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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Guest posts’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

What is common among Sulochana (real name: Ruby Mayer), Rose (Rose Musleah), Pramila (Easther Victoria Abraham), Sabita Devi (Iris Gasper) and Ramola Devi (Rachel Cohen)?

They all were Jews (almost all of them being Baghdadi Jews) hailing from Calcutta (Kolkata) and were star actresses in Hindi films during 1930s and 40s. Barring Ramola Devi, all of them started their filmy career with silent films. It is surprising that those days when oriental women were mostly relegated to the four walls of their homes, how these Baghdadi Jew actresses found their way to the film industry which was not regarded as a respectable profession even in their Middle-East culture. To understand this, it is necessary to go into the genesis of Baghdadi Jews in India.

Some Baghdadi Jews migrated to India sometime in the beginning of 18th century from Iraq and other Middle-East countries to escape religious persecution and for better business opportunity. Once in India, they quickly adapted to the British culture. The children were educated in convent schools run by Christian missionaries. Over a period of time, they switched over from Arabic to English as language of communication within the families. By virtue of education and a good command over English, Baghdadi Jews got the employment opportunity with British companies and Government organisations. The woman folks mostly worked as teacher, nurse, telephone operators and secretaries.

During the early stage of film industry in India, the producers found it hard to get female actors as those days joining film industry was not regarded as a respectable profession by most of the Hindus and Muslim families. On the other hand, the Baghdadi Jews families living in Calcutta were liberal in this respect. Moreover, the Indian audiences’ weakness for the fair skin was a favourable proposition for film producers to get the Baghdadi Jews and Anglo-Indians as actress for their films.

In this article, I am discussing one of star actresses belonging to Baghdadi Jew family of Calcutta. And the star actress is Rose Musleah, who was known as Rose or Miss Rose in the film industry.

I had given a short profile of Miss Rose in my article hamen kyaa ab khizaan jaaye na jaaye. Arun ji had also given a short profile of her in his article aayenge saajna aayenge. Sometime back, I had read a detailed interview of Rose taken by Susheela Rani Patel in November 1941 issue of ‘Filmindia’ Magazine. But the thought of writing an article on her came to my mind now only as I have mp3 clips of a couple of her rare songs.

I also used information on Rose that was available in the other featured sections of ‘Filmindia’ in its various issues from 1937 to 1945. For Baghdadi Jews in India, some of the information has been taken from the articles appearing on the internet in connection with production of a documentary film ‘Shalome Bollywood – The Untold Story of Indian Cinema’ in which the contributions of Indian Jewish artists would be covered. The documentary is yet to be released.

Rose was born on June 19, 1911 in a wealthy Baghdadi Jew family in Calcutta (Kolkata). Her father was the private secretary to Sir B B Banerjee, the Consul General of Costa Rica who was the son-in-law of Maharaja Jatindra Mohan Tagore. At the age of 15, Rose passed Senior Cambridge examination and was set to become a doctor. However, her father was not in favour of her further studies and instead at the age of 16, he got her married to a boy from Ezra family. The marriage ended in a divorce by which time she had two daughters from him.

Like father, Rose became a private secretary in a British company. Side by side, she also became an instructor for Ball Room dancing. Because of her flair for dancing and acting apart from being an attractive looking girl, her friends suggested her to take up the acting career. This prompted her to join the stage under Agha Hashr Kashmiri, the famous poet and playwright of that time. Under his tutelage, Rose learnt to speak fluent Hindustani and improved her acting skill.

After getting experience of acting on the stage, Rose met J F Madan of Madan Theatre with a letter of recommendation from the owner of Tollywood Studio and joined the banner. [I, however, find her first film to be the silent film ‘The Culprit’ aka ‘Apraadhi’ (1931) produced under the banner of Barua Film Unit]. Her first talky film with Madan Theatre was ‘Pati Bhakti’ (1932). Thereafter she worked in ‘Hindustan’ (1932), ‘Alladin Aur Jaadui Chiraag’ (1933), ‘Turki Sher’ (1933) and other 5-6 films.

In 1935, Rose shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) and joined Imperial Film Company for a two-year contract. ‘Hamaari Betiyaan’ aka ‘Our Darling Daughters’ (1936) was her first film with Imperial in which she shared the star cast with her cousin Pramila. This was followed by ‘Ghulam Daaku’ (1936) and ‘Do Auraten’ aka ‘Two Women’ (1937).

After the end of the contract, Rose joined Saroj Movietone and worked in their films ‘Kal Ki Baat’ (1937) and ‘Rifle Girl’ (1938). After her stint with Saroj Movietone, Rose seems to have become a freelancer as she did Sagar Movietone’s ‘Hum Tum Aur Who’ (1938), Saraswati Cinetone’s ‘Sach Hai’ (1939), National Studios’ ‘Sanskaar’ (1940), ‘Kasauti’ (1941) and ‘Garib’ (1942), Ranjit Moveitone’s ‘Adhuri Kahaani’ (1939) and ‘Aaj Kaa Hindustan’ (1940), Kishore Sahu’s ‘Bahurani’ (1940), Prakash Pictures’ ‘Maala’ (1941) and Prabaht’s ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943).

In the interview, Rose had said that since she had two growing daughters, she wanted to have the flexibility of working in the films according to her convenience and as a freelancer she could get that freedom. However, it would appear that in trying to balance her career with family responsibilities, she missed her career in the later years as I find that in 1944, she did not have any films for release. In 1945, she had only one film ‘Ramayani’ (1945). Her filmy career ended with ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946).

Rose worked in 28 films during 1931 to 1946. Unfortunately, only one of her film, ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943) is available for viewing. From the reviews of some of her films of 1940 and thereafter, it appears that she had done mostly the role of an educated and sophisticated girl.

I could not get the information as to how Rose spent her life after her ‘retirement’ from the films. All I know is that during 1940s, she was staying in Keval Mahal at Marine Drive. And those days, it was a status symbol for successful film stars to stay in Marine Drive in buildings like, Keval Mahal, Kapur Mahal, Zaver Mahal, Krishna Mahal (all these buildings are adjunct to each other).

Rose had two daughters – Marjorie and Cynthia. Cynthia was 87 when her interview was taken in her apartments in Las Angles (USA) sometime in 2015 in connection with the documentary film I referred to above. I guess Marjorie remained in Mumbai until her death if I go by a comment of her daughter Rachel Reuben, the super model and now a film editor, in an article which appeared in ‘Outlook’, July 2006.

Coming to the song, I have selected a rare song ‘qismat mein koi sukh nahin’ rendered by Rose from an obscure film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946). The film was produced under the banner of Star Productions (Ratanbai’s film production company) and was directed by Ramnik Desai. The star cast included Rose, Shahu Modak, Durga Khote, Shantarin, Chandabai, Majeed, Zillo etc. The film had 9 songs written by Wahid Qureshi which were set to music by Mustaq Hussain (Ustad Mustaq Hussain Khan of Bareilly), probably based on Raag Malkauns.

With this song, the film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’(1946) makes its debut in the Blog.


Song-Qismat mein koi sukh nahin (Daasi Ya Maa)(1946) Singer-Miss Rose, Lyrics-Wahid Qureshi, MD-Mushtaq Hussain

Lyrics

qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin

hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin

maut ki oar ??
maut ki oar ??
maut ka ?? sahi ??
maut ka ?? sahi ??
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin

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This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Hullo to all in Atuldom

At the outset let me post my usual disclaimer: I am no encyclopaedia as regards the birth and death anniversaries of my favourite Bollywood actors, actresses, singers, music directors, lyricists, choreographers etc. I am assisted in keeping track of the dates by the list on our blog and the good old trust-worthy Vividh Bharati services of All India Radio. And today (27 july 2017) also I am writing this after looking up the list on our blog and listening to “Aaj Ke Phankaar” on radio.

Has anyone forgotten Saudagar Singh, Wajid Ali Shah, Dilawar, Hawaladar Sher Singh? Ok does the name Bishan or Bholaram ring a bell in anyone’s head? Ok all these are characters played by a person who is the son of a well-known yesteryear actor. The person I am talking of made his debut as a child star in the 50s and went on to do theatre on attaining adulthood. He had to wait for a while after his debut in 1973; to play a dacoit in a movie that ran in a single movie hall in Bombay (back then, called Mumbai now) continuously for almost 10 years.
Ahh! Now I am sure that the light of recognition has lit up in the minds of the readers. Yes, I am talking of Amjad Zakaria Khan alias Amjad Khan alias Gabbar Singh; son of actor Jayant. They were Pashtun with Afghan ancestry and Amjad Khan was born in Peshawar. He had his education in Mumbai.

He was seen in “Nazneen” in 1951 and “Ab Dilli Door Nahin” in 1957 as a child star. He is said to have made minor appearances with his father in a few films, done theatre and assisted K. Asif in the 60s during the making of “Love and God”. His debut as adult actor came in 1973 in the Raj Kumar starrer “Hindustan Ki Kasam”.

His next release “Sholay” made him a household name. He went on to play Saudagar Singh in “Hum Kisise Kum Nahin”, Nawab Wajid Ali Shah in “Shatranj ke Khiladi”, Dilawar in “Muqaddar Ka Sikandar”, Hawaldaar Sher Singh in Kumar Gaurav starrer “Love Story”. The last-mentioned character was a deviation from the villainy roles that he used to essay at that time. It was a comic character complete with a funny moustache and he had a sweet way of saying- “Ek ludka ek ludki”. He played a cop who is assigned duty of tracking down the run-away children of rich parents- Danny and Rajendra Kumar.

He played a straight forward cop in Feroz Khan’s Qurbani. There his character was the bubble-gum chewing Inspector Amjad Khan who is on the trail of two thieves who decamp with jewels from Amrish Puri’s house. Amjad as Dilawar in “MKS” was a local goonda in love with a nautch girl who is misled to believe that Sikandar (Amitabh) is also a contender for the nautch girl which eventually leads to both killing each other.

Personally speaking, I have not seen the movie “Shatranj Ke Khiladi” but I have heard that he made a very good Wajid Ali Shah. I have seen Nasir Hussain’s “Hum Kisise Kum Nahin” n-number of times and every time his Saudagar Singh act has managed to startle me. These are only a few of the characters that Amjad played, I will not sit to analyse his act in all the 130+ movie he has acted in. His grey shaded characters of Damu (Damodar) in “Naseeb”, Mangal Singh in “Parvarish”, Avatar Singh (Bhoot Singh) in “Des Pardes”, Fazlu in “Dada”, Bholaram in “Hum Se Badkar Kaun” etc always interspersed his villainous roles. And no, I will not go on to describe my most love-to-hate character that Amjad Khan ever played- Gabbar Singh. The world knows a lot more about this act of his, how he prepared for it etc. than I can write about.

