Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1948’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4808 Post No. : 16576

Few days back, I came across an obscure song rendered by Janardan Tanjorkar from the film ‘Kuchh Naya’ (1948). The surname ‘Tanjorkar’ sounded odd to me. It was apparent that Janardan was from Tanjore (now Thanjavur). But why did he use a Maharashtrian sounding surname? Was he a Maharashtrian whose family migrated to Thanjavur during the reign of Marathas in the 17th and 18th centuries? A search on the internet revealed a very interesting family background of Janardan Tanjorkar.

Janardan Tanjorkar (1913-1980) was born in Baroda (now Vadodara) to Devdasi Kantimathi Amma and Appaswamy Pillai. Kantimathi was a Bharatnatyam dancer attached to Brihdhiswara temple in Thanjavur and her husband, Appaswamy Pillai was the Nattuvanar, a kind of a Guru and a Choreographer who accompanied the devdasi dancers as a dance master, the music conductor and the vocal percussionist. Janardan got his initial training from Kumbakonam Narayanswamy Iyer and Palghat Mani Iyer and learnt Mirdangam and Carnatic vocal.

Sometime in 1880-81, a troupe of two devdasi Bharatnatyam dancers, along with two Nattuvanars and musicians were sent to Baroda as a part of dowry during the marriage of Princess Chimanabai (born Laxmibai) of Thanjavur with Prince Sayajirao (III) Gaekwad of Baroda. Kantimathi Amma as a Bharatnatyam dancer and her husband, Appaswamy Pillai as Nattuvanar joined the troupe after a couple of years as replacement for an earlier dancer and Nattuvanar respectively. Kantimanthi and her cousin, Gowri performed the Bharatnatyam dance in the court of the Maharaja of Baroda on Wednesdays and Saturdays. That was the beginning of introducing Bharatnatyam outside the Madras Presidency to the western and later to the northern India. In Baroda, Appaswamy Pillai adopted the family name of ‘Tanjorkar’ in keeping with the Maharashtrian tradition.

In Baroda, Janardan Tanjorkar learnt violin and became a violin player in the court of the Maharaja of Baroda. Here, he came into contact with Ustad Faiyyaz Khan, a Hindustani classical vocalist with Baroda court who trained him as a Hindustani classical vocalist. Janardan also learnt playing other musical instruments like Saraswati Veena while in Baroda. Over a period of time, he learnt both Carnatic and Hindustani classical music and became experts in playing multiple musical instruments.

Janardan Tanjorkar moved to Mumbai sometime during the second half of 1940s and became a graded artist of All India Radio as a violinist and vocalist. He also taught violin to music students and accompanied the Bharatnatyam dancers as a violinist.

Janardan’s younger brother, Kubernath Tanjorkar was an exponent of Bharatnatyam and became Nattuvanar in the court of Maharaja of Baroda. Later, he was appointed as the Professor of Dance at the Faculty of Fine Arts of Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad University, Vadodara. After retirement, he established Tanjore Dance Music and Art Research Centre in Vadodara, Presently, his third generation is involved with the propagation of Bharatnatyam and Carnatic music at this centre.

Janardan Tanjorkar had three sons and five daughters. All the three sons – Venugopal, Shekhar and Dayanand are based in Mumbai and are connected with Bharatnatyam dance and music. His grand-daughter, Dr. Madhu Tanjorkar (daughter of Shekhar), is a solo violinist and vocalist, both in Carnatic and Hindustani classical music. She has taken Bharatnatyam and the classical music to Manchester and the northern part of the UK where she runs music schools besides participating in concerts in India and abroad.

This is an unique case where a dowry in the form of Bharatnatyam dance troupe resulted in the propagation of Bharatnatyam and Carnatic music, probably for the first time outside the then Madras Presidency in Vadodara. The troupe created the Thanjavur legacy of Bharatnatyam dance in the pure traditional form in the midst of a different cultural setting.

Janardan Tanjorkar had shifted his base in Mumbai during the second half of 1940s. However, it seems, he had no interest in singing in films. The only film song he sang during his life time was in ‘Kuchh Naya’ (1948). Probably, Ninu Mazumdar, the music director of the film knew Janardan as both were associated with All India Radio, Mumbai.

‘Kuchh Naya’ (1948) was produced by Kantilal Acharya under the banner of Shanti Pictures and was directed by Ninu Mazumdar who also wrote the story and was also the music director for the film. The star cast comprised of mostly newcomers with Sudha Rao and Ramesh Arora in the lead roles. They were supported by Ramesh Sinha, Purnima Chowdhary and Dube. It was a maiden film for Kantilal Acharya as a producer, Ninu Mazumdar as a director, Ramesh Arora and Purnima Chowdhary as actors.

I have no idea about the story of the film. As per the report on Filmindia magazine, the film was privately screened in August 1948 for Morarji Desai, the then Home Minister of Bombay State and other dignitaries. The home minister had congratulated the producer for the novelty of the theme. In the absence of the film, it is difficult to know as to what was the novelty in the story of the film. The title of the film would, however, suggest that the theme of the story may be something to do with the fresh thinking for the people of the post-independent India as to how to move forward to rebuild India.

The film had 10 songs of which one song has been covered on the Blog. Except for two songs – one each accredited to Meerabai and Amir Khusrau, the lyricist/s for the rest of the songs are not known. I am presenting the second song, ‘aisa desh hamaara santon’ rendered by Janardan Tanjorkar to appear on the Blog. The song is set to music by Ninu Mazumdar. From the lyrics of the song, iI guess it to be a background song.

Acknowledgement: The information on Janardhan Tanjorkar and family for the article is sourced from:

1. madhutanjorkar.wixsite.com

2. sangeethas.wordpress,com

3. Tanjore Dance Music and Art Research Centre

Audio Clip:

Song-Aisa des hamaara santon (Kuchh Naya)(1948) Singer-Janardan Tanjorkar, Lyrics-Unknown, MD-Ninu Majumdar

Lyrics

aisa des hamaara..aa
san n n ……ton
aisa des hamaara
aisa des hamaara
aisa des hamaara
santon
aisa des hamaara jee..ee
aisa des hamaara

ved kitaab jahaan nahin pahunche
ved kitaab jahaan nahin pahunche
kahat sunat se(??) nyaara
santon
aisa des hamaara jee..ee
aisa des hamaara

jaat varan kachhu
priya aa naahin
?? sandhya ?? man ??
jaat varan kachhu
priya aa naahin
?? sandhya ?? man ??
bin baadal kya bijli chamke
bin ravi ?? ujiyaara
aisaa..aa des hamaara…aa
san n n ……ton
aisa des hamaara


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4803 Post No. : 16570

‘Chunariya’ (1948) was produced under the banner of Kuldeep Pictures of Lahore-based Kuldeep Sehgal which was his first film in Mumbai after partition. The film was directed by Ravindra Dave. The story, dialogues, screen-play and lyrics were written by Mulk Raj Bhakri. The production controller was his brother, Lekh Raj Bhakri. The star cast included Manorama and Wasti in the lead role with Randhir, Pran, Sophia, Cuckoo, Narbada Shankar, Mehdi Raza, Chand Burque, Baij Sharma etc in subsidiary roles.

It is interesting to note as to how the box office success of ‘Chunariya’ (1948) helped the career revival of some of the displaced persons from the Lahore film industry. Most of them had shifted to Mumbai after partition in 1947 almost penniless. Although the film was produced by Kuldeep Sehgal, according to character actor Janaki Das, it was Mulk Raj Bhakri along with his brother, Lekh Raj Bhakri who organized the actors and the crew, mostly among the displaced from Lahore film industry. Later, both Bhakri brothers floated their own film production companies and became producers/director.

The film’s director, Ravindra Dave was also a displaced person from Lahore film industry who came to Mumbai along with his brother Ramnarayan Dave and their maternal uncle, Dalsukh Pancholi. ‘Chunariya’ (1948) was his first directorial film in Mumbai. Ravindra Dave also floated his own film production company and became the producer-director of Hindi and Gujarati films. The acting career of Manorama and Pran, both from Lahore, took off in Mumbai from the success of ‘Chunariya’ (1948).

Music Director, Hansraj Bahl who started his career as the music director in Mumbai with ‘Pujaari’ (1946), was on the downhill after the continuous failures of about half-a-dozen films. He bounced back with good compositions of the songs for ‘Chunariya’ (1948) some of which became popular. Although, Geeta Dutt was the main female playback singer for the film, it was Lata Mangeshkar’ song, dil-e-naashaad ko jeene ki hasrat ho gayi tumse which became very popular. Similary, Mohammed Rafi’s song, sab kuchh lutaaya hamne aakar teri gali mein also became very popular.

‘Chunariya’ (1948) has the distinction of becoming a film in which Asha Bhosle sang her first song in Hindi film, ‘saawan aaya re saawan aaya jaage more bhaag’ along with Geeta Dutt and Zohrabai Ambalewaali in this film. However, according to Raju Bharatan who wrote Asha Bhosle’s musical biography, Asha Bhosle sang her first Hindi film song, ‘gareebon ke data gareebon ke waali’ in ‘Andhon Ki Duniya (1947) along with Zohrabai Ambalewaali. Unfortunately, as of now, both the songs are not available on any of the video sharing platforms. There may be some story as to why many on-line articles on Asha Bhosle consider the song in ‘Chunariya’ (1948) being her first Hindi film song rather than her song from ‘Andhon Ki Duniya’ (1947).

