Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Rajkumari solo’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4796 Post No. : 16557 Movie Count :

4508

‘Aawaaz’ (1942) was produced by Dadasaheb Torne under his banner, Saraswati Cinetone and was directed by Rafique Razvi. The star cast included Maya Bannerji, Wasti, Swarnlata, Danve, Kailash, Shantabai, Baby Anwari etc. Dadasaheb Torne set up Saraswati Cinetone in 1931 after the sound films came into being. His maiden sound film, ‘Shyamsundar’ (1932) completed silver jubilee run in Mumbai. ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) was the last film of Dadasaheb Torne.

I became aware of Dadasaheb Torne when his name had propped up prominently in many newspapers and magazines around the time of closing of the centenary celebrations of Indian films in May 3, 2013. The day was exactly 100 years after Dadasaheb Phalke’s first Indian film. ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was released. Vijay and Anil Torne, the sons of Dadasaheb Torne claimed that it was their father, Dadashaeb Torne who produced India’s first film ‘Shree Pundalik’ (1912) which was released in the Coronation theatre in central Mumbai on May 18, 1912.

A petition signed by many citizens including the family members of Dadasaheb Torne and Vikas Patil, the producer and the then Chairman of IMPPA was submitted to the then President, Pranab Mukherjee and others seeking the status to Dadasaheb Torne as the producer of the first Indian film ‘Shree Pundalik’ (1912). A Public Interest Litigation (PIL) was also filed in Bombay High Court seeking the honour to Dadasaheb Torne for producing the first Indian film. Both the petition as well as PIL have cited the advertisement of the film which appeared in the Times of India dated May 25, 1912 and its screening in the Coronation Theatre. The film ran for two weeks.

I could not get to know whether any decision on the petition or the judgement on PIL came out. But judging by the intense debate in the print media those days on this issue, I do not think that the Government of India gave any final response to the petition.

There were many articles which appeared on this issue in various newspapers of that time such as the Times of India, Indian Express, DNA, Mid-Day etc. Based on the articles in these newspapers, I have summarised the points of arguments for and arguments against declaring ‘Shree Pundalik’ to be the first Indian film produced by Dadasaheb Torne which are as under:

Arguments in favour of ‘Shree Pundalik’ as the first Indian film

1. ‘Shree Pundalik’ was shot on a movie camera with a cameraman. The shooting script was written by Dadasaheb Torne and his friends, Ramrao Kirtikar and Nanasaheb Chitre.

2, Dadasaheb Torne directed ‘Shree Pundalik’ beside acting. Tipnis and Joshi also acted along with other actors. The shooting was done at the junction of the then Girgaon Road and Lamington Road. So, it was a location shooting.

3. The length of the film was 4000 feet, So, it was a feature-length film as per the standard of films those days.

4. Dadasaheb Torne was continuously associated with Indian films as a producer, director, editor, sound recordist and film distributors since 1912.

Arguments against ‘Shree Pundalik’ as the first Indian film.

1. ‘Shree Pundalik’ was a recording of a drama of the same name with a camera fixed on the stage. In other words, there were no camera movements, no close-ups and multiple angle shots. As against this, ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was filmed using the cinematic techniques. It was shot with a movie camera with multiple angles and in parts. All the parts were later joined together to make a full film (editing functions).

2. It is claimed that ‘Shree Pundalik’ was 1500 feet in length with a runtime of 22 minutes whereas the length of ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was 3700 feet with a runtime of 40 minutes.

3. For ‘Shree Pundalik’, the camera was operated by a Britisher, Johnson who took the raw film to London for processing. The negatives of the film is not available in India. The film’s positive print along with other related documents was lost during the Panshet dam flooding in Pune in 1961. ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was processed in India. In the words of Dadasheb Phalke, it was a complete swadeshi film.

4. Raja Harishchandra’ was made with a shooting script. Actors were specially selected for the film. Elaborate sets were designed both for indoor and outdoor shootings. Special costumes were designed for the actors. There were shooting schedules of about 4 weeks. In other words, all the important aspects of a film making – direction, camera movements, a couple of trick scenes, art work, costumes, lighting, editing etc were handled while making ‘Raja Harishchandra’.

Government of India continues to recognise ‘Raja Harishchandra’ as the first feature film made in India and Dadasaheb Phalke as the pioneer of Indian films.

A biographical book on Dadasaheb Torne was written in Marathi by Shashikant Kinikar, a film journalist which was published in 2007. After failing to get the book though I got some material from the preview of the book. I came across an article written by Kumar Kadam in Marathi in Maharashtra Times, dated April 23, 2012 giving a short biography of Dadasaheb Torne.

Ramchandra Gopal (Dadasaheb) Torne (13/04/1890 – 19/01/1960) was born in Sukalwad village, near Malwan in Sindhudurg district. At the age of 3, his father passed away plunging the family into poverty. As a result, Dadasaheb Torne did not complete his primary schooling.

Because of poverty, the family shifted to Mumbai. Soon, the young Dadasaheb went to Karachi with a friend and worked there in a shop learning job of an electrician. After about 6 months, he came back to Mumbai and joined Greaves Cotton in their Electric Department.

In Mumbai, once he attended the premier of the Marathi drama ‘Shree Pundalik’ staged by an amateur drama company. Soon, he became attracted to Marathi drama and joined Advocate Kirtikar’s Shripad Natak Mandali. Because of his multiple talents, he became one of the important members of the drama company.

At that time, the silent films from Hollywood were getting released in Mumbai which had become popular. Dadasaheb Torne’s mind was working on the conversion of Marathi drama, ‘Shree Pundalik’ into a silent film. He was in contact with his Hollywood friend to get the knowledge of making a film and the approximate cost thereof. His friend, Advocate Nanasaheb Chitre arranged for a movie camera and a British cameraman, Johnson. Thus, India’s first silent film ‘Shree Pundalik’ was produced and directed by Dadasaheb Torne which was released in Coronation Theatre on May 18, 1912. It ran for 2 weeks.

Soon after the release of ‘Shree Pundalik’, Greaves Cotton transferred Dadasaheb Torne to their Karachi office where he became friendly with Baburao Pai (He was the same Baburao Pai who became one of the partners of Prabhat Film Company and introduced Dev Anand in ‘Hum Ek Hain’, 1946). Both of them started the business of importing silent films from Hollywood for distribution in Karachi.

After a couple of years in Karachi, Dadasaheb Torne returned to Mumbai and spent 3-4 years in Kolhapur probably to learn the nuances of film making. During the first World War period, he came back to Mumbai and started a company dealing in cine equipment like camera, films and other accessories which were required for making films. His business boomed as many had started making silent films. In 1929, Dadasaheb Torne in partnership with Baburao Pai floated ‘Super Pictures’, a film distribution firm which made a lot of profit during the boom period of silent films.

In around 1927, sound films had made their presence in Hollywood. Dadasaheb foresaw the opportunity in doing business in sound equipment. With his American associates, he learnt the use of sound technology in films. When Ardeshir Irani was planning to make India’s first sound film, ‘Alam Ara’ (1931), Dadasaheb Torne provided him Bell & Havel movie camera and the sound equipment. He himself supervised the sound recording of ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) sitting with the Sound Recordist.

In 1932, Dadasaheb floated his own film production company, Saraswati Cinetone with a studio in Pune and produced its maiden sound film, ‘Shyam Sundar’ (1932). Under this banner, Dadasaheb made 20 films in Marathi and Hindi up to 1942.

The financial constraints forced Dadasaheb Torne to rent out his studio premises in Pune to one of his close associates (W Z Ahmed?). In 1947 in the wake of the partition, his associate mortgaged the premises to a bank by forging the signature of Dadasaheb Torne. Thereafter, he ran away to Pakistan with the money he raised and along with the expensive camera and other equipment. A shocked Dadasaheb got his first heart attack after which he decided to completely retire from the films. He stayed with his family in his bungalow in Shivaji Nagar, Pune until his death in January 19, 1960.

I feel very sorry for Dadasaheb Torne as he came so close to becoming the pioneer of Indian films, but lost the honour on technical points. He was a visionary man who foresaw the advent of silent and sound films well in advance and kept himself ready in learning the techniques of film making. His efforts need to be lauded as he came from a very poor family without even completing his primary education.

It is not known whether Dadasaheb Phalke had occasion to see ‘Shree Pundalik’. But he may be aware of the short comings of the film which could have facilitated him to improve upon while planning ‘Raja Harishchandra’. I feel that Dadashaeb Torne’s contributions to Indian cinema need to be recognised some way or the other – say by instituting an award for some film related activities. A road in Pune is named after him.

Coming back to the last film produced by Dadasaheb Torne, ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) had 10 songs written by Ramesh Gupta and Kaabil Amritsari. However, accreditation of lyricist of each song is not available. There were two music directors for the film – K C Verma and Sadashiv Neverekar. Again, accreditation for each song is not available. Sadashiv Narvekar was associated with Marathi films as a music director who composed Lata Mangeshkar’s first ever recorded song in a Marathi film, ‘Kiti Hasaal’ (1942).