It is 25 years since Amjad khan passed away due to heart failure. And I was spoilt for choice as to which song to play/ post to remember him by. He was one of those multi shaded character actors like Pran who had a few songs filmed on him. Then I remembered that when I was browsing Hindigeetmala.net for some song last month I chanced upon a recital of a thumri which our Sadanandji has mentioned in a post of his. I feel this is as good a time as any to post it. It is from Satyajit Ray’s “Shatranj Ke Khiladi”- Sadanandji has given a very detailed insight into the movie in his post. I will just add that this is in Amjad Khan’s voice and Satyajit Ray himself has set the thumri written by Wajid Ali Shah to tune.


Song-Tarap tarap sagri rain gujri (Shatranj Ke Khilaadi)(1977) Singer-Amjad Khan, Lyrics-Wajid Ali Shah, MD-Satyajit Ray

Lyrics

tarap tarap sagri rain gujri
kaun des gayo o o saanwariyaa
ho bhar aayi ankhiyaan aan madwaari ee
tarap tarap gayi chunariyaa

tumhre ghodan more dwaare se jo nikase
sudh bhool gayi main baawariyaa aa

tarap tarap sagri rain gujri
kaun des gayo o o saanwariyaa


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Missing Films of 1960s – 34
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Yesterday, 25th July, was the anniversary of passing away of GS Kohli, the music director extraordinaire. He passed away in 1996, in Bombay.

A long time assistant music director to OP Nayyar, he had a short stint as an independent music director in the decade of 1960s. Despite a load of fantastic lilting songs in all his films – songs that became instant hits, very popular in their times, and still continue to be favourites of the lovers of the golden era of Hindi film music – he remained confined to B/C grade stunt films only. He continued to work as OPN’s assistant before, during and after his stint as an independent music director.

There is a lot common in his music and that of OPN, and that is in part due to the fact that he had a major role to play in designing and creating the rhythms and beats of OPN’s songs. The use of dholak and the rhythms of Punjab make the music of GS Kohli oh so adorable. Just give one more listen to the wonderful pensive sound of “Yaad Tori Aayi To Main Chham Chham Royi Re” (film ‘Faulaad’, 1963). After just the first half line of the mukhda, the dholak takes on, and continues to support the singing pieces, without a break till the end. The symbolism for emotions can be debated, but just listen to the beat as it keeps on consistently through the song. So beautifully constructed – try to think about this song without the dholak beats. . . would you??

There is one more very interesting thing about the music of GS Kohli. A wonder that has always been missed in the golden era of Hindi film music is. . .  guess. . . – think about OP Nayyar and what is missing from his portfolio. . .

Full marks to all who thought about Lata Mangeshkar. The creations that would have been, had these two artists worked together, has forever now remained a topic of speculation. Aah, but there is a reprieve – the music and songs of GS Kohli. Yes, Lata ji has sung for GS Kohli. And listening to these songs, one can get the closest feel for how it would have been – Lata ji singing for OPN. Let us check out the songs –

‘Shikari’ (1963) has four songs.
Baaje Ghunghroo Chhun Chhun Chhun Chhun” – solo
Agar Main Poochhoon Jawaab Doge” – duet with Rafi Sb
Chaman Ke Phool Bhi Thujko Gulaab Kehte Hain” – duet with Rafi Sb
Maangi Hain Duaayen Hamne Sanam” – duet with Usha Mangeshkar

‘Adventures of Robin Hood’ (1965) has one song.
Pyaar Ki Baat Nigaahon Se Jataayaa Na Karo” – duet with Mahendra Kapoor

‘Namaste ji’ (1965), another bonanaza of superb songs, has two songs.
Mere Do Naina Matwaale. . .  Kis Ke Liye” – solo
Bahaaro Thaam Lo Ab Dil Mera Mehboob Aata Hai” – duet with Mukesh

‘Naujawaan’ (1966) has two songs,
“Aaiye Aap Tashreef Le Aaiye, Baakhuda Aapse Koi Parda Nahin” – solo
“Majnoon Saa Aashiq Mar Gaya Lekin Nasihat Kar Gaya” – duet with Usha Mangeshkar

‘Sangdil’ (1967) has one gem of a female duet.
“Badi Kaafir Tumhaari Nazar Nikli, Meri Jaan Le Gayi, Do-Jahaan Le Gayi” – duet with Usha Mangeshkar

And then ‘Gunda’ (1969) has a superb solo
“Nazar Ne Uth’te Hi Kuch Is Adaa Se Kaam Kiya” – solo

Definitely worth a re-listen, and try the flavor with the thought in the mind – here is the music that could be the closest representation of Lata ji singing for OP Nayyar.

For today’s song, I have another fabulous female duet from the film ‘Do Matwaale’ (1966). The song is ‘Hamre Sajan Ghar Aaye’, sung alongwith Usha Mangeshkar. Interesting to note that all the Lata duets in female company, composed by GS Kohli, are all sung with Usha Mangeshkar.

The film ‘Do Matwaale’ opens its account on our blog today. As has been his wont, this is another stunt film from the banner of Rainbow Films, Bombay, directed by Kamraan, whom we all remember as one of the popular leading men of such stunt films in the 1950s and 60s. The star cast is led by the two pairs – Randhawa and Malika, and Kamraan and Helen. Others in the cast include Madan Puri, Madhumati, Rani etc.

The film has 5 songs listed, which are written by two songwriters – Anjaan and Farooque Kaiser. However, the Geet Kosh does not specify which song is written by which poet. This song, as mentioned above, is an all female duet sung by Lata ji and Usha Mangeshkar. As I was searching for a song for today, I came to this song and stopped. For one, here was a debut opportunity for another 1960s film, and secondly, when I heard it, it turns out to be a favourite from radio listening days, but completely forgotten in the interim. It is wonderful to be re-united with this song once again. Wonderful words, enchanting music and rhythm, and quickfire synchronized rendition – all combine to make a winner. From the sounds of it, it seems to be a twin dance song, and could likely have been picturized on Malika and Helen. I am just guessing, but yes, I would request other knowledgeable readers and friends, to add more information about the on screen performances.

Song – Hamre Sajan Ghar Aaye  (Do Matwaale) (1966) Singer – Lata Mangehskar, Usha Mangeshkar, Lyrics – [Unattributed] [either Anjaan or Farooque Kaiser], MD – GS Kohli
Lata Mangeshkar + Usha Mangeshkar

Lyrics

hamre sajan ghar aaye
haaye
aaye sajan ghar aaye
keh de koi chaand se jaa ke
jaana ho to jaaye
hamre sajan ghar aaye
haaye
aaye sajan ghar aaye
keh de koi chaand se jaa ke
jaana ho to jaaye
hamre sajan ghar aaye
haaye
aaye sajan ghar aaye

nain kunwaare kajra sajaaye
raah takey teri
ho o o
pehli nazar mein dil de daala
bhool hui hai meri
haaye
bhool hui hai meri
daulat ho to maang loon waapas
dil na manga jaaye
hamre sajan ghar aaye
haaye
aaye sajan ghar aaye

poochho na hum se tanhaayion mein
hum pe kya kya beeti
ho o o o
dil dhadka hai saans ruki hai
samjho qayaamat tooti
haaye
samjho qayaamat tooti
phir bhi ye dil pyaar ka maara
tere hi gun gaaye
hamre sajan ghar aaye
haaye
aaye sajan ghar aaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हमरे सजन घर आए
हाए
आए सजन घर आए
कह दो कोई चाँद से जा के
जाना है तो जाये
हमरे सजन घर आए
हाए
आए सजन घर आए
कह दो कोई चाँद से जा के
जाना है तो जाये
हमरे सजन घर आए
हाए
आए सजन घर आए

नैन कुँवारे कजरा सजाये
राह तके तेरी
हो ओ ओ
पहली नज़र में दिल दे डाला
भूल हुई है मेरी
हाए
भूल हुई है मेरी
दौलत हो तो मांग लूँ वापस
दिल ना मांगा जाये
हमरे सजन घर आए
हाए
आए सजन घर आए

पूछो ना हमसे तन्हाइयों में
हम पे क्या क्या बीती
हो ओ ओ
दिल धड़का है सांस रुकी है
समझो क़यामत टूटी
हाए
समझो क़यामत टूटी
फिर भी ये दिल प्यार का मारा
तेरे ही गुण गाये
हमरे सजन घर आए
हाए
आए सजन घर आए


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Hullo to all in Atuldom

Year- 1999. Months- June/ July. Region- Snow-clad Himalayas. Kashmir to be more precise. Kargil- Dras sector to be even more exact. Aim- to control the Siachen Glacier by establishing military outposts on the surrounding mountains ridges. This has often resulted in military skirmishes in the 1980s and tensions only escalated in the 1990s. In an attempt to defuse the situation, both countries signed the Lahore Declaration in February 1999, promising to provide a peaceful and bilateral solution to the Kashmir conflict.
“During the winter of 1998 -1999, some elements of the Pakistani Armed Forces were covertly training and sending Pakistani troops and paramilitary forces, some allegedly in the guise of mujahideen, into territory on the Indian side of the line of control (LOC). The infiltration was code named “Operation Badr.” The aim of the Pakistani incursion was to sever the link between Kashmir and Ladakh and cause Indian forces to withdraw from the Siachen Glacier, thus forcing India to negotiate a settlement of the broader Kashmir dispute. Pakistan also believed that any tension in the region would internationalise the Kashmir issue, helping it to secure a speedy resolution. Yet another goal may have been to boost the morale of the decade-long rebellion in Indian Administered Kashmir by taking a proactive role.
Initially, with little knowledge of the nature or extent of the infiltration, the Indian troops in the area assumed that the infiltrators were jihadis and claimed that they would evict them within a few days. Subsequent discovery of infiltration elsewhere along the LOC, and the difference in tactics employed by the infiltrators, caused the Indian army to realize that the plan of attack was on a much bigger scale. The total area seized by the ingress is generally accepted to between 130 km² – 200 km².

The Government of India responded with Operation Vijay, a mobilisation of 200,000 Indian troops. Finally, war came to an official end on July 26, 1999, thus making it as Kargil Vijay Diwas.