‘Chunariya’ (1948) had 10 songs – all written by Mulk Raj Bhakri of which 8 songs have already been covered on the Blog. The remaining two songs were not available on video sharing platforms for quite some time. Very recently, I am able to get mp3 clip of one of the two ‘missing’ songs which I have uploaded on a video sharing platform.

I am presenting the 9th song, ‘daaman se bandh gayi choli re, meri sakhi paraayi ho li re’ which is rendered by Geeta Dutt and chorus. From the wordings of the lyrics, it is apparent that it is a ‘Bidaai Song’ sung by bride’s friends.

Audio Clip:

Song-Daaman se bandh gayi choli re (Chunariya)(1948) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Lyrics-Mulkraj Bhakri, MD-Hansraj Bahl
Chorus

Lyrics

daaman se bandh gayi choli re
choli re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re
daaman se bandh gayi choli re..ae
choli re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re

em>mori sakhi paraayi ho li re..ae
ho li re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re

baabul kaa ghar chhod sakhi
kar pi kaa ghar aabaad
hoooooooo
piya prem mein kho na jaana
hamein bhi rakhna yaad
man har lenaa
saanwariya kaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
bol ke meethhi boli re..ae
boli re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re
daaman se bandh gayi choli re..ae
choli re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re

pi charanan mein baith sakhi
tum swarg ka sukh nit paana
ho ooo oo
unki charan dhool ka nis din
maathhe tilak lagaana
haan haan
har raat teri bane deewaali
ee ee ee ee eee
har din ho tera holi re
holi re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re
daaman se bandh gayi choli re..ae
choli re daaman se
ho daaman se bandh gayi choli re


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4791 Post No. : 16548

Today’s song is from the film Rang mahal-1948. This social film was made by Eastern Pictures, Bombay. It was written and directed by Pt. Anand Kumar.

Not much is known about this director. He was one of those aspirants who ran away from home to Bombay- the Dream City, to make a career. In his first attempt he failed, went back to his village to do the ‘run away’ scene again second time, with more money. Even this time he failed, so he returned to his home and became a big and famous writer. He came back to Bombay only when he was invited by the film industry to make use of his skill !

Pt.Anand Kumar was born in Delhi on 4-9- 1907. He was a producer, director, writer and Lyricist. From childhood, he was not interested in studies in English medium. He was taught Urdu, Hindi and Sanskrit by his poor Brahmin Shastri father.

When he was 15 year old, he entered a business. He was always discontented. He wanted to become an actor, but family resisted. He tried fasting and even suicide. Then he stole some money and ran to Bombay. He could not get into any studio and after money finished, he returned to Delhi, only to take more money and run to Bombay again. Even after this failure, he went back to Delhi and started writing stories.

His first book ‘ Mera Huq ‘ became a hot seller and he started earning money. He was invited by film people and he went to Bombay nth time. He wrote stories, dialogues and Lyrics of scores of films and earned name and money. He produced the film ‘Zameen’-43, under his own banner Anand Brothers. He directed 5 films, including a Hit Marathi film, Gora Kumbhar-42. Some of his films as a Lyricist were Suvarn Mandir-34,Katle aam-35, Pratibha-37, Divorce-38, Saathi-38, Alakh Niranjan-40, Punarmilan-40, Charnon ki Dasi-41, Raja Rani-42 etc. As a writer some films were, Divorce-38, Honhaar-36, Saathi-38, Vasant sena-42, Rang mahal-48 etc etc.

The 6 songs of this film were written by Shiv Kumar and were tuned by a pair of MDs, namely K. Datta and V.A. Balsara. The songs are not credited to any specific MD in HFGK. However, singer’s names are given for all the songs. Suraiyya has 3 songs in it, which are already covered in the Blog. Today’s song is the 4th song sung by Shalini and Anant Marathe.

I could not get any information about this singer-Shalini. She was an actress in Hindi films. Starting her career with film Tulsi-1941, which was one of the last films of CIRCO Productions owned by Chimanlal Trivedi. After making 12 films from 1937 to 1942, he sold this company, studio and land to A.R. Kardar, who established his Kardar Sudios in Parel, Bombay. In her first film, Shalini was the Heroine opposite Trilokn Kapoor. Anant marathe was also in this film. Shalini acted in 25 Hindi films. her last Hindi film was Taqdeer-1967. She sang 3 songs in 2 films, Rang mahal-2 songs and Roop Sundari-49 1 song.. She seems to have worked in some Gujarati and Marathi films too.

Anant Marathe also known as Anant Kumar acted in 71 films. He also sang 5 songs in 5 films. His career started in 1936. Anant Marathe aka Anant Kumar was the brother of actor and famous singer Ram Marathe. I was searching for his information for quite some time. My search ended when I found an article written by his son about his father.

Anant Marathe was born in 1936. In a career that spanned over 50 years, he was a witness to many changes and upheavals in the Hindi film industry. Born in Pune, in a family that was doing well for itself, he had three brothers and two sisters. Losing his father at the tender age of four, he was forced to give up education and begin work, to fend for his family. In the process the family left Pune and came to Mumbai, the city that fed every soul.

The world of films, those days, was not an industry. It was just like a 9 to 5 job in an office. Anant Marathe, with his innocent looks, expressive eyes and inborn confidence, was chosen by Master Vinayak, to play a role as a child artiste in a hindi film, Chhayaa. In this film he played the role of a son, who for his own selfish means is used by his father, ( played by Late Shri Chandra Mohan).

The real breakthrough came when he was called for an audition at Prabhat Studios, the most distinguished film company of those days. This 1943-44 film was ‘ Ramshastri’, in which he was to play the part of Chhota (young) Ramshastri. Ramshastri Prabhune was the Supreme Judge of the Peshwa dynasty and known for his supreme judgement. Once he was selected for the role, his grooming as an actor really began. In the storyline, Chhota Ramshastri was depicted as a boy who hates to study and loves to play all day long. He would swim, roam about with his pet dog and enjoy life. For this role Anant marathe was made to learn swimming even though he was scared of water! He could not get along with the puppy dog, even though it was supposed to be his pet. And to top it all, after shooting, the swimming and the sequences with the dog were edited from the film! The song, ‘Don ghadicha daav, yala jeevan aise naav” sung by him was very popular at that time. He received an award for his performance as Ramshastri from Bengal Film Journalists Association as the best supporting actor of the year. This film was screened in a number of National and International film festivals.

Film industry in South India was very active in the early 50’s. Anant Marathe acted in a number of films produced by the South Indian film studios, namely AVM, Gemini studios etc. Shri Chettiar of AVM was planning a socio-mythological film on the life of a famous saint. The lead role was played by Shahu Modak. The film in general was devotional and to bring in an interesting element, a comic character was created, in the form of the saint’s shishya ( pupil ). This role was offered to Anant Marathe and he displayed histrionics that astonished everybody on the sets.

The Director who groomed the great showman Raj Kapoor was Kidar Sharma and Anant Marathe had the privilege to work in one of his films, this time as a villain! The film was Hamaari Yaad Aayegi. This film also launched Tanuja, who would be known as a talented actress in the coming years. Anant Marathe played the role of a character called Pyarelaal, a very deceiving name for a villain! He is a suave character, moving about in the company of elite people but behind the cute face there is a monster of sorts, a wolf in sheep’s clothes. Anant Marathe, with his charming smile was very stunning, not only in his looks but in every move. Kidar Sharma was known to reward any actor who performed a great scene with a 4 anna coin, known as chavanni in those days. A chavanni earned for a great shot was like an achievement. And Anant Marathe earned many, which he cherished till the end.

His journey as an actor continued with great flourish. Since he could speak Marathi and Hindi fluently, he received offers from both Marathi and Hindi films. He was truly a bi-lingual actor.

Manoj Kumar was inspired by the life of Bhagat Singh, the great sikh patriot from Punjab and was planning a film on his life. Manoj Kumar and Prem Chopra were to play the roles of Bhagat Singh and Sukhdev respectively but casting for Raajguru, the third freedom fighter was still to be done, as Manoj Kumar wasn’t happy with the short-listed few, to play the role. Manoj Kumar heard about Anant Marathe, who had acted in many hindi and marathi films. Anant Marathe was asked to come over and meet Mnoj Kumar. One look at him and he had found his Raajguru! The experience of working in a truly patriotic film, that too with a thespian like Pran who played a cameo in Shaheed, was a very inspiring experience for him. Incidently Pran did not charge a single rupee for this role! Shaheed brought a wave of patriotism in the audience, they cheered and loved their heroes. The real mother of Bhagat Singh was felicitated at the premiere of this film at Delhi. She was moved by the performances of every actor in the film. What’s more, a special screening was arranged for the then Prime Minister of India, Late Shri Lal Bahadur Shastri, who praised the film and awarded certificates of honour to all the actors.

