ( Masood Parvez) and Samrat Chandragupta-45 ( Ishwarlal ). her film career was very short. She announced her retirement from films in February 1944,while shooting for her last films. She did only 7 films and sang only 3 songs in 3 films.

After partition,her family migrated to Pakistan. In Pakistan,though in demand,she refused to do any films. Instead,she decided to devote her time for women’s uplift,education,welfare and social work. She also did some work on Pakistan Radio.

When TV came to Pakistan,she became very active and for next 15-20 years she was a popular figure on Pak TV. In 1963,she completed her Master’s degree,at the age of 45 years. From August 1982 to April 1983,she published 9 instalments of her autobiography in the popular magazine ” Herald ” as ” The uprooted sapling”. This was,later on,edited and published as a Book, ” A woman of substance- the memoirs of Begum Khursheed Mirza “, by her daughter Lubna,in 2004. Renuka Devi died on 8-2-1989 at Lahore after a prolonged illness.

In her book she included a chapter of 24 pages ” Renuka Devi-my celluloid identity”,in which she has described many interesting anecdotes. her detailed description of the times of the 30s and 40s is a lovely chronicle of history of Bombay film industry. here are some excerpts from her book, for you…

1) Back in the Thirties, acting in films was not considered an honourable profession for anybody. And for a married woman from a well-educated and respectable upper-middle class Muslim family, it was forbidden to even think about it. But Khurshid Mirza, the daughter of the founders of the Aligarh Women’s College, the wife of a police officer and already a mother of two, was too free-spirited to be tied down by any social norm. I took the plunge and soon a star named Renuka Devi was born.

2) In 1939, Shanta Apte wrote that she received four or five letters each day from young girls wanting to join the movies “due perhaps to this monetary attraction”. Actresses themselves acknowledged in interviews that the money was substantial and more than one actress claimed that her salary rivalled that of the Governor of Bombay! But aside from several myth-building exercises, it is now apparent that film acting was a uniquely high-paying profession for women. According to Filmindia, Shobhana Samarth’s approximate total income in 1942 was Rs 36,000 while Sardar Akhtar, Naseem Banu, and Madhuri earned about Rs 30,000 each. These figures indicate that leading heroines of the day averaged an income of Rs 3,000-4,000 per month (some actresses were freelancers and did not work through the year), at a time when a French chiffon sari cost Rs 9, and a brand new imported Studebaker cost Rs 6,000. It is hardly surprising then, that I would want to make “a little dough”.

3) Akbar stood by me in the face of stiff opposition from both our families. Nevertheless, he maintained a strange attitude towards my work. He enjoyed the benefits the money brought us, such as a new car, expensive game-hunts, and pleasure trips to fashionable Mussoorie in summer and excellent schooling for our children. And, yet, he treated my work as a hobby, instead of giving it its due importance.

( My thanks to the book,”A woman of substance “, some information from ” Free Library”,Cineplot and my own notes).

One more name Maya Devi may be new to readers. Maya Devi was from Bombay and started her career from silent films in 1928 with Anarkali by imperial. Her first Talkie film was Kunwari ya widhva-35. Her real name was Leela. She became a favourite of Bombay Talkies and she did 6 films with them in 37 and 38. In all she did 5 silent films and 31 Talkie films till 1949. She got married with a Muslim and then migrated to Pakistan, where she did 19 films and then retired in 1964. She died in Lahore on 1-2-67. She did films in Gujarati and Punjabi also.( info from pakfilms.com).

The story of film Jeewan Prabhat-37 was……..

In this film Uma (Devika Rani) is born in a high caste Brahmin family,but falls in love with a boy of Kumhar caste(Potters).Her love with Ramu (Kishore Sahu) leads them nowhere as there is a great opposition to this from all sides. They realise that their love will lead them nowhere. Finally Uma is married off to Nandlal (Prithviraj kapoor), a Brahmin boy and Ramu accepts the reality.

The marriage makes the potters very happy too. Later it is rumoured that Nandlal is about to marry Padma (Chandraprabha),because Uma is a ‘ baanjh’ (infertile). Ramu meets Uma and their meeting is seen by Nandlal. He sends Uma back to her parents. Few days later, Uma discovers that she is pregnant,but Nandlal doubts her fidelity. At the end Padma, herself understands how much Uma loves Nandlal. She withdraws from the proposed marriage. Not only this,she also convinces Nandlal about Uma’s purity.

Finally, Nandlal and Uma begin a new life a new Jeevan Prabhat.