527 soldiers from Indian Armed Forces sacrificed their lives during the war”

This synopsis of the situation of 1999 is courtesy Wikipedia.

Whether made in Hollywood or Bollywood, movie makers have always had a soft corner for war themed movies. If the two world wars are the favourite of Hollywood, Indo-Pak wars have been the preferred theme of many Bollywood movies. Border (1997) had the 1971 war as its base as also Hindustan Ki Kasam (1973) and Upkaar (1967) had featured the 1965 war. LOC Kargil (2003) and Lakshya (2004) based their story on 1999 Kargil conflict. Though war was the basic theme in both the movies, Lakshya focused on the life of a young man who finds direction and meaning to life after joining the Indian Army and the final shot of the movie shows him hoisting the Indian Tri-colour atop Point 5179; a crucial vantage point dominating the army’s main supply line National Highway 1D. LOC Kargil focused on the many army officers, jawaans and their families; and war strategies and actual action too with a few real-life dialogues that were supposedly uttered by the jawaans when on duty etc.

The peak- Point 5179- has its northern side on the Pakistani side of the LOC; western side is a 1000ft vertical rock cliff; and the southern side 3km of empty ground with no cover. The young man (Hrithik Roshan) and a group of 12 officers and soldiers are assigned the mission to scale the 1000ft rock-cliff on the western side and flank the enemy stronghold. The unit sets off on their mission and while moving through a grass field toward the rock cliff, they come under fire. The unit discovers a Pakistani mortar unit in the field and destroys it, but loses their commanding officer and a number of other soldiers. The team’s radios are also destroyed, so they cannot communicate with battalion HQ. Out of the initial 12, only 6 remain. They decide to continue with the mission. They successfully scale the cliff and attack the Pakistani position during the night. Their assault is successful although Hrithik is wounded, and the team loses 3 more men. The next morning, Hrithik limps to the peak, where he plants the Indian flag and fires a flare, signalling that they have captured the peak.
This then is the background of Lakshya whose song I present here today on the occasion of Kargil Vijay Diwas. Lakshya was directed by Farhan Akhtar and starred Amitabh Bachchan, Hrithik Roshan, Preity Zinta, Boman Irani, Lillette Dubey, Amrish Puri (guest appearance) and Sushant Singh, Om Puri, Raj Zutshi, Sharad Kapoor and Aditya Srivastav playing other important characters. Today’s song is sung by Hariharan, Kunal Ganjawala, Roop Kumar Rathod, Shankar Mahadevan, and Vijay Prakash. It is penned by Javed Akhtar and music is by Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy. This is one of my personal favourite movie with all its songs. And today’s song is a lovely marching song. Hope it is liked by all .


Audio

Song-Kandhon se milte hain kandhe (Lakshya)(2004) Singers-Hariharan, Kunal Ganjawala, Roop Kumar Rathod, Shankar Mahadevan, Sonu Nigam, Vijay Prakash, Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-Shankar Ehsan Loy
Chorus

Lyrics

kandhon se milte hain kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain
kandhon se milte hain kandhe
kadmo se kadam milte hai
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain

ab toh hamein aage badhte hai rehna
ab toh hamein saathi hai bas itna hi kehna
ab toh hamein aage badhte hai rehna
ab toh hamein saathi hai bas itna hi kehna
ab jo bhi ho
shola banke pathar hai pighlaana
ab jo bhi ho
baadal banke parbat par hai chhaana
kandhon se milte hai kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain
kandhon se milte hain kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hai
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain

nikle hain maidan mein
ham jaan hatheli par le kar
ab dekho dam lenge
ham jaake apni manzil par
khatron se hanske khelna
itni toh ham mein himmat hai
mode kalaai maut ki
itni toh ham mein taakat hai
ham sarhadon ke waaste
lohe ki ik deewar hain
ham dushmanon ke waaste
hoshiyaar hai taiyaar hai

ab jo bhi ho
shola banke pathar hai pighlana
ab jo bhi ho
baadal banke parbat par hai chhaana
kandhon se milte hai kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hai
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain

josh dil mein jagaate chalo
jeet ke geet gaate chalo
josh dil mein jagaate chalo
jeet ke geet gaate chalo

jeet ki jo tasveer banaane ham nikle hain
apni lahoo se hamko uss mein rang bharna hai
saathi maine apne dil mein
ab ye thhaan liya hai
ya to ab karna hai
ya to ab marna hai
chaahe angaare barse ke bijli gire
tu akela nahin hoga yaara mere
koi mushkil ho ya ho koi ho morcha
saath har mod par honge saathi tere
ab jo bhi ho
shola banke patthar hai pighlaana
ab jo bhi ho
baadal banke parbat par hai chhana
kandhon se milte hain kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain

ik chehra aksar mujhe yaad aata hai
iss dil ko chupke chupke woh tadpaata hai
jab ghar se koi bhi khat aaya hai
kaaghaz ko maine bheega bheega paaya hai
o palkon pe yaadon ke kuchh deep jaise jalte hain
kuchh sapne aise hain
jo saath saath chalte hain
koi sapna naa toote
koi waada naa toote
tum chaaho jise dil se
woh tumse naa roothe
ab jo bhi ho
shola banke patthar hai pighlaana
ab jo bhi ho
baadal banke parbat par hai chhana
kandhon se milte hai kandhe,
kadmon se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain

chalta hai jo yeh caarvan,
goonji si hai yeh waadiyaan
hai yeh zameen goonji goonji
yeh aasmaan
goonja goonja
hai yeh hawa goonji goonji
hai yeh sama goonja goonja
har raste ne
har waadi ne
har parbat ne sada di
ham jeetenge
ham jeetenge
ham jeetenge har baazi
kandhon se milte hain kandhe
kadmon se kadam milte hai
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain
kandhon se milte hai kandhe
kadmo se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain
kandhon se milte hai kandhe
(goonji si hai)
kadmon se kadam milte hain (yeh waadiyan)
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain
(goonji si hai)
kandhon se milte hain kandhe (yeh waadiyan)
kadmon se kadam milte hain
ham chalte hain jab aise toh
dil dushman ke hilte hain


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (24 july 2017) is the First Monday of the Holy month of Shravan, as observed in the Western, some Eastern and Southern states of India. On this occasion, here is a very melodious Shiv bhajan from the film Shivratri-54. Chitragupta, the King of melody, has composed this bhajan by G.S. Nepali, and is sung sweetly by Asha Bhosle.

India is simply a wonderful and unique country in this world. With 22 languages, recognized by Indian Constitution ( and 122 major and 1599 smaller languages), 9 major and 125 minor religions and over 25 states having exclusive cultures, it was a wonder that Independent India survived after the British left in 1947.

India not only survived but is becoming and recognized as one of the developing countries, supplying its talents to the modern world almost for every industry. It was predicted that within 5 to 10 years after Independence, India will destroy itself with internal chaos and religious infighting. India not only proved the world wrong, but also showed the world how Unity can be achieved in Diversity !!!

This is because of Indian culture which crosses the religious boundaries. When there are killings and riots everyday in “One- Religion ” countries of the world, India is the only hope for the world with its diverse cultural diaspora. The high degree of adaptability and tolerance in the Indian Culture, leading to Peaceful Co-Existence of Religions and languages is the secret of India’s uniqueness.

Take the case of Calendar, as an example of adaptability. Throughout the world, there is uniform calendar in every country. Only in India, the Calendar is based on regional needs. More than 80% population follows a Calendar which has adapted itself to regional climatic routines and the Agricultural diversity of North and South India. The country has 2 ways of counting days. One- followed in the west,south and part of east, wherein the month ends on the No-Moon Day or Amavasya. The Hindi speaking belt of North, Northwest and Northeast follows the system wherein the month ends on the Full Moon Day or Pournima. There is a difference of only 15 days in these systems and due to 15 days’ counting system, all the Festivals fall on the same day all over the country. Hats off to whosoever devised this methodology which unites while maintaining the individuality of different states.

This year in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Goa, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, Assam and Tripura ( Amavasyant states), Shravan month will be started from Monday, 24th of July 2017 which will be observed as the 1st Shravan Somvar Vrat. Shravan Somvar Vrat will be observed on every Monday i.e. 24th of July, 31st of July, 7th of August, 14th of August and 21st of August which will be the last day of Shravan Month as well.

Shravan month has already started from Monday, 10th of July, 2017 which will be observed as the 1st day of Shravan Month as well as 1st day of Shravan Somvar Vrat. Shravan Somvar Vrat will be observed on every Monday i.e. on 10th July, 17th July, 24th July, 31st July and 7th August which will be the last day of Shravan Month for Delhi, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh’, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Odisha and J&K. ( Purnimant states)

This entire period will be very auspicious for Lord Shiva Devotees and almost everyone of them will observe fast either for the entire month or at least on every Monday which falls during this period. The month of Shravan ( Saawan) is considered a very Holy month, especially for the Shiv Bhakts and every Monday is auspicious for Lord Shiva’s Pooja, Vrat or Fasting etc.

Shiv literally means auspiciousness, welfare. He is the third God of the Hindu Trinity, representing darkness. Because he is often portrayed as the angry god and the God of destruction, Lord Shiv is one of the most feared and worshipped Gods in Hinduism. He is said to play a complementary role to Brahma because he is protector of souls until they are ready for recreation by Lord Brahma. Shiv has eight forms: Rudra, Sharva, Bhava, Ugra, Bhima, Pashupati, Ishana and Mahadeva; which, according to the Shiv Purana, correspond to the earth, water, fire, wind, sky, a yogi called Kshetragya, the sun, and the moon respectively.

Shiv symbolically represents the tamasic quality. This happens to be one of the gunas in Hinduism, symbolizing inactivity. His body color, which is white, denotes his purity and association with the snowy mountains. His three eyes represent the sun, the moon and the earth, the three paths of liberation and the triple nature of creation. The third eye is actually the eye of wisdom or occult knowledge. Epithets note his distinctive hairstyle; he has matted hair which holds the flowing Ganges River and a crescent moon. Shiv is said to be the essence of the Vedas and the creator of the Word. He is also the creator of Dance. Shiv’s dance of anger is called the Roudra Tandava and his dance of joy, the Ananda Tandava. He dances both the dance of destruction and the dance of creation. The rhythms he dances to are that of a world continuously forming, dissolving and re-forming.