Anant Marathe acted in over 250 Hindi and Marathi films, out of which 71 films are Hindi. he also sang 5 songs in 5 Hindi films.When he made his foray in Hindi films, he was not very fluent in Hindi so he took lessons from a tutor who taught him the nuances of Hindi, thus improving the pronunciations so he could speak the language flawlessly. He also learnt English to give his persona the required sparkle, so important for a lead hero. He had to give up formal schooling due to circumstances that prevailed and may be he made up for it in this manner.

Some of the films he acted in are, Bhakta Bilwamangal (Durga Khote), Bhakta Gopalbhaiya (Amir Kanataki), Geeta (Chandra Mohan, Durga Khote), Gokul ( Kamala Kotnis, Sapru), Jivacha Sakha (Durga Khote, Sulochana), Malti Madhav (Durga khote, Baby Shakuntala), Nanda Kumar ((Durga Khote), Sant Janabai (Hirabai Badodekar), Seeta Swayamvar (Durga khote, Baby Shakuntala), Jawaee Majha Bhala, Choravar Mor, Bhintila Kaan Astaat, Shri Krishna Darshan ( (Durga khote, Usha Kiran), Sampoona Ramayan, Bharat Milap and many more.

In “ Barkhaa”, he played the role of a doctor opposite Nanda. The song, “Ek raat mein do-do chaand khile…” became an instant hit. “Bada bhai”, a film starring late Ajit, had him playing Ajit’s younger brother with Amita as the female lead. In “Sanskaar” also he played the lead role opposite Amita. He acted in some Gujarati films also.

In the early stages acting was like a job for him but soon it became a passion. All these years, while he worked in front of the camera as an actor, he learnt the finer details of film making, by observing, making mental notes. He had a flair for writing. In fact, he was a habitual diary writer. He wrote poems for small children and later they were published in the form of a book.
He had a good voice and was planning to be a singer but destiny had something else in store for him, a career in acting.

He wielded the megaphone in 1974, for a Marathi film named “Sonarana Tochala Kaan”, starring comedian and an intense actor Nilu Phule in lead role with Usha Chavan as the female lead. It was inspired by a Hollywood caper with famous comedian, Bob Hope in lead. The film was a huge success all over Maharashtra.

Soon he was set to direct a film in Hindi. After a detailed script was worked out by him, the producer backed out. Losing hope but not the spirit, he turned a new leaf and began work on his next project, once again in Marathi. The name of the film was “ Bijlee”, meaning lightning.

Rangat-Sangat Pratishthan, founded by the wife of late Shri Shahu Modak conferred the Manus puraskaar, an award on him for life-time achievement. The name for this award, for obvious reason is Manus (meaning human), a film by this name had Shahu Modak in a memorable role as a Havildaar.

Anant Marathe lived a contented life. Having worked in films from the age of 8 took its toll on him and he passed away in 2002.(Thanks to http://www.writewrong.wordpress.com, muVyz, HFGK, and my notes).

With this duet song singer Shalini makes her Debut on the Blog.


Song-Bachpan tu mera daaman chhod zaraa (Rang Mahal)(1948) Singers- Shalini, Anant Marathe, Lyricist- Shiv Kumar, MD- K.Datta and V.A.Balsara

Lyrics

Bachpan tu mera aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
jaa
le ja apne khel khilaune jaa aa aa aa
Bachpan tu mera aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa

chanka ki kanghi se
ab main uljhe baal sanwaaroongi ee
aasmaan se tod ke taare
aasmaan se tod ke taare
maang mein apni daaroongi ee
maang mein apni daaroongi
kheloongi
koi kheloongi
kheloongi koi khel niraala sa aa aa aa
jaa
le ja apne khel khilaune
jaa aa aa aa
Bachpan tu mera aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa

bijli si chanchalta lekar
nainon mein bhar loongi main
phoolon se muskaan chheen kar honthon mein bhar loongi main
le loongi koyal se ae
le loongi koyal se
madhur gala aa aa aa
jaa
le ja apne khel khilaune
jaa aa aa
Bachpan tu mera aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa

phoolon ke ras ke laalach mein
main bhanwra ban jaaooonga
koyal ki sunkar madhur kook main
vasant ban aaunga

main phool ban
tu bhanwra ban kar aa aa aa
khelenge
koi khel niraala saa aa
jaa
le ja apne khel khilaune
jaa aa aa
Bachpan tu mera aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa
daaman chhod zaraaa aa aa aa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4778 Post No. : 16530

We are in the midst of Saawan, the 5th month of the Hindu calendar. Besides, being a holy month for Hindus, it is also a month for romanticism. After experiencing the scorching summer for a couple of months, rains bring a great relief to the people. By the time, the month of saawan starts, the rains have already transformed not only the dry agricultural fields into green but also the surroundings areas. Also, in the saawan month, the intensity of the rains gets reduced allowing the inter-play of showers and soft sunrays. All these changes in the climate make the atmosphere congenial for romanticism. Longing, rejoicing and separation become the part of the romantic month of saawan for those in love. Poets, writers and artists have been inspired by the romaticism of saawan in their works.

In ‘Meghdoot’, written by Kalidas about 1600 years ago, there is no direct reference to ‘saawan’ in the poems. But the reference to the clouds gives an indication of the rainy season when the exiled Yaksha on a mountain sees a cloud perched on the peak. He requests the cloud to deliver his message to his beloved in the Himalayan city of Alaka. Probably, this was the inspiration for some ‘saawan’ songs in Hindi films, the popular one being saawan ke baadalon unse ye jaa kaho from ‘Rattan’ (1944).

In the 14th century, Amir Khusrau wrote a ‘saawan’ poem, ‘amma mere baba ko bhejo ri ke saawan aaya’. The poem was written in a form of the conversation between the mother and her newly married daughter staying in her sasural (in-law’s place). The full song is as under:

amma mere baba ko bhejo ri ke saawan ayaa
beti tera baba to boodha ri ke saawan ayaa

amma mere bhai ko bhejo ri ke saawan ayaa
beti tera bhai to baala ri ke saawan ayaa

amma mere mamu ko bhejo ri ke saawan ayaa
beti tera mamu to baanka ri ke saawan ayaa

Probably, Amir Khusrau wrote this piognant poem in the background of a convention among the some of the Hindu families that the newly married daughters stay with their parents during the month of saawan, among other reasons, to celebrate the festivals like Naag Panchami, Teej, Raksha Bandhan, Shri Krishna Janmashtmi etc. for the first time after the marriage. In olden days, it was either father, brother or the maternal uncle who would bring the newly married girl to her parent’s house. Khusrau’s poem is the reflection of a newly married girl who is longing to visit her parent’s house in the month of saawan but unable to visit as her father is too old and her brother is too young to undertake the journey to fetch her.

As against this, for the girl whose marriage has been fixed, the month of saawan is the longing for her fiancé. There is an eagerness to meet him. The mood of joie de vivre is well expressed in Shailendra’s lyrics in aaye re din saawan ke in the film ‘Gaban’ (1966).

The rejoicing mood in Meerabai’s bhajan, barse boondiyaan saawan ki which Lata Mangeshkar sang, became very popular though it was a non-film song. I will not be surprised if other poets of Bhakti movements at that period also wrote on the month of saawan.

In the Urdu drama, ‘Inder Sabha’ (1850s) which was written in verses by Amanat Lucknawi, there is a ghazal praying for the early arrival of ‘saawan’. He had used the metaphor of saawan in various romantic instances, like the swirling of beloved’s ‘zulfen’ and ‘dupatta’ to that of the clouds of saawan. A somewhat similar metaphor was used by Raja Mehdi Ali Khan in the mukhda of the song, zulfon ki ghata lekar saawan ki pari aayi in ‘Reshmi Roomaal’ (1961).

This was an unique ghazal in the sense that it had two matla (the first she’r) and had used ‘radif ‘(repeat words) – ‘saawan ki’ in all the 11 she’rs of the ghazal. One can say that it was a ‘saawan dominated’ ghazal. The first two she’rs of the ghazal are as under:

dil ko marghoob hai thandi hawa jo saawan ki
maangta hoon main sada haq se duwa saawan ki

yaad aata hai wo sabza wo ghata saawan ki
shaql dikhlaaye kahin jald khuda saawan ki

And lastly, Amanat Lacknawi writes:

ae ‘Amanat’ yah nikaali hai zameen tu ne nayi
pahle thhi kiski ghazal tere siwa saawan ki

Not all the poets used in their poems, the context of ‘saawan’ in the conventional sense of romance, separation and rejoice. Neeraj used the month of saawan in one of his ghazals to depict the ironies of life. He said:

ab ke saawan mein ye sharaarat mere saath huyi
mera ghar chhod kar kul shahar mein barsaat huyi
zindagi bhar to huyi guftugoo ghairon se magar
aaj tak hamse na hamaari mulaakaat huyi

Hindi film music has also been influenced by ‘saawan’ songs since the sound films appeared in 1931. Unfortunately, in the initial period of sound films, the songs were rarely released on gramophone records. Due to non-availability of the films’s print, most of songs from the films of early 1930s have been lost. The earliest ‘saawan’ song’ from the Hindi films for which I could get the mukhda of the song is from ‘Maharani’ (1934) in which the song ‘saawan ghan barse chaatak kyun tarse’ was listed. However, the song is not available. As far as I know, the earliest ‘saawan’ song from Hindi films that is available for listening (also for watching) is naahin aaye ghanshyam from the film ‘Devdas’ (1935). There has been a steady flow of ‘saawan’ songs in Hindi films since the inception of sound films.