I am presenting the first song ‘naach naach re man pankhi’ from ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) to appear on the Blog. The melodious song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey. An almost similar sounding tune was used in the mukhada of the song, nain dwaar se man mein wo aake in ‘Saawan’ (1959). But I guess that this has more to do with the same raag-based songs than getting inspired from the tune of the song under discussion.

With this song, ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) makes its debut on the Blog.
Audio Clip:

Song-Naach naach re man pankhi tere saajan aayenge(Aawaaz)(1942) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyricist-Kabil Amritsari/Ramesh Gupta, MD-K C Verma/ Sadashiv Nevrekar

Lyrics

naach naach re
naach naach re man pankhi
tere saajan aayenge
naach naach re man pankhi
tere saajan aayenge
phoolon ka chaadar sajaa le
phoolon ka chaadar sajaa le
aasha ke ae ae ae ae
aasha ke man deep jalaa le
aasha ke man deep jalaa le
(??) ko dhoond rahi hain ankhiyaan
(??)ko dhoond rahi hai ankhiyaan
kab saajan aayenge.. ae ae
kab saajan aayenge
naach naach re mann pankhi
tere saajan aayenge

jeewan ki ee ee ee
ho…. o
o o o o
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa
jeewan ki ?? lehraaye
?? ankhiyan basaayen
manwa meethhe gaane aaye
gaane gaaye
gaane gaaye
manwa meethhe gaane aaye
kyaa
tere saajan aayenge
haan
aayenge
naach naach re mann pankhi
tere saajan aayenge


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4793 Post No. : 16553 Movie Count :

4507

Leela Desai was one of the top actresses during 1937-47 both in Kolkata and Mumbai. There was a curiosity in me as to why she suddenly disappeared from the film industry after 1947 when her career was at the peak. Thereafter, she lived in almost obscurity. What is surprising about Leela Desai is that information about her date/year of birth, her marital status, what she did after she left the film industry and when she passed away are unknown or sketchy.

Leela Desai was the 4th of the 5 children born to Dr Umedram Desai from Gujarat and Satybala Devi, daughter of a Bengali landlord settled in Bihar. It was a second marriage for both of them as Satyabala Devi lost her husband during the childhood while Dr Umedram Desai got married to his first wife in his childhood through whom he had two sons. Later, Dr Umedram Desai married Gunobati Mitter, a Bengali Christian, for the third time with whom he had 6 children. Before her marriage, Gunobati Mitter worked as a tutor for the children of Dr Umedram Desai and Satyabala Devi in Rampur. So apart from her own 4 siblings, Leela Desai had 8 step brothers/sisters.

Leela Desai was born in Newark when her parents were in the USA for a 3-year stint. She was brought up in Rampur as her father, Dr Umedram Desai became the State Surgeon for the State of Rampur and the personal Physician to the Nawab of Rampur. At the age of six, Leela Desai was sent to Kolkata for her primary schooling and to Kurseong near Darjeeling from where she completed her Matric and Junior College. Thereafter, Leela Desai returned to Lucknow by which time her father had passed away in Mumbai. In Lucknow, she enrolled to learn Kathak from Shambu Maharaj. During her training, she gave a lot of charity dance performances and made a good name as a dancer.

Hemchandra Chunder, one of the film directors in New Theatres who was on a visit to Lucknow, attended one of Leela Desai’s dance performances. He was impressed by her dance performance with her expressive eyes. He offered her a role of a younger sister of Kamlesh Kumari in New Theatre’s ‘President’ (1937) in which she had also a dance performance. At first, she did not show much interest to work in the film. However, after few days when she watched New Theatres’ Krorepati’ (1936), she felt that she could act in the film. She wrote to Hemchandra Chunder about her willingness to work in the film. The fact that Hemchandra along with Nitin Bose rushed to Lucknow with a contract showed their eagerness to take Leela Desai for the film without the screen test.

‘President’ (1937) became a hit on the box office and Leela Desai’s performance in the film was appreciated so much that overnight she became the star. Under New Theatres’ banner, apart from ‘President’ (1937), she worked in ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Dushman’ (1938), Kapal Kundala’ (1939) and ‘Nartaki’ (1940). Except ‘Kaapal Kundala’, she also acted in Bangla versions of the films and had also dance performances in these films.

After ‘Nartaki’ (1940), Leela Desai left New Theatres and took a year-long all-India tour with her dance troupe which became very successful both in terms of recognition as a dancer as well as in monetary terms. After accepting the attractive offer from Chimanlal Trivedi of Laxmi Productions, she landed in Mumbai to act in their maiden film ‘Tamanna’ (1942). In Mumbai, though Leela Desai worked as a free-lance actor, she was associated with Laxmi Productions for ‘Inkaar’ (1943), ‘Sharaafat’ (1943), ‘Miss Devi’ (1944), ‘Kamala’ (1946), and ‘Maharani Milandevi’ (1946). She also worked with her New Theatres’ colleagues and directors in Mumbai such as Nitin Bose in ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Mujrim’ (1944), with Debaki Bose in ‘Meghdoot’ (1945) and with Kidar Sharma in ‘Kaliyaan’ (1944). In addition, she worked with veterans directors like Vishram Bedekar in ‘Nagad Narayan’ (1943), R S Chaudhary in ‘Magadraj’(1946) and with Ramchandra Thakur in ‘Geet Govind’ (1947).

During her short filmy career between 1937-47, Leela Desai worked in 22 films. After 1947, Leela Desai seems to have taken a ‘voluntary retirement’ from the film industry. Her only connection to filmy industry after 1947 was that her name appeared on the credit titles of Bimal Roy’s film, ‘Kabuliwala’ (1961) as Associate Producer. It is said that Leela Desai bought the rights of ‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961, Bangla) from Tapan Sinha with an intention to make the film in Hindi. However, later she sold the rights to Bimal Roy.

Leela Desai’s elder sister, Shanti Desai was married to Bratindranath Tagore, a nephew of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. Her younger sister, Monica Desai was also an actress in Bangla and Hindi films who got married to film director, Phani Majumdar in 1947.

As I said earlier, not much information about Leela Desai was available after she left the films. One of the commentators has mentioned on the facebook page that Leela Desai remained unmarried for rearing the children of her elder sister, Shanti who passed away at a young age. If it is true, it is a sacrificial act by her to leave the film industry and remain unmarried to take care of her elder sister’s children.

Another reference I got about Leela Desai after her leaving films was from an obituary of Sumita Sanyal written in 2017 by Shoma A Chatterji, a film scholar and a free-lance journalist. In this article, she has mentioned that Leela Desai was staying in Mumbai at her apartment in Worli Sea Face where she used to conduct acting classes for the prospective actors coming from Kolkata. One of such actors to whom she gave acting training was Sumita Sanyal. It is possible that Leela Desai may have recommended Sumita Sanyal to Hrishikesh Mukherjee for the film ‘Ashirwaad’ (1968).

As per the comment on Upperstall, written by Shoma A Chatterji in the context of yester year stars who passed away in oblivion, it was stated that Leela Desai passed away in Mumbai. But her date/year of death was not mentioned. She further stated that none of the newspapers and film magazines carried the news of her death.

Leela Desai who started her filmy career with her maiden film “president’ (1937) under the direction of Nitin Bose, got the opportunity to work under his direction in ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Mujrim’ (1944), later film being also produced by Nitin Bose under the banner of Vishnu Cinetone. The star cast included Motilal, Leela Desai, Jagdish Sethi, Yakub, Veena Kumari, Sunalini Devi, Cuckoo etc.

From a very short synopsis available on-line, the film was a ‘musical crime-thrilling family drama’. Motilal is a kind hearted person who meets Leela Desai and fall in love with her. Both of them want to marry each other but a villain, Yakub comes in the way as Leela Desai would inherit a lot of wealth if she gets married. So, Motilal is framed under a false murder case by Yakub. How the real culprit is traced and Motilal and Leela Desai get united, becomes the part of the thrilling end.

The film had 6 songs written by Kailash Matwala (4) and Rammurti Chaturvedi (2). The songs were set to music by Padmabhushan Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh, one of the greatest Tabla and Harmonium players.

I am presenting the first song ‘mori dukaniya aana baabu’ from ‘Mujrim’ (1944) to appear on the Blog. The song is rendered by Rajkumari Dubey on the words of Rammurti Chaturvedi. It is very melodious song with unusual orchestration. There is also some influence of Rabindra Sangeet in the musical composition of the song.

With this song, ‘Mujrim’ makes a debut on the Blog.

Note: Leela Desai’s early life sketch is based on an article which appeared in July 1942 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine after the release of ‘Tamanna’ (1942), her maiden film in Mumbai. Some personal information about Desai family is supplemented from a Blog of Adeel Desai.