The legend of marriage of Shiv and Shakti is one the most important legends related to the festival of Mahashivaratri. The story tells us how Lord Shiv got married a second time to Shakti, his divine consort. According to legend of Shiv and Shakti, the day Lord Shiv got married to Parvati is celebrated as Shivaratri – the Night of Lord Shiva.

Legend goes that once Lord Shiv and his wife Sati or Shakti were returning from sage Agastya? ashram after listening to Ram Katha or story of Ram. On their way through a forest, Shiv saw Lord Rama searching for his wife Sita who had been kidnapped by Ravana, the King of Lanka. Lord Shiv bowed his head in reverence to Lord Rama. Sati was surprised by Lord Shiv’s behavior and inquired why he was paying obeisance to a mere mortal. Shiv informed Sati that Rama was an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. Sati, however, was not satisfied with the reply and Lord asked her to go and verify the truth for herself.

Using her power to change forms, Sati took the form of Sita appeared before Rama. Lord Rama immediately recognized the true identity of the Goddess and asked, “Devi, why are you alone, where’s Shiv?” At this, Sati realized the truth about Lord Ram. But, Sita was like a mother to Lord Shiv and since Sati took the form of Sita her status had changed. From that time, Shiv detached himself from her as a wife. Sati was sad with the change of attitude of Lord Shiv but she stayed on at Mount Kailash, the abode of Lord Shiv.

Later, Sati’s father Daksha organised a yagna, but did not invite Sati or Shiv as he had an altercation with Shiv in the court of Brahma. But, Sati who wanted to attend the Yagna, went even though Lord Shiv did not appreciate the idea. To her great anguish, Daksha ignored her presence and did not even offer Prasad for Shiv. Sati felt humiliated and was struck with profound grief. She jumped into the yagna fire and immolated herself.

Lord Shiv became extremely furious when he heard the news of Sati’s immolation. Carrying the body of Sati, Shiv began to perform Rudra Tandava or the dance of destruction and wiped out the kingdom of Daksha. Everybody was terrified as Shiv’s Tandava had the power to destroy the entire universe. In order to calm Lord Shiv, Vishnu severed Sati’s body into 12 pieces and threw them on earth. It is said that wherever the pieces of Shakti’s body fell, there emerged a Shakti Peetha, including the Kamaroopa Kamakhya in Assam and the Vindhyavasini in UP.
Lord Shiv was now alone undertook rigorous penance and retired to the Himalayas. Sati took a re-birth as Parvati in the family of God Himalaya. She performed penance to break Shiv’s meditation and win his attention. It is said that Parvati, who found it hard to break Shiv’s meditation sought help of Kamadeva – the God of Love and Passion. Kaamadeva asked Parvati to dance in front of Shiv. When Parvati danced, Kaamadeva shot his arrow of passion at Shiva breaking his penance. Shiv became extremely infuriated and opening his third eye that reduced Kaamadeva to ashes. It was only after Kamadeva’s wife Rati’s pleading that Lord Shiv agreed to revive Kaamadeva.

Later, Parvati undertook severe penance to win over Shiv. Through her devotion and persuasion by sages devas, Parvati, also known as Uma, was finally able to lure Shiv into marriage and away from asceticism. Their marriage was solemnized a day before Amavasya in the month of Phalgun. This day of union of God Shiv and Parvati is celebrated as Mahashivratri every year.

I have been fasting on every Monday during Shravan and Mahashivratri since I was a child. Our family was a staunch Shiv Bhakt and we had our own big Shiv Temple in the compound of our Bungalow in Hyderabad. My father had spent some time in Banaras studying Vedas. I too was there for 2 years when I was a small kid. Anyway, all this had immense impact on me and I follow whatever is possible in the month of Shravan.
This time there are 5 Mondays in Shravan. We will try to discuss one Shiv Bhajan on every Monday from 24th July onwards.

Let us enjoy today’s Bhajan which is very sweet indeed. This song is the 2300th song of Asha Bhonsle as a playback singer in the blog.


Song-Shankar ki pooja chhoote na (Shiv Ratri)(1954) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Gopal Singh Nepali, MD-Chitragupta

Lyrics

Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na
Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na
shambhu ke bina
bulbula bhi jal mein phhoote na
ho o
shambhu ke bina bulbula bhi jal mein phhoote na
ho Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na

raaja roothhe
taqdeer phhire
duniya badle
ho o
raaja roothhe
taqdeer phhire
duniya badle
kailaashpati saubhaagyawati se roothhe na
ho o o
kailaashpati saubhaagyawati se roothhe na
ho Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na

shiv ko pooje jo
apne piya ki matwaali
shiv ko pooje jo
apne piya ki matwaali
shambhu ka trishool kare nit uski rakhwaali
ho o o o
shambhu ka trishool kare nit uski rakhwaali
vrat toote na to
phir suhaag koi loote na
ho o o
vrat toote na to
phir suhaag koi loote na
ho Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na

harihar chaahe to janmon ka phera chhoote
harihar chaahe to janmon ka phera chhoote
bandhan toote
taala toote
ghera toote
ae ae ae
bas janam janam natwar se naata toote na
ho o o
bas janam janam natwar se naata toote na
ho Shankar ki pooja chhoote na
chhoote na


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This article is a tribute to an actor whom I started admiring for his acting calibre only a couple of years back. He became a star actor without having any godfather in Hindi film industry. During his filmy career of less than 15 years (1934-48), he donned the different kind of roles, mostly in negative shades, in around 30 films most of which became box office hits. Had there been a concept of super star in his days, he would have been the one among K L Saigal, Motilal, Surendra etc. The actor is Chandra Mohan and today, July 24, 2017 happens to be his 111th birth anniversary.

During my younger days, the only information I knew from words of mouth about Chandra Mohan was that he was the most handsome actor of his time. Even until a couple of years back, my awareness about him was restricted to his being from a Kashmiri Pandit family, about his filmography, watching him in VCD of films like ‘Pukaar’ (1939), ‘Roti’ (1942), ‘Humayun’ (1945) and ‘Shaheed’ (1948). Each of his roles in these films impressed me of his acting skill, the dialogue delivery and the expressions.

Chandra Mohan rarely got opportunity to work as hero in a conventional sense in his 30 odd films. Even in the films like ‘Bharosa’ (1940) and ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942) in which he was in the lead roles, he had some shades of negative characters like a seducer of his best friend’s wife and an autocratic husband, respectively. It is said that his facial features and cat eyes always created the shades of villain in him. His eyes were so powerful that even his innocuous smiles gave an impression of villainous smiles.

During the last two years or so when I was more into songs of the films of 1940s, I became aware of some of the important film personalities of that era and one of them was Chandra Mohan. I had read an interview of him taken by Hyacinth, a name under which Susheela Rani Patel wrote articles in ‘Filmindia’ magazines (November 1941). The interview was taken on the eve of the release of his film ‘Roti’ (1942). This was also a period when his career was at its peak. The interview gave me an impression of Chandra Mohan being a short tempered person, a self-centred egoistic man and a man of strong likes and dislikes.

Recently, I came across a moving obituary on Chandra Mohan written by Khorshed Dhondy, a film journalist who knew Chandra Mohan personally. The article appeared in April 1949 issue of SOUND Magazine, (Courtesy: Professor Surjit Singh’s Website). After reading the article, I had a different impression of Chandra Mohan – a kind hearted man, helped needy persons anonymously, a spend thrift during financially good times but accepted the life as it came in bad times. He was not arrogant but his frank talks may have given that impression.

Chandra Mohan Wattal (24/07/1906 – 02/04/1949) was born in Narsinghpur (presently in MP) in a Kashmiri Pandit family. His grandfather was the Diwan of Karauli State (now in Rajasthan) and his father was a member of the darbaar of Maharaja of Gwalior. Chandra Mohan lost his mother when he was a child. He was brought up by his maternal grandmother at Narsinghpur. His grandmother pampered him so much that he had become a spoilt child. It is not known whether he completed his high school.

Sometime in the 1930, after his father’s death, Chandra Mohan realised that his views and his grandparents views were poles apart. So he ran away from his house and reached Delhi. After changing job many times, he joined a film distribution company at Delhi at a monthly salary of Rs.35/-. The job entailed travelling for meeting film producers for negotiating terms for their film distributions.

On one such assignment, Chandra Mohan travelled to Kolhapur to discuss with the owners of Prabhat Film Company for negotiating the terms for distribution of their film ‘Sairandri’ (1933). V Shantaram saw in him the artistic potential – a handsome young man with his blue-greenish eyes which spoke more than his voice. He offered him a contract for the film which he refused. However, when Baburao Pendharkar left Prabhat, Chandra Mohan was asked to reconsider his decision. This time, Chandra Mohan met V Shantaram in Poona (Pune) and accepted the offer at a monthly salary of Rs.75/-. Thus he got his first role of a fanatic priest in Prabhat’s ‘Amrit Manthan (1934).

Chandra Mohan’s role in ‘Amrit Manthan’ (1934) was very much appreciated by both the cinegoers and the film critics. With his very first film, he had become a star. Thereafter, he worked for Prabhat’s ‘Dharmatma’ (1935) as an evil priest, in ‘Amar Jyoti’ (1936) as a tyrannical minister, and in ‘Wahan’ (1937) as autocratic Aryan king. Sometime in 1936, Chandra Mohan had differences with Shantaram over his remuneration which had remained the same despite the box office successes of his three films in a row. So he left Prabhat and joined Huns Pictures of Master Vinayak in 1937 on profit sharing basis.

After completing ‘Jwaala’ (1938), he quit Huns Pictures and joined Sohrab Modi’s Minerva Movietone. He got the role of Mughal Emperor Jehangir in ‘Pukaar’ (1939). His role had created so much impression that Maharaja of Kashmir, Hari Singh who was a close friend of Chandra Mohan, used to receive him personally at his royal palace and address him as Jehangir. In Minerva’s ‘Bharosa’ (1940), his role as a seducer of his friend’s wife was critically appreciated in the film’s review in ‘Filmindia’.

Keeping with his temperament, Chandra Mohan left Minerva Movietone too after doing just two films and became a free-lancer. During his free-lancing phase, he had done a double role in negative character in ‘Geeta’ (1940) – as Durga Khote’s husband and her son. His role of a ruthless businessman in ‘Roti’ (1942) and an autocratic husband in ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942) who ‘conveys more from his actions than the words’ were well appreciated. In ‘Shakuntala’ (1943), his portrayal of role as King Dushyant had many shades of emotions.