Some of the ‘saawan’ songs in Hindi films which are of my liking (not an exhaustive list) are as under:

saawan aaye na aaye – Sadhana (1939)

saawan ke nazaare hain – Khazaanchi (1941)

kayi din se saawan barasta hai rimjhim rimjhim – Samaaj (1954)

thandi thandi saawan ki phuhaar – Jagate Raho (1956)

do boonden saawan ki – Phir Subah Hogi (1958)

garjat barsat saawan aayo re – Barsaat Ki Raat (1960)

deewaana huwa baadal saawan ki ghata chhaayi – Kashmir Ki Kali (1964)

saawan ke din aaye sajanwa aan milo – Bhumika (1977)

saawan ki aayi bahaar re – Junoon (1978)

lagi aaj saawan ki phir wo jhadi hai – Chaandni (1989)

Notwithstanding my above list, if someone was to ask me to instantly give one example of ‘saawan’ song from the Hindi films, the first song that will invariabnly come to my mind is rimjhim gire saawan sulag sulag jaaye man from ‘Manzil’ (1979) The reason is that I had watched the film and the song was picturised on Amitabh Bachchan and Maushumi Chatterjee in the midst of real rains. This song gives a real feel of the atmosphere of the month of saawan.

Our Blog has covered as many as 99 ‘saawan’ songs. The count could be more as tagging of few ‘saawan’ songs may have been missed. I am presenting today, a lovely ‘saawan’ song, ‘barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa saawan ka aaya mahina’ from the film ‘Papeeha Re’ (1948). HFGK is silent on the singers of the song. However, I am fairly sure that the two voices sound like that of Munawwar Sultana and Zeenat Begum.

From the lyrics of the song, it appears that Zeenat Begam is singing for an actress doing a male character in this song sequence.

Audio Clip:

Song-Barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa saawan ka aaya maheena (Papeeha Re)(1948) Singers-Munawwar Sultana, Zeenat Begam, Lyrics-Mulkraj Bhakri, MD-Dhaniram
Both

Lyrics

barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa
saawan ka aaya maheena

o na jaa pardes
o na jaa pardes
na jaa
na jaa haan
mera mushqil tum bin jeena
saawan ka aaya maheena

tum to chale pardesiya
yahaan laagega kaise jiya
o piya
kaahe ka jadoo kiya
jo thhaa jaana chhod ke hamko
jo thhaa jaana chhod ke hamko..o o o
kaahe ka jaadoo kiya
o raaja
phir kaahe ka jaadoo kiya
barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa
saawan ka aaya maheena

naukri karne ko jaana zaroori
gori jaana zaroori
aayi badi majboori
dil mein tu apne aake basaa le mori
aake basaa le
phir kaahe ki doori sajaniya
phir kaahe ki doori

barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa
saawan ka aaya maheena

maar tu goli naukari ko
o raaja naukari ko
morey raaja
rah jaa tu mere paas
dekh sooratiya bhookh mitegi mori
bhookh mitegi
nainon ki jaayegi pyaas
o morey raaja
nainon ki jaayegi pyaas
barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa
saawan ka aaya maheena

na ro tu na ro
na ro tu na ro
o meri raani na ro
o meri raani
kaahe bhayi tu udaas
ab to karoonga teri main chaakri
ho teri main chaakri
tera banoonga daas
o meri raani
tera banoonga daas

barkha ki rut hai baanke balamwa
saawan ka aaya maheena


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4749 Post No. : 16484

So. Finally it is official.

We are teenagers now, the first step into the growing up years. The childhood years left behind and now the coming of age years are starting.

What started off as a ‘let’s-try-it’ hobby run with the simplest of the simple philosophical musings – “Miley Na Phool To Kaanton Se Dosti Kar Li“, has come of age today and has blossomed into a huge tree with thousands of branches spread out, with roots that are deep and strong, and are full of conviction. A tree that provides shade in terms of solace to the lovers of music, which in turn are spread out all over the globe. This is the world tree of music and songs. This is a tree that has a flavor for every palate, a tree that has fruits of everlasting tastes for the connoisseurs, a tree that conserves and perpetuates that enchanting phenomena that is the lovely Hindi Film Music – this is a tree that has many different meanings and many different treasures for the seekers of pleasure in music. There is a whole universe of music that has  settled itself around this tree. Although the desires abounded for flowers, but when none were forthcoming this direction, the protagonist settled for the proverbial thorns to start with. That humble gesture ensured that flowers of all shades and colors, and also, flower bearers of all tastes and wonders, kept on coming together one by one, till a complete orchestra of performers was formed, and the bandwagon got its name.

Thirteen years and counting. And if you talk of counting, here are some counts that will really make you happy with wonder.

Do you know that we have a visitor to this blog, every thirty seconds – the total count (and still counting) is upwards of 14.5 million visitors. Now that is a number to really wonder about.

Do you know that we have been averaging quite, quite close to one new film per day since the inception of this blog. 4749 days today and 4480 films showcased. And oh yes, that is not counting the Non-Film songs categories. Adding them categories, we shall surely be at 1+ new film or new non-film song category per day. Isn’t that a wow that makes one feel like flying.

Do you know that the average daily rate of posting is upwards of three posts per day. Try doing that seven days a week, 365 days a year, and continuously at that rate for 13 years. Try writing a letter each to three friends every day, day on day, for 13 years. My, does that no yet boggle the mind.

And that is where the superlatives start ceasing to have an impact.

13 years – 4,749 days – 16,484 posts. . .

And just ONE person.  Now isn’t that something to boggle the google. Especially when we know it is a labor of love, and that it is not an endeavor for remuneration. Ah yes, it does finally boil down to love. As does of course, everything else in this universe.

That one person, carrying the entire earth on his shoulders, like the legendary Atlas. Not pausing for even a day to rest. Of course yes, there have been rarities that we have had dot days. But in the final count, the averages will speak for themselves. No matter how many runs and how many centuries – double, triple – any other batsman has scored, the Don Bradman remains the Don Bradman when the averages are calculated.

Atul ji, over the years that we have been associated for this endeavor, we have completely used up all the possible epithets and adjectives to address our appreciation of your work. And now, we are at a loss to articulate this emotion any further. And will finally end up saying these lines that I borrow from another legend – ABBA,

So I say
Thank you for the music, the songs I’m singing
Thanks for all the joy they’re bringing
Who can live without it? I ask in all honesty
What would life be?
Without a song or a dance, what are we?
So I say thank you for the music
For giving it to me

And not just to me – to this entire world, a compilation that is sans any peers. Who would have thought it could have been possible. Your own words have been that your earliest flights of imagination brought you to a number of maybe 2,500. And that then you would rest.

Aah, but for the passion this ignited, within yourself, and within this motley crew of the musical bandwagon. The counter is ticking oh so close to 16,500 posts. And not a day’s breather seems to be in view. Mightier and stronger and higher we ride the Olympian altitudes. And the bandwagon keeps chugging along, day on day, week on week, month on. . .

I just thought of taking a look at the date of 19th July across our travels. We have had a total of 68 posts that have been celebrating this anniversary, after the intial 19th July post of 2008. Seven posts in 2009, 4 posts in 2010, 5 posts in 2011, 6 posts in 2012, 5 posts again in 2013, then on to 7 posts once again in 2014, 5 posts in 2015, and wow, a whopping 8 posts in 2016, back to 4 posts in 2017, aah – 3 posts in 2018, 4 posts in 2019, back up to 6 posts in 2020, and then today, 4 posts again to celebrate this wondrous milestone. With songs posted across the entire spectrum of decades, from 1936 all the way up to 2002, the celebrations of this anniversary have been multifarious and varied.

Ah but let me not bore you with any more statistics and analyses. And bring you to this song for the celebration today.

Geeton Ka Sansaar Yahaan Par

Took me a while to locate this wonderfully complementary theme song for this celebration. And for its rarity, it is – sorry, it was not yet available online. The film is ‘Nai Reet’ from 1948. The film itself makes a debut on our blog today.

The film has been produced under the banner of India Film Corporation, Bombay and is directed by Shubh Karan Ojha. This relatively obscure film that probably did not garner much attention and box office receipts when it was released in 1948, has the cast listed as Sulochana Chatterjee, Geeta Bali, Rajendra, Krishankant, Tiwari, Badri Prasad, Tara Bai, Leela Mishra, and Ramesh Sinha. Most names are familiar, and I am sure the full cast would be carrying more names.

