Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Public lament song’ Category


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4481 Post No. : 15992

Hello everyone,

My appearances here on the blog are becoming increasingly infrequent, not unlike the cameo visits of an MP/MLA to his constituency post-elections. 🙂

I will not get into reasons for my long absence from here – no excuses. Mea culpa.

As usual, my appearance here marks a special occasion.
This time it has to do with Sahir Ludhianvi’s death anniversary.

The legendary poet & lyricist passed away exactly 40 years ago, on the 25th of October 1980.

What can I write about Sahir that I haven’t already written here in previous posts?

Hardly anything, to be honest.

I’ve written so much about him here, on many of his birth and death anniversaries, that anything I write will be repetitive.

And yet I cannot let the occasion go by without marking it with my small contribution here. It has almost become a ritual for me now. 🙂

One thing though.

I might be a big Sahir fan, but I´m nothing compared to Avinash ji.
As usual, he contacted me a few days ago requesting me to do a post for this occasion.

And, as usual, he sent me a song with lyrics.

That was all the motivation I needed to come out of hibernation. 🙂

Prompted by the lyrics of this song, Avinash ji also shared some of this thoughts with me. Wide-ranging reflections on society, politics, media, polarization and other topics.

I must say I agree with his views – sobering thoughts for these times.

So today, perhaps the best tribute I can give Sahir is not to repeat what I’ve said so often about his poetry and lyrics, but to just reflect on where we are as a society, much as Sahir often did.

So kindly bear with me as I share a few thoughts.

You don’t have to agree with me at all – that’s perfectly fine.
We can disagree – and still be friends. 🙂

So if Sahir were around today, how would he have felt about today’s India?

Indian society, politics, media, justice system. . . everything that touches the common man’s life.

Am specifically talking about the common man, because clearly Sahir used his voice most to speak up for the aam aadmi and underprivileged against the powerful.

I’m not sure Sahir would’ve had many kind things to say.

The religious divide he warned us about, the exploitation of women he lamented, the oppression of labor class that he railed against, the caste inequality that he talked about – all of them exist, and even flourish, to this day.

At least in the early years post-independence, one can argue that India was still struggling to find its feet. It was besieged with a whole lot of baggage, including mass illiteracy and mass poverty, a colonial hangover, lack of institutions and infrastructure.

Not that any of this is an excuse to justify oppression, but India was still a baby then, and had huge challenges to deal with on multiple fronts. It had a history of feudalism that ensured a master-slave mentality between the haves and have-nots.

Today, many decades later, it’s not unfair to expect India to have matured more as a democracy. With more concern for people’s rights and freedoms, a greater regard for the dignity of every individual.

And yet how much have we really matured as a democracy?

We keep thumping our chests, claiming to be the world’s largest democracy. But what should democracy really mean?

Many think it is the right to vote.
But is that all there is to a democracy?
The right to vote?
That’s too narrow and limiting a function of a democracy.

For me, in a democracy (as opposed to a dictatorship), each person has a voice, has a right to express an opinion.

In fact, voting is one way of expressing your opinion.
But it’s just ONE way.

When farmers go on a nationwide protest to draw attention to their issues, they are also exercising their right to express themselves.

When citizens protest on the streets against what they believe to be an unfair law, they are similarly exercising their right to express themselves.

As long as the protests are peaceful, they are legitimate in a democracy.

In fact, even before independence, Gandhi ji and other leaders led peaceful protests against colonial rule. So it is nothing new in India.

Many of Sahir’s songs are actually a protest against exploitation by those in power. Imagine if he were not allowed to express his thoughts!

Do we even want such a society?

Do we want everyone to be a blind conformist, not to have independent thoughts of his own, to be fearful of expressing himself, to kowtow to those in power without a murmur?

Then we might as well just call ourselves a nation of slaves.

There’s no point in a nation being free, if its people aren’t.

A nation is nothing without its people.

And people, whether some of us like it or not, have the power to think.

And when they think, they might not exactly think in our way.

Just because we have power, it doesn’t entitle us to stifle their voice.

That goes against the very grain of a democratic mindset, in which each person has a voice.

Unless the person is inciting violence, no one has the right to shut him up.

Not even the State.

If you disagree, put forth a better argument to make your case.

Don’t use your brute power to threaten, intimidate or (in the case of the State)  arrest those you disagree with.
Just because you can.
That’s sheer abuse of power.

This has nothing to do with any particular political party. Many of them are guilty in their own ways of suppressing people’s voices.

If they get their way, what will we end up with?

A people living in fear, afraid to express an opinion that might be frowned upon by those in power.

Everyone becoming a conformist – whether by choice, or out of sheer fear.
In short, a nation of sheep.

Is that what we want?

Let’s pause, and reflect on this for a moment.

Speaking purely for myself, I like to express my views rather openly, even if they’re not exactly reflecting popular sentiment of the moment.

If I have to check myself every time, out of fear for repercussions, I’d feel extremely stifled.

As Sahir would too.

There are many more topics one can reflect on (and Avinash ji’s thoughts traversed many of them), but I’m limiting myself to just this one topic today because it sort of syncs with the song for today. Need to also leave material for future posts on Sahir, right? 🙂

Today’s song from ‘Naach Ghar’ (1959) is  Sahir’s sarcastic piece of advice to society.  “Just observe things happening, but don’t  speak up. Just let them happen. Don’t upset the apple-cart. Even call the dark of night, “day” if you need to”.

I quite like the rendition by Lata Mangeshkar.

Music is by N. Datta, for whom Sahir wrote excellent lyrics also for ‘Dhool Ka Phool’, also a 1959 film. And for ‘Dharmputra’ (1961). So theirs was quite a fruitful partnership.

In fact, I’ve already written a post for a song from Naach Ghar (1959) on the occasion of Sahir’s 500th song on this blog – “Tere Shehron Se Raja Hamen Ban Hi Bhaley

That is a straightforward lament, today’s song is a sarcastic take on society.

I like both songs a lot, but then I’m biased towards Sahir so my opinion should be taken with a truckload of salt. 🙂

So please listen to the song, and judge for yourself.

In closing, I’d like to say Sahir was one of a kind.  They don’t make his type anymore.

 

Song – Ae Dil Zubaan Na Khol (Naach Ghar) (1959) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Sahir Ludhianvi, MD – N Datta
Chorus

Lyrics

aye dil zubaan na khol sirf dekh le
kisi se kuchh na bol sirf dekh le
hmm hmm hmm hmm
aye dil zubaan na khol sirf dekh le

ye haseen jagmagaahatein ae
hmm hmm hmm
aanchalon ki sarr saraahatein en
hmm hmm hmm
ye haseen jagmagaahatein ae
hmm hmm hmm
aanchalon ki sarr saraahatein en
aanchalon ki sarr saraahatein
ye nashe mein jhoomti zameen
hmm hmm hmm
sabke paanv choomti zameen
hmm hmm hmm
ye nashe mein jhoomti zameen
hmm hmm hmm
sabke paanv choomti zameen
hmm hmm hmm
kis kadar hai gol sirf dekh le
aye dil zubaan na khol sirf dekh le

kitna sach hai kitna jhooth hai ae
kitna haq hai kitni loot hai
rakhh sabhi ki laaj kuchh na keh
kya hai ye samaaj kuchh na keh
dhol ka ye pol sirf dekh le
aye dil zubaan na khol sirf dekh le

maan le jahaan ki baat ko
hmm hmm hmm
din samajh le kaali raat ko o
hmm hmm hmm
maan le jahaan ki baat ko
hmm hmm hmm
din samajh le kaali raat ko o
hmm hmm hmm
din samajh le kaali raat ko
chalne de yoon hi ye silsilaa aa
hmm hmm hmm
ye na bol kisko kya milaa aa aa
hmm hmm hmm
chalne de yoon hi ye silsilaa aa
hmm hmm hmm
ye na bol kisko kya milaa aa
hmm hmm hmm
taraazuon ka jhol sirf dekh le
aye dil zubaan na khol sirf dekh le

————————————————————
Hindi Script Lyrics
(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————

ए दिल जुबां न खोल सिर्फ देख ले
किसी से कुछ न बोल सिर्फ देख ले
हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म
ए दिल जुबां न खोल सिर्फ देख ले

ये हसीन जगमगाहटें ए
हम्म हम्म हम्म
आँचलों की सर सराहटें एं
हम्म हम्म हम्म
ये हसीन जगमगाहटें ए
हम्म हम्म हम्म
आँचलों की सर सराहटें एं
आँचलों की सर सराहटें
ये नशे में झूमती ज़मीन
हम्म हम्म हम्म
सब के पाँव चूमती ज़मीन
हम्म हम्म हम्म
ये नशे में झूमती ज़मीन
हम्म हम्म हम्म
सब के पाँव चूमती ज़मीन
हम्म हम्म हम्म
किस कदर है गोल सिर्फ देख ले
ए दिल जुबां न खोल सिर्फ देख ले

कितना सच है कितना झूठ है
कितना हक है कितनी लूट है
रख सभी की लाज कुछ न कह
क्या है ये समाज कुछ न कह
ढोल का ये पोल सिर्फ देख ले
ए दिल जुबां न खोल सिर्फ देख ले

मान ले जहां कि बात को
हम्म हम्म हम्म
दिन समझ ले काली रात को ओ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
मान ले जहां कि बात को
हम्म हम्म हम्म
दिन समझ ले काली रात को ओ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
दिन समझ ले काली रात को
चलने दे यूँही ये सिलसिला आ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
ये न बोल किसी को क्या मिला आ आ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
चलने दे यूँही ये सिलसिला आ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
ये न बोल किसी को क्या मिला आ
हम्म हम्म हम्म
तराजुओं का झोल सिर्फ देख ले
ए दिल जुबां न खोल सिर्फ देख ले


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4460 Post No. : 15940

“Aansoo”(1953) was produced by Qamar Jalalabadi and directed by Shanti Kumar. The movie had Kamini Kaushal, Shekhar, Pran, Nawab, Amirbai Karnataki, Indu Pal, Chamanpuri, Rajkumar, Kabil Amritsari, Parvati Devi, C Nazeer, Indira Bansal, Mumtaz Mati, Suhel Chaudhary, Satyarani, Aruna Mehta, Mrs Homi Master, Ghulam Hussain, Madan Singh, Madan Mogan, Sudesh Kumar, Baby Kumkum, Baby Kavita, Baby Suman, Binu Baraar etc in it.