The World War II period (1939-45) brought significant speculative gains for businessmen. Some of them channelled the money in film productions. During this time, the remunerations of the star actors went up significantly. Chandra Mohan was one of the major beneficiaries of this trend as he did nearly 20 films during this period. According to a film journalist I referred to earlier, Chandra Mohan earned as much as Rs.18 lakhs during this period which was a big sum at that time.

However, Chandra Mohan’s good earnings came at a cost which was reflected in his career later. During the boom, he had accepted roles in the films of all sorts, some of which flopped at the box offices. During this period, he tried his hand in producing a film ‘Jhankar’ (1942) in partnership with his close friend M Kumar. This film too flopped at the box office.

Once the war was over, there was a slump in business activities which also got reflected in the film industry. However, keeping with his temperament, Chandra Mohan would not lower his remuneration nor would he approach film production banners for roles. The result was that he did not get any films during 1946 and 1947. During this period, whatever he had earned was majorly lost in gambling like horse races which he was very fond of. Also his lavish life style and partying with his close friends continued until all his earnings were exhausted. He had to sell his personal belongings like cars, race horses etc to maintain his routine expenses.

It was during this period that Chandra Mohan was afflicted with some kind of mental illness (probably depression) resulting in losing his mental balance. It is said that during this period, he used to get hallucinations quite often. It is during this time, he became extremely religious person as against the atheist earlier. He spent whatever little money he had for going on pilgrimage all over India and visiting places of all faiths.

In the film industry, when the chips are down for an artist, even his close friends desert him. Chandra Mohan was lucky that he had some close friends like Motilal, M Kumar, Ulhas, Ranjan Haksar who were genuinely attached to him irrespective of his financial conditions. They used to visit his house in Churchgate periodically to inquire about his well being.

I guess that the moral support (perhaps, discreetly financial too) which Chandra Mohan got from his close friends during his difficult times might have brought him to normalcy. After about 2 years of hiatus, he got an important role in Filmistan’s ‘Shaheed’ (1948). His stunning performance as a duty bound Deputy Commissioner whose son (Dilip Kumar) has become a revolutionary, was as memorable as that of Dilip Kumar in ‘Shakti’ (1982). His monologue in a court scene where, for the first time, he supports his son for his actions, is unforgettable. He also acted in Prakash Picutres’ ‘Raam Baan’ (1948) in the role of Ravan and ‘Dukhiyaari’ (1948) etc.

Unfortunately, Chandra Mohan’s second innings was short lived. On the morning of April 2, 1949, he breathed his last due to heart attack after a short illness of about 15 days. Baburao Patel, editor of ‘Filmindia’ wrote in his tribute to Chandra Mohan – ‘the lambs of the day can never reach the stature of the lion that died’.

Chandra Mohan’s untimely death was one of the main reasons for further delay of K Asif’s magnum opus, ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) in which he was playing the role of Emperor Akbar. Some reels of the film was already shot.

Coming to the song for the occasion, from the VCDs of his films I have watched, I could not find any song which Chandra Mohan had lip synced on the screen. At last, I have settled for a background song picturised on him. The song is ‘Na Jaane Kahaan Ka Ye Jaadu Kiya Hai’ from the film ‘Shakuntala’ (1943). The singer of the song is not identified. My guess is that the singer is Khan Mastana.

There were 13 songs in the film written by Deewan Sharar and Ratan Piya. However, the song under discussion has not been identified as to which of the two lyricists had written the song. My take is that the song may have been written by Deewan Sharar as I find that 8 songs for which Ratan Piya have been accredited, have pure Hindi lyrics whereas the song under discussion have words like ‘adaayen’ ‘nighaayen’, ‘jahaan’ ‘jaam’ which a purist Hindi poet would generally avoid. Vasant Desai composed music for all the songs. Six songs from the film have been covered in the Blog.

‘Shakuntala’ (1943) was the first film produced and directed by V Shantaram after he left Prabhat films and set up Rajkamal Kala Mandir . The star cast included Jaishree, Chandra Mohan, Nimbalkar, Zohra, Ameena, Raja Pandit, Nana Palsikar, Shantarin etc. The film was a box office hit. It ran for 104 weeks in Swastik theatre in Bombay (Mumbai).

Interestingly, for his first film under his own banner, V Shantaram chose Chandra Mohan for the role of King Dushyant in the film despite their earlier disagreement in 1937 because of which Chandra Mohan had left Prabhat Films in 1937. Chandra Mohan had acknowledged in his interview that V Shantaram was the best director among the directors he worked with.


Song – Na Jaane Kahaan Ka Ye Jaadu Kiya Hai (Shakuntala) (1943) Singer – Unidentified Male Voice, Lyrics – [Unattributed], MD – Vasant Desai

Lyrics

na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai
na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

wo baanki adaayen
wo meethi nighaahen aen
wo baanki adaayen
wo meethi nighaahen
chale…en
chale phir wahaan par
jahaan dil diyaa hai
jahaan dil diyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

inhin ne kiyaa aa mast
saare jahaan ko o
inhin ne kiyaa aa mast
saare jahaan ko o
jin aankhon kaa..aa
jin aankhon kaa
ik jaam hamne piya hai
hamne piya hai
kisi ne
mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai
na jaane kahaan kaa ye
jaadoo kiyaa hai
kisi ne mere dil mein
ghar kar liyaa aa hai

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ना जाने कहाँ का ये जादू किया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है

वो बाँकी अदाएं
मीठी निगाहें
वो बाँकी अदाएं
मीठी निगाहें
चले॰॰एन
चलें फिर वहाँ पर
जहां दिल दिया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है

इन्हीं ने किया मस्त सारे जहां को॰॰
इन्हीं ने किया मस्त सारे जहां को॰॰
जिन आँखों का॰॰
जिन आँखों का इक जाम हमने पिया है
हमने पिया है
किसी ने
मेरे दिल में
घर कर लिया है
ना जाने कहाँ का ये जादू किया है
किसी ने मेरे दिल में घर कर लिया है


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (23rd July 2017) is the death anniversary of one of the most popular comedian artistes of yesteryear, Mehmood (29 September 1932 – 23 July 2004).  On this occasion I’d like to pay a humble tribute to him.

To call Mehmood just a comedian is not to do him full justice. For, apart from doing very popular comedy roles, he was also a producer and director in his own right. And he also did playback for some songs Not just that, he even wrote for a couple of films  – so, all things considered, he must be considered quite an all rounder. Of course his comedy roles are what made him a big star in the industry and these are what he is best known for.

Mehmood was the son of the famous stage and film actor-dancer of yesteryear, Mumtaz Ali . He was one of eight children – one of his sisters was Minoo Mumtaz, is well-known for her dances and character roles in the 50s and 60s. Mehmood started as a child artiste in a few films – I remember seeing him in Kismet (1943). He did several odd jobs, like selling eggs and poultry products, being a driver. He even taught Meena Kumari table tennis – as a result of this association, he ended up marrying her sister, Madhu.

In films, it took him a while to get recognition and significant roles. He can be seen in small roles in ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), in ‘CID’ (1956), and in ‘Pyaasa’ (1957). He had somewhat more significant roles in ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1959),  ‘Shriman Satyavaadi’ (1960) and ‘Miya Biwi Raazi’ (1960), suggesting that his career graph was definitely on the up. And then come 1961 and Mehmood struck gold with the Prasad Productions film ‘Sasuraal’. Not only was the film a huge hit but Mehmood got a Filmfare nomination for Best Supporting Actor. His comedy in the film was hilarious and much-appreciated.

‘Sasuraal’ was also a trend-setter in that it triggered the famous Mehmood-Shubha Khote pairing. And the famous Mehmood-Dhumal partnership. Film after film in the 1960s would feature them, often with success. ‘Sasuraal’ also had two popular songs picturised on Mehmood-Shubha Khote.  They were “Apni Ulfat Pe Zamaane Ka Na Pehra Hota” and “Jaana Tumhaare Pyaar Mein”. Clearly with this film, if not earlier, Mehmood had made his stamp on the industry – as a comedy actor. He never looked back. The screen name Mahesh, that he had in ‘Chhoti Bahen’ (1958) and now in ‘Sasuraal’ (1961) was like a lucky charm for him. He would have that name in at least fifteen films thereafter.

The 60s was a golden decade for Mehmood. He went from strength to strength as producers realized his growing popularity. Much like Johnny Walker who would invariably have a song picturised on him, Mehmood too would get at least one song picturised on him. Often this would be sung by Manna Dey. Sometimes Mehmood, with his antics, would even overshadow the hero of the film. In ‘Gumnaam’ (1965), his screen performance of “Hum Kaale Hain To Kya Hua” stole the show. Even ‘Aulaad’ (1968) is best-remembered for his Charlie Chaplin act opposite Aruna Irani in the song “Jodi Hamari”. And that brings me to his other partnership – with Aruna Irani. This was another successful pairing for Mehmood – one that went well into the 70s.

Among Mehmood’s many films of the 60s, I would like to mention two here. ‘Pyar Kiye Jaa’ (1966) and his home production, ‘Padosan’ (1967). In both these films Mehmood scaled new heights of comedy – and firmly established himself (if any further confirmation was necessary at all) as the leading comedian of the times. By then Johnny Walker was also in decline, so Mehmood was THE most sought-after comedian.

Oh, before I forget, I must mention his partnership with IS Johar, the other well-known maverick comedian.  Mehmood teamed up with him to act in a couple of films,  ‘Johar Mehmood in Goa’  (1965) and ‘Johar Mehmood in Hong Kong’ (1971).

Mehmood continued to be a popular actor through the 70s. Though he did act thereafter, his career slowed down. However, any discussion on Mehmood would be incomplete without referring to his direction and production endeavors. Back in 1961, when he was still not an established actor, Mehmood chose to make a film ‘Chhote Nawab’, directed by his brother Usman Ali. This was the film which gave RD Burman his break.  The film, with Mehmood in a lead role, unfortunately did not do well at the box-office.

In 1965, Mehmood would again team up with RD Burman for a home production for ‘Bhoot Bangla’. The producer was officially his brother Usman Ali, Mehmood was the director.  This film, again with Mehmood in the lead role opposite Tanuja, did well – and brought RD Burman a lot of credit for its music. RD Burman himself had a small role in the film, including possibly the only song he lip synced on screen, in his own voice. This further cemented the Mehmood-RD Burman friendship. They would  go on to work together in ‘Padosan’ (1968), a film that was a hit in its time and continues to be popular to this day as one of the finest comedies ever. This film brought RD Burman huge recognition, while also getting Mehmood a lot of plaudits for his acting.