Song-Paalna mero munwa jhoole (Jeewan Prabhat)(1937) Singer-Saraswati Devi, Unidentified Male Voice, Lyrics-J S Kashyap, MD-Saraswati Devi
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

mero lalna jhoole paalna
mero lalna jhoole paalna
mero munna jhoole paalna
mero lalna jhoole paalna
mero munna jhoole paalna

hari gulabi resham ki dor lagi
soney chaandi ki bati ye khoob bani
hari gulabi resham ki dor lagi
soney chaandi ki bati ye khoob bani

faro faro maa ek lagaai
mann mohey bholi chhavi pyaari
faro faro maa ek lagaai
mann mohey bholi chhavi pyaari
maa ke mann mein uthat hilore
maa ke mann mein uthat hilore

jhoola jhoole laalna
jhoola jhoole laalna
mora bituwa jhoole paalna
jhoola jhoole laalna
mora bituwa jhoole paalna

badho bhalo to chhodo jhoola
doley it ut chalo khadula
badho bhalo to chhodo jhoola
doley it ut chalo khadula

baat banaawe bholi bholi
baat banaawe bholi bholi
bhookh lagey par daudo aawe
kahey totli boli
bhookh lagey par daudo aawe
kahey totli boli

maa maa
oti de
maa maa
dudhu de

maa daud uthaave
doodh pilaave
maa daud uthaave
doodh pilaave
laalna
mero munwa jhoole paalna
mero lalna jhoole paalna
mero munna jhoole paalna

?? to ghar mein aawe
maatha  peete daud lagaave
?? to ghar mein aawe
maata ji se to daud lagaave

arey kin ne maara
baa..boo
babua kaun laaya
baa..boo
dudhu kaun pilaaya
ammaa
kaala teeka deta
ammaa

mera pyaara raaj dulaara
amma amma karta pyaara
mera pyaara raaj dulaara
amma amma karta pyaara
laalna
mero munwa jhoole paalna
mero lalna jhoole paalna
mero munna jhoole paalna

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

मेरो ललना झूले पालना
मेरो ललना झूले पालना
मेरो मुन्ना झूले पालना
मेरो ललना झूले पालना
मेरो मुन्ना झूले पालना

हरी गुलाबी रेशम की दो लगी
सोने चांदी की बटी ये खूब बनी
हरी गुलाबी रेशम की दो लगी
सोने चांदी की बटी ये खूब बनी

फड़ो फड़ो माँ एक लगाई
मन मोहे भोली छवि प्यारी
फड़ो फड़ो माँ एक लगाई
मन मोहे भोली छवि प्यारी
माँ के मन में उठत हिलोरे
माँ के मन में उठत हिलोरे

झूला झूले लालना
झूला झूले लालना
मोरा बिटुवा झूले पालना
झूला झूले लालना
मोरा बिटुवा झूले पालना

बढ़ो भलो तो छोड़ो झूला
डोले इत उत चलो खडोला
बढ़ो भलो तो छोड़ो झूला
डोले इत उत चलो खडोला

बात बनावे भोली भोली
बात बनावे भोली भोली
भूख लगे पर दौड़ो आवे
कहे तोतली बोली
भूख लगे पर दौड़ो आवे
कहे तोतली बोली

माँ माँ
ओटी दे
माँ माँ
दुधु दे

माँ दौड़ उठावे
दूध पिलावे
माँ दौड़ उठावे
दूध पिलावे
लालना
मेरो मुनवा झूले पालना
मेरो ललना झूले पालना
मेरो मुन्ना झूले पालना

?? ?? तो घर में आवे
माथा पीटे दौड़ लगावे
?? ?? तो घर में आवे
माथा पीटे दौड़ लगावे

अरे किन ने मारा
बा॰॰बू
बबुआ कौन लाया
बा॰॰बू
दुधु कौन पिलाया
अम्मा
काला टीका देता
अम्मा

मेरा प्यारा राज दुलारा
अम्मा अम्मा करता प्यारा
मेरा प्यारा राज दुलारा
अम्मा अम्मा करता प्यारा
लालना
मेरो मुनवा झूले पालना
मेरो ललना झूले पालना
मेरो मुन्ना झूले पालना


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3783 Post No. : 14764 Movie Count :

4037

Today’s song is from film ‘Holi’ (1940). It is written by DN Madhok and composed by Khemchand Prakash. This duet is sung by Sitara Devi and Kantilal.