“Aansoo”(1953) had eight songs in it. Five songs from the movie have been covered in the blog so far.

Here is the sixth song from “Aansoo”(1953) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Shamshad Begam. Qamar Jalalabadi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Husnlal Bhagatram.

Only the audio of the song is available. The song sounds like a background song cum theme song. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Koi meri sune aurat na bane (Aansoo)(1953) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Qamar Jalalabadi, MD-Husnlal Bhagatram

Lyrics

koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re
koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re
bhaai bahan ki suno kahaani
bhaai ki kismat tez
bhaai bahan ki suno kahaani
bhaai ki kismat tez
bhaai ko dekhe hans ke dulhaniya
bahan se maange dahej
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi
haay main mar gayi
duniya ke baazar mein bikta ik naari ka pyaar re
koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re
koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re

beewi ghar mein bhakti aur sewa ki jyot jalaaye
beewi ghar mein bhakti aur sewa ki jyot jalaaye
baabu sair kare duniya ki
gairon se nain ladaaye
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi
haay main mar gayi
kabhi dil hai yahaan
kabhi dil hai wahaan
haay mardon ka jhoothha pyaar re
koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re

maa bechaari sab ke aansu apni aankh mein laaye
maa bechaari sab ke aansu apni aankh mein laaye
ye marzi aulaad ki
chaahe ya thhukraaye
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi raam
haay main mar gayi
haay main mar gayi
maati main giri hain wo kaliyaan
duniya ka hai jo singaar re
koi meri sune aurat na bane
ye to mardon ka hai sansaar re


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4192 Post No. : 15375 Movie Count :

4238

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) was produced by B R Chopra and directed by Ravi Chopra for B R Films, Bombay. This movie had Raj Babbar, Smita Patil, Nana Patekar, Om Shivpuri, Dheeraj Kumar, Shafi Inamdar, Vijay Arora, Arun Bakshi, Ashalata, Chandrashekhar, Ifthekhar, Alok Nath, Goofi Paintal, Dalip Tahil, Dinesh Thakur, Bashir Khan, Chaandni, Deepak Kaajir, Sonika Gill, Urmila Bhatt, Raksha Chauhan etc in it.

The movie was based on Hollywood blockbuster “Death Wish”(1974).

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) had seven songs in it.

Today (9 january 2019) is the 86th birth anniversary of Mahendra Kapoor (9 January 1934 – 27 September 2008). On this occasion, here is the title song of the movie. This song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor. This song plays in the background as the movie begins with credits appearing on the screen.

Hasan Kamaal is the lyricist. He won Filmfare best lyrics award for this song.

Ravi is the music director.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala (long long ago in 2012).

With this song ,”Aaj Ki aawaaz”(1984) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Aaj ki aawaaz jaag ae insaan (Aaj Ki Aawaaz)(1984) Singer-Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics-Hasan Kamaal, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Aaj ki aawaaz
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Zindagi kitni
Behifaazat hai
Kal bhi aayegaa
Kya jamaanat hai
Din pareshan hai raat hai hairaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dar ke saaye mein
Gar jawaan hongi
Ye nayee naslen kal kahan hongi
Hosh me aa ja ab to aye nadaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Kya nagar hai ye
Kaisi basti hai
Ya to mitti se jaan sasti hai
Zindagi mushkil maut hai aasaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dekh ghar aangan loot nahi jaayen
Pyaar ke rishtey chhut nahi jaayen
Kal bachane ka aaj hi kar dhyaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4176 Post No. : 15352

Mohammed Rafi : The Incomparable (II) – Song No. 14
———————————————————

Remembering Mohammed Rafi Sahab on his 95th birth anniversary :

Someone once told me that to become cynical you first had to be an idealist and it was the loss of those ideals that created the disillusionment. But than what is an idealist if not an individual with independent thinking and with the added ability to incorporate diverse ideas. And cynicism is bound to be an integral part of any ideological theory if it seeks to negate the perceived or real concepts of injustice against humanity. Critical analysis of any ideological concepts will possibly make the ideologist a cynic if the said ideology is not perfect enough or as perfect as the ideologist wanted it to be. Cynical person is often very critical of things and situations and their repercussions. While as an idealist, will find a lot to express about the idea rather than focusing on criticism of anything else. That makes cynicism the anti-thesis of idealism. On the other hand, idealism if it seeks to unilaterally implement a social order in a given society is regressive to its intellectual and overall progress as a civilization, since it seeks no introspection and encourages narrow thoughts. Whereas a cynic will look at all things surrounding it and might even be able to look beyond it.

It looks like I want to have my cake and eat it too. Isn’t it ?

Of course, in the complex scheme of nature, nothing is as simple as the above monologue. Things are almost always multi-layered and multi-hued. There is also the matter of view-points, one can put in a blob of prejudices and rigidity. But overall there is also a certain accounting for taste.

I am remembering a word of Urdu which is “zarf”. This word is almost always pre-fixed with “aa’laa” and it becomes “Aa’la Zarf”. Urdu is the language of ‘adab’ i.e. respectfulness and ‘adaab’ i.e. principles. Any student or seeker of these two qualities will end up with the ‘zarf’, which is better taste, with or without the prefix.

It can be as domestic as the idealism of my brother against the cynicism/pragmatism/practicality of my own.

And what does one call people who do not expect anything from anyone? Not loyalty, not goodness of heart, nothing. And these are often the neediest, in terms of attention and togetherness.

This was certainly Rafi sahab. This type of personalities which who have refused to claim any material benefits, were without ambitions or nor made demands on anyone. It must have been so easy to convince him that he has sung so many songs that he can approach the “Guinness book of world record” for singing highest number of songs.

The other day I saw a video on youtube, where the presenter is trying to analyse, what made Mohammed Rafi such an exceptional person. He says this about Rafi Sahab : “ Unhen pata hi nahi thha ke duniya mein sharafat ke ilaawa bhi koyi cheez hai ”. “Sharafat” is too simple a word in my understanding which just is a way of life that includes simplicity, honesty and integrity. But when I googled it, I found nobility, civility, good manners. So my own definition is more integral and personal than google’s definition. To be “Shareef” on personal level is one thing, but to believe that there is no other thing in the world apart from “Sharafat” is another thing altogether. We see quotable quote which say similar things like to think and believe the best about others also. These type of exhortations are common is all social, religious set ups across the board.

To be on that plane where you see the best in others and believe the best about others, discarding all negative notions about anything and anybody, what a blissful state that must be. Rafi Sahab had this inherent quality without trying to achieve it. Truly blessed by the Almighty. Where is the ‘Zarf” in all this ? ‘zarf’ cannot be left behind, because it is also high ideals and values. By all accounts Rafi Sahab never let go of his ‘zarf’, without ever realising those high ideals/values were chronicled widely in literature and philosophies. I hope that he was always giving thanks to the Almighty for these known and unknown blessings. It is a fact that we the ignorant humans are unable to know in what all ways the Almighty has blessed us all.

I am presenting a solo song by Rafi song from the film ‘Mera Geet’ (1946). The composer is Shankar Rao Vyas and Ramesh Gupta is the lyricist. My favourite period for Rafi Sahabs songs in actually 1950’s. It is picturised on Susheel Kumar as per the excel sheet. I am aware that huge no of Rafi songs from 50’s are yet to be posted in the blog. There are a few songs from 40’s also are available for posting. For the last few months I was trying to do the series of ‘Dheere dheere” songs and some other newer songs of post-Rafi era.

Hopefully, the new year we will see more songs by Rafi Sahab in the blog,

The audio link available is reasonably clean and clear, unlike most songs of this period.


Song-Aapas ke jhagdon ne dekho Bharat ko barbaad kiya(Mera Geet)(1946) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Ramesh Gupta, MD-Shankar Rao Vyas

Lyrics

aapas ke jhagdon ne dekho
bharat ko barbaad kiya
jinka thha mohtaaj zamaana
aaj unhen mohtaaj kiya
aapas mein ham rahen jhagadte
gairon ne aa raaj kiya
jinka thha mohtaaj zamaana
aaj unhen mohtaaj kiya

kabhi mere iss bharaat mein bhi jee
doodh ki nadiyan behti thhi
thhi doodh ki nadiyaan behti thheen
dhan dhaan ke thhe kothhaar bhare
aanand mein duniya rehti thhi
dhan dhaan ke thhe kothhaar bhare
aanand mein duniya rehti thhi
thha kuber ka bhandaar yahaan
heeron ki hoti kheti thhi
mitti ka sonaa bantaa thha
anmol yahaan ki reti thhi
mitti ka sonaa bantaa thha
anmol yahaan ki reti thhi
aaj ussi gulshan ko dekho
kusum(?) ? ? ka raaj kiya
jinka thha mohtaaj zamaana
aaj unhen mohtaaj kiya

kabhi mere gulshan ki daaliyaan
hari bhari lehraati thhin
haan hari bhari lehraati thhin
jhoom jhoom ke sundar kaliyaan
geet suhaane gaati thheen
jhoom jhoom ke sundar kaliyaan
geet suhaane gaati thheen
thhaa saraswati ka vaas yahaan
daulat insaan ki daasi thi
thhey roz naye tyohaar yahaan
har roz deewaali aati thhi
thhey roz naye tyohaar yahaan
har roz deewaali aati thhi
sur mein thhe sab saaz mere
ye kis ne besur aaj kiya
jinka thha mohtaaj zamaana
aaj unhen mohtaaj kiya

naye taraane sunte sunte
bhool gaye ham apnaa taal
gairon ke sang chalte chalte
bhool gaye ham apni chaal
aish mauj fashion mein phans kar
aaj huaa bhaarat kangaal
aaj huaa bhaarat kangaal
roti roti khade pukaaren
bhaarat maa ke laakhon laal
roti roti khade pukaaren
bhaarat maa ke laakhon laal
roti eee
roti eee
roti eeee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4129 Post No. : 15287

Today’s song is from a Musically Iconic film Bazaar-1949.