Throughout his career, Mehmood acted in a number of films for South Indian producers.  And many of these films did well at the box-office, thanks in no small measure to Mehmood himself. Or he would do a remake of a South Indian film, using a South Indian director. Unlike many other actors, he had no qualms or airs about working with anyone. Some prominent films come to mind – ‘Sadhu Aur Shaitan’ (1968), ‘Lakhon Mein Ek’ (1971), ‘Main Sundar Hoon’ (1971),  ‘Bombay to Goa’ (1972), ‘Do Phool’ (1973).

In 1974, Mehmood directed a landmark film of his career ‘Kunwara Baap’. It was a sensitive film, serious in its message – something we were not used to seeing from Mehmood. This gave us a glimpse into another side of his personality. Then in 1976, Mehmood made two films that were noticed. One was ‘Sabse Bada Rupaiya’, which although it didn’t do well at the box-office, was known for its popular songs. And the other was ‘Ginny Aur Johnny’, which fared better, and starred Mehmood’s own daughter, Ginny.

After this, Mehmood began fading away from the scene. By then he had already become a living legend in his own right and didn’t need any industry validation. He would still appear in the odd film but he wasn’t a selling point for a film anymore.

Much later, in the 90s, he made a film, another serious film, called ‘Dushman Duniya Ka’ (1996) starring his own son, Manzoor Ali. This was a hard-hitting film about drugs – I remember seeing it.

That is my last memory of a Mehmood film.

So, quite a career! And much of it during my childhood years. This is probably why I have so many memories of his films. And although I must admit that sometimes his part could be distracting from the story line (like in ‘Tumse Achha Kaun Hai’ (1969), or even ‘Ziddi’ (1964), both directed by Pramod Chakravarty), it was more a director’s issue than Mehmood’s acting fault. For example, I feel  Hrishikesh Mukherjee did a fantastic job with him in Do Dil (1965).

Anyway moving on to the song for today. This is from the 1976 film, ‘Sabse Bada Rupaiya’. It is the title song – sung by Mehmood himself. It  was quite popular in its time. I remember I was in high school then – and everyone around me would be saying “The whole thing is that…”.  Even today, you can still hear sometimes “the whole thing is that,  ki bhaiya, sabse bada rupaiya”. The phrase has made its place in the popular jargon of this country.

As I usually do, I watched the film again recently in order to refresh my memory of it. I’d watched it in the 70s itself, but forgotten the details. It was nice to watch it again. I like the film a lot, it has lovely songs – it’s a pity it didn’t do well at the box-office. The story is about Vinod Mehra, a very big-hearted, generous businessman and his friend, Mehmood, who works for him, but is much more business-minded and careful with money. Mehmood disapproves of the way Vinod Mehra gives away his money to charity. It’s an interesting plot, different from the usual stuff at that time.

Vinod Mehra and Moushumi Chatterji are supposed to get married to each other. But since Vinod Mehra has played a prank on Moushumi, she decides to return the favour in this song. All for fun. Mehmood, of course, is still trying to convince Vinod Mehra about the importance of money.

So here is the title song, “na biwi na bacha”. The music is by the duo of Basu-Manohari, earlier assistants for SD Burman, then later for RD Burman. Here they get a chance to branch out on their own. And I think they did a pretty good job of it too.

Hope you enjoy the song.

ED” With this song, which is the fourth and final song from the movie in the blog, “Sabse Bada Rupaiyya”(1976) now get YIPPEED in the blog.


Song – Na Biwi Na Bachcha, Na Baap Bada Na Maiyya (Sabse Bada Rupaiya) (1976) Singer – Mehmood, Lyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD – Basu Manohari
Chorus

Lyrics

hooo
na biwi na bacha
na baap bada na maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya

na biwi na bacha
na baap bada na maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya

bin rupaiya to mister
teri mummy ka pyaar
jo paida karta tujhe to
kabhi na kar sakta mere yaar
doctor laut jaata
fee na milti agar
tu maa ke pote ke andar
padaa hi reh jaata har baar
to kiya jisne paida
wo ishwar hai na maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya

ooo
haath khaali agar tu
mar gaya meri jaan
na agni tujhko chhuegi
na dharti hi degi maan
hahaha
hahaha
hahaha
hahaha
hahahahahaha
hadd ye hai mere bhai
ye khudao ka ghar
teri daulat ne banaaya to
hue khush allah bhagwaan
tu us duniya ke khaatir
jodey ja aana paiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya

sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
haah

ek leader ko dekho
he is looking so very grand
udaata firta dinner hai
in the hotel sun n sand
uske ladke ki shaadi
dekhe ja ye na pooch
kahaan se aaya ye haathi
from where this english band
aaj kaahe ka nation
kaahe ki dharti maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya

na biwi na bacha
na baap bada na maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya
once more
na biwi na bacha
na baap bada na maiya
the whole thing is that
ki bhaiya sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
very good
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
hooo
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya
sabse bada rupaiya


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

It was a surprise for many – when the Mukesh Geet Kosh was published (in 1985), and the compilation, at that time, was able to list less than a thousand songs in all – filmi, non filmi, other languages all combined. It was a general impression carried amongst the fans that well, yes, Mukesh has not sung as many songs as Rafi Sb, but then, less than thousand?? And then, it became a new topic to write about and discuss – why is it so that the impression is that Mukesh has recorded a lot many more songs than are popularly known.

Remembering Mukesh on the 94th anniversary of his birth today (22nd July, 2017).

This topic became a subject of curiosity amongst fans. Many years later, on an occasion of a get together with famed film historian and writer, Nalin ji Shah (of Bombay), this topic got discussed. I was part of that get together. Nalin explained this quite at length. As per him, this is a mental extrapolation that happens in the minds of the fans. While the main line playback singers like Rafi Sb, Kishore Kumar etc have their compilations listed in terms if multiple thousands of songs, still, the human mind captures and sustains a limited number as popular an favorites. No doubt, if one listens to an unheard or an obscure song, the appreciation is most certainly there. But the mind would retain only so much in the memory, as favorites. So when that number is juxtaposed against the total list of compilation, there is a level of appreciation associated with the estimate of the quantity versus the list of what a personal preference would term as “good quality” favorites. Given the case of Rafi Sb, this number may work out to be 1 is to maybe 4 or 5, in the minds of discerning fans.

When a similar sense of reasoning gets applied to the portfolio of Mukesh’s recordings, a different outcome appears. When a discerning fan would apply this estimation to the compilation of Mukesh’s list of songs, then the estimate of the quantity versus the list of “good quality” favorites would work out to be 1 is to maybe 1 or 2. And then just by an expectation of the extrapolation, the mind succinctly assumes that there are or there will be many more songs of the singer, that are not retained in the memory as “good quality” favorites. And hence the disbelief about the total listed in the compilation.

In other words, as a general impression, the ratio of number of songs of Mukesh that have captured the interest of listeners, and are listed as “good quality” favorites, is probably much higher than the other main line singers, who have shared more or less the same timelines as career contemporaries.

That, is then the curious quality of the singing of this soulful voice. There have been references – some music directors did not consider him good enough. At time he himself did not consider himself good enough. And yet, despite being a singer of one and two songs in most of his films, there is a something special that he injects into the rendition, that makes the song memorable. The sound of his singing has a golden ring of sincerity, as if the voice is coming from his soul and not just from his lungs. Pick up any listing of his songs; I daresay you would be hard pressed to drop un-likeable non-favorites from that list.

I would agree with this perspective and this explanation given by Nalin ji. Yes, definitely, there is that something compellingly charismatic in this voice.

Yes, known and liked better for his poignant and sad renditions – Raja ji has rightly observed that such songs of Mukesh serve as a soothening balm to a troubled mind, there are some so well known charmingly fast paced fun songs that he has rendered. Sample this list – “Ruby O Ruby, Jaane Mehboobi” (from ‘Chaahat’, 1971), “Tauba Ye Matwaali Chaal” (from ‘Pathar Ke Sanam’, 1967), “Ye Mausam Rangeen Samaa” (from ‘Modern Girl’, 1961), “Socha Tha Pyaar Hum Na Karenge” (from ‘Bluff Master’, 1963), “Har Dil Jo Pyaar Karega” (from ‘Sangam’, 1964), “Ruk Ja O Jaane Waali Ruk Ja” (from ‘Kahnaiyya’, 1959), “Hum To Tere Aashiq Hain Sadiyon Puraane” (from ‘Farz’, 1967), “Teri Nigaahon Pe Mar Mar Gaye Hum” (from ‘Shabnam’, 1964), “Phir Milengi Kahaan, Aisi Tanhaaiyaan” (from ‘Bhaavna’, 1972), “Dekho Mausam Kya Bahaar Hai” (from ‘Opera House’, 1961), “Aasmaan Pe Hai Khuda Aur Zameen Pe Hum” (from ‘Phir Subah Hogi’, 1958), “Nain Tumhaare Mazedaar O Janaab e Aali” (from ‘Junglee’, 1961), “Kisi Nargisi Nazar Ko Dil Denge Hum” (from ‘Main Nashe Mein Hoon’, 1959), “Zara Sambhaalna Meri Jaan Apni Nigaahen” (from ‘Aaya Toofaan’, 1964), “Dil Tadap Tadap Ke Keh Raha Hai Aa Bhi Ja” (from ‘Madhumati’, 1958), “Mast Nazar Dekh Idhar” (from ‘Ek Dil Sau Afsaane’, 1963), “Yaad Aayi Aadhi Raat Ko Kal Raat Ki Tauba” (from ‘Kanhaiyya, 1959), “Ae Dil e Awaara Chal” (from ‘Dr Viday’, 1962). . . I could go on and on and on.

Today’s song belongs to that fast paced fun category. The film is ‘Mehndi Lagi Mere Haath’ from 1962. The words are written by Anand Bakshi and the music is from the baton of Kalyanji Anandji. Yet one more charming rendition from this voice that never ceases to amaze.