Audio Clip:

Song-Mori dukaniya aana baabu (Mujrim)(1944) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Rammurty Chaturvedi, MD-Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh

Lyrics

mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana
haan aan aan
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa

jeth maheena aa aa
raat ki raani ee ee
jeth maheena raat ki raani
phoolen aadhi ratiyaan aan aan
jeth maheena raat ki raani
phoolen aadhi ratiyaan aan aan
bahey paseena jee ghabraaye
saajan karen na batiyaan
karen na batiyaan
karen na batiyaan
aan aan aan aan aan aan
phool ka haar pahan ke sajni
saajan ko lalchaana aa aa
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa

aaya maas ashaadh
chameli phooli kyaari kyaari
aaya maas ashaadh
chameli phooli kyaari kyaari
kali kaliyon mein se khushboo nikli pyaari pyaari
chilla chilla kar baabu mere roothhi naar manaana
chilla chilla kar baabu mere roothhi naar manaana
baabu roothhi naar manaana
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana
baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4751 Post No. : 16486 Movie Count :

4479

Today’s song is from the film Maharani Minal Devi-1946. This film was made by Lakshmi Productions, Bombay, owned by the Director Chimanlal Trivedi. This film was made on a remarkable historical personality from Gujarat.

Bombay film industry has made more than 12000 films so far, on various Genres, but it’s score on making films on Historical Indian personalities is very pathetic. While films on Mughal Kings, Queens and other personalities were made in all decades since the films started talking, not much focus was given on Indian historyHero and Heroines. Not that no films were made at all on them, but if you see its number, there can not be a justification for the large gap.

In the history of India, there were hundreds of such worthy sons and daughters who fought for the country, brought social reforms, did extraordinary work for the people and generally did things for which the country remembers them proudly. Actually,in every state of India, there are Heroes and Heroines who did a lot of good work for the people, in the past few hundred years. Sadly, Hindi films are very poor on this count.

However, I find that regional cinemas are way ahead of Hindi cinema in this matter. Particularly I would quote Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Bangla films in the first list. The second list is of Marathi and Oriya films. Mind you, I am not talking about films on religious personalities and saints like Kabir, Tulsida etc. Even in this category, very few are the subject matter of Hindi films.

People like Rana Pratap, Ishwarchandra Vidyasagar, Rabindranath Tagore, Dhondo Keshav Karve, Rani Chennamma etc etc deserved Hindi films. The entire focus was on Mughals and those who came from outside.The regional films at least did some justice by making films on their Heroes/heroines. Tamil and Bangla films are leaders in this. The strong Regional Pride was the causal factor essentially but honouring heroes is a matter of appreciation. Films on Babar, Humayun, Shahjehan, Bahadurshah Zafar and the likes of them are made in plenty, for obvious reasons, but how many films were made on Savarkar, Shivaji, Rana Pratap, Ashoka the great, Jhansi ki Rani etc ? Leave the older ones. Are there films on Indira Gandhi, Nehru, Gandhi ? A British person had to come here to make a film on Gandhi !

During the British rule – till 1947 – it was probably not possible, allowed or was risky, but since 1947 till date what was the problem ? I feel sad at this state of affairs in making films. Luckily, in the last few years, some enterprising filmmakers have dared to make films on Indian Heroes. I do hope that the situation will improve further and films on Indian heroes/Heroines (there are plenty of them) will be made.

Film maharani Minal devi-1946 is a film on a brave, intelligent, kind and Patriotic personality from Gujarat. I could not get any information on her, the story of the film or other details. Fortunately, I could find a site http://www.streeshakti.com, wherein I found a note on her. here it is to get an idea who she was and what she did….

“Minal Devi or Mayanalla, a famous queen of eleventh century Gujarat, is remembered as an able and just administrator. She was the daughter of Jayakeshin, a king of the Kadamba dynasty in Karnataka and was married to Karna I, a Chalukya king of Anahillapatanawada who met an early death, leaving his queen and young son Siddharaja Jayasimha. Minal Devi acted as regent for her son, who went on to become a legendary hero. An incident described in Rajashekhar Suri’s Prabandha Kosha testifies to the fact that she inspired him in many of his warlike exploits.
She also managed affairs of state, built several monuments and lakes and was responsible for the remission of the tax on pilgrims visiting the Somnath temple. Two lakes built in her period were Minalasar or Munsar near Viramgam and Malva at Dhavalakka or Dholka in Ahmedabad. According to legend, there was a house owned by a woman at the proposed site of the lake Malva, which needed to be demolished to give the lake a regular shape. The queen offered a big sum of money to the woman for her house, but she refused, saying, ‘I shall be famous with your lake,’ thus threatening to sacrifice her life if her house was touched. The queen did not coerce her, showing herself to be a just ruler. This event led to the Gujarati saying: ‘If you want to see justice, go to Dholka and have a look at Malva lake.’

Minal Devi is mentioned with high esteem in contemporary literature. A Sanskrit play entitled Mudritakumudachandra-prakarana depicts a learned dispute between the Digambaras and Svetambaras, the two major Jain sects. One topic in this dispute is whether a woman can achieve salvation. The Svetambaras here claim that women possessing sattwa (identity: an inner quality of goodness) could attain salvation and cite Sita from mythology and Minal Devi in the court of Siddharaja Jayasimha as examples.”

The film had 7 songs written by two lyricists, composed by Saraswati Devi-the music Director. The film was directed by Chimanlal Trivedi. The cast of the film was Prem Adeeb, Leela desai, Durga Khote, Jagdish bSethi, Agha, Sankatha prasad and many others. Director Chimanlal trivedi was a remarkable enterprising person.

Chimanlal Trivedi, was one of the major filmmakers of the 30s and the 40s decade. He was more a Producer businessman than a Director. While he directed hardly 7 films, he produced close to 50 films- all having A grade actors, directors and composers !

Born on 19-3-1909 at a village near Anand in Gujarat he was from a Brahmin family. He did his schooling in Ahmedabad and technical graduation from Baroda. Being an expert in weaving, he took up a job as a weaving Master in Calcutta. Fond of writing, he started writing Dramas, which were staged in Bengal and Gujarat. He was attracted towards Cinema and tried some work in New Theatres. Knowing that the real playing field is Bombay he reached there. He wrote stories for the film Chevrolet-36 and Danger Signal-37 for Mohan pictures.

He established his own production company CIRCO (Cine Industries Recording COmpany) in 1937. By 1943, he had made 12 films. He preferred not to direct his films, but appointed directors like Mohan Sinha for Laxmi-40, Anuradha-40 and Vanmala-41, Balwant Bhatt for Suhag-40 and Madhusudan-41, A R Kardar for Swami-41 and Nai Duniya-42 and Debki Bose for Apna Ghar-42.

He had the art of getting the most popular stars for his films like, Prithviraj kapoor, Chandramohan, Durga Khote,Mazhar khan, Bibbo,Surendra, Jairaj, Sitara, Jeevan, Yaqub, Shobhana Samarth, Prem Adeeb, Vishnupant Pagnis,Leela Desai, Pahadi Sanyal, Shanta Apte and many others. Even big directors like Debki Bose,Nitin Bose, Kardar,Mohan Sinha, Sarvottam Badami, Nandlal Jaswantlal,Profull Roy, Sudhir Sen, R S Chaudhary, Phani mujumdar, Balwant Bhatt etc. worked for him. From Prabhat he brought Shanta Apte for Rs.1000 pm, and also Chandramohan, Pagnis and Mazhar khan. His friend Chandulal Shah followed his way and brought K L Saigal from New Theatres !

C L Trivedi was an expert in gathering funds for his films. After CIRCO at Parel, he started Laxmi Productions at Andheri, in 1942. He made mera Gaon,Sharafat,Bhagya Laxmi,Kadambari,Tamanna,Inkaar,Mohabbat,Miss Devi etc. In 1951, it was Supreme Pictures, Trivedi Productions was in 1952, Kala Kendra in 1953 and with Chitra Bharati in 1954, he made 13 films upto 1961. Top Composers like Timir Baran,Ashok Ghosh,Rafiq Gaznavi,K C Dey,Saraswati Devi,Husnlal-Bhagatram and Naushad gave music to his films.

In the end, he turned to Stage and started Abhinay Bharati. He staged many dramas in Bombay and Gujarat. Chimanlal always went for big names. He had close relations with Nehru, Menon, Morarji Desai, and other National leaders. His wife Kantaben was a Leader herself. Chimanlal Trivedi died on 25-11-1973. His wife, 3 sons and a daughter settled in the USA.

It may be a coincidence, but Gujarati businessmen like Chimanlal Trivedi, Chimanlal Desai,Chimanlal Luhar, Chaturbhuj Doshi, Chimankant Desai, Chunibhai Desai and Chandulal Shah made sizable contribution to Hindi cinema in the first 20 years of the Talkie era. All names started with CH ( ? ) !