The film was made by Madhukar Pictures. It was based on a story by K.Amarnath, who also directed this film.The 16 songs of the film were written by Qamal Jalalabadi and the Music Director was Shyam Sundar- one of my favourite composers in Hindi.

1949 was the best year in the Golden Era of HFM. There were so many films offering evergreen, out of this world songs, that the audience did not know which film to see and which song to be heard. The sale of records registered a Record of Sales in 1949. 157 films were made in 1949. Barring the figure of 181 films in 1947 ( we know the reasons), 1949 produced the maximum films from 1931 to 1984 – a period of 50++ years. What’s more, almost every alternate film gave superb songs. Nearly every Music Director of Hindi films was present in 1949, with his film.

This was also a transition period, when older composers were giving way to newer ones. Additionally, the competition between Naushad and C Ramchandra for the Number One position was on its peak. Though CR is my favourite composer, during the period 47 to 49, it was all the way Naushad who was the undisputed Numero Uno as far as quality and number of hit films were concerned. Here is a chart…

composer Year Number of films Hit films
C Ramchandra 1947 8
1948 3
1949 7
Total 18 4
Naushad 1947 2
1948 3
1949 4
Total 9 8

In this period Naushad’s strike rate of Hit films was more than double, compared to C Ramchandra percentagewise.

The year 1949 had absolutely heavenly showers of Musical Films. Some of such films were Andaz, Badi Behan, Barsaat, Bazaar, Dulari, Jeet, Apna Desh, Chandni Raat, Chaar Din, Sunehre Din, Shayar, Dillagi, Ek thi ladki, Kaneez, Laadli, Lahore, Mahal, Namoona, Patanga etc etc. The year 1949 also witnessed the introduction of A and U Censor certificates, the establishment of Films Division, the start of Navketan productions of Anand brothers and few other landmarks in Hindi film industry.

The cast of bazaar -49 was Nigar Sultana, Shyam, Gope, Cuckoo, Badri prasad, Yakub etc etc. Shyam was a very handsome actor. However, just like Ashok kumar, he too was first rejected in the screen test by Bombay Talkies. In the case of Ashok kumar, this rejection was overruled by Himanshu Rai- owner of Bombay Talkies and he became a Hero immediately. In case of Shyam, he had to wait for some more time.

Sunder Shyam Chadda (20 February 1920 – 25 April 1951) was born in Sialkot, now in Pakistan on February 20, 1920. Shyam’s grand father was a village Patwari, while his father worked as a store keeper with the Indian medical Service. So the young Shyam had to keep moving with his father in different cantonment towns of Punjab. A graduate from the Punjab University Shyam had a great fascination for films right from early childhood. It was Shyam’s uncle, late Tarachand Chadha, a subedar with the British Army who convinced Shyam’s father to allow Shyam to join the film line. Shyam came to Poona and worked with Prabhat cinema and stayed in lane no-9 Prabhat road in Adhar Bungalow.
In 1941 Shyam was called for a screen test by Bombay Talkies but met with no success. Determined to work in films, he took up the job of assistant director to JK Nanda and appeared in a Punjabi picture from Lahore. Shyam’s first film was Mann ka meet-44. Saigal’s death in 1947 created a void in the film world which was soon filled up by one of the leading heroes of those times, Ashok Kumar. Shyam ruled the world of celluloid from 1948 and 1951, when he was killed in a tragic accident.

With super hits like Dillagi, Patanga, Kaneej, Samadhi, Man Ka Meet and Shabistan under his belt, Shyam had scaled dizzying heights of super stardom in his late 20s. He was a true achiever in every sense of the word.

After Dillagi, in which he stared opposite Suraiya, which was released in 1949, he shot to stardom with the popular song Tu Mera Chand Mai Teri Chandni, a rage in those days.( this song was sung by singer Shyam kumar and not by actor Shyam)

He married a Muslim, Mumtaz Qureshi (nickname “Taji”), with whom he had a daughter, Pakistani TV actress Sahira Kazmi, married to actor Rahat Kazmi, and a son named Shakir (born two months after his death), a psychiatrist based in UK. His wife migrated to Lahore, Pakistan, after his premature death in 1951, along with her elder sister, Zeb Qureshi, who was an actress in Bombay. Mumtaz later married a gentleman, Ansari after Shyam’s death.

He acted with Munawar Sulltana in many films like Kaneez and Majboor. A highly educated person, Shyam wrote an article for Blitz, a leading film magazine of those times on his favourite heroines. He was a close personal friend of Saadat Hasan Manto and was the inspiration of many of his stories. Even after partition, their bond of friendship endured.

He died after a nasty fall from horseback, at the young age of 30 when destiny snuffed the life out of this versatile actor. It was an ill-fated day when he was shooting for Filimistan’s Shabistan directed by Vibhuti Mitra at Ghodbunder road near Borivali when the reins of the horse slipped from Shyam’s hand. He was thrown off the horse and received major injuries on his head and was rushed to the Bombay Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds.

Fans from all over thronged to pay their respects to their loved hero at the Sonapur crematorium at the Bombay Kings road.

Even the BMC (Bombay Municipal Corporation) named the place where Shyam stayed in Chembur as Shyam Park. Though younger than Ashok Kumar , he played roles of the latter’s elder brother. After Ashok Kumar, Dilip Kumar, Raj Kapoor and Dev Anand , Shyam and Rehman are remembered most for their contribution to the field of Hindi cinema.

Shyam is incidentally survived by Younger brother, Harbans Chadha. Shyam was fond of his daughter Sahera but he did not live long to see his son, who was born a couple of month after his death. His son Shakir, who now lives in Pakistan with his mother Taji, who had migrated there after partition.

Filmography of Shyam’s films as a lead hero:

1948-Majboor,Shikayat,Bazaar,Chandani Raat,
1949- Char Din, Dada, Dillagi, Kaneez, Naach, Patanga, Raat Ki Rani,
1950- Choti Bhabiu, Meena Bazaar, Nirdosh, Samadhi, Sangeeta, Suraj Mukhi, Wafa , Kale Badal,
1951- Shabistan
Shyam acted in 24 films, in all.

There are many versions of how Shyam died during the shooting. However , here is the report from an eye witness, who was present there on that day and this happened before his eyes. The horse Shyam rode, was owned by him.

Jimmy Bharucha, one of the best Horse Trainers in India, had himself been trained in foreign countries. He had opened a Horse Training School in Poona. Yesteryear actor SHYAM was one of his earliest students. For all his films, Shyam used the same horse from Bharucha. Actor Shyam had died while doing a stunt for film Shabistan-51.

Whenever he talked about Shyam, Bharucha got emotional. The truth about Shyam’s death….

That fateful day, Shyam was in a very cheerful mood. He joked with other artists as usual. The film was SHABISTAN. He had to do a stunt scene on a horse. His double was kept ready. However Shyam insisted on doing that dangerous shot himself that day. The scene started and was also completed successfully. There was a round of applauding claps.

Shyam was getting down from the horse and suddenly,the horse started running. Shyam’s foot got stuck in the stirr-up and he was dragged some distance before people ran and stopped the horse. Shyam was unconscious. He was immediately taken to the hospital, but he died-with his make up and costume still on him ! ( from an article by Vasant Bhalekar in book ‘Ruperi Smaran Yatra’ by Prof. Subhash Savarkar and article ‘Anipals’ by Mala Doshi ).

Film Bazaar was released on 4-3-1949 at Excelsior Cinema in Bombay. The Film India magazine of May 1949 had published a review of this film. Once for a change, Baburao Patel had good words about a film and its music. The story of the film, as outlined in this review is this…

An impecunious poet, Parwana (Shyam), runs away from home in company with his pal Jagu (Gope) to join a theatrical company. On the way, they come across a gypsy camp and Jagu succeeds in picking up Koel (Cuckoo), a gypsy dancer, as his sweetheart. Parwana and Jagu soon cross swords with Khanna ( Yakub) of Khanna Theatres, whose main attraction is Bijli ( NIgar Sultana), a beautiful and temperamental dancer. Bijli is attracted by Parwana’s poetry and physique and we soon see Parwana, Jagu and Koel working in Khanna Theatres.
Parwana and Bijli begin to love each other and Khanna doesn’t like the look of things, being himself in love with Bijli. Things soon reach a show-down stage and Bijli walks out of Khanna Theatres arm-in-arm with Parwana and his stooges. The new team tries to start its own theatre business, but the love-stricken Khanna becomes vindictive and with his influence and money hounds them out from place to place till Parwana and Bijli are ruined and heartbroken. In a desperate attempt to save Parwana’s poetic soul, Bijli, sacrificing her love for him, compromises matters with Khanna, who helps to put Parwana on the stage once again. But, Parwana needs more than mere success to feel happy and very soon he returns heartbroken to his parental home, a sadder but wiser man.

Now Parwana dedicates himself to national service and we soon come to the climax, in which Khanna, realizing the intensity of Bijli’s love for Parwana, gracefully gives her up and all rush to a public meeting for their individual professions and confessions. Evidently, anyplace seems to be good enough for the Punjabis to vomit their love and a large crowd does not deter Bijli from vomiting her love for Parwana on a public platform. It ends well.