The film has 8 songs in total. All the songs are written by a team of two songwriters in collaboration – Bal Krishan Gupta and Ratan Kumar Gupta. The footnote that is carried in the Geet Kosh, succinctly states that – “As per the information recieved from Lyricist Bal Krishna Gupta all songs this film were written by both Lyricists working together, i.e. `Kumar-Gupta` (Ratan `Kumar` Gupta + Bal Krishna `Gupta`. However the records carry the name as `Kumar Gupta`.” So by this input, we would also use the lyricist’s name as Kumar-Gupta.

The music is by SK Pal, and the singing voice is that of Meena Kapoor.

And the words – they oh so well sum up the emotions of this celebration today – that here is a universe of songs that has been put together for us.

गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
हर फूल में जादू फैला है

A world of songs is here
It is a festival celebration of smiles
Every leaf is swaying with delight
There is a joyous magic spread through every flower

मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
भर लेने को बिखरी दौलत
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
लगता बड़ा झमेला है

In haste I come here
To gather this treasure spread about
I try to garner it all in my arms
And the mind is in a dilemma
What all shall I take
And what all shall I leave

एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
सुन्दर सुन्दर प्यारा प्यारा
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
कली सा खिल खिल खेला है

What a joyful garden this world is
So beautiful and lovely
The whole world is a sweet melody
And my mind is untamed in passion
Blossoming like new buds playing

Yes, all these emotions run through the mind when I look at this incredible and phenomenal treasure of enchanting melodies – this world of songs, here, with us.

A grand celebration for this inception day milestone.

A wonderful musical greetings to all readers and all members of the musical bandwagon.

And a bagful of wishes and blessings, that this tree may only proliferate further, day by passing day.

And that this journey may never cease.

तमन्ना है ये साथ चलते रहें हम ना बीते कभी ये सफर. . .

Song – Geeton Ka Sansaar Yahaan Par  (Nai Reet) (1948) Singer – Meena Kapoor, Lyrics – Kumar-Gupta, MD – SK Pal

Lyrics

geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
patti patti jhoom rahi
jhoom rahi
patti patti jhoom rahi
jhoom rahi
har phool mein
har phool mein jaadu phaila hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai

main bhi apni jholi laai
main bhi apni jholi laai
bhar lene ko bikhri daulat
main bhi daudi daudi aayi
kya chhodoon kya chun loon is mein
kya chhodoon kya chun loon is mein
lagta bada jhamela hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai

ek anokha baag hai duniya
ek anokha baag hai duniya
sundar sundar pyaara pyaara
maano meetha raag hai duniya
maano meetha raag hai duniya
paagal mann mera masti mein
paagal mann mera masti mein
kali sa khil khil khela hai
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai
geeton ka sansaar yahaan par
muskaanon ka mela hai
mela hai
mela hai

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
झूम रही
पत्ती पत्ती झूम रही
हर फूल में
हर फूल में जादू फैला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है

मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
मैं भी अपनी झोली लाई
भर लेने को बिखरी दौलत
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
मैं भी दौड़ी दौड़ी आई
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
क्या छोड़ूँ क्या चुन लूँ इस में
लगता बड़ा झमेला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है

एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
एक अनोखा बाग है दुनिया
सुन्दर सुन्दर प्यारा प्यारा
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
मानो मीठा राग है दुनिया
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
पागल मन मेरा मस्ती में
कली का खिल खिल खेला है
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है
गीतों का संसार यहाँ पर
मुसकानों का मेला है
मेला है
मेला है


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4743 Post No. : 16470

Playback singing was introduced for the first time in Hindi films for a song in New Talkies’ ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’ (1935) under the music direction of R C Boral. The song main khush hona chaahoon was sung by Parul Ghosh, Suprobha Sarkar, Harimati and K C Dey. In Bombay film industry, playback singing was introduced for the song ‘jeewan hai ek kahaani’ in Sagar Movietone’s ‘Mahageet’ (1937) which was sung by Anil Biswas under his own music direction. Unfortunately, gramophone record for this song was not issued.

There is a general impression that playback singing was introduced with a view to making trained singers sing for actors who can not sing. But the original intention of introducing the playback singing was mainly to segregate the functions of composing songs from the shooting of the song to afford flexibilities in picturisation of the song sequences. Hence, in the initial stages of playback singing – say during 1935-40 – it was mainly actors who would first record the songs in their own voices which would be lip sync on them on the screen. For examples, actor-singers like K L Saigal and Kanan Devi in Kolkata, Surendra and Khurshid Bano in Mumbai used to first record the song in their voices to be playback during the songs’ shooting.

It was some time towards the end of 1930s and the beginning of 1940s, that professional and trained singers started lending their voices to be lip synced by actors who were not good singers. A beginning was made by actor-singers like Rajkumari Dubey and Amirbai Karnataki who either gave up acting or reduced their acting commitments to concentrate mainly on playback singing. Around the same period, radio singers like G M Durrani, Shamshad Begum, Zohrabai Ambalewaali and radio singers/musicians like Khan Mastana, S D Batish and Rafique Ghaznavi also started lending their voices to actors.

Soon film producers realised that the gramophone records of songs rendered by trained and professional singers sold out like hot cake swhich was an additional source of revenue for them. The stock of the handful of playback singers of that time went skyhigh when the songs of films like ‘Khazaanchi’ (1941), ‘Khandaan’ (1942), ‘Kismet’ (1943), ‘Rattan’ (1944) became very popular with the masses. The film industry felt the need to search for trained singers who could be used as playback singers. The easiest way of searching for prospective playback singers for films at that time was to consider singers whose voices ere heard on All India Radio.

In the last couple of months, I have been going through past issues of fortnightly bulletins that are available on line, namely ‘The Indian Listener’ of the All India Radio (AIR) from 1936 to 1950. Daily programmes of the various stations of AIR are listed in it . Browsing of the pages of the Bulletin has revealed that most of the popular playback singers of Hindi cinema of the 1940s had their origins as radio singers on AIR. Take AIR, Lahore, for example. Shamshad Begum started singing on AIR Lahore in 1937, followed by Noor Jehan in 1939, Zeenat Begum, Naseem Akhtar and Naseem Begum in 1940, Surinder Kaur, Mohammed Rafi, Dilshad Begum, Munawwar Sultana, Iqbal Begum in 1943 etc.

Zohrabai Ambalewali and Shamshad Begum had shifted their base from Lahore to Mumbai in the late 1930s and early 1940s, respectively while Zeenat Begum shifted to Mumbai in 1944. All these three playback singers gave some tough competition to Mumbai-based Rajkumari Dubey and Amirbai Karnataki. There were many other radio singers attached to AIR Lahore, like Munawwar Sultana, Dilshad Begum, Naseem Akhtar, Naseem Begum, Iqbal Begum, Rashida Begum, Bahar Begum, Mohammed Rafi etc. Most of them made their debuts as playback singers around middle of 1940s. There were also the radio singers from AIR, Delhi, Mumbai, Lucknow and Kolkata etc. Some of them became playback singers too. For example, Zohrabai Ambalewali, G M Durrani, Khan Mastana, Geeta Roy, Mohantara Talpade, Sitara Kanpuri, Utpala Sen, Kalyani Das and many more,

I am very fond of the voices of playback singers Dilshad Begum, Munawwar Sultana and Nazira Begum. Unfortunately, their playback singing careers did not take off despite having very good voices for the singing of film songs. The total numbers of identified songs rendered by them since their debut totaled 27, 30 and 6 respectively. What could be reasons that they did not succeed in their playback singing career?

Neither of the three seem to have pursued the playback singing career seriously. They confined their playback singing career mostly to films produced at Lahore or with Lahore-based music directors like Pandit Amarnath, G A Chishti, Lachhiram Tomar and lesser-known music directors like Inayat Hussain, K S Sagar and Master Mohan. Probably, they did not wish to travel out of Lahore for song recordings say, in Mumbai. Most of the films for which they sang were not from the top banners. To add to their woes, due to partition, some of the films produced during 1946-47 were either remained unreleased or had released after inordinate delays.

The Blog has so far covered the melodious voices of Lahore’s lesser-known playback singers, Munawwar Sultana (11), Dilshad Begum (12) and Nazira Begum (1). I am presenting today, a melodious song from the film ‘Chupke Chupke’ (1948) sung by one of the lesser known playback singers from Lahore. The song is a ghazal, ‘apne dil mein pyaar ki duniya basa kar loot gaye’ which is set to music by S D Batish. There were two lyricists – Tufail Hoshiyarpuri and Wakar Pandey. But individual distributions of the songs among the lyricists are not available.

It is learnt that the label of 78 RPM gramophone record of the song does not mentione the name of the singer. Some on-line websites have mentioned the name of the singer as Iqbal Bano. I have some doubt about Iqbal Bano being the singer of the song on two counts. First, the singing voice in the song under discussion does not sound to match with that of Iqbal Bano. Second, Iqbal Bano was born sometime in 1935. At the time of the recording of the song which could be as early as 1946 (I suspect the film was the victim of partition and its released got delayed to 1948), Iqbal Bano’s age was around 12 years. I wrote to Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji, an expert in identifying the singers of Hindi film songs especially of 1930s and 1940s. He replied that Jayraman of RMIM Group has identified the singer of the song as Nazira Begum and he agrees with him. So, for the time being, Nazira Begum has been accredited as the playback singer of the song under discussion.