When silent films started talking, it became imperative for the film makers to recruit only those artistes who could sing on screen. In this compulsion, most of the times, the composers had to compromise on the singing ability of the artistes, because for the artistes, acting was primary and singing was secondary. Barring the born, natural singers like Noorjehan, KL Saigal, Khursheed, Surendra and few others, the rest of the singers in the film industry were all ‘make do’ types. In the early era, till about the beginning of the 40’s decade, the music directors had a tough time getting songs sung by these so called ‘singers’. May be, that is the reason why we find that many composers also sang when the playback started.

Almost all the heroes and heroines (with the sole exception of Jairaj – who was an ‘Aurangzeb’ in music) willy-nilly sang even after the playback singing had firmly set in. Pure and exclusive singers like Lata, Asha, Geeta, Rafi, Mukesh and Talat started occupying their legitimate place in playback singing in films from the mid 1940s onward. At the same time, slowly and steadily singing by the actors and actresses diminished, and by the dawn of the 1950’s decade, playback singing was rooted firmly. In my opinion, this was also one of the major reasons of ‘Golden Period of Film Music’ blossoming from around 1947-48 onward. Due to the availability of playback singers, actors started acting wholeheartedly and composers got new energy and they concentrated on making good music rather than breaking their heads on teaching the ‘pseudo-singers’ how to sing their songs ! In one of the interviews, Naushad had expressed his relief from getting song sung by non-singers !!

Singers like Ishwarlal, Kantilal, AR Oza, Vatsala Kumthekar etc were part actors and part singers. Thus we find that very rarely any song sung by these part time singers became an evergreen song. I can, however, think of only one song- “Zindagi Ka Saaz Bhi Kya Saaz Hai, Baj Raha Hai Aur Be-awaaz Hai” by Naseem Bano in film ‘Pukar’ (1939). She had sung it well and the composer Meer Sahab too should get some credit for its composition. But such cases are rare. Mohd. Rafi’s case in this connection can be quoted. After the regular playback singers became composers’ first choice, one by one the ‘part time’ singers closed their shops ! See here how Rafi did it.

Mohd. Rafi, no doubt, was a versatile singer. Like Lata, when he came on the scene of playback singing – after considerable hard work and struggle, he replaced the old singers who sang in the films, one by one.

  • Ashok kumar’s singing spree stopped when Rafi sang for him in film ‘Saajan’ (1947).
  • Ishwarlal stopped singing when Rafi sang for him in film ‘Sharbati Aankhen’ (1945).
  • Shahu Modak stopped after ‘Chakradhari’ (1954).
  • WM Khan after ‘Aalam Ara’ (1956).
  • Master Nissar after ‘Boot Polish’ (1954)
  • GM Durrani after ‘Lal Pathar’ (1971)
  • Karan Dewan after ‘Duniya’ (1949).
  • Noor Mohammed Charlie after ‘Zameen Ke Taare’ (1960).
  • Balak Ram after ‘Shri Ram Bharat Milan’ (1965).
  • Moti Sagar after ‘Paak Daman’ (1957).
  • Man Mohan Krishna after ‘Basant Bahar’ (1956).

Mohd. Rafi even sang for some composers who used to sing in films,

  • SN Tripathi – ‘Pawanputra Hanuman’ (1957).
  • Snehal Bhatkar – ‘Baawre Nain’ (1950) (he was doing a beggar’s role in this film)
  • Sudhir Sen – ‘Saat Phere’ (1970).

By the way, Rafi was the only male playback singer who sang with all 3 major singer actresses

  • Noorjehan – ‘Jugnu’ (1947).
  • Khursheed – ‘Aage Badho’ (1947)
  • Suraiya – they have sung together in 13 films

The female singer in today’s song is Sitara Devi (8-11-1920 to 25-11-2014), the well known Kathak dancer. Her life story is available freely on the internet. She was bestowed the title of ‘Nritya Samragni’  by Ravindranath Tagore, in 1936, when she was just 16 year old. Sitara is also famous for her multiple marriages. She was the one who refused to accept ‘Padma Bhushan’ honour, stating that she deserves nothing less than ‘Bharat Ratna’ alone ! She had taught Kathak Dance to younger actresses like Madhubala, Rekha, Mala Sinha and Kajol.

The male singer in today’s song is Kantilal. KANTILAL CHHAGANLAL PACHCHIGAR was born on 18-4-1907 in Surat, Gujarat. Due to inherent interest in music, after college education he came to Bombay to try film singing. His first film was ‘Bulbul e Paristan’ (1934) from Vishnu Cinetone. Kikubhai Yagnik was the MD. Kantilal sang 2 songs in it. In 1935, he acted, sang and gave music to ‘Preet Ki Reet’ (1935). He sang 6 songs. He also gave music in ‘Punjab Ka Sinh’ (1936) and also in ‘Gul Badan’ (1937). From 1937 to 1941, he was with Ranjit Movietone and acted and sang in 16 films. He sang 40 songs under Khemchand Prakash and Gyan Dutt.