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari dubey. With this song the film makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song- Ae maina madhubaina tu kehna sajan se (Maharani Minal Devi)(1946) Singer- Rajkumari Dubey, Lyricist- Not known, MD- Saraswati Devi

Lyrics

Ae maina
madhubaina
tu kehna sajan se
sapnon mein aaye na
Ae maina
madhubaina
tu kehna sajan se
sapnon mein aaye na
chupke chupke
nindiya churaaye na
chupke chupke
nindiya churaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na

raat ko jab main sudh budh khowoon
nindiya ka main jhoola jhooloon
chanda ki kirnon mein chhupke
muskaata wo aaye
chanda ki kirnon mein chhupke
muskaata wo aaye
dheere dheere man mein samaaye
soye peer jagaaye
main man ki
main man ki us ko poochhoon
wo bhed na kuchh batlaayen
wo bhed na kuchh batlaayen
main pallaa uska pakdoon
main pallaa uska pakdoon
wo apna aap chhudaaye
wo apna aap chhudaaye
isi raar mein sapna toote
aankh meri khul jaaye ae ae
aankh meri khul jaaye

aankh khule to yaad mein unki
gaaun geet piya ke
gaaun geet piya ke
taaron ki aankhon mein chhupke
phir wo kare ishaare
phir wo kare ishaare

sun ree pyaari koyal kaali
sun ree pyaari koyal kaali
jaa ke sajan ko keh de aali ee ee ee
keh de aali
bhola sa man mera
bhola hai man
bhola sa man mera
bhola hai man
kisi ko tarsaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na
kisi ko tarsaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4680 Post No. : 16359 Movie Count :

4442

Writing on old films, its people and its music is an unusual hobby. Such people are very few and what they write is read by a limited but a large circle. This group of people are exclusive and generally they are not recognised by the society. Funnily, ” writing on old films” is mainly ( and wrongly) equated with old songs only. people are not aware that there is a world beyond old songs and music as far as old films are concerned.

Whenever I tell people that ‘ I write on old films’, their immediate reaction is to start praising old songs which they know. Depending on the age of the person, the period of ‘ old films’ differs. For an young man of, say 20-25 years old films may mean films which came in the 80’s and 90’s. For people of 30-40 years, films of the 6o’s and 70’s are old films. For people of 45-60 years of age, old films are from the 50’s. Only people in the age bracket of 65 to say 80/85, it is films of the 30’s and 40’s which are old films !

Irrespective of the age group and their definition of old films, people unanimously equate films with songs only. That is why I say films have 2 parts…..
1. Poetry – It consists of the songs, the lyricists, the Music Director, the arrangers, instruments used and its players, how songs are presented, who is the singer etc etc.
2. Prose – It consists of information of the producing studios,producers, directors, actors, film stories, locations, cinematography and all those who help make a film-other than songs and music.

Most Social Media sites and groups centre around film music, songs, singers and related topics. I would guess that about 95 % groups and sites belong to this category. However, the remaining 5% groups and sites, Blogs loyally give importance to people connected with film making. They collect and provide information on the old films, production houses, biographies of artistes, producers, directors, cinema stories,filmographies, interviews with people etc etc. These sites and groups are exclusive and known only to people who are interested in this aspect of films, for whatever reasons.

However, I strongly believe that the 2 parts, i.e. Prose and Poetry of films are incomplete without each other. One may specialise in knowledge of one part, but he can not do without having a sufficient knowledge of the other part too. For example, if I specialise in the Prose part of old films, I also have a sufficient knowledge of the Poetry part of the films. Therefore,instead of specialisation, i would call it a Preference of the particular part. I have also noted that most people who write or do any kind of blogging or ‘siting’ of old Hindi films, do this as a Hobby. In a way, it is ” Love’s Labour” for them.

Another point.As is generally believed,all people connected with this hobby are not the ‘Retired ‘ people. There are enthusiastic bloggers in this field, who are professionals having either a job or a business. Some high profile bureaucrats, some doctors, educationists, professors, senior managers in Government or private enterprises or even directors of companies. They are of course in the age group of 45 and above. Not that there are no young people involved in old films. Just take a round of related pages on Fb, you will find quite young people enjoying old songs and also putting their ‘ knowledgeable’ remarks/comments.

I developed this love of old films quite early, in my early or pre teens, perhaps.As the youngest member of a big joint family, I was assigned the duty of accompanying the elders, whenever they went to see a film – which was quite often. I started liking films (mostly mythological or social films) and their songs. I branched off into seeing action and stunt films with my friends. Language was not a bar. Hyderabad being a multilingual state, I used to see films in Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, English (especially Republic Serials like Captain Marvel etc.)

I developed a habit of jotting down the details of the film seen, in a notebook. This habit lasted with me till about a few years till I reached my final college year in the late 50’s. Once I joined my job and then got married, my notebook writing stopped. I had carefully preserved these notebooks till I started writing articles. But by that time many notebooks had faded, some were torn, some had white ants. I salvaged many and transcribed from the spoiled ones, but some information was lost forever. Still, what remained was enough for me to write hundreds of posts and film synopsis. Good habits always help !

Believing in discipline and organised work, all my more than 1000 articles are neatly stacked in 45 Long books. More than 1100 Bio sketches of cine artistes are in my Laptop. I have 100s of books, purchased and got as gifts from the authors,in Hindi, Marathi and English. I have already written in a diary what is to be done of all these after I leave and also informed the person. The idea is not to waste all this knowledge and that the next generation should have it readymade.

Today’s post has become a different one. Once in a while, some diversion !.

Today’s song from the film Torpedo-41 is a lovely, sweet song by Rajkumari Banareswali. This was a Costume film as per HFGK, but looking at the actors it seems to be a mixture of action and stunt. The cast is Yashwant Dave, Shehzadi, Samson, Meher Sultana and others. The director was N A Mansuri, B.A. He later directed 2 more films, Soorat-47 and Sanwariya-49. I wonder what must he be doing in between ? Music was by Shyam Babu Pathak and Shanti kumar. With this song, film Torpedo makes its Debut on the Blog. Thanks to Shri Abhay Jain(US) for the rare song and Sadanand Kamath ji for uploading it for me.


Song- Chal Saajan chal saajan Ek chhoti si duniya apni basaayen (Torpedo)(1941) Singer- Rajkumari-Banareswali, Lyricist- Kabil, MD- Shanti Kumar Desai

Lyrics

Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Ek chhoti si duniya apni basaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Ek chhoti si duniya apni basaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan

is duniya se ae door kahin jaa kar
is duniya se ae door kahin jaa kar
door kahin
door
door kahin
door
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Ek chhoti si duniya apni basaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan

prem ka deepak man mein jalaa kar
prem ka deepak man mein jalaa kar
kaali ghata ka parda hataa kar
kaali ghata ka parda hataa kar
duniya ki nazron o o o se
duniya ki nazron o o o se
ojhal ho jaayen
ojhal ho jaayen aen aen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Ek chhotisi duniya apni basaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan

ham tum hon wahaan
aur na ho koi
ham tum hon wahaan
aur na ho koi
bhor bhaye aji saajan ho
bhor bhaye aji saajan ho
viyog ke baadal kabhi na chhaayen
viyog ke baadal kabhi na chhaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan
Ek chhoti si duniya apni basaayen
Chal Saajan
Chal Saajan


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4656 Post No. : 16324

“Firdaus”(1953) was produced by M S Ahluwalia and directed by Vasant Joglekar for New Premier Films, Bombay. The movie had Geeta Bali, Anoop Kumar, Rama, Om Prakash, Lalita Pawar, Jamaal Amrohi, Badri Prasad, Randhir, Pesi Patel, and Vasant Thengadi etc in it with Ashok Kumar in guest appearance.

The movie had eight songs in it, all being female solos, sung by four singers- Rajkumari (3), Geeta Dutt(2), Asha Bhonsle (2) and Lata Mangeshkar (1). Two songs have been covered so far.

Here is the third song from “Firdaus”(1953) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rajkumar. D N Madhok is the lyricist. Music is composed by Robin Chatterjee.

Only the audio of the song is available. The song sounds like a mujra song to me, going by its lyrics. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Dekhi re anaadi tori preet (Firdaus)(1953) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-D N Madhok, MD-Robin Chatterjee

Lyrics

dekhi re anaadi tori preet
dekhi re anaadi tori preet
dekhi re anaadi tori preet
anaadi tori preet

jhooth mooth ki baat ko
maine jaana saanch
ab door khade muskaat ho o o
dekh begaani aanch(?)
mare hue ko marna yaa kaahe ki reet ho
kaahe ki reet
anaadi tori preet
anaadi tori preet
dekhi re anaadi tori preet

tum bin jeena maut baraabar
tum bin jina maut baraabar
aur julam bedardi na kar
aur julam bedardi na kar
hamne apni haar maan li ee ee ee ee
hamne apni haar maan li
maan li tori jeet
maani tori jeeet
dekhi re anaadi tori preet
anaadi tori preet
dekhi re
dekhi re anaadi
anaadi tori preet
dekhi re anaadi tori preet


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4613 Post No. : 16246 Movie Count :

4417

Today’s song is a rare song, from an unknown film Suhagi-48. Yes, the title is Suhagi and NOT Suhag. It is rather an unusual and misleading title. There is a cluster of titles around the word Suhag. There were 4 films as Suhag and also 4 films as Suhagan. There was a film Suhag raat ke Pehle and then there were 3 films as Suhag Raat. 2 films as Suhag Sindoor. There were two films with funny titles like Suhag ka Daan and Suhag ka Balidan. And among all this cluster poor film Suhagi was hidden in a corner !