This song proves that Nazira Begum had a very melodious voice. She has rendered the indentified songs in only 4 films, out of which three films remained unreleased – ‘Rustam Aur Sohrab (1940s), ‘Pardesi Baalam’ (1940s) and ‘Basant Panchami’ (1940s).

Audio Clip:

Song-Apne dil mein pyaar ki duniya basa kar lut gaye (Chupke Chupke)(1948) Singer-Nazeera Begam, MD-S D Batish

Lyrics

apne dil mein pyaar ki
duniya basa kar lut gaye
gair nikle hum jinhen
apna bana kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

zindagi ki har khushi
karwat badal kar rah gayi
zindagi ki har khushi
karwat badal kar rah gayi
ek wafa na aashna hai se
dil laga kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

kya khabar
iss mohabbat ki haqeeqat hai fareb
kya khabar
iss mohabbat ki haqeeqat hai fareb
pyaar ne dhokha diya
dhokhe mein aa kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

shaakh thak wo jal gayi
kisi ka apna aashiyaan
shaakh thak wo jal gayi
kisi ka apna aashiyaan
apne dil ki aag se
dil ko jala kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki

kya kare….n
jaa kar kisi se
badnaseebi ka gila aa aa aaa
is dil-e-betaab ki
is dil-e-betaab ki
baaton mein aa kar lut gaye
apne dil mein pyaar ki


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4703 Post No. : 16407

“Ghar Ki Izzat”(1948) was produced and directed by Ram Daryani for Murli Movietone Bombay. The movie had Mumtaz Shanti, Dilip Kumar, Manorama, Jeevan, Dixit, Suleman, Gulab, Gope etc in it. The movie had 12 songs in it. Eight songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the ninth song from “Ghar Ki Izzat”(1948) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Shamshad Begam. I C Kapur is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pt Govindram.

The song is picturised on Mumtaz Shanti. Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.


Song-Dar dar ki thokaren hain (Ghar Ki Izzat)(1948) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-I C Kapur, MD-Pt Govindram

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
phootaa naseeb lekar
jaanaa mujhe kahaan hai ae
phootaa naseeb lekar
jaanaa mujhe kahaan hai ae ae
dar dar ki thokrein hain

bhatkaa huaa hai raahee
hain paaon dagmagaatey ae ae
bhatkaa huaa hai raahee
hain paaon dagmagaatey ae ae
manzil kaa kya thhikaanaa aan aa
rastaa hai na nishaan hai ae ae
manzil kaa kya thhikaanaa aan aa aa
rastaa hai na nishaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman mera jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokrein hain

shikwaa kisi se kyaa ho
jab apne huye paraaye
shikwaa kisi se kyaa ho o
jab apne huye ae paraaye aey
na zindagi hai saathi
naa maut meharbaan hai
na zindagi hai saathi ee
na maut meharbaan hai ae
dar dar ki thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki thokarein hain


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4701 Post No. : 16403

‘Chanda Ki Chandni’ (1948) was directed by Dwarka Khosla for IA Patel Productions, Bombay. It was a social movie. It had Rehana, Jairaj, Veera, Bilimoria, Shanta, Neelkanth Tiwari, Moni Chatterjee, Pandey, Keshri, Ameer Banu and others.

This movie has nine songs penned by DN Madhok and music was composed by Gyan Dutt. So far, the following five songs from this movie  have been posted on the blog.

Sr.No. Song Title Posted on
01 Chanda ki chaandni hai mauj hai bahaar hai 07.02.2014
02 Ulfat ke dard ka kabhi mazaa lo 11.03.2014
03 Ham ko bhoolaa diya to kya 16.03.2016
04 Jab teri yaad aati hai dil mera bhar bhar aaye 18.10.2017
05 O jaadugar kaahe tihaar gali aaye 16.07.2020

Today we are presenting sixth song from the above movie which is sung by Geeta Roy (later Geeta Dutt) and music is composed by Gyan Dutt. Lyrics are by DN Madhok as mentioned above.

I came across this song long back when I had shared one song each sung by Sulochana Kadam and Geeta Dutt. The today’s song was noted then but it had remained unposted so far.

Let us now enjoy today’s song …

Song – Jab Kaali Kaali Raatein Hongi (Chanda Ki Chaandni) (1948) Singer – Geeta Roy, Lyrics – DN Madhok, MD – Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab aam ki daali dolegi
aur door koyaliya bolegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab tum hum ko yaad karoge
jab tum hum ko yaad karoge
bhoole se ek aah bharoge
bhoole se ek aah bharoge
jab jhilmil jhilmil taare honge
jab jhilmil jhilmil taare honge
chanda se shokh ishaare honge
chanda se shokh ishaare honge
jab dhak se chhati dhadkegi
aur aankh hamaari phadkegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————

जब काली काली रातें होंगी
जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब आम की डाली डोलेगी
और दूर कोयलिया बोलेगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब तुम हम को याद करोगे
जब तुम हम को याद करोगे
भूले से इक आह भरोगे
भूले से इक आह भरोगे
जब झिलमिल झिलमिल तारे होंगे
जब झिलमिल झिलमिल तारे होंगे
चंदा से शोख इशारे होंगे
चंदा से शोख इशारे होंगे
जब धक से छाती धड़केगी
और आँख तुम्हारी फड़केगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

 


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4676 Post No. : 16352 Movie Count :

4440

Today’s song is from the film Taqdeer wale-aka- Lucky Friends – 1948. It was a Stunt film, a ‘C’ grade film made by Rajan pictures. The director was S H Tharani and music was composed by Shyam Babu Pathak and Ram Prasad Sharma. The cast of the film was Neelam, Rajan, Habib, Chandrika, Shanta Desai, Fazlu, Putli, Mannan and Maqbool – all typically stunt film regulars !

The 8 songs of this film were written by Indiwar and Muzaffar. Out of these 8 songs, 3 songs were originally recorded for an unreleased film-Parda aka Laparwah, for which Shyam Babu was the MD. Now these 3 songs were included in this film. Today’s song is also one of these “imported” songs from the film Parda. However, the singer’s name for any song is not known.

This is the problem with such small time ‘C’ grade films. Hardly any information is available about them, unless they are made by some prestigious banners like Wadia Movietone. In those times, stunt films were the best possible item to invest money and get sureshot profits. This was because there was a captive audience for stunt films, who were very loyal. Such films also were exhibited in dilapidated, old time theatres in some corner of the town.

According to Master Bhagwan, he used to make a stunt film for 50 to 75 thousand rupees in the 40’s decade. In the early times, i.e. the 30’s decade, a film was made in 15 to 30 thousand rupees. Of course in those days, living was much cheaper and the value of Rupee was also high. The same 30000 rupees would be equivalent to 6+ Lakhs today at current inflation rates, as per Mr. Google ji. Imagine even in 1963, a state Govt. Clerk’s starting salary was Basic 80 + DA 30 = 110 rupees total. Today a clerk starts at Rs. 33000, but he has the same difficulty in living a life as his counterpart had in 1963 – thanks to inflation !

Director S H Tharani had 5 films to his name as a Director- Stage Girl-47, Black Market-47, Taqdeerwale-48, Achhaji-50 and Azmaish-52. In 1954, I found one H S Tharani (his son ?) who had directed only the film Fujiyama-54.

Out of the cast, I found an interview of the heroine actress Neelam, which gives some information about her.

” Neelam, whose real name is Leticia Ferns, is a devout Roman Catholic and, to her, religion is the sheet-anchor which has given her strength and confidence to face many difficulties during her struggle for success. Dusky, limpid-eyed Neelam is the only film star of Bombay whose earliest ambition was to become a nun!

Born in Mangalore, Neelam was brought to Bombay when only one year old, and was educated at the Gloria High School where she did her matric. Right from her school days, Neelam was a serious and thoughtful girl and never indulged in fancy dreams of becoming a film star. She was happiest when attending her religion classes and she thought she would like to dedicate her life to the service of God. Her grandmother, however, wouldn’t hear of it. She did not want her pretty, talented grandchild to submit herself to the strict, austere life of a nun and promptly vetoed the idea.

There upon Neelam, who loves children and likes nothing better than to be with a roomful of kids, took up a position as a teacher in St. Teresa’s School. A year later, however, she found a better job with the Telephone Company, and quit teaching. It was here that Neelam, like a few of other filmland colleagues, made contacts which completely changed the placid routine of her everyday life.

She met several film personalities while working with the Telephone Company: Meena Shorey, Mumtaz Shanti, Sheila (who used to appear in Sohrab Modi’s films). Husn banoo and her mother, Sharifa. At the time, Neelam was always dressed in a frock, or a skirt, and blouse, but every one noticed her fresh, youthful looks, her trim figure and her charm and vivacity.

One day, Director S.M. Yusuf spotted her and insisted that she play the lead in “Chini Jadugar,” a “semi-stunt” picture. At first, Neelam was bewildered by the offer. She had never dreamt of a film career and when the chance to gain fame and make big money was thrust upon her, she didn’t know how to deal with it. She knew that her family would never approve of her taking up this “most dubious” of professions.