Song – Teri Wo Chaal Hai Ke Tauba  (Mehndi Lagi Mere Haath) (1962) Singer – Mukesh, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, MD – Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics

tauba

teri wo chaal hai ke tauba
aisa kamaal hai ke tauba
mera wo haal hai ke tauba
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba
aisa kamaal hai ke tauba
mera wo haal hai ke tauba
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba

teri har adaa mastaani
meri har nigaah deewaani
teri har adaa mastaani
meri har nigaah deewaani
vallah jaan e kasam
samjhe to sanam
vallah jaan e kasam
samjhe to sanam
donon ka ik hai fasaana
donon ka ik hai fasaana
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba
aisa kamaal hai ke tauba
mera wo haal hai ke tauba
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba

hum se bhali ye raahen
jin pe teri hain nigaahen
hum se bhali ye raahen
jin pe teri hain nigaahen
tu ek nazar to dekh idhar
tu ek nazar to dekh idhar
ye dil hai tera deewaana
ye dil hai tera deewaana
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba
aisa kamaal hai ke tauba
mera wo haal hai ke tauba
teri wo chaal hai ke tauba

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

तौबा

तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा
ऐसा कमाल है के तौबा
मेरा वो हाल है क तौबा
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा
ऐसा कमाल है के तौबा
मेरा वो हाल है क तौबा
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा

तेरी हर अदा मस्तानों
मेरी हर निगाह दीवानी
तेरी हर अदा मस्तानों
मेरी हर निगाह दीवानी
वल्लाह जान ए कसम
समझे तो सनम
वल्लाह जान ए कसम
समझे तो सनम
दोनों का इक है फसाना
दोनों का इक है फसाना
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा
ऐसा कमाल है के तौबा
मेरा वो हाल है क तौबा
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा

हम से भली ये राहें
जिन पे तेरी हैं निगाहें
हम से भली ये राहें
जिन पे तेरी हैं निगाहें
तू एक नज़र तो देख इधर
तू एक नज़र तो देख इधर
ये दिल है तेरा दीवाना
ये दिल है तेरा दीवाना
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा
ऐसा कमाल है के तौबा
मेरा वो हाल है क तौबा
तेरी वो चाल है के तौबा


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

chaman mein sab ne hi gaaya
tarana zindagani ka
magar sab se alag tha rang
meri hi kahani ka

zamanaa sun raha hai jis ko
wo meri kahani hai

 

The voice of Mukesh continues to enthral the world of music. Today (22 July) is his birth anniversary and I present here a short song from the film ‘Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai’ (1960). This film has already been Yippeee’d on the blog, but this particular rendition can as well be taken as an additional separate song.

The video shows Raj Kapoor on the screen, though he does not lip-sync the song. Mukesh in his usual trademark voice recites two dohas (couplets) of Sant Kabir Das. There are some comments on the internet that this short song and scene were missing in the film. I request readers to throw more light on this aspect.

Though there are many websites dedicated to the dohas of Kabir, I requested our Sudhir ji to not only write the lyrics for me but also translate the same. I thank him profusely for the help rendered.

I feel that the voice and the empathy expressed by Mukesh will be more pronounced and appreciated if one understands the meaning of the dohas first. Mukesh, who has recorded the original rendition of the popular ‘Ramcharit Maanas’ of Tulsidas (abridged version), also has a lot of bhajan’s in the film and non-film category. Quite a few of these bhajanas are yet to appear on the blog.

I have been away from the blog as far as song postings is concerned, due to some personal commitments, but will surely come back with more compilations of Mukesh with the artists in the two on-going series. There are a couple of newly discovered songs which will be introduced in the very near future.

With this short song wherein the clarity of the pronunciation of words and the heart-felt expression in the voice is very much perceptible, I once again join numerous Mukesh fans in remembering him on the anniversary of his birth.

Translation and Notes (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————————

kabeer soya kya kare, uth na rovey dukh

Why continuing to sleep
Be awake, be alert
And stop crying for sorrows

jaaka vaasa gor mein, so kyon sovey sukh

For happiness is not the destiny
One who eternally lives in grave
Can he ever sleep in peace

Notes: In his couplets, Kabir Das has a specific addressal. When the message of the couplet is a teaching directed towards others, the form of addressal used is ‘sadho‘. When the message of the couplet is directed inwards, then the addressal used is ‘Kabir‘ or ‘Kabira‘. But as is seen in all cases, the message is meant for all. In this couplet, the poet is cautioning the human, not to continue sleeping. Now this sleeping is not simply the physical sleep that one resorts to when the body is tired. The poet is referring to the sleep of ignorance, that most human being undergo, as they spend their lives on this planet. The ignorance being referred to is the ignorance of the true nature of the self and of this material world. The human seeks happiness, but is almost always drowning in the tears of sorrow. So the poet says, wake up and realize the true nature, and don’t continue to cry for your sorrows. Because the life on this planet has only one destination, that is death. We are all residing in graves that have already been prepared for us. For a living person who is existing in a grave, can there be any happiness to be found (in the grave), can such a person ever have a peaceful sleep.
jaaka = variant of ‘jis ka’; for whom
vaasa = to reside; to live
gor = grave; कब्र

जीवन मरण विचार कर, कूड़े काम निवार

Contemplate the cycle of life and death
And dispose of the menial tasks of life
(do what needs to be done for life)

जिन पंथों तुझ चालना, सोई पंथ संवार

But realize the true paths
That have to be traveled
Strive to improve and enrich
The knowledge of that path

Notes: The poet is exhorting the learner, to contemplate the true nature of the cycle of life and death – that nothing in this world is permanent. The process of living entails certain tasks to sustain the life; these are low level tasks, that need to be dispositioned and done with. Do not lose yourself in this process of life, for there are other truer paths that one has to traverse. Make efforts to improve, enrich, clean up the awareness and the knowledge of these paths, so that the travel on these paths of truth is free of obstacles and pain.

In the given scenario, Raju, the village bumpkin and singer, is torn between how to sort out the problem he is facing – neither the dacoits are willing to just meekly give up their profession and surrender, nor is the police showing any benevolence towards them, to try and bring them in alive. In the scene just before these couplets, Raju is at the residence of the police commissioner (role played by Raj Mehra), and is pleading for leniency in return for their surrender. While this conversation is in progress, one of the dacoits, on the instructions of Raaka (role played by Pran), who is now the new gang leader, throws a message tied to a stone, into the house, breaking a window pane. The message is a challenge to the police commissioner, to hand over Raju and Kammo (role played by Padmini) to the dacoits. (Padmini has left the dacoit’s hideout with Raju, much to the chagrin of Raaka). The police commissioner is infuriated, and in anger expresses his will to capture all dacoits and hang them. Raju is now in a fix; what to do. The police won’t listen to him, and for their own reasons. And Raaka, blinded by his obsession for Kammo, and his vexation at Raju, for being the preferred person in Kammo’s heart, isn’t going to oblige by listening to Raju.

In this quandary, Raju is not able to sleep. And then these two couplets play in his mind. He is not lip syncing, but his expressions are so impressive, as he listens to this voice from within. This voice sings two couplets to him, telling him that it is useless to seek happiness in this life and this world, which is only sorrows – the epithet used is “jaaka vaasa gor mein”; that all humans are living in graves already dug for them. The second couplet advises that one should only contemplate on the truth of life, and seek out the path that will take towards that truth. And once that path is evident in the mind, then the personal striving should be cleanse and enrich this path, leading one towards the truth.

When this second couplet plays, a smile descends on the lips of Raju, a light is seen and a determination is made. Raju leaves the police commissioners home immediately, leaving Kammo sleeping inside the room. One does not see him leave, but the next scene is Kammo waking up only to find Raju missing. On enquiry, she is told that he left during the night, but where he has gone, is not known to anyone. But Kammo knows, that Raju has returned to the gang’s hideout.

 


Song – Kabir Soya Kya Kare (Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai) (1960) Singer – Mukesh, Lyrics – Kabir Das, MD – Shankar Jaikishan

Lyrics

kabeer soya kya kare, uth na rovey dukh
jaaka vaasa gor mein, so kyon sovey sukh

jeevan maran vichaar kar, koode kaam nivaar
jin panthun tujh chaalna, soi panth sanwaar

jin panthun tujh chaalna, soi panth sanwaar

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

कबीर सोया क्या करे, उठ ना रोवे दुख
जाका वासा गोर में, सो क्यों सोवे सुख

जीवन मरण विचार कर, कूड़े काम निवार
जिन पंथों तुझ चालना, सोई पंथ संवार

जिन पंथों तुझ चालना, सोई पंथ संवार

 


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (22 july 2017) is the birth anniversary of our beloved  singer, Mukesh Chand Mathur, better known to one and all as Mukesh (22 july 1923-27 august 1976).

I don’t recall if I have written a tribute to him yet on this blog – I think I might have. But even so, there are no rules here saying I cannot write another one. 🙂  And since I have several fond memories of listening to Mukesh songs in my life, I am happy to use this occasion to remember him and pay my humble tribute to him.

Many regulars here know that I am a big fan of Rafi Saab. And I am a fan of Kishore Kumar also. But that’s the thing – it doesn’t mean I do not like other singers’ songs. I am fond of them all – and I listen to them all. At heart, I am a music lover – and unless  any music is particularly cacophonic or jarring to the ears, I have no problem listening to it.

And let’s be fair – every singer has sung memorable songs, every composer has composed good music, every lyricist has written good lyrics. Yes, not every song or composition or lyrics is memorable – but none of them would have reached where they did in their careers if there was nothing of quality in their work.

At least that’s my thinking. This is also why I tend not to get into “Rafi Saab vs Kishore” or “Lata vs Asha” discussions unless they’re respectful to all concerned and and the discussion is held in the best of spirit. I dislike bashing of any artiste.

Anyway, back to Mukesh. Long before I became a huge fan of Rafi Saab, Mukesh was a big part of my music experience. Kishore was of course the ruling superstar singer of my childhood. He was everywhere.

But Mukesh, with his distinctive voice, always made me notice him. And sit up. There would be ten non-stop Kishore songs, and there’d be one Mukesh song – say, “Kahin Door Jab Din Dhal Jaaye”. Or “Jaane Kahaan Gaye Wo Din”. And that ONE song would go straight to my heart – and linger in my mind for a long, long time. I remember what effect “Kisi Ki Muskuraahaton” would have on me.

That was Mukesh. Mukesh always had that special quality – maybe it was that nasal tone of his, maybe it was the ease and simplicity with which he seemed to deliver his songs.  But he always made an impact on me.