Then came ‘Gazi Salahuddin’, ‘Kangan’, ‘Holiday In Bombay’ and ‘Kanchan’. Kantilal sang 60 songs in 24 films under 5 MDs. Some of his films were, ‘Toofaani Toli’, ‘Ban Ki Chidiya’, ‘Billi’, ‘Gorakh Aaya’, ‘Prithviputra’, ‘Adhoori Kahaani’, ‘Nadi Kinaare’, ‘Aaj Ka Hindusthan’, ‘Achhoot’, ‘Diwali’, ‘Holi’, ‘Musafir’, ‘Pardesi’, ‘Sasural’, ‘Shaadi’ etc.

In 1943, he married Ushaben and acted in Gujarati films and dramas. He passed away on 17-6-1971.

Khemchand Prakash (12-12-1907 to 10-8-1950) was a very talented composer, but unfortunately  most of his career, he dealt with average singers. Whenever he got opportunity to make songs for real singers like Saigal (‘Tansen’ and ‘Bhanwara’), Khursheed, Kishore ( ‘Ziddi’ and ‘Muqaddar’), Lata (‘Mahal’) and Rajkumari, his songs became famous and very popular. Today’s song is sung by the so called part time singers, but they have tried their best in it.

With this song film ‘Holi’ (1940) makes its debut on the blog.

 


Song – Dhanwaalon Ki Duniya Hai Ye, Nirdhan Ke Bhagwaan  (Holi) (1940) Singer – Kantilal, Sitara Devi, Lyrics – DN Madhok, Music – Khemchand Prakash
Kantilal + Sitara Devi

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

dhanwaalon ki duniya hai ye
nirdhan ke bhagwan
dhanwaalon ki duniya hai ye
nirdhan ke bhagwan

nirdhan teri
nirdhan ka main
nirdhan teri
nirdhan ka main
ek anokhi shaan
ek anokhi shaan

do din ki ye mast jawaani
do din ki ye mast jawaani
do din ka ye roo..oop
ek mundere chaanv hai aayi
ek mundere dhoo..oop
bhole panchhi is pinjre ka
bhole panchhi is pinjre ka
jhootha tere maan
haa..aan
jhootha tere maan
haa..aan
dhanwaalon ki duniya hai ye
nirdhan ke bhagwan

ret ke mahal bana kar moorakh
ret ke mahal bana kar moorakh
in mein kiya baseraa. . .
ek fanaa ke jhonka aaya
kooch hua sab dera
ret ke mahal bana kar moorakh
ret ke mahal bana kar moorakh
in mein kiya baseraa. . .
ek fanaa ke jhonka aaya
kooch hua sab dera
jhootha jeevan ka iktaara
jhootha jeevan ka iktaara
jhoothi us ki taa..aan
dhanwaalon ki duniya hai ye
nirdhan ke bhagwan
dhanwaalon ki duniya hai ye
nirdhan ke bhagwan

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

धनवालों की दुनिया है ये
निर्धन के भगवान
धनवालों की दुनिया है ये
निर्धन के भगवान

निर्धन तेरी
निर्धन का मैं
निर्धन तेरी
निर्धन का मैं
एक अनोखी शान
एक अनोखी शान

दो दिन की ये मस्त जवानी
दो दिन की ये मस्त जवानी
दो दिन का ये रू॰॰प
एक मुंडेरे छाँव है आई
एक मुंडेरे धू॰॰प
भोले पंछी इस पिंजरे का
भोले पंछी इस पिंजरे का
झूठा तेरे मान
हाँ॰॰आँ
झूठा तेरे मान
हाँ॰॰आँ
धनवालों की दुनिया है ये
निर्धन के भगवान

रेत के महल बना कर मूरख
रेत के महल बना कर मूरख
इन में किया बसेरा॰ ॰ ॰
एक फना का झोंका आया
कूच हुआ सब डेरा
रेत के महल बना कर मूरख
रेत के महल बना कर मूरख
इन में किया बसेरा॰ ॰ ॰
एक फना का झोंका आया
कूच हुआ सब डेरा
झूठा जीवन का इकतारा
झूठा जीवन का इकतारा
झूठी उसकी ता॰॰आन
धनवालों की दुनिया है ये
निर्धन के भगवान
धनवालों की दुनिया है ये
निर्धन के भगवान


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 14900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Movies with all their songs covered =1167
Total Number of movies covered =4104

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