But a pretty, young girl cannot always resist a glamorous and luxurious life and the opportunity to be seen and admired by thousands of people. Neelam decided to take the plunge, come what may. She had accumulated a lot of leave at the office and, taking advantage of it, she started to work in “Chini Jadugar” without telling her family anything about it.

Neelam completed her role in the picture and then quietly went back to the routine of everyday life. Then the secret was out. A photograph of hers appeared in “The Times of India” and there was commotion in the Ferns family.

By this time, Neelam had finally decided she wanted to remain in films and when her people raised objections she said that she would utilize part of the money she earned to maintain an orphanage. In the selection of her screen name she was guided by her friend, Meena, who had played the title role in a file called Neelam (1945).

After her role in “Chini Jadugar”-47, she worked in Wali’s “Padmini”-48, Taqdeerwalw-48, and was later asked to dance in Nargis Art Concerns’ “Romeo and Juliet.” But although she did not work in this picture she formed a fruitful association. She met Nargis and her mother, the late Jaddanbai. The latter took a tremendous liking to Neelam and groomed her with loving care. Sadly, Neelam says, “I miss her love and kindness. She was like a mother to me. I can say that I ‘woke up’ in her lap, because it was with her help that I saw life and learnt how to face it.”

For four years, Neelam spent most of her time with Jaddanbai who helped her find roles in “Anjuman,”-48, “Darogaji,”-049, “Pyar ki Baatien” -51, Bewafaa-52, Chori chori-55,and Bewaqoof-60. She worked in about 20 films or so.

True to her promise to her family, Neelam spent most of her money in looking after children whom she took from destitute mothers. Her innate love of children made this task a pleasant one for her. Neelam adopts children of all communities and personally attends to their education and general upbringing. At one time, when she could afford it, she adopted nine children, eight girls and one boy, and looked after them until they grew up and were able to look after themselves or were helped to pursue higher education.

As each lot of children passed on from her home, Neelam, even with her slender resources, continued to take in more each time. At present she has five children under her care. She and her brood of happy kids kneel down to pray every night, a practice which Neelam never misses.

Yet, the religious streak in her does not prevent Neelam from enjoying life to the hilt as most girls of her age do. She enjoys going to, and giving, parties and loves ballroom dancing. Her main recreation is reading – “novels, mostly” – and her favorite sport is swimming. Like most members of her sex, she loves to “just sit around and gossip,” although she likes people too much to be malicious about them.

Apart from looking after her own home, and her five little ones, she still takes the responsibility of supporting part of her family – a duty which she feels she owes to them. Her film career has not been a grand success in terms of fame and wealth, but this has not impaired her gay and carefree outlook on life.”
( Courtesy Cineplot: This interview was conducted in October 1954, contributed by Sudarshan Talwar).

Another name from the cast is Putli….very little information is available about her too. Mothers and daughters acted as leading ladies in the same era….Miss Putli or Putlibai and Miss Gohar Mamajiwala (the term Miss was used not merely to state the marital status of the leading ladies of those days)….

Like Miss Sharifa and Husna Banu , Putli and Gohar were mother and daughter. Putli was an accomplished actress of the silent screen who entered effortlessly in the Talkies because of her extraordinary singing talents. Gohar was born in 1910 and entered the screen in 1926, whereas her mother Miss Putli too entered more or less the same time. Information about Miss Putli is very limited. However, Gohar became India’s popular iconic star and is still remembered today.

Miss Putli acted in 33 Talkie films. Her first Talkie was Ratan Manjiri-35 and her last film was Dhoke baaz-46. She sang one song each in the film Lehri Badmash-44 and Dhokebaaz-46.

The Music Director Shyam Babu Pathak was born in 1908 at Gwalior. His music tuition started when he was just 7 years old. He studied in Madhav Sangeet Vidyalaya, under Raja Bhaiya Poonchhwale, Narayan Gupte and Bhatkhande etc. He became an excellent singer and was invited by several Royal houses all over India, for singing. Even V D Paluskar had blessed him. Strangely, though a good singer, he never sang a song in any film.

While touring all over India for Music Mehfils, he learnt many folk songs and tunes. This actually prompted him to join films as a composer. His first film was Royal Commander-1938 – a B grade Costume drama film made by Vishnu Cinetone. In his first film, for just 9 songs, he used as many as 6 different singers. Minimum songs had been his specialty. This was a novelty in the 30s, when the norm was on an average of 12 to 15 songs each film.

V M Vyas of Vishnu Cinetone, was impressed with him and he gave him many films. He got Rani saheba-40, Torpedo-40, Samsheerbaz-40, Malan-42 and Ghar sansar-42. He gave good songs sung by Kalyani, Sardar Akhtar and Kajjan. In Lajwanti-42, his songs were light and comedy type. By now, he had become a confirmed Stunt/action and B/C grade composer. Pyara watan-42,Double face-46 were such films. Double face was Indivar’s first film.

Black Market-47, Namak-47, krishna Sudama-47 and Kismatwali-47 were not much help. Takdirwale-48 with Ramprasad, Imtihan-49 and Ret Mahal-49 led him to film Jeet-49 with Anil Biswas. Actually,it seems Anil Biswas took over when Pathak left the film halfway.

After Janmashtami-50 and Achha ji-50, came Preet ka geet-50.Famous poet Harikrishna Premi wrote the songs, which were sung by Mukesh, Geeta and Johra. Next film Hamari Duniya-52 had good Lata songs. Meanwhile his film Parda remained unreleased. In the last phase of his career, came Sapna-52, Vanraj-52, Bombay Central-60 and finally, film Mehbooba-65 closed his career. In all he composed 224 songs in 29 films. He even sang a song in the film Krishna Sudama-47.

So, here is a song from the film Taqdeerwale-48, which makes a Debut on the Blog. Singer’s name is not known but I liked the song. Thanks to Ajay Jain ji (US) for the song and Sadanand Kamath ji for uploading it for me.


Song – Mujhe wakt-e-Namaaz yaad jo aayee teri (Taqdeerwaale)(1948) Singer-Unknown female voice, Lyricist- Indivar, MD- Shyam Babu Pathak

Lyrics

Mujhe wakt-e-Namaaz yaad jo aayee teri
Mujhe wakt-e-Namaaz yaad jo aayee teri
khuda ko bhool ke ratt maine lagaayi teri ee
khuda ko bhool ke ratt maine lagaayi teri ee
Mujhe wakt-e-Namaz yaad jo aayee teri ee ee

misaale sirq e chashm(?) toone nikaala mujhko
misaale sirq e chashm(?) toone nikaala mujhko
meri aankhon mein phir bhi shakl samaayi teri
meri aankhon mein phir bhi shakl samaayi teri
Mujhe wakt-e-Namaz yaad jo ayee teri ee ee

deen o duniya se gaya
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
koi nayi baat nahin
khuda se bhi juda
karti hai judaayi teri ee
khuda se bhi juda
karti hai judaayi teri ee
Mujhe wakt-e-Namaaz yaad jo aayee teri ee

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
qasoor teri kashish ka hai gunaah mera nahin een
qasoor teri kashish ka hai gunaah mera nahin een
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
gar main ?? kahoon gaa aa aa
dil ki duhaayi teri ee
gar main ?? kahoon gaa aa aa
dil ki duhaayi teri ee
Mujhe wakt-e-Namaaz yaad jo aayee teri ee ee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4613 Post No. : 16246 Movie Count :

4417

Today’s song is a rare song, from an unknown film Suhagi-48. Yes, the title is Suhagi and NOT Suhag. It is rather an unusual and misleading title. There is a cluster of titles around the word Suhag. There were 4 films as Suhag and also 4 films as Suhagan. There was a film Suhag raat ke Pehle and then there were 3 films as Suhag Raat. 2 films as Suhag Sindoor. There were two films with funny titles like Suhag ka Daan and Suhag ka Balidan. And among all this cluster poor film Suhagi was hidden in a corner !

Made by Blue art pictures, the film was directed by A.Shakoor, who directed only one more film in his career- Paayal-48, also made by the same banner. Film Suhagi was produced by Ismaile Devjee and the MD was Shaukat Dehlavi.

1948 was an year in which all the industries-including film industry- were trying to come back to normalising their businesses. The new government had not yet changed any laws and rules, so there was peace on all fronts. The Black money which was being poured into making films was now used by Politicians and thus the film industry was almost back to genuine producers and filmmakers. Most of the famous studios were on the verge of ending the studio system and studio culture. Some big names like New Theatres, Prabhat, Sagar, Ranjit were now mere shadows of their earlier powerful existence.

While film makers lost an important topic of Patriotism( in a garb), they now concentrated on Indian culture, Mythology, History, Family values, Joint family importance, literacy and such development themes. This changed the face of films. However, stories based on Folk tales, Religion and Kings-Queens and evil Wazirs still continued with public patronage. Raj Kapoor emerged as a Director, Ashok Kumar became a middle aged Hero, Dilip and Dev prospered with love stories and young themes. Older Heroes, Heroines, Directors and character artistes started vanishing and a new crop of actors etc took over their mantle. Music was changing its tunes. Melody ruled over Lyrics now and Naushad, C Ramchandra, H-B, S – J, Madan Mohan and the likes of them started making names and films.