Film Bazaar was remade as ‘Naya Andaz-1956’ starring Kishore kumar and Meena kumari . This film also had excellent music by O P Nayyar. Interestingly, this film also was directed by same K.Amarnath only.

Film Bazaar-49 had 16 songs. 14 are already discussed here. Today’s song is the 15th song.( I am surprised how this song remained uncovered so long. May be my good luck !) . The only song now remains to be covered is ” Nazar se mil jayegi nazar”. HFGK is silent about its singer, but also has a note that this song was removed from the film. This song’s record number is also not given, leading to a guess that, may be this song, having been removed from film, was not made into a record. In that case, today’s song is the last song of this film to be covered. Worth thinking.


Song- Maang raha hai Hindustan Roti Kapda aur Makaan (Baazaar)(1949) Singer- Mohd. Rafi, Lyricist- Qamar Jalalabadi, MD- Shyamsunder
Chorus

Lyrics

watan ki raah mein jo moti lutaaye jaate hain aen
to motiyon se jawaahar banaaye jaate hain aen
tu dekh Dilli mein jaa kar samaadh Baapu ki
ke is pe phool nahin
dil chadhaaye jaate hain

maang raha hai Hindustan
Roti kapda aur makaan
Roti kapda
Roti kapda aur makaan
maang raha hai

millon mein jaao aur dekho
millon mein jaao aur dekho
kya hai Hindustan
dekh ke bangle mein raunaq
dekh ke bangle mein raunaq
mazdoor ka ghar veeraan aan
maang raha hai Hindustan
Roti kapda aur makaan
Roti kapda
Roti kapda aur makaan
maang raha hai

kheton mein jaao aur dekho
kya hai Hindustan
kheton mein jaao aur dekho
kya hai Hindustan
zameendaar ke bhare hain kothe
zameendaar ke bhare hain kothe
bhookhha mare kisaan
maang raha hai Hindustan
Roti kapda aur makaan
Roti kapda
Roti kapda aur makaan
maang raha hai

mehlon mein jaao aur dekho
mehlon mein jaao aur dekho
daawat ka saamaan
neeche raste par soya hai
neeche raste par soya hai
ik bhookha insaan aan
maang raha hai Hindustan
Roti kapda aur makaan
Roti kapda
Roti kapda aur makaan
maang raha hai

Hindustan ko aaj banaa den
aisa Hindustan
sab ko mile roti kapda
sab ko mile makaan


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day : 4116 Post No. : 15269

Here is that date again.

The 25th of October is a date that many Hindi film lovers, and lovers of shaayari, remember with some pain. For it was on the 25th of October 1980 that one of the tallest figures of the industry, and certainly of the world of poetry, bade farewell to us.

Sahir Ludhianvi.

I’m usually careful with my choice of adjectives, especially when using them in the superlative. But in the case of Sahir, I don’t have the slightest hesitation in saying “one of the tallest”. For he comfortably satisfies this criterion.

There have been more famous figures in the industry.

And there have certainly been more popular and liked figures in the industry. If anything, Sahir, with his uncompromising nature, and and ego and mood to match, wasn’t the easiest person to get along with.

And yet, when it comes to stature, that too in his particular field, Sahir was truly a giant.
Without belittling any of the others who also produced outstanding work in the form of lyrics, Sahir always seemed to be in a league of his own.

They say that an actor is not real – after all, it is his job to act. He is only putting on a show. Which is one reason Kishore Kumar preferred singing to acting. He felt a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, whereas an actor’s job is to pretend.

A lyricist goes a step further than even a singer.

While a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, he does not create it. He only renders it.

The text comes from the lyricist.

And therefore the lyricist has the best chance of putting his heart and soul into his creation. He talks to his audience through his lines. He can use his poetry as an outlet for his thoughts, his feelings, his joys and his frustrations.

And I feel no one did this better than Sahir.

With Sahir, what you saw was what you got.

Sahir was pretty much an open book in terms of his preferences, his likes and dislikes. Nothing duplicitous or fake about him. He had strong views on certain topics, and he had absolutely no qualms about expressing them.

He even got into trouble early in his life with the Government of Pakistan for this reason – and fled Lahore (and thus, Pakistan) to come to India in 1949.

Imagine if this had not happened. Imagine what might have been lost to us.

Whatever issues Indians might have with the Government of Pakistan, I thank the Pakistan Government, on behalf of all Indians, for creating an “enabling” environment for Sahir to move to India. 🙂

And Sahir never looked back.

From “thandi hawayen” (Naujawan-1951), the song that got him noticed, to “pal do pal ka saath hamaara” (The Burning Train-1980), one of the last films for which he wrote lyrics, Sahir was one of the most highly regarded lyricists of his time.

I remember saying this before. When Sahir passed away, I only knew his name as a lyricist. In those days, still a teenager, I had limited knowledge of song details. I’d know the song, and the singer. Yes, some chance I’d know the composer, but unless I’d listened carefully to the lyricist’s name while listening to it on radio, not much chance I’d know the lyricist. In those days, to be honest, I enjoyed songs without knowing whether it was a Majrooh or Sahir or Shailendra or Hasrat Jaipuri song.

With this limited knowledge, I read the obituary on Sahir in the Illustrated Weekly of India in 1980. It was a fairly long obituary, and naturally many of his songs were mentioned.

That was when it hit me.

Oh, “aage bhi jaane na tu” was Sahir’s?

And “ye raat ye chaandni phir kahaan”?

Oh, and “udey jab jab zulfen teri” also?

And “abhi na jao chhod kar”?

And “zindagi bhar nahin bhoolegi wo barsaat ki raat?”

And “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”?

Oh, and “jeevan ke safar mein raahi” also?

And “tadbeer se bigdi hui taqdeer bana le”?

There were many more – and each one was a song I knew, a classic. Yet, such was my pathetic knowledge at the time of who the lyricist was, that I never realized these were all Sahir.

At that time, if you’d asked me to mention a few Sahir songs, I’d have come up with Pyaasa and Kabhie Kabhie songs. These I always knew as Sahir songs. But I am ashamed now to think of how ignorant I otherwise was.

It was only at that moment I realized what a legend Sahir had been. And what the world had lost.

After that, I paid a lot more attention to the lyricist, while listening to songs.

And often it was Sahir.

Much later in life, I read that it was only on Sahir’s insistence that All India Radio itself started mentioning the name of the lyricist also, in its radio programmes.

It was not only the name of the lyricist, but also the lyrics themselves, that I started paying attention to.

And that is when I realized that Sahir’s lyrics were different.

They were deep, they conveyed an emotion that came from the heart – and often a strong emotion at that. They were not the “baith ja, baith gayi, khadi ho ja, khadi ho gayi” types.

If today lyrics are a very big, in fact the biggest, part of my love for a song, it is entirely due to Sahir. I listen to lyrics carefully today – no appreciation of a song is complete for me, without appreciating the lyrics.

Whether Sahir was writing romantic poetry (“abhi na jao chhod kar”) or mocking the government for its failures (“cheen-o-Arab hamaara”), whether he was lamenting the state of society (“jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain”), or trying to uplift those seemingly with no hope (“wo subah kabhi to aayegi”), whether he was exhorting the oppressed to fight for their rights (“ponchh kar ashq” , “na munh chhupa ke jiyo”), or showing a mirror to society about its treatment of women (“aurat ne janam diya mardon ko”), whether he was trying to promote communal harmony (“tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”), or talking about the futility of war (“khuda-e-bartar”), every single time Sahir’s lyrics tugged at your heart strings.

Not just because the poetry was beautiful and the lyrics powerful (which they absolutely were), but because you could feel that every word was written with heart and soul. No wonder it went straight from Sahir’s heart to our hearts.

You could feel Sahir’s anguish and despair when he says “ye duniya agar mil bhi jaaye to kya hai”. Or his cynicism when he says “aasmaan pe hai khuda aur zameen pe hum, aajkal wo is taraf dekhta hai kam”.

At the same time, you could feel the romance in the air, with “tum agar saath dene ka waada karo” and “parbaton ke pedon par”. Just listen to poetry like “thehre thehre paani mein, geet sarsaraate hain….bheege bheege jhonkon mein, khushbuon ka deraa hai”. Waah!
And “abhi na jao chhod kar”, one of my alltime favourites, and surely one of the most perfect songs ever in every respect.

Sahir’s poetry for the hurt felt by the jilted lover was no less powerful. “Jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”. Or lines like “laut rahi hain meri sadaayen, deewaaron se sar takra ke….haath pakad kar chalne waale, ho gaye rukhsat haath chhuda ke (sad version of in hawaon mein)”. And of course, “chalo ek baar phir se ajnabi ban jaayen hum dono” with lines like “wo afsaana jisey anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, usey ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

Then you have the Barsaat Ki Raat qawwalis. Roshan’s masterpiece “na to karwaan ki talaash hai” merging into “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq” is one of the greatest ever compositions in Hindi cinema, with Sahir’s contribution in lyrics being no less significant. With lines like “jo dawaa ke naam pe zeher do, us chaaraagar ki talaash hai”.

I can go on and on. Dharamputra, Taj Mahal, Aaj Aur Kal, Mujhe Jeene Do, Chitralekha, Kaajal, Waqt, Neel Kamal, Humraaz, Bahu Begum, Aadmi Aur Insaan. Each one with memorable lyrics. One of my favourites is “poochhe koi ki dard-e-wafaa kaun de gaya, raaton ko jaagne ki sazaa kaun de gaya…kehne se ho malaal, to hum kya jawaab dein….duniya kare sawaal, to hum kya jawaab dein”.

Although Sahir was less productive in the 70s, he still came up with poetry that reminded us of Sahir of yore. The 70s was a decade where poetry began steadily losing ground to more “chaalu” lyrics. Urdu also began losing ground in the process.

This was a development that Sahir could not prevent, but did leave him disillusioned. His “main pal do pal ka shaayar hoon” very correctly represents his then state of mind. He continued to write though, but mostly for the Chopra family’s films, for films like Karm, Trishul, Insaaf Ka Tarazu, Kaala Patthar and The Burning Train.