Made by Blue art pictures, the film was directed by A.Shakoor, who directed only one more film in his career- Paayal-48, also made by the same banner. Film Suhagi was produced by Ismaile Devjee and the MD was Shaukat Dehlavi.

1948 was an year in which all the industries-including film industry- were trying to come back to normalising their businesses. The new government had not yet changed any laws and rules, so there was peace on all fronts. The Black money which was being poured into making films was now used by Politicians and thus the film industry was almost back to genuine producers and filmmakers. Most of the famous studios were on the verge of ending the studio system and studio culture. Some big names like New Theatres, Prabhat, Sagar, Ranjit were now mere shadows of their earlier powerful existence.

While film makers lost an important topic of Patriotism( in a garb), they now concentrated on Indian culture, Mythology, History, Family values, Joint family importance, literacy and such development themes. This changed the face of films. However, stories based on Folk tales, Religion and Kings-Queens and evil Wazirs still continued with public patronage. Raj Kapoor emerged as a Director, Ashok Kumar became a middle aged Hero, Dilip and Dev prospered with love stories and young themes. Older Heroes, Heroines, Directors and character artistes started vanishing and a new crop of actors etc took over their mantle. Music was changing its tunes. Melody ruled over Lyrics now and Naushad, C Ramchandra, H-B, S – J, Madan Mohan and the likes of them started making names and films.

One major event that happened in 1948, was the entry of Southern producers into Hindi heartland, with a Bang, when S S Vasan brought his Magnum-Opus- ” Chandralekha”, with more than 600 prints for All Indfia release. The extraordinary success of this film paved the way of other big production houses of South, like AVM, L V Prasad etc. to push their Hindi remakes of successful Southern films into the Hindi markets all over India.

For the MD Shoukat Dehlavi of film Suhagi, it was only his second film as an MD. Do you know who this MD was ? He used 5 different names to compose music to 29 films in his career spanning from 1947 to 1965 in India. He composed 203 songs and also sang 3 songs in 3 films namely, Dildar-47, Aiye-49 and Baradari-55. His 5 names were 1. Shoukat Dehlavi, 2. Shoukat Hussain Dehlavi 3. Shoukat Ali 4. Shoukat Haidari and finally he took a permanent new name 5. NASHAAD.

I can remember only one more artiste who had 5 names in her life. She was known as Qamar Sultana, Indira, Indu, Jaijaywanti and AMEETA !

After Partition, there was a rush to migrate to Pakistan and artists continued to shift there from 47 to almost 1950. Some artistes like Noorjehan left immediately. There were few cases where some people borrowed money from friends and then left the country quietly, leaving the money lender high and dry. By about 49-50, almost everything was settled on both sides. The conditions in Lahore and Karachi had stabilised considerably for film making and lots of opportunities existed for film artistes there by mid 50s. That led to a second wave of migration to Pakistan at that time. Those who had continued in India completed their assignments here and went to Pakistan.

This type of Migration continued till almost mid 60s, when actor Kumar, MD Naashaad, producer actor Shaikh Mukhtar etc migrated to Pakistan. For the lucky ones, the talented ones and those who had preexisting ties in Pakistan sustained, prospered and were happy, but a few artistes suffered heavily. Once a popular Heroine, Meena Shorey, one of the most handsome actors of his times-Najmul Hasan and the hopeful Shaikh Mukhtar spent their last days in utter neglect, penury, disillusionment and sorrow. Actors like Noor Mohammed Charlie regretted their decision to migrate, but it was too late.
One of the later migrants was NASHAD, music director,who shifted in 1963 or so.

NASHAD was born as Shaukat Haidari,in Delhi,on 11-7-1923. He completed his schooling in Delhi, where he learnt playing the flute. He came to Bombay and worked as assistant/helper to many composers, learning to play different instruments. He even worked as assistant to Ghulam Haider and Naushad.

He was one composer who used several names to give music. His first film was Dildar in 1947. He used the name Shaukat Dehlavi for Dildar-47, Paayal-48, Suhagi-48, Dada-49, Ghazab-51 and Ram Bharose-51. He was Shaukat Hussain Dehlavi for Jeene do-48, Shaukat Ali for Toote Tarey-48 and Shaukat Haidari for Aiye-49.

He was considered a mediocre composer in India. Then one day he was called by producer Nakshab Jarchvi,who offered him a film,with a condition that he changed his name to Nashad. He accepted the offer and used the name Nashad throughout his life. After him his 15 children too used Nashad as their surname.

Nakshab Jarachavi wanted to make a film. Those days Naushad was the Top composer. Films were sold on his name. Naushad worked only for Top banners. Nakshab approached him and offered his film. Naushad scornfully said,” Hum kisi aire gaire ki film ko music nahi detey”. This infuriated Nakshab no end and he challenged Naushad that he will make another Naushad in the industry. He called the comparatively less known but talented Shaukat Haidari,changed his name to NASHAD (to resemble Naushad’s name) and gave him the film.

Nashad, on his part, tried very hard and gave the music to film Naghma. It was,though not like Nashad’s standard, but excellent songs were there and the film became a hit due to its music. Unfortunately, Nashad could not repeat his success again ever in India. As Nashad he gave music to 21 films (total 30 films),like Bara Dari, Bada Bhai, Naghma, Char chaand, Kaatil Jawab, Sabse bada Rupiah, Rooplekha, Darwaza etc

Nashad gave their first hindi movie singing breaks to Mubarak begum, Suman Kalyanpur and Sabita Banerjee.

His friend Nakshab Jarachavi had migrated to Pakistan after 1947 and was making films there. He called Nashad to Pakistan as a composer for his film Maikhana-64 (after his film Fanoos also crashed at the Box office in Pakistan). Nashad accepted his offer. Before leaving , Nashad married singer Premlata and both went to Pakistan. His first film became a major hit and Nashad was on top. He gave music to 64 films in Pakistan.

Nashad died in Lahore on 3-1-1981.

While in India, Nashad was always accused of plagiarism, to which he answered through an interview to Filmfare, dated 5th August 1955, ( Thanks to Cineplot) thus….

” Although no one says it to my face, I know that there is a section in the film industry who decry my music as “a rehash of familiar tunes.”
This amounts to a charge of plagiarism.

I have no defense, no apology, to offer, except to say that, if I am a plagiarist, I am one unconsciously.
With only seven main notes, six ragas, thirty-six raginis and seventy-two sub-raginis, every “new” musical composition is bound to sound familiar in places.
Try to hum any popular film composition of today and then cast back your mind. Make a careful search for a parallel and you will easily find one in some celebrated songs of yesterday.

I believe in popular music, music which people will like, humming and singing it in their homes—in moments of joy or sorrow. I try my-best to keep my compositions free from complicated “alaps,” “tans” and those notational cascades which the man-in-the­-street (who has no musical training) cannot easily remember and hum.

Film music, to be good and popular, must always be the result of team-work. The ego of the music-director as well as that of the lyric-writer needs to be suppressed completely, even to the extent of accepting suggestions from everyone in the unit.

In the music of one of my forthcoming films, the appeal of the songs owes much to suggestions made by the producer and mem­bers of his staff. One of the tunes owes its origin to an air I heard the office-boy humming!

The producer was no professional musician, but I discarded two of my best tunes to fit in a completely different third one based on his suggestions.
I am glad that I do not live in an ivory tower and am not deaf to the music of ordinary people, I say to myself : “If this is the kind of music they love, it is absurd to give them a high-brow composition. Both in rhythm and structure, I stick rigorously to what is popular, even at the sacrifice of my own preferences.

Such film music can be planned scientifically and with precision. My first job usually is to sit with the director and determine the musical “situations”. Once these are agreed upon, I start composing the melodies, in harmony with the “mood” of those situa­tions. Then the lyricist writes the words of the approved tune.

After the song has been recorded, our work is ended and it now depends on the director to make or mar it in his picturisa­tion of it. This, indeed, is a hurdle all film music must take.

Everyone has listened to film songs which sound good on the radio, yet have been “murdered” by poor picturisation. Every­one, too, has heard songs which on the air have sounded mediocre and of no particular merit, yet have been things of beauty in the film—thanks to clever directorial work. A really good song, given to a good director to picturise, seldom fails to go over in a big way with the public.