I know he’s not considered quite in the league of Rafi Saab, in terms of range. Many consider Mukesh besuraa – he himself felt that way at times. Yes, you wouldn’t expect him to go all classical like a Manna Dey or even a Rafi Saab with “Naache Mann Mora Magan”. And yes, for most of his career, inspite of several hit songs, he was not considered THE no.1 singer of the time, unlike Rafi Saab or Kishore Kumar (or even Talat Mahmood early on). He was probably No.2 all along.

And yet, he held his own throughout his career. Whatever other singers did – and practically all of them had their ups and downs – Mukesh’s career was largely steady.

Mukesh didn’t sing several thousand songs – according to our blog stats, he has sung just 932 Hindi film songs.  And yet, a very large number of these songs are memorable, hummable – and easily relate-able.  You listen to a Mukesh song for the first time – and there’s a very good chance it will appeal to you right away. Soon you might be humming it. And that’s because his songs went straight to your heart.

It is often said that Mukesh specialized in sad songs. To some extent this is true – he was slotted into this category in the industry. So often if there was a sad song to be sung, his would be the voice called for. For example, one of my favourite songs “Zubaan Pe Dard Bhari Dastaan Chali Aayi”.

But I happen to think, even this is a bit misleading. When I listen to a Mukesh “sad song”, it doesn’t make me one bit sad. It actually goes right to my heart and acts like a balm, it soothes me. I feel better after listening to the song. Might seem odd – and maybe it’s only my personal experience. Maybe it has to do with empathy with the situation of the song. Am not sure what it is.

But Mukesh has also sung many happy songs – and not just for Raj Kapoor. His “Ibtadaa-e-Ishq Mein” and “Bol Meri Taqdeer Mein Kya Hai” from Hariyali Aur Raasta (1962) come readily to mind. And , the quintessential “Ye Mausam Rangeen Samaa”  from Modern Girl (1961).

Although I remember several Mukesh songs from early on in my childhood, the first time he made a huge impact on me was when we’d gone to the town, 25 km away, to see ‘Mera Naam Joker’ (1970). It was the first film I ever saw in a cinema hall as such – my dad took the whole family because he thought it was a children’s film (joker et al :-))  My dad himself didn’t know Hindi and didn’t know any Hindi songs at all, except for one line of one song – “Awaara Hoon” 🙂  That gave me an idea that this song must have been massively popular in its time.

Anyway, while I enjoyed “Ae Bhai Zara Dekh Ke Chalo” immensely – and didn’t understand all the details of the story at that time – I was also much impressed by “Jaane Kahaan Gaye Wo Din” and “Jeena Yahaan Marna Yahaan”. I liked “Kehta Hai Joker Saara Zamaana” as well.

When we got a 2-in-1 at home for the first time, we had just 2 or 3 cassettes, which we would play non-stop. We had songs of ‘Guddi’, ‘Abhiman’, ‘Yaadon Ki Baaraat’ and ‘Zanjeer’.  And we had a Mukesh cassette.

I treasured it – and listened to it SO many times. I remember every song on it, starting with “Mera Naam Raju” to “Chhalia Mera Naam” to “Aa Laut Ke Aaja Mere Meet” to “Sab Kuchh Seekha Hum Ne” (my favourite at the time) to “Dum Dum Diga Diga” to “Aansoo Bhari Hain” to “Chal Ri Sajni Ab Kya Soche” to “Hum Ne Tum Ko Pyaar” to “Chaandi Ki Deewar Na Todi” to “Hum Chhod Chale Hain” (another all-time favourite).

Mukesh songs would regularly figure on radio too – even his “current” songs, like “Kahin Door Jab Din Dhal Jaaye”or “Jis Gali Mein Tera Ghar Na Ho Baalma” or “Jo Tumko Ho Pasand” or “Koi Jab Tumhara Hriday Tod De” or “Ek Pyaar Ka Nagma Hai” would be regulars in farmaishes.

And that’s the thing – many think that Mukesh’s career was primarily for Raj Kapoor, and maybe Manoj Kumar. And most of it was anyway 1950s/60s. But, though his output might have been less in the 70s, he had several memorable songs in this decade too  – right till his death. And  for other actors. Like I said at the start, unlike other singers, Mukesh did not seem to have ups-and-downs in his career, it was largely steady.

Just to give examples of some 1970s songs (non-Raj Kapoor/Manoj Kumar)

Duniya Se Jaane Waale” from Pushpanjali (1970).

Tere Honthon Ke Do Phool” from Paras (1971).

Kahin Door Jab Din Dhal Jaaye” from Anand (1971).

Ae Baadal Jhoomke Chal” from Nadaan (1971), a song I very fondly remember. 🙂

Main To Har Mod Par” from Chetna (1970).

Kai Sadiyon Se, Kai Janmon Se” from Milap (1972).

Zindagi Aur Bataa Teraa Iraadaa Kyaa Hai” from Zindagi Aur Toofaan (1973)

Kai Baar Yun Bhi Dekha Hai” from Rajnigandha (1973).

Barkha Rani Zara Jamke Barso” from Sabak (1973).

Main Dhoondhta Hoon Jinko” from Thokar (1974).

Sansaar hai ek nadiya” from Raftaar (1975).

Phool Aahista Phenko” from Prem Kahani (1975).

Kabhi Kabhi Mere Dil Mein” from Kabhie Kabhie (1976)

Main Pal Do Pal Ka Shaayar Hoon” from Kabhie Kabhie (1976)

Suhani Chandni Raatein” from Mukti (1977)

The reason I mention this decade specifically is to just stress that Mukesh held his own throughout his last few years, inspite of Kishore Kumar’s dominance in that decade. I have not mentioned songs like “Ik Din Bik Jaayega” (Raj Kapoor), “Do Jasoos Karen Mehsoos” (Raj Kapoor) and “Ek Pyaar Ka Nagma Hai” (Manoj Kumar) – they were all very popular too.

So as a young boy growing up, listening to these “current” songs not to mention the fantastic Mukesh songs of earlier decades, I became a Mukesh fan too. So much so that, after Mukesh’s death, one of my friends gifted me a book full of Mukesh songs. It was my prized possession for a long time. It had a whole lot of “new” Mukesh songs for me. I remember I would wait for a Mukesh song on radio – and then quickly rush to check the song in the book, matching the lyrics in the book with the song. I’d be thrilled if the song was in the book – obviously not all songs were.  And till I heard the song, I didn’t know the tune of course.  The song was just words to me, till then. Those were pre-internet days – and I didn’t have access to music shops either.

Some songs I remember “matching “ like this were “Dil Jalta Hai To Jalne De”,  “Zinda Hoon Is Tarah”, “Mujhe Raat Din Ye Khayaal Hai”  (one of my favourite songs) and “Dil Lootne Waale Jaadugar”. It was thanks to this book that I first heard of names like Husnlal Bhagatram and Iqbal Qureshi. Very fond memories of those times. And many of them associated with Mukesh.

Now moving on to the song for today. This is from film ‘Darinda’ (1977). This film has not made its entry on the blog yet – so with this song, it makes its debut. I remember seeing this film when it was released.  But, given my memory, I had forgotten the story completely – the only thing I remembered from that time was this Mukesh song “Chaahe Aaj Mujhe”. I remember liking it even then.

So now, when I wanted to write a post on Mukesh, this song came to mind. I checked the blog – and was a bit surprised to see it missing. I don’t think the film did well – but this song did ok, from what I remember. Since I prefer to post songs of films that I have seen – so that I have some context – I decided to watch this film again.

Briefly, the story is how Sunil Dutt, separated as a poor young boy from his rich childhood friend, Parveen Babi, grows up as a yogi, supposedly to do good deeds. But he has just one goal in mind – to find Parveen, and win her over. He searches everywhere for her – becoming a  monster (Darinda) in the process, even killing women in his pursuit. And when he finally does find her, she is engaged to be married to Feroze Khan. How he then reacts, what is Parveen’s reaction, what happens to Feroze – see the film if you want to find out 🙂 There’s a bit of a hint in this song too. 🙂

As I close, I want to say “Thank you, Mukesh ji, for giving us so many wonderful songs. We will always remember you and be thankful to you.”


Song – Chaahe Aaj Mujhe Napasand Karo. . . Aakhir Mein Tumhen Mera Hi Hona Hoga (Darinda) (1977) Singer – Mukesh, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics

chaahe aaj mujhe naapasand karo
chaahe dwaar hriday ke band karo
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga

chaahe aaj mujhe naapasand karo
chaahe dwaar hriday ke band karo
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga

bachpan ke pyaar ki mit-ti nahin nishaani
bachpan ke pyaar ki mit-ti nahin nishaani
jitna hi mitaana chaahe isey jawaani
jahaan yaad teri soyi ho
jahaan yaad teri soyi ho
dooja na aur koi ho
koi dil ka tumhaare aisa bhi konaa hoga
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga

main kya se kya ban gaya tumhaare kaaran
main kya se kya ban gaya tumhaare kaaran
auron ki tarah mera pyaar nahin sadhaaran
na samjho isey dikhaava
na samjho isey dikhaava
hai ye mere pyaar ka daawaa
mere hansne pe hansna, roney pe ronaa hoga
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga

chaahe aaj mujhe naapasand karo
chaahe dwaar hriday ke band karo
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga
aakhir mein tumhe mera hi hona hoga

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
चाहे आज मुझे नापसंद करो
चाहे द्वार हृदय के बंद करो
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा

चाहे आज मुझे नापसंद करो
चाहे द्वार हृदय के बंद करो
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा

बचपन के प्यार की मिटती नहीं निशानी
बचपन के प्यार की मिटती नहीं निशानी
जितना ही मिटाना चाहे इसे जवानी
जहां याद तेरी सोई हो
जहां याद तेरी सोई हो
दूजा ना और कोई हो
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा

मैं क्या से क्या बन गया तुम्हारे कारण
मैं क्या से क्या बन गया तुम्हारे कारण
औरों की तरह मेरा प्यार नहीं साधारण
ना समझो इसे दिखावा
ना समझो इसे दिखावा
है ये मेरे प्यार का दावा
मेरे हंसने पे हँसना
रोने पे रोना होगा
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा

चाहे आज मुझे नापसंद करो
चाहे द्वार हृदय के बंद करो
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा
आखिर में तुम्हें मेरा ही होना होगा


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3200 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13466

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1014
Total Number of movies covered =3696

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3250 days.

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