Since Sahir started as a poet, and moved into film song lyrics, the sense of poetry comes across strongly in his lyrics. Much like with Kaifi Azmi.

So much for Sahir’s poetry. No one can do justice to it in one article. I’ve barely scraped the surface.

But what really makes me put Sahir on a different pedestal altogether is not the QUALITY of his poetry, but the CONTENT of his poetry.

Clearly Sahir was a rebel, a non-conformist.

And his poetry often reflected this, since he wrote straight from the heart.

But importantly, he never shied away from expressing his views. He never tried to be politically correct. He showed society a mirror, whether society liked it or not. For example, his line “kaho ji tum kya kya khareedoge, yahaan to har cheez bikti hai” is a much underrated, but powerful, line, in my opinion.

Yes, he railed and ranted – whether it made a difference or not. “Samaj ko badal daalo” he wrote.

Today, 39 years after his death, we are still languishing with most of the ills that existed in Sahir’s time, and which he spoke against.

It is a sad commentary of our times that many of his laments feel just as relevant today as they felt then. Yes, “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko, mardon ne usey bazaar diya” and “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega, insaan ki aulad hai insaan banega” are just as relevant in 2019, as they were in 1958-59.

If Sahir were alive today, he’d probably be writing just as strongly today as he wrote then. The issues haven’t gone, sadly only Sahir has.

That’s a sobering thought.

Now, let’s move on to the song for today.

It’s from the 1969 film, Paisa Ya Pyaar.

As has now become customary :-), the lyrics for this song have been sent to me by Avinashji.

I remember seeing this film as a young boy, but I don’t remember the story now. It was a remake of a Tamil film Panama Paasama, starring Gemini Ganesan and Saroja Devi, which was a pretty big hit at the time. In fact, the name Panama Paasama, translates in Hindi to Paisa Ya Pyaar.

I remember the song “Ber lo, ber lo” was a lift from the very popular “yelantha pazham yelantha pazham” song of Panama Paasama. 🙂

But today’s song is different. It is a typical Sahir song – Insaan ne paise ke liye.

Here, Sahir’s lament is about how money destroys relationships. He talks about how people lose everything, even their own self-respect, for money. He concludes by saying that love is the biggest wealth there is.

The song is sung by Hemant Kumar, music composed by Ravi.

Please do listen.

I’d like to end by saying that Sahir was wrong in one respect.

He wrote

“kal koi mujh ko yaad kare
kyon koi mujhko yaad kare
masroof zamaana mere liye
kyon waqt apna barbaad kare”

Sahir saab, I can only say you grossly underestimated our love and respect for you.

jo aapse mila hai, wo itna hai anmol
roz sunte hain, aap hi ke hum bol
aap ko bhool jaayen, ye mumkin nahin
aap ki yaad na aaye, aisa koi din nahin

Thank you SO MUCH for what you’ve given us, Sahir saab.

And, very importantly, for just being you.

Video

Audio

Song-Insaanon ne paise ke liye aapas ka pyaar mita daala (Paisa Ya Pyaar)(1969) Singer-Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhainvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics (based on audio link) (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Hanste baste ghar phoonk diye
Dharti ko narak banaa daalaa

Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Jazbaat ke naazuk rishton ko
Mitti ke taley dafnaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Mandir Masjid aur Girjon ko
Bankon ki bhent chadhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Daulat ki hawas mein logon ne
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Chaahat izzat mehnat gairat
Sabkaa neelaam uthhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi insaan ne
Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi ee insaan ne
Kudrat ke banaayi daulat ka
Sikkon mein mol lagaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

————————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————–
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
हँसते बसते घर फूँक दिए
धरती को नरक बना डाला

मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
जज़्बात के नाज़ुक रिश्तों को
मिटटी के तले दफना डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
मंदिर मस्जिद और गिरिजों को
बैंकों की भेंट चढ़ा डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दौलत की हवस में लोगों ने
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
चाहत इज्ज़त मेहनत गैरत
सबका नीलाम उठा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी इंसान ने
प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी ई इंसान ने
कुदरत के बनायी दौलत का
सिक्कों में मोल लगा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4093 Post No. : 15237 Movie Count :

4188

Just like so many more human endeavors, wherein the concepts and philosophical models of ‘-isms’ are all so correct and convincing, and their practical implications and implementations are so faulty and distorted that the discussions about the defects and flaws, also sounds very convincing in the hindsight.

Take Communism for example. The writings of Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels and Vladimir Illych Lenin – as they write about the class struggle between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’, and lucidly present their ideas on how to address this social divide, for the betterment of humanity – are so very a convincing, palpable and substantial, that it is easy to be convinced about the failings and deficiencies of the capitalist / imperialistic model of the world order, which should be replaced everywhere with the model of Communist social order. When Marx passed away in 1883, the debate on this subject was quite vigorous both amongst the elite and the working class in the countries of Europe.

Not long thereafter, the revolution of the working class came about in 1917, in Russia, under the leadership of Lenin. A new model of state and governance, and a new social order was established. The history is replete with the narrative of violence and misery that accompanied this change, but the Communist movement had come on to stay. Over the next three decades, this model of a new social order spread to other neighboring states – towards the west of the erstwhile USSR, which formed the countries in eastern European bloc and towards the South East, i.e. China.

For all the populism and the PR that was a big budget activity in the USSR, the model did not quite stick for very long. Within our own lifetimes, we have witnessed the downfall of Communism in 1980s – the so called perestroika or restructuring of the social order and government in the USSR, now Russia. The theories of the great philosophers of the late 19th century, did not quite hold on together when implemented and the rubber met the road. Although China still holds out with their powerful Communist Party supported by their strong army, the Communistic form of social order did last, albeit just for about seven decades.

A similar pageant has played out and is playing out, in India. The ‘-ism’ that is associated with Mahatma Gandhi, that Munna Bhai so endearingly likes to call ‘Gandhi-giri’ (‘Lagey Raho Munna Bhai’, 2006), has seen its prime during the early decades of the twentieth century, and its subsequent devaluation in the closing decades of the same twentieth century. I remember – in the 1980s and 90s, around the time of his birth anniversary (2nd October) every year, one was treated to editorials and articles in newspapers, and panel discussions on Doordarshan, with titles that were variations on “The Relevance of Gandhi Today”. Even then, my mind used to react that as a society, we have apparently lost Gandhi and his ideals, if now that the intelligentsia is beginning to discuss the relevance. Just so strongly underscores the fact that the question of relevance comes to fore, when the storm of doubts and disbelief is surging strong in the society. That discussion still continues.

Where and what are the fault lines? I had read his autobiography – ‘The Story of My Experiments with Truth’ way back when I was in college. I was, and honestly I still am, deeply impressed, influenced, overwhelmed by honesty and simplicity with which he has laid bare his persona and his internal turmoils, his candid admissions of his faults, expressions of his ideals and idealistic resolutions, and the strength of character to personally follow and implement those ideals in practical life. It is a frightening tale of development of a human mind from the basic animalistic existence to literally a sainthood. It goes to establish that Gandhi was no ordinary soul, and such souls appear on this planet quite rarely. Albert Einstein has so beautifully summed it up in his tribute – “Generations to come will scarce believe that such a one as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth”

A time was, at the turn of the century, when the nation was seeking a simple philosophy in leadership. Here was a teacher, who did not just teach. In fact he refused to teach or direct others, for things that he himself had not practiced and not lived through himself. A hallmark of a true saint, whose existence within his own mind, and as seen by those around him, is starkly the same. My readings about the Tolstoy Farm that he established in South Africa in 1910, are such an impactful influence. And also a conviction that this soul is an honest and truthful spiritual leader, who will not lead his flock astray for personal or ideological gains.

For all his goodness and his saintly leadership of the people, his words and his teachings stand at crossroads today. The retinue of his followers diminishing over time, and bevy of protesters calling out their criticisms and insults – their tribe is incessantly increasing. Where is the fallacy? Is there an aberration that we see on the radar of history?

A lot has been written and continues to be written about him. But I really wonder how many of us are actually, really reading him. He has written extensively, and not just one book. His complete works including his articles and speeches, will form a complete section of a good size library. Many years ago, maybe more than three decades ago, I read the following in one of his articles printed in 1927 in the journal ‘Young India’. Countering all that I had read till then, and had been hearing about his philosophy of ahimsa (non-violence), here was a paragraph that stunned me with its clarity of thought and perfection of logic.

“My creed of non-violence is an extremely active force. It has no room for cowardice or even weakness. There is hope for a violent man to be someday non-violent, but there is none for a coward. I have therefore said more than once in these pages that if we do not know how to defend ourselves, our women and our places of worship by the force of suffering, i.e., nonviolence, we must, if we are men, be at least able to defend all these by fighting.”

All his life, he incessantly tried to differentiate for his followers, the distinction he made between non-violence and cowardice. In the same journal, in another article, even earlier in 1920, he writes,

“I do believe that, where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence…. But I believe that non-violence is infinitely superior to violence, forgiveness is more manly than punishment. Forgiveness adorns a soldier. But abstinence is forgiveness only when there is the power to punish; it is meaningless when it pretend to proceed from a helpless creature.”

At another place, his words on this same theme are

“Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence. . . I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor. . .”

Are we, in this age and these circumstances, aware of this strong advocacy of the above distinction he makes between the oh so terribly misunderstood themes of non-violence vs cowardice? And are we teaching, nay even projecting the correct understanding of all that this great soul stood for all his life?

The generation that had spent time with him, that had experienced his influence and his aura first hand, is already relegated to history. Well, almost. The survivors of that generation are very few. In another few years, maybe a decade or so, we shall not be hearing of a Gandhian anymore. For the newer crop of followers that we see, Gandhi is more of a political crutch, and face to be put on the currency notes, nothing much more than that.