One major event that happened in 1948, was the entry of Southern producers into Hindi heartland, with a Bang, when S S Vasan brought his Magnum-Opus- ” Chandralekha”, with more than 600 prints for All Indfia release. The extraordinary success of this film paved the way of other big production houses of South, like AVM, L V Prasad etc. to push their Hindi remakes of successful Southern films into the Hindi markets all over India.

For the MD Shoukat Dehlavi of film Suhagi, it was only his second film as an MD. Do you know who this MD was ? He used 5 different names to compose music to 29 films in his career spanning from 1947 to 1965 in India. He composed 203 songs and also sang 3 songs in 3 films namely, Dildar-47, Aiye-49 and Baradari-55. His 5 names were 1. Shoukat Dehlavi, 2. Shoukat Hussain Dehlavi 3. Shoukat Ali 4. Shoukat Haidari and finally he took a permanent new name 5. NASHAAD.

I can remember only one more artiste who had 5 names in her life. She was known as Qamar Sultana, Indira, Indu, Jaijaywanti and AMEETA !

After Partition, there was a rush to migrate to Pakistan and artists continued to shift there from 47 to almost 1950. Some artistes like Noorjehan left immediately. There were few cases where some people borrowed money from friends and then left the country quietly, leaving the money lender high and dry. By about 49-50, almost everything was settled on both sides. The conditions in Lahore and Karachi had stabilised considerably for film making and lots of opportunities existed for film artistes there by mid 50s. That led to a second wave of migration to Pakistan at that time. Those who had continued in India completed their assignments here and went to Pakistan.

This type of Migration continued till almost mid 60s, when actor Kumar, MD Naashaad, producer actor Shaikh Mukhtar etc migrated to Pakistan. For the lucky ones, the talented ones and those who had preexisting ties in Pakistan sustained, prospered and were happy, but a few artistes suffered heavily. Once a popular Heroine, Meena Shorey, one of the most handsome actors of his times-Najmul Hasan and the hopeful Shaikh Mukhtar spent their last days in utter neglect, penury, disillusionment and sorrow. Actors like Noor Mohammed Charlie regretted their decision to migrate, but it was too late.
One of the later migrants was NASHAD, music director,who shifted in 1963 or so.

NASHAD was born as Shaukat Haidari,in Delhi,on 11-7-1923. He completed his schooling in Delhi, where he learnt playing the flute. He came to Bombay and worked as assistant/helper to many composers, learning to play different instruments. He even worked as assistant to Ghulam Haider and Naushad.

He was one composer who used several names to give music. His first film was Dildar in 1947. He used the name Shaukat Dehlavi for Dildar-47, Paayal-48, Suhagi-48, Dada-49, Ghazab-51 and Ram Bharose-51. He was Shaukat Hussain Dehlavi for Jeene do-48, Shaukat Ali for Toote Tarey-48 and Shaukat Haidari for Aiye-49.

He was considered a mediocre composer in India. Then one day he was called by producer Nakshab Jarchvi,who offered him a film,with a condition that he changed his name to Nashad. He accepted the offer and used the name Nashad throughout his life. After him his 15 children too used Nashad as their surname.

Nakshab Jarachavi wanted to make a film. Those days Naushad was the Top composer. Films were sold on his name. Naushad worked only for Top banners. Nakshab approached him and offered his film. Naushad scornfully said,” Hum kisi aire gaire ki film ko music nahi detey”. This infuriated Nakshab no end and he challenged Naushad that he will make another Naushad in the industry. He called the comparatively less known but talented Shaukat Haidari,changed his name to NASHAD (to resemble Naushad’s name) and gave him the film.

Nashad, on his part, tried very hard and gave the music to film Naghma. It was,though not like Nashad’s standard, but excellent songs were there and the film became a hit due to its music. Unfortunately, Nashad could not repeat his success again ever in India. As Nashad he gave music to 21 films (total 30 films),like Bara Dari, Bada Bhai, Naghma, Char chaand, Kaatil Jawab, Sabse bada Rupiah, Rooplekha, Darwaza etc

Nashad gave their first hindi movie singing breaks to Mubarak begum, Suman Kalyanpur and Sabita Banerjee.

His friend Nakshab Jarachavi had migrated to Pakistan after 1947 and was making films there. He called Nashad to Pakistan as a composer for his film Maikhana-64 (after his film Fanoos also crashed at the Box office in Pakistan). Nashad accepted his offer. Before leaving , Nashad married singer Premlata and both went to Pakistan. His first film became a major hit and Nashad was on top. He gave music to 64 films in Pakistan.

Nashad died in Lahore on 3-1-1981.

While in India, Nashad was always accused of plagiarism, to which he answered through an interview to Filmfare, dated 5th August 1955, ( Thanks to Cineplot) thus….

” Although no one says it to my face, I know that there is a section in the film industry who decry my music as “a rehash of familiar tunes.”
This amounts to a charge of plagiarism.

I have no defense, no apology, to offer, except to say that, if I am a plagiarist, I am one unconsciously.
With only seven main notes, six ragas, thirty-six raginis and seventy-two sub-raginis, every “new” musical composition is bound to sound familiar in places.
Try to hum any popular film composition of today and then cast back your mind. Make a careful search for a parallel and you will easily find one in some celebrated songs of yesterday.

I believe in popular music, music which people will like, humming and singing it in their homes—in moments of joy or sorrow. I try my-best to keep my compositions free from complicated “alaps,” “tans” and those notational cascades which the man-in-the­-street (who has no musical training) cannot easily remember and hum.

Film music, to be good and popular, must always be the result of team-work. The ego of the music-director as well as that of the lyric-writer needs to be suppressed completely, even to the extent of accepting suggestions from everyone in the unit.

In the music of one of my forthcoming films, the appeal of the songs owes much to suggestions made by the producer and mem­bers of his staff. One of the tunes owes its origin to an air I heard the office-boy humming!

The producer was no professional musician, but I discarded two of my best tunes to fit in a completely different third one based on his suggestions.
I am glad that I do not live in an ivory tower and am not deaf to the music of ordinary people, I say to myself : “If this is the kind of music they love, it is absurd to give them a high-brow composition. Both in rhythm and structure, I stick rigorously to what is popular, even at the sacrifice of my own preferences.

Such film music can be planned scientifically and with precision. My first job usually is to sit with the director and determine the musical “situations”. Once these are agreed upon, I start composing the melodies, in harmony with the “mood” of those situa­tions. Then the lyricist writes the words of the approved tune.

After the song has been recorded, our work is ended and it now depends on the director to make or mar it in his picturisa­tion of it. This, indeed, is a hurdle all film music must take.

Everyone has listened to film songs which sound good on the radio, yet have been “murdered” by poor picturisation. Every­one, too, has heard songs which on the air have sounded mediocre and of no particular merit, yet have been things of beauty in the film—thanks to clever directorial work. A really good song, given to a good director to picturise, seldom fails to go over in a big way with the public.

It is thus necessary for a music director to be careful in signing his contracts. It is important to him to make sure that the film for which he is employed to provide music will be directed by a competent man, so that not only are his songs not “murdered” in transcription to the screen but any possible shortcomings in them are glossed over by good picturisation.

Consequently I have always studied the directors of the films for which I am to provide music. One knows that one’s songs are safe with them and gain in appeal from attractive picturisation.

To these men, too, my tunes often sound “vaguely familiar”! But, then, what tune doesn’t ?
With only seven notes, six ragas, thirty-six raginis—but we’ve just gone over that! ”

Film Suhagi-48 had a starcast of Begum Para, Manorama, Sadiq Ali, Badri prashad, Jilloobai, Abu Bakar etc. The word Suhagi means ‘ Lucky ‘. However the name benefit does not seem to be got by the film, as it was not a famous or popular film.

I have no idea about the story of this film. From its ad.s in Film India, I guess the story was about a family’s bahu who is Lucky after marriage. Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari. With this song, film Suhagi-48 makes its Debut on our Blog.


Song-Aag dil mein lagaaye baithe hain (Suhagi)(1948) Singer- Raj Kumari Dubey, Lyricist- Not known, MD- Shaukat Dehalvi

Lyrics

Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain
apni duniya aa aa aa
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

haaye majbooriyaan
haaye majbooriyaan muhabbat ki
haaye majbooriyaan muhabbat ki
unko apna banaaye baithhe hain
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

toone kya kya aa aa
kya kya
toone kya kya sitam kiye hum par r
toone kya kya sitam kiye hum par r
yaad hai par bhulaaye baithhe hain
apni duniya lutaayye baithhe hain
haaye
Aag dil mein lagaye baithe hain

ashq aankhon mein hai
haaye ae
ashq aankhon mein hai
labon pe se haan
labon pe se haan
aan aan
dard dil mein dabaaye baithhe hain
dard dil mein dabaaye baithhe hain
haaye
aag dil mein lagaaye baithhe hain
aag dil mein lagaaye baithhe hain aen aen


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16600 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1280
Total Number of movies covered=4520

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