It is thus necessary for a music director to be careful in signing his contracts. It is important to him to make sure that the film for which he is employed to provide music will be directed by a competent man, so that not only are his songs not “murdered” in transcription to the screen but any possible shortcomings in them are glossed over by good picturisation.

Consequently I have always studied the directors of the films for which I am to provide music. One knows that one’s songs are safe with them and gain in appeal from attractive picturisation.

To these men, too, my tunes often sound “vaguely familiar”! But, then, what tune doesn’t ?
With only seven notes, six ragas, thirty-six raginis—but we’ve just gone over that! ”

Film Suhagi-48 had a starcast of Begum Para, Manorama, Sadiq Ali, Badri prashad, Jilloobai, Abu Bakar etc. The word Suhagi means ‘ Lucky ‘. However the name benefit does not seem to be got by the film, as it was not a famous or popular film.

I have no idea about the story of this film. From its ad.s in Film India, I guess the story was about a family’s bahu who is Lucky after marriage. Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari. With this song, film Suhagi-48 makes its Debut on our Blog.


Song-Aag dil mein lagaaye baithe hain (Suhagi)(1948) Singer- Raj Kumari Dubey, Lyricist- Not known, MD- Shaukat Dehalvi

Lyrics

Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain
apni duniya aa aa aa
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

haaye majbooriyaan
haaye majbooriyaan muhabbat ki
haaye majbooriyaan muhabbat ki
unko apna banaaye baithhe hain
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

toone kya kya aa aa
kya kya
toone kya kya sitam kiye hum par r
toone kya kya sitam kiye hum par r
yaad hai par bhulaaye baithhe hain
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

ashq aankhon mein hai
haaye ae
ashq aankhon mein hai
labon pe se haan
labon pe se haan
aan aan
dard dil mein dabaaye baithhe hain
dard dil mein dabaaye baithhe hain
haaye
aag dil mein lagaaye baithhe hain
aag dil mein lagaaye baithhe hain aen aen


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4560 Post No. : 16171

The blog ten year challenge series is in progress in the blog since 2019. The current blog ten year challenge (2011-2021) has not yet picked up steam because very few songs were discussed during the initial days of 2010. That year even had a few DOT days during the first few days of the year.

This day ten year ago (viz 20 january 2010) saw just one song getting discussed, and that one song was from “Anjaan”(1956). This movie cannot be taken up for Blog Ten year challenge today because the movie has already been YIPPEED.

So what to do ? “Anjaan”(1956) may have been YIPPEED in the blog, but “Anjaan”(1941) is not. So let me discuss a song from “Anjaan”(1941) today. 🙂

“Anjaan”(1941) was directed by Amiya Chakraborty for Bombay Talkies Limited, Bombay. The movie had Devika Rani, Ashok Kumar, V H Desai, Girish, Suresh, P F Pithawala, Gulab, Fatty Prasad, Yusuf Suleman, Saiyyad Mukhtar, David, Reva, baby Madhuri, Arun Kumar, Ibnul Hasan, Bachan Lal Dixit, Om Prakash, Tarun Kumar, Bhargavi etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Three songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the fourth song from “Anjaan”(1941) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rajkumari. Kavi Pradeep is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pannalal Ghosh.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knoledgeable readers to thro light on the picturisation of the song.

PS-Our regular visitor Ammj Wijesiriwardene points out that the video of the song is available. From the video, we see that the song is picturised as a stage performance song where one lady, flanked by two others, lip syncs this song and that is performed by their dance accompanied by a dholak player, as this performance is watched by a housefull audience in a haveli. I request our knowledgeable readers to help identify the actors seen in the picturisation.

Audio

video

Song-Chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagaariya(Anjaan)(1941) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Kavi Pradeep, MD-Pannalal Ghosh

Lyrics

chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagariya
chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagariya
mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
ho
mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagariya
mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
ho
mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya

aayi peene pilaane ki bela
haan aayi peene pilaane ki bela
haan aaj panghat pe pyaaso nka mela
haan aayi peene pilaane ki bela
haan aaj panghat pe pyaason ka mela
dekho laage na mohe najariya
haan dekho laage na mohe najariya
dekho dekho na laage najariya
haan mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
haan mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
chhalko chhalko na ras ki gagariya
mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya
haan mori panghat pe bheeje chunariya


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4563 Post No. : 16160

“Ghar” (1945) was a Sunrise Production movie. It was directed by V M Vyas. The movie had Jamuna, Nawab, Molina, Yakub, Kalyani, Dulari, Iftikar, W. M. Khan, Mohan, Mirza Musharaff etc in it.

Three songs from this movie have been discussed in the past.

Here is the fourth song from “Ghar”(1945) to appear in the blog. This rare song is sung by Rajkumari. Roopbani is the lyricist. Music is composed by A R Qureshi.

Only the audio of this melancholic song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Meri aankhon ke aansoo (Ghar)(1945) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Roopbani, MD-A R Qureshi

Lyrics

Meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao
meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao
duniyaa aa
duniya kahin badnaam na kar de
haan badnaam na kar de
meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao

vidhwa hai tu
tera ujda suhaag
vidhwa hai tu
tera ujda suhaag
tujhe hansna bhi paap
tujhe rona bhi paap
tujhe hansna bhi paap
tujhe rona bhi paap
aap na rowo
na hamko rulaao
na hamko rulaao
aap na rowo
na hamko rulaao
na hamko rulaao
meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao

poori ??
bani suhaagan
poori ??
bani suhaagan
ho gayi vidhwa
main abhaagan
choodiyaan tooti
aur kesar bikhra
choodiyaan tooti
aur kesar bikhra
meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao

koi nahin jo dewe dilaasa
koi nahin jo bandhaa de aasha
vidhwa vidhwa naam hai mera aa
aansoo peena kaam hai mera aa
dharti mujhe marne nahin deti
duniya mujhe jeene nahin deti
kaise kaatoon dukhiyaa jeewan
Bhagwaan mujhe batlaao
Bhagwaan mujhe batlaao o
meri aankhon ke aansoo
meri aankhon ke aansoo
aankhon mein hi so jaao
haan haan so jaao


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4476 Post No. : 15978

Today’s song is from the film Village Girl aka Gram Kanya-1936.

Nine years later, Ramnik Productions made another film with the same title in 1945 with the famous singer Noorjehan singing under the baton of Melody maker music director Shyamsundar. So, when the name Village Girl is mentioned, one’s mind thinks only of the 1945 film of Noorjehan- Village Girl aka Gaon ki Gori-45.

The 1936 film was made by Sagar Movietone. Though Sagar made Talkie films right from the first year of the Talkie era-1931, their films did not make much mark in the film world, till Motilal and Sabita Devi pair came on the scene in 1934 end with ” Shehar ka jaadu”. The new pair clicked famously and Sagar became a name to reckon with. This successful pair did 8 films together for Sagar.

During this period actor singer Surendra came on the scene with his film ” Deccan Queen”-1936, with Aruna Devi. The two Heros then worked with different Heroines of Sagar company. While Motilal worked with Shobhana Samarth, Bibbo, Maya Banerjee and Rose, Sabita Devi worked with Kumar and Surendra. Both Motilal and Surendra came together in the film Jagirdar-36. For the young pair of Surendra and Sabita Devi, film Village Girl was the first film together. They did only one more film together- For Ladies Only-39. Both the films were directed by Sarvottam Badami.

S.Badami is an example of what the Cinema industry is. For some, it is a ditch which destroys the entrant and for a few lucky ones it plays ” Philosopher’s Stone (Paras)”, which turns their lives into Gold. He is one of the two examples, where an ordinary Motor Mechanic makes it as a famous member of the cinema industry. Besides Badami, the other such example is Poet-Director Gulzar (Sampooran Singh Kalra), who was also a Motor Mechanic.

Sarvottam Badami was born in 1910 at Channapatna in Karnataka,to a revenue officer working in Mysore. He passed his SSLC and worked as a garage mechanic and then a projectionist in Select Picture House, Bangalore, both of which were owned by Dr. Ambalal Patel. Patel moved to Bombay and financed Ardeshir Irani of Imperial Film Company, and Chimanlal Desai as a partner forming Sagar Movietone in 1930.
At the age of 19 years, Badami went to Bombay to study automobile engineering. He was asked by Ardeshir Irani who met him at a wedding to help out with the recording equipment he had purchased from abroad.

Badami helped in the sound recording department for the first Talkie in India, Ardeshir Irani’s Alam Ara (1931). Around that time a German director making the film Harishchandra left half-way and Badami offered to complete it, the co-director was Raja Chandrasekhar, although the co-director credit has also been cited as T. C. Vadivelu Naicker. The film turned out to be successful. He was contracted by Sagar Movietone (Sagar Film Company) to direct three films, two in Telugu and one in Tamil: Galava Rishi (Tamil), Rama Paduka Pattabhishekam and Shakuntala in Telugu. The success of these films established him as a director. His working team had people like the cinematographer Faredoon Irani, music director Anil Biswas and the Sagar Movietone favourites Sabita Devi and Motilal.