Where lies the answer to the ‘WHY’ connected with this scenario? I do not know. There are many an ill of the human tendencies and human traits that we can expound to explain. But probably the answer lies deeper – deeper inside the very constitution of this existence itself. A simple axiom that makes up the destiny of everything that we can observe. Simply put – everything decays. Ensconced in these two simple words is the terrible and profound truth that applies to everything in this universe, and to the universe itself. I will posit it from two different directions that I am aware of.

One – our scriptures. It is written in our scriptures, in the sections where the creation of this universe is described, that when He created this universe, it was perfect, in every possible way that can be thought of. But this perfection lasted for just that first instant of creation. This perfect universe started to decay in the very next instant. It is stated so, in our books. And this decay encompasses everything that is material and even non-material in existence. That is the progression of the ‘yugas’ (eras) that we are so familiar with in our scheme of the universe and its passage through time. The good shall diminish and the things will always be progressively worse.

Two – from the perspective the study of the physical nature of this universe as a subject – Physics. There is a branch of this study called Thermodynamics, which deals with the energy within a system, and all aspects related to it. This branch of physics was formalized as a subject through the research work, both physical and philosophical, of scientists in the 18th and 19th centuries – names like Count Rumford, Sadi Carnot, William Thomson, Gibbs, James Maxwell etc. Based on their works, this branch now has a set of laws called the Laws of Thermodynamics, which are time tested and form the foundations of a huge segment of physical sciences. The second of these laws has a very simple, very interesting statement, and a very profound implication for the entire universe itself. The law states that –

“The total entropy of an isolated system can never decrease over time.”

The key element to understand in this statement is ‘entropy’. Simply defined, entropy is the measure of the state of disorderliness in a physical system. Going by this law, a deduction that can be inferred immediately is that in any physical system, the disorderliness will always increase with time. To put it even more simply, and bluntly, every system will always and only, decay with time. That brings us back to a concurrence with the assertions contained in our scriptures.

And so, as with everything, the social systems will also decay with time. I am sure I do not need to explain this statement further. People with awareness of history, and also, the awareness of the experiences of a lifetime, will concur.

Truth, however, remains unchanged. In all the rigmarole of the eras and human evolution, and the transitions of history that we are aware of, the only thing that remains unchanged is the Truth. In Hindi, the word is ‘सत्य’ which comes from the root ‘सत्’. If I may draw an analogous word from the English language, it would be ‘stat’ or ‘static’, which also means – un-moving, at rest, unchanging. Truth, in this creation, and as a conceptual idea, remains static unchanged, in this tumultuous ocean of creation that is eternally in a chaos of constant change and decay.

The concept of this unchanging Truth is discussed and described quite at length in our scriptures. A basic characteristic of this Truth is that not just that it is unchanging, but it is also inert and passive. It does not DO anything. It just IS.

That thread now brings us back to the Mahatma again. Here is one person who realized quite early in life, the nature of this Truth, as is evident from the title of his autobiography – ‘The Story of My Experiments with Truth’. Understanding the passive and inactive nature of Truth, he set out on a journey to experiment with it, to understand it better. That realization, and his unflinching endeavor to pursue and investigate it, is what makes him stand out as a giant amongst men. He belongs to that list of a handful people in the history of the human civilization who have raised this query within themselves, and have encountered the answer. For that, he is a Mahatma – the extraordinary soul, and a notch above the Atma – the ordinary souls, who can be counted in millions.

The song being presented today, belongs to the 1978 film ‘Nasbandi. The period of history covered in this film is that of June 1975 to January 1977, during which Emergency was proclaimed in our country. I am not going into the politics behind this episode. Enough to say that in 1977, when the elections were held, the powers that proclaimed and benefitted from this state of emergency, lost, and a new political equation was written into history of India. The film deals with the topic of forced sterilization of menfolk, one of the key ingredients of the political battle in 1977.

The film is produced by Johar Films, and is directed by IS Johar. The name is sufficient to give an idea of what kind of a comical spoof this film is. Especially when we have IS Johar and Rajendranath playing the lead roles.

Geet Kosh lists seven songs for this film, written by Indeewar, Rajendra Krishan and Hullad Muradabaadi. This particular song is written by Indeevar and the music is composed by Kalyanji Anandji. This is a background song in the film, rendered by Kishore Kumar.

The song is a regretful complaint about the state of the nation, and a supplication to the Mahatma – as to the social and political conditions prevailing. That the dream of a disciplined and amiable social edifice that the Mahatama had envisioned, was in shambles. The instances of regrets are many, and the passing years and decades, have only added to them. None of them have been is taken away.

And that brings us back to the thread of the continuous decay, everywhere.

The philosophies and the visions of great men are like beacons of light in the thick fog of chaos and uncertainty that this universe, this existence is. And that existence is steadily moving towards more chaos, more uncertainty. That is the nature of existence itself. These great men – Nanak, Buddha, Abraham, Moses Prophet Mohammed, Christ, Socrates, Gandhi, Zoroaster, Kabeer, and many more – have been the extraordinary souls that have realized the Truth of this existence. Their messages to the humankind are an effort to make more of us ordinary souls understand this path, and its goal. But this world is what it is. Despite that so many extraordinary souls have visited and tried to spread this message. Or maybe, we can say that this world is what it is today, because of these enlightened souls – it would have been even a worse present, had these men not visited this earth.

O Gandhi, the vision of society that you shared with us, lies unread in books no one reads anymore, in libraries that no one visits any more.

And thieves have stolen the ‘बकरी’ (goat) whose milk had nourished your soul.

Song – Gandhi Tere Desh Mein Ye Kaisa Atyachaar  (Nasbandi) (1978) Singers – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Kalyanji Anand ji
Chorus
Kishore Kumar + Chorus

Lyrics

janta ki awaaz hai ye
sun le o bapu gandhi
ye kaisa hahaakaar desh mein
ye kaisi aag ki aandhi

kahaan gayi wo teri ahinsa. . .
kahaan gayi wo teri ahinsa
kahaan gaya wo pyaar
gandhi tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
bapu tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
ek bharat mein ban gaye
jalianwaale baagh hazaar
gandhi tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
bapu tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar

tu ne jab awaaz lagaai..ee..ee
saara hindustan utha
saara hindustan utha
angrezon ke dil bhi dehle..ea..ea
aisa ik toofaan utha
aisa ik toofaan utha
khushi khushi tere kehne par
bharatwaasi jail gaye
seene par goli jhel gaye
apne praanon par khel gaye
apne praanon par khel gaye
naam pe tere par laakhon jawaan
duniya ke sab sukh bhool gaye
dulhan ka ghunghat bin khole hi
phaansi par jhool gaye
phaansi pe wo jhool gaye
tu swaraaj le aaya. . .
tu swaraaj le aaya
hum to phir bhi rahe lachaar
gandhi tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
bapu tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar

azaadi ki jung ladaa tha
isi liye kya hindostan
isi liye kya hindostan
arey nyaye maangne nyayaalay mein
ja na sakey koi insaan
ja na sakey koi insaan
kitne hi nirdosh yahaan
misa ke andar band huye
andhe kuen mein kitne hi
azaad samandar band huye
azaad samandar band huye
ismat loota karte hain jo
ban kar raaj ke pehredaar
apni satta rakhne ko jo
chheene janta ke adhikar
chheene janta ke adhikar
gandhi tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
bapu tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar

dekhi kahin kalam-bandi
dekhi kahin zubaan-bandi
dekhi kahin zubaan-bandi
darr ki hukumat har dil par bhi
saara hindostan bandi
saara hindostan bandi
nasbandi ke naam pe zulm huye
wo dukhion deenon par
lagta tha latka ho jaise
prajatantr sangeenon par
prajatantr sangeenon par
prajatantr sangeenon par
turkmaan wo gate aasmaan
toota jahaan zameenon par
chala diye bulldozer jab
bebas logon ke seenon par
bebas logon ke seenon par
bebas logon ke seenon par
apnon ke haathon hi..ee..ee..ee
apnon ke haathon apnon pe
goli ki bauchhaar
gandhi tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar
bapu tere desh mein
ye kaisa atyaachaar

saare desh par zulmon sitam ke
ghor andhere jab chhaaye
ghor andhere jab chhaaye
tab prakash ki kirnen le kar
jai prakash aage aaye
jai prakash aage aaye
gandhi tere naam ki
ab hogi jai jaikaar
gandhi tere name ki
ab hogi jai jaikaar
arey jo bhi hukumat zulm karegi
uski hogi haar
jo bhi hukumat zulm karegi
uski hogi haar

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

जनता की आवाज़ है ये
सुन ले ओ बापू गांधी
ये कैसा हाहाकार देश में
ये कैसी आग की आँधी
कहाँ गई वो तेरी अहिंसा॰ ॰ ॰
कहाँ गई वो तेरी अहिंसा
कहाँ गया वो प्यार
गांधी तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
बापू तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
एक भारत में बन गए
जालियाँवाले बाग हज़ार
गांधी तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
बापू तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार

तूने जब आवाज़ लगाई
सारा हिन्दोस्तान उठा
सारा हिन्दोस्तान उठा
अंग्रेजों के दिल भी दहले
ऐसा एक तूफान उठा
ऐसा एक तूफान उठा
खुशी खुशी तेरे कहने पर
भारतवासी जेल गए
सीने पे गोली झेल गए
अपने प्राणों पर खेल गए
अपने प्राणों पर खेल गए
नाम पे तेरे लाखों जवाँ
दुनिया के सब दुख भूल गए
दुल्हन का घूँघट बिन खोले ही
फांसी पर झूल गए
फांसी पे वो झूल गए
तू स्वराज ले आया॰ ॰ ॰
तू स्वराज ले आया
हम तो फिर भी रहे लाचार
गांधी तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
बापू तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार

आज़ादी की जंग लड़ा था
इसीलिए क्या हिन्दोस्तान
इसीलिए क्या हिन्दोस्तान
अरे न्याय मांगने न्यायालय में
जा ना सके कोई इंसान
जा ना सके कोई इंसान
कितने ही निर्दोष यहाँ
मीसा के अंदर बंद हुये
अंधे कूंए में कितने ही
आज़ाद समंदर बंद हुये
आज़ाद समंदर बंद हुये
इस्मत लूटा करते हैं जो
बन कर राज के पहरेदार
अपनी सत्ता रखने को जो
छीनें जनता के अधिकार
छीनें जनता के अधिकार
गांधी तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
बापू तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार

देखी कहीं कलम-बंदी
देखी कहीं ज़ुबान बंदी
देखी कहीं ज़ुबान बंदी
डर की हुकूमत हर दी पर भी
सारा हिन्दोस्तान बंदी
सारा हिन्दोस्तान बंदी
नसबंदी के नाम पे ज़ुल्म हुए
वो दुखिओं-दीनों पर
लगता था लटका हो जैसे
प्रजातंत्र संगीनों पर
प्रजातंत्र संगीनों पर
तुर्कमान वो गेट आसमान
टूटा जहां ज़मीनों पर
चला दिये बुलडोज़र जब
बेबस लोगों के सीनों पर
बेबस लोगों के सीनों पर
बेबस लोगों के सीनों पर
अपनों के हाथों ही॰॰ई॰॰ई॰॰ई
अपनों के हाथों अपनों पे
गोली की बौछार
गांधी तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार
बापू तेरे देश में
ये कैसा अत्याचार

सारे देश पे ज़ुल्म ओ सितम के
घोर अंधेरे जब छाए
घोर अंधेरे जब छाए
तब प्रकाश की किरणें ले कर
जयप्रकाश आगे आए
जयप्रकाश आगे आए
गांधी तेरे नाम की
अब होगी जय जयकार
गांधी तेरे नाम की
अब होगी जय जयकार
अरे जो भी हुकूमत ज़ुल्म करेगी
उसकी होगी हार
जो भी हुकूमत ज़ुल्म करेगी
उसकी होगी हार


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4061 Post No. : 15194 Movie Count :

4174

Today’s song is from film Abla-41.This highly obscure film was directed by actor Director R.N.Vaidya (9 silent and 16 Talkie films as a director). The film was made under the banner of Bharat Photophones Ltd. Bombay. The music was composed by one Khurshid khan. This seems to be the only film for which he composed music. All the 6 songs were written by Pt. Gyan Chandra, who wrote mainly for Wadia films and other C grade action films. The cast of film Abla-41 was Heeralal,Shyam Narayan,Dar Kashmiri, Akbar khan, Ghulam Mohd., Sunder, Raja Babu, Chandrika, Suryakumari, Dev kumari, Sheela, Guljar etc.etc.

Funny cast this ! There is a Suryakumari and a Chandrika and there is a Dev Kumari also!There is a Raja, Akbar and Ghulam also ! And there is a Sunder and Guljar also !! What a collection !! Apart from the humour, names of Surya kumari, Chandrika, Dev kumari and Shyam Narayan are names which I have heard first time.

About Dar Kashmiri.Most sites and Blogs list Dar kashmiri as another initial name for actor Jeevan. Even Surjit Singh ji, in his short articles on years from 1931 to 1947, on his site, claims that Jeevan was called Dar Kashmiri in his initial career (see article on 1934 on his site). The reality, however, is different. Dar Kashmiri was a Pseudo-name used for Om Prakash Dar- a Kashmiri actor, who was the elder brother of actor Jeevan and who came to work in Hindi films much earlier than Jeevan had.

Om Prakash Dar was born into a large family, he had 23 siblings. His grandfather was the Governor of Gilgit in Gilgit-Baltistan. He lost his father when the youngest- Jeevan- was 3 years old and his mother died at childbirth. Being the eldest,he came to Bombay in search of jobs and entered films. Instead of his original long name,he was called Dar Kashmiri.

Actually, When Jeevan came to Bombay in search of film roles, Om Prakash Dar aka Dar kashmiri, his elder brother, was already working in films. Jeevan appeared first time in Fashionable India-35. Since his name was Onkar Nath, he was billed as O.K.Dar (and not Dar kashmiri-please note).
His elder brother Dar Kashmiri worked in films like –
Noor Mahal-34, Watan parast-34, yaad rahe-40, Abla-41, Saugandh-42, Angoori-43, Naya Tarana-43, Room No.9-46, Hua savera-48, Kundan-55 and Ayodhyapati-56. and many other films. Every film, he was billed as Dar kashmiri only.
Jeevan was billed as O.K.Dar (Jeevan) from film Romantic India-36 onwards
and then on as Jeevan only-except still a few films where he was billed as O.K.Dar(Jeevan).
In film Patit pawan-1955, both brothers acted and they were individually billed as Jeewan and Dar Kashmiri. This settles their name issue decisively. Most of this information comes from Filmdom-The All India Film Directory and Who’s who in Indian Film Industry-1946.

The curse of ” Same Name Confusion” is cast on the film industry from its early era (The first heroine Zubeida – Alam Ara-31, had a same name actress later on in the 40s). The name Ghulam Mohammed was the only one in 1932, but later on two more Ghulam Mohammeds came on the scene for the same period. One of them was the well known Music Director and the third one was a small time singer in the 50s and the 60s. Initially, very little information was available on actor Ghulam Mohammed. Now,more information is available and hence his information is more uptodate- with dates of Birth and Death etc. Here is the latest note on Ghulam Mohammed-the actor…

Ghulam Mohammad was born on 19-3- 1905 in Lahore and died on March 10, 1961. He appeared in more than 500 stage dramas and was, during the WW1, in Baghdad, Iraq. He was best known as Chacha (Uncle) in film circles.

Ghulam Mohammad was a super star villain actor in the pre-partition films. He was a popular stage actor in the 1920s and appeared in movies mostly as villain actor in the 1930s/40s. His first big film was Madhuri in 1932 which was directed by R.S. Choudhary. He was in Villain’s role with actress Salochana who was a Jewish artist and the first ever super star film heroine in the sub-continent. It was one of many famous productions by the leading Bombay based film company Imperial Film Co. and Ghulam Mohammad was an automatic choice for them. He was called Prince of Imperial Film Company and he was the first ever Muslim actor to bye a luxury car in the 1930s.

Ghulam Mohammad was an all round actor and appeared as hero, villain and supporting actor in 65 movies in the 1930s-40s. In ‘Daku ki Ladki’-33 he was in the role of the Daku. With this film he became popular. By 1942,he was called by Dalsukh Pancholi,to Lahore. He did ‘Khandan’,’ Zamindar’, and Shirin Farhad’ during 1942 to 1945. Shirin Farhad was a big flop. He came back to Bombay. He did about 25 films here. Some of his films were Ek din ka Sultan,Sanyasi,Behram Khan,Humjoli, Raajputani, Chhin le Azaadi, Jugnu, Lakhon mein ek, Heer Ranjha, Pardesi Mehmaan, Vidya etc.

He played the main villain role in the first ever colored film Kissan Kanya in 1937. He was in main role with Noorjahan in Lahore based Punjabi film Chowdhary in 1941 and also in her first Hindi/Urdu film as heroine, Khandan in 1942, which was made in Lahore as well. He was also in the last big film before partition Jugnu (with Noorjahan and Dilip Kumar and Sulochana).

Around 1949,he migrated to Pakistan and did 69 films there (41 urdu and 28 Punjabi films) and finally died in poverty and anonymity.

( Adapted from http://www.pakmag and vo bhuli dastan by Subhash Jadhav)

For a long time,I was searching for information on comedian Sunder. I got hold of a 2 page detailed article on Sunder, but it was in Punjabi- which I could not read or use. I found a small paragraph on Sunder in Sanjit Narvekar ji’s book ” Eena Meena Deeka”. Lastly, I requested Harish Raghuwanshi ji for help. Despite his failing health, he promptly sent me articles in Hindi, English and Gujarati, on Sunder. He is such a helpful person. May God give him a healthy life.

Sunder Singh aka Sunder was born in Sialkot, Punjab in August 1916. His father was working in Madon Theatres, Calcutta. Sunder also started working there. Initially, for long period,he did Girl’s roles. Once his work was seen by H.S.Rawail (Director in later life). He was quite impressed. Later Rawail started working with R.N.Vaidya as his assistant in direction.Meanwhile Sunder started working in Talkie films. His first film,where he was credited was ” Na honewali baat”-38. Before that, Rawail and Vaidya were preparing to make film Banke Sipahi-37.Rawail recommended Sunder and Vaidya gave him an uncredited small role in that film.

Sunder and Rawail became good friends and started staying in one flat in Calcutta. After few films here, they both went to Lahore and Sunder got the Hero’s role in film ” Shukriya”-44. There were 4 Heroines in the film- Ramola, Rooplekha, Manorama and Raksha. Sunder’s role in this film was that of a young man from a village and Ramola was from a City. Sunder’s one song from this film-‘ Nayanon ke teer chala gayee ek shehar ki laundiya’ became very popular allover India, However the song was banned in Punjab due to its lyrics. After this they both came back to Calcutta.

His next film was Albeli-45, in which too there were 4 Heroines- Ramola, Rooplekha, Manoram and Usha. In the 40’s , Sunder acted in many films like Arabian Nights, Baap, Shabri, Chandrashekhar, Ek aurat, Grihalaxmi, Lottery, Samapti, Jhoothi kasme, Savyasachi, Do baaten, Shadi ke baad, Bawra, Khiladi, Nai Bhabhi etc. In Calcutta, Sunder got married to a girl from his community. Rawail left for Bombay. After few months, Sunder also returned to Bombay.