Initially, to avoid embarrassment to his family he requested not to be credited in the regional language films. He did not know Hindi but from 1932-1947, he worked for Sagar Movietone and also directed nearly 30 films in Hindi, for many others. His first Hindi film was Chandrahasa (1933) starring Noor Mohammed Charlie. He was paid Rs 2000 per film with the complete film being made within Rs 50,000. He worked with most of the top actors of the time like Motilal, Nargis, Ashok Kumar and Pahari Sanyal. He brought Mehboob Khan who was then doing roles as an extra out of obscurity and gave him the role of Sabita Devi’s father in the film Vengeance is mine(1935).

He made several films based on novels. Some of the writers whose work he used were K.M.Munshi, Sarat Chandra and Ramanlal Vasanthlal Desai. The film Aap ki Marzi (1939) was inspired by the Hollywood film Paradise for Three (1938). He became known for his satirical comedies and “socially relevant films”.His film Grihalaxmi (1934), which starred Jal Merchant and Sabita Devi had the woman getting into marriage only if her doctor husband agreed not to want children. The success of the film mitigated the enraged public reaction at the time.

He showed his understanding of media publicity required for films when in 1937, Badami resorted to woo audiences by announcing cash prizes of Rs.500, Rs.200 and Rs.100 for the best reviews of his newly released film Kulvadhu (1937). The promotional gambit worked sending audiences to the theatres. According to an interview, most of Badami’s films didn’t survive as the negatives were burnt to extract the silver from the silver nitrate.

After Aap ki Marzi-38, he followed his mentor, Dr. Patel and joined Sudama Pictures, when in 1939, Sagar Movietone merged into National Films. Badami

also worked in Famous Cine Laboratories, from 46 to 48.

Apparently, in 1948 Deputy Prime Minister Vallabh bhai Patel, who was then also in charge of the Information Ministry, on a visit to the Cine Laboratories Bombay, asked Badami to help set up a Newsreel and Documentary section. The Films Division was established in 1948. He became chief producer in the newsreel department and made several documentaries. He worked in the Films Division making documentaries from 1948-1952. After that he stopped making films and returned to Bangalore to retire as “I was a forgotten man in the feature film world”. He became an industrialist by starting a manufacturing business. Later he worked as a Consultant for Kamani Group of Industries also. He died in 2005 in Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

FILMOGRAPHY: 1932: Harishchandra; Galava Rishi; Paduka Pattabhishekham; Shakuntala; 1933: Chandrahasa; 1934: Grihalakshmi; 1935: Dr. Madhurika; Vengeance is Mine; 1936: Jeevan Lata; Grama Kanya; 1937: Kokila; Kulavadhu; 1938: Three Hundred Days and After; 1939: Aap Ki Marzi; Ladies Only; 1940: Chingari; Sajani; 1941: Holiday in Bombay; 1942: Khilona; 1943: Prarthana; 1944: Bhagya Lakshmi; 1945: Ramayani; 1946: Uttara Abhimanyu; 1947: Manmani; 1951: Vinoba Bhave (Doc);1952: Roof over the head

(Ack: Sapnon ke saudagar by Vithal Pandya, Sagar Movietone by Biren Kothari, HFGK, muVyz, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, and my notes)

The cast of the film was Sabita Devi, Surendra, Yakub, Aruna, Kayam Ali, Sankatha Prasad and many others. The film’s story was written by Dr. Jayant Shyama. The story is about a young man Kumar (Surendra) who loves Vilasini (Aruna), but has to marry Bansari (Sabita Devi) due to family obligations. The film shows the complications in their lives.

Kumar’s father (Sankatha Prasad) has taken a loan from sheth Dinanath (Kayam Ali) for Kumar’s education, on condition of Kumar’s marriage to his daughter Bansuri. Unknown to this precondition, Kumar falls in love and impregnates Vilasini. Due to parental obligations, Kumar is forced to marry Bansuri and abandon Vilasini. As the days pass by, Kumar’s father gets killed accidentally by Kumar himself. Vilasini tries to take the blame on herself. In the court the truth comes out and Bansuri comes to know about her love and pregnancy from Kumar. Bansuri frees Kumar from her bond and the lovers unite.

Now we come to the Music riddles of this film. The film, as mentioned in the book “Sagar Movietone” by Shri Biren Kothari ji gives the name of Bhaskar Rao as its Music Director and also for film ‘ Captain Kirti Kumar-37’. Who is this Bhaskar Rao ? A. Bhaskar Rao was a writer ( Aadmi-39) and asstt. Director(Padosi-41) in Prabhat. Hailing from south Karnataka, Amembal Bhasker Rao’s elder brother A.Sunder Rao was an expert Harmonium player. His younger brother A. Dinkar Rao aka D. Amel, was with A.I.R. as a Musician for 40 years. A.Bhasker Rao was a Tabla player and a disciple of Master krisna Rao Phulambrikar.

However, HFGK gives the name of MD as only ” Rao”. The uploader of the song claims that the MD is Shankar Rao Khatu. Dr. Ashok Ranade, in his book “Music beyond Boundaries”, on page 342, mentions the name as Shankar Rao Khatu. I wrote to Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji, who says it is Shankar rao khatu. Now, this Khatu was a famous Bhajan singer. He had dabbled in films too by acting in film Vasant Sena-34, sang a song in film ” Khwabon ki duniya-37″ and gave music to film Sagar kanya-36. In all these films his name appears as Shankar Rao Khatu and nowhere as only “Rao”. I feel this confirms that Rao does not mean Shankar Rao Khatu. In western India like Maharashtra and Gujarat, people from Karnatak or southern states are referred to only as Rao. All these pointers take me to feel that the MD is A.Bhaskar Rao. Moreover, for two successive Sagar films he was the MD.

PS-Shri Biren Kothari has subsequently clarified that the music director was Shankar Rao Khatu.

There is confusion about the singer also. HFGK lists the singer as Rajkumari. When I listened to the other songs of Rajkumari from the same film, I felt that this voice was different. Isuru kariyawasam, the Sinhalese expert on old Hindi films commented on YT that the singer is Sabita Devi. The uploader, Shalin Bhatt agrees to some extent about voice but insists on the name of Rajkumari. Girdharilalji claims it to be Rajkumari Calcuttewali ! I feel it is unlikely because Pullobai did not sing in any film outside Calcutta or films made by other than Calcutta producers. So I have gone the safe way by saying that Rajkumari is the singer of this song.

I request experts to opine. I am not a voice expert.


Song-Tum Tulsi maata pyaari (Village Girl)(1936) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyricist- Unknown, MD- Shankar Rao Khatu

Lyrics

Tulsi maata pyaari
tum Tulsi Maata pyaari
tum Tulsi Maata pyaari
sati ho dukh nivaari
tum devi sankathaari
sati ho dukh nivaari
tum devi sankathaari
sabke rog taaro tum
sabke rog taaro tum
jeewan nav ka taaro
sabke rog taaro tum
sabke rog taaro tum
jeewan nav ka taaro
Tulsi mata pyaari
tum Tulsi Mata pyaari

mahima sabne maani
mahima sabne maani
murli waala gun gaaya
mahima sabne maani
haan aan aan aan aan aan aan
mahima sabne maani
murli waala gun gaaya
murli waala gun gaaya
murli waala gun gaaya
poojan ko aayi daasi
poojan ko aayi daasi
vinti karat tori main
vinti karat tori main
vinti karat tori main
Tulsi maata pyaari
tum Tulsi Maata pyaari

sati ho dukh nivaari
tum devi sankathaari
sab ke rog taaro tum
sab ke rog taaro tum
sab ke rog taaro tum
jeewan nav ka taaro
jeewan nav ka taaro
Tulsi maata pyaari
tum Tulsi Mata pyaari


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4359 Post No. : 15682

Today’s song is from the film Ismat-1944 – a Muslim Social film made by Fazli brothers. This film was directed by the younger brother Sibtain Fazli, making his Debut as a Director. This was the second film of Fazli brothers to be made in Bombay, after the earlier film Fashion-43 also made in Bombay. Prior to that, they began their film making from Calcutta. This was to avoid the possible hindrance from the Muslim fundamentalists in Bombay, who were against making films depicting Muslim social life. Their first such film was Qaidi-40, made at Calcutta. It was followed by Masoom-41 and Chauranghee-42-all at Calcutta. Then they shifted to Bombay.

Films with the Muslim background of Muslim Culture were quite common in India,right from the First ever Hindi Talkie, “Aalam Ara”-31. Not just Social but different Genres like Arabian Night stories,Historical Romance, Folk Tales, Adventure Tales, Religious stories, Common King and Queen stories, Costume dramas etc had Muslim backgrounds. Indian public audiences watched these films with interest and without any bias.

If you see the film production patterns, You will realise that the biggest film companies all over India also followed the pattern of making initial films with Muslim background. Take for example the very first year of talkie films. Out of 24 films made, 7 films were on Muslim background. After Aalam Ara, there was Abul Hasan, Shirin Farhad, Laila Majnu, Noorjehan etc in 1931. Prabhat film company made Ayodhya ka Raja in 1932, but same year, next film was Jalti Nishani-32, a Pseudo-Historical Muslim background movie.

In Calcutta, New Theatres made their first 3 Talkie films in Hindi on Muslim subjects. Mohabbat ke aansoo-a household story, Subah ka sitara-a Folk Tale and Zinda Laash- an Arabian Night story. In the 30s and 40s, most stunt and costume films were on Muslim cultures.

In the initial era, the Talkie films were dependent on Parsi Urdu and Gujarati theatre stories. Before films appeared in India, the main channel of entertainment was stage dramas. Theatres were active and popular mainly in Maharashtra, Bengal and Andhra. The regional drama companies used to have mostly Mythological topics for their dramas. They also used to tour quite a lot. But their sphere of activities was limited to their language areas. Marathi drama companies toured only in Maharashtra towns or where there was a sizable Marathi population, like Baroda, Gwalior or Indore etc. So, their audiences were limited.

Similarly, Bengal and Andhra drama companies also toured where Bangla or Telugu population was the main audience. It was only the Parsee Theatre companies, Alfred, Elphinston etc etc, which toured all over the country, performing their Urdu dramas. Many times these companies used to take whole special trains to travel with artistes and material. This earned them All India acceptance of Muslim themes, which translated into the films that were made initially. In this endeavour, major contribution was from drama writers like Agha Hashra kashmiri, Syed Yavar Ali, Munshi Nazir, Betab, kathawachak, Bekal, Ehsaan etc etc.

Some early Talkie films on Muslim subjects were, Naksh e Sulemani-33, Bahar e Sulemani-35, Naadira-34, Farz e ada-35, Mumtaz Begum-34, Rashida-35 (First Muslim Social film), Noor e yaman-35, Qismat ka shikar-34, Adil e Jahangir-34, Anarkali-35, Jahan Ara-35, Shamsheer e Arab-35 and many more.

Fazli Brothers were the pioneers in making Muslim Social films from 1940 onwards. They felt that due to certain shortcomings in Muslim community, their development is suppressed. Their attempt was to highlight these points like Lack of education, for example, in their films in the garb of entertainment. Filmmakers like the great Mehboob Khan too were keen on such films, because he earnestly wanted to help his community to improve their status in Indian society.

That is why he opted for a Muslim Social theme for his Firtst movie under his own banner,” Mehboob productions”. The film was ‘ Najma-43″. Mehboob featured A grade actors like Veena, Sitara, Ashok kumar, Kumar, Yaqub, Majid and others for his first film. Later on he made yet another Muslim social film,” Elaan”-47 which was much bolder and he expected some opposition from the Muslim Fundamentalists. That is why he had warned his actors – especially Munawwar Sultana- to be ready for any repercussions from their own people, after the film was released. He gave an option to her to quit the film for safety, but she showed total faith in him and stuck to her role in the film.

Film Ismat-44 ( the Google meaning of this word is Chastity or Modesty) was made by Fazli brothers on all this background. By now, with the experience of 4 such films behind them, they had captured the technique of making films with subtle messages to their community. In this film, the darker side of the Western Culture, particularly Divorce and Separation, was highlighted.

The story of the film was – Aslam (Nandrekar) and Ismat (Nargis) get married. They both are from good traditional Muslim families. Same day Shafi Anwar (Ghori) and Ishrat (Mehtab) too get married Both had tasted western culture and follow it merrily. in due course of time, the Eastern culture (Aslam/Ismat) couple is happy, but Western Culture couple (Anwar/Ishrat) can’t adjust or compromise and are divorced. Ishrat joins a Theatre company as a Dancer at a very good salary. Soon she becomes rich and famous.

Aslam goes to Bombay to look for a job and meets with an accident with Ishrat’s car. She takes him to her home and looks after him. In this accident, Aslam loses his memory and forgets about Ismat. One day Ismat and her brother see his photo with Ishrat in a newspaper. They learn everything about his accident and loss of memory etc.

Ismat goes to Bombay and works as a maid in Ishrat’s house. She tries to remind Aslam about his past, step by step. One day Ishrat discovers this and removes Ismat from the job. Dejected, Ismat sits down for nonstop prayer. After some time, due to its power, there is a storm, lightning and thunder. In this period, Aslam is affected and suddenly his memory comes back. He escapes from Ishrat’s home and returns to Ismat. Both get happily united again and Eatern Culture wins over Western Culture.

The Hero of this film was B. Nandrekar, whose name may not ring any bells in new generation readers. Many actors-males and females- shifted from silent films to Talkie films easily as they knew Urdu/Hindi language fluently. There was an actor who easily transitioned from silent films to talkie films. This was B Nandrekar or Baba Saheb Dada saheb Nandrekar.
Nandrekar was one of the very few really handsome actors Hindi films ever had. He was born on 15th November 1910, in Sangli district of Maharashtra, near Kolhapur. Being a Muslim, he could speak Urdu/Hindi fluently. He completed his schooling from Kolhapur and joined films. Vishnupant Damle (one of the founder partners of Prabhat Films) was making silent film ‘Maharathi Karna’ (1928) for Maharashtra Film Co. He offered Nandrekar a role. Then he worked in other films like ‘Baji Prabhu Deshpande’ (1929), ‘Lanka’ (1930), ‘Kismet’ (1931) and ‘Dushman Ki Raat’ (1931).

His first talkie film was ‘Kurukshetra’ (1933). Prabhat gave him a role in ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1936) (its Hindi version came in 1948). He worked in ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936) and became quite popular as a hero, opposite Shanta Apte. He was the hero in ‘Baghbaan’ (1938) opposite Sitara Devi.

In 1939, he became the first actor to go abroad to shoot scenes in the film ‘Africa In Hind’ – ‘हिन्द में अफ्रीका’ (1939). The shooting was done in Africa. Thus this became the first ever Hindi film to shoot in foreign country, and NOT film ‘Naaz’ (1954), as is popularly believed and also as mentioned in HFGK. Nandrekar had become very popular. The chappals he used in the film ‘Baghbaan’ became fashionable by the name ‘Nandrekar Chappals‘. This alone is enough to prove his popularity.

His lawsuit against Prabhat Film Company was a topic of discussion in the industry. There were differences between him and Prabhat over his contract with them. His lawyers were Mr. Jinnah and Mr. Setalwad, who won the case for him. He was also the first actor to work as a freelancer.

Nandrekar appeared in 23 films. His films were ‘Kurukshetra’ (1933), ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936), ‘Jaadugarin’ (1937) (UR), ‘Baghbaan’ (1938), ‘Africa In Hind’ (1939), ‘Qaidi’ (1940), ‘Hindustan Hamara’ (1940), ‘Alakh Niranjan’ (1940), ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), ‘Mamaji’ (1942), ‘Duniya Tumhari Hai’ (1942), ‘Nai Kahaani’ (1943), ‘Andhi Duniya’ (1943), ‘Swarn Bhoomi’ (1944), ‘Lady Doctor’ (1944), ‘Ismat’ (1944), ‘Bachpan’ (1945), ‘Kamla’ (1946), ‘Jeevan Sikho’ (1946), ‘Parshuram’ (1947), ‘Meri Amaanat’ (1947), ‘Khandani’ (1947), ‘Sant Tukaram’ (1948) and last film ‘Bihari’ (1948).

He passed away in 1949. No definite information is available about his demise.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari. It is composed by H P Sharma (2 songs), who was a co-MD of the film with his own elder brother Pt. Govardhan Prasad (5 songs). This is the third song from film Ismat-44 to feature on this Blog.

(Ack: Information is used, with thanks, from books – ‘ stages of life ‘ by Kathryn Hansen, ‘Muslim Cinema’ by Isak Mujawar, and ‘Forgotten movies on Muslim culture’ by Kamalakar P.)


Song-Badali hawa luti bahar rang-e- chaman bigad gaya (Ismat)(1944) Singer- Rajkumari Dubey Banraswali, Lyricist- Shams Lucknowi, MD- H P Sharma

Lyrics

Badli hawa luti bahaar
rang-e- chaman bigad gaya
phoool hanse to yoon hanse
daagh bhi gar nikal gaya

gham se badal gayi khushi
maut bani hai zindagi
saans mili to jaise ek
saans mili to jaise ek
teer(??) ka dil machal(?) gaya
saans mili to jaise ek
teer (??) ka dil machal(?) gaya

thahri hawa ko chhaanv ne
sharmo haya ko raat bhar
aah magar ghame sahar
aah magar ghame sahar
kaam bana bigad gaya
aah magar ghame sahar
kaam bana bigad gaya
badli hawa luti bahaar
range chaman bigad gaya
phool hanse to yoon hanse
daagh bhi gar nikal gaya


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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