Rawail was very happy to get him back and gave him roles in almost all of his films. Not only Rawail, but also J.Om Prakash, Mohan Kumar, Lekhraj Bhakri, Manoj kumar etc gave him roles in their all films and he became a busy actor. He was at one time, in great demand. He was quite popular due to his nature.In the decade of 50’s he did 88 films, which increased in the 60s and 70s. In the 80s however films came haltingly.

From singing Hero, he became a Junior artiste( extra), in presence of the new crop of actors. The role of comedians was on decline, as Heroes like Amitabh and others did comedy scenes themselves. His health started troubling him. His last film was probably Bahurani-89. He became ill for a long time and finally died on 5-3-1992. Sunder acted in 436 films He was a good singer and sang his own songs in early cinemas. In all, Sunder sang 40 songs in 25 films. ( Thanks to Harish Raghuwanshi ji for material for adaptation.)

I do not know, what the film Abla-41 was about and what its story was. I could not find anything about this film in any issues of Film India of that period. Only 2 songs of the total 6 songs in the film are available on You Tube. From the HFGK, it is known that the film’s singers were Ram Dulari, Binapani, Bhawani and Akbar Khan Durrani Peshawari- who had worked in the film also. Today’s song is sung by Akbar Khan and Chorus. With this song, film Abla-41 makes its Debut on the Blog.


Song-Bharat ki vidhwa dukhiyaari (Abla)(1941) Singer- Akbar Khan Durrani Peshawari, Lyricist- Pt. Gyan Chandra, MD- Khurshid Khan
Chorus
Unknown female voice 1
Unknown female voice 2

Lyrics

Bharat ki vidhva dukhiyaari
Bharat ki vidhava
Bharat ki vidhava dukhiyaari
Bharat ki vidhva

bin maalik ke kheti jaaye
bin maalik ke kheti jaaye
chor uchakka najar lagaaye
chor uchakka najar lagaaye
laage aag bhasam ho jaaye
laage aag bhasam ho jaaye
sookhe jeewan ki phulwaari
Bharat ki vidhva dukhiyaari
Bharat ki vidhva

?? jewar
?? saare
?? jewar
?? saare

har deewaali gaye intzaari
har deewaali gaye intzaari

mata pita bhi thokar maaren
mata pita bhi thokar maaren
bipad padi dukhiya pe bhaari

Bharat ki vidhava dukhiyari
Bharat ki vidhava

jaago jaago hosh mein aao
ghar mein laagi aag bujhaao
jaago jaago hosh mein aao
ghar mein laagi aag bujhaao
vidhwaaon ke kasht mitaao
vidhwaaon ke kasht mitaao

?? dekh ki duniya bhaari
Bharat ki vidhva dukhiyaari
Bharat ki vidhva


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3933 Post No. : 15006

“Roop Sundari”(1964) was directed by Chandrakant for Chitradoot, Bombay. This veshbhoosha pradhaan (euphemism for B grade movie) had Anita Guha, Mahipal, B M Vyas, Sundar, Ratnmala, Bela Bose, Rajrani, V Gopal, Laxmichhaaya etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Five of these songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the sixth song from the movie to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rafi. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by Sardar Malik.

Only the audio of the song is available. From the sounds of it, this appears to be a public lament song sung in the background when the leading lady is seen suffering.

I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani (Roop Sundari)(1964) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Sardar Malik

Lyrics

nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani
dharti ki beti sab dukh sahti
chup chup rehti
kuchh bhi nahi kehti
naari vyatha ki
katha puraani
katha puraani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani
nayi srrta ki suno nayi kahaani

auron ko tu phool hi baante
khud daaman mein bharti kaante
kaisa ajab hai bhaag tumhaara
amar hai naari tyaag tumhaara
teri anokhi hai kurbaani
teri anokhi hai kurbaani
hai kurbaani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaani

ye samaaj ne zulm hi dhaaye
kya kya tujhpe kalank lagaaye
soya hua bhagwaan na jaaga
raam ne bhi jab tujhko tyaaga
ban ban bhatke dard deewaani
ban ban bhatke dard deewani
dard deewani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kaheani
nayi seeta ki suno nayi kahaeni


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3751 Post No. : 14716

The Hindi film industry has seen many legends in its 100+ years of existence. Giants in their chosen field, revered by not just their generation but by generations that followed. They have a very fond place in the hearts of film lovers, who are eternally thankful for their immense contribution to cinema. They all recognise the the world of cinema would be much the poorer without this contribution.

One such legend, and one who probably elevates the worth of the term “legend”, is, without doubt, yesteryear poet and lyricist, Sahir Ludhianvi.

Today (25 october 2018)happens to be his death anniversary – and, as we’ve done on previous occasions, we pay our humble tribute to him today.

Among various artistes that I’ve written about on this blog, Sahir has probably featured the most, alongside Rafisaab. I’ve written many times about him, on his birth and death anniversaries.

And yet, I’m never bored while discussing Sahir. Yes, readers of my posts might get bored 🙂 – but I’m not.

Whenever I write about him, I feel a rush of energy in my body. The content might be repetitive, but the huge regard I have for him overcomes everything else.

Sahir’s status as poet and lyricist extraordinaire is established beyond debate. He might not have been the most popular person around (and that’s the understatement of the millennium!) but even his most ardent critics would have to grudgingly acknowledge the sheer magic of his poetry.

Such is the richness of the treasure trove that he has left us that no post can do justice to it. In previous posts on him, I have often listed some of his songs – the sheer power of many of them transports you to a different world. Yes, there’s much more to a song than just its lyrics – but with Sahir, you could be assured that the lyrics never missed your attention.

Sahir’s lyrics were a direct reflection of his personality. He had strong views on various aspects of life and society, on relationships, on politics – and never hesitated to let the world know of them. It was as if he was waiting for an opportunity to use his poetry and lyrics to convey the message that Sahir, the person, wanted to get across to the world.

Thus, when you listened to “zindagi bheekh mein nahin milti, zindagi badh ke chheeni jaati hai”, you felt it was Sahir exhorting you to demand your rights in life.

Or even, later in life, when he was disillusioned with the way things were going in his life, “main pal do pal ka shaayar hoon”.

Sahir had a very strong sense of justice and injustice in society. Early in life, when called upon to choose between his mother and his far wealthier father, he chose his mother. Till her very end, he was totally devoted to her. Many of his songs reflect the loving relationship between a mother and child.

Throughout his life, Sahir spoke out against injustice and tyranny. He spoke for the underprivileged, the marginalized, the labour class. He tried to show society a mirror, however ugly it looked. He was trenchant in his criticism of the state of affairs – “Samaj ko badal daalo” was one of his lines.

Sahir’s lament about the pathetic state of living for the poor in India is well illustrated in the poignant songs of Pyaasa (1957). “Yahaan par to jeewan se hai maut sasti” he wrote, following it up with “ye duniya agar mil bhi jaaye to kya hai”. “Jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain”, he said.

Continuing in this refrain, he went satirical, writing “Cheen-o-Arab hamara, Hindustan hamara, rehne ko ghar nahin hai, saara jahaan hamaara” for Phir Subah Hogi (1958).

Each line, one could feel, coming straight from the heart.

There were other aspects also that Sahir was concerned about and discussed in his lyrics. Hindu-Muslim unity for example. Always a sensitive topic, and even more so in the years following independence. But Sahir was never one to shy away from a topic – his lines “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega” are some of the greatest lines of Hindi cinema.

The other thing that bothered Sahir greatly was the treatment of women in Indian society. He was deeply disturbed by the lack of respect accorded to women, thanks to a patriarchal society that privileged men over women. Sahir minced no words while lamenting this – his “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko” is a classic in Hindi cinema, with its entire theme revolving around women and how they have been treated by men in India.

It is therefore only fitting that on his death anniversary, the song picked for the blog reflects his thoughts on this topic. The song is “Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa na saki” from Lakshmi (1982). The film was released after Sahir’s death – in fact, the film starts with a tribute to Sahir.

This song was one of several songs proposed to me for this write-up by Avinashji. As usual, he has been kind enough to prepare the lyrics for this song.

Though this song is not all that well-known, certainly not as well known as “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko”, its words are trademark Sahir. Typical of him, in this song too, he laments the way women have been treated in Indian society. But this time he uses Seeta as his example, saying even she could not find happiness on this earth. He says women have forever suffered, and in today’s world, there isn’t even a Valmiki to give a Seeta refuge in time of need. She has to fend for herself all alone, and constantly seek to avoid the predatory eye of men around her.

Talking of the predatory eye, I cannot help talking about one of the hottest topics right now in India – at least in urban India and on social media. And that is the #MeToo movement. I’m sure Sahir would have had something to say about it, had he been around. So I’m taking the liberty of sharing my thoughts on the subject.

The #MeToo movement, in my opinion, is primarily about those who have been sexually abused and harassed, coming out with their story. While these are mostly women, it is not necessarily limited to women alone. There have been a few cases of men too coming out with their horrific stories. At the moment, it is largely focussed on workplace harassment, but there’s no reason it couldn’t go way beyond that.

It is a fact that, mainly thanks to our patriarchal society, there is a huge power imbalance between men and women in India. This actually exists around the world, but the patriarchy makes it much worse in India.

Power, as we all know, is a hugely corrupting and intoxicating drug. So it is not at all surprising that those in power, mostly men, would tend to exploit those they have power over, mostly women. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody.

What makes it worse, as if to add insult to injury, Indian society is also unforgiving towards women in this respect. Instead of being supportive, it tends to blame the victim. Even the woman’s own family make her feel guilty for what is essentially a man’s wrongdoing. She is often gaslighted into thinking that it is somehow her fault, that she invited it. She is encouraged to just be quiet about it, since “the honour of the family” might be at stake.

If she is a working woman, she might even be encouraged to stop working. Many women have fallen out of the workforce in India for this reason alone.

Then again, thanks to the power imbalance, she is up against it if she even chooses to seek justice through the justice system. To even make a complaint to the police, to get an FIR registered is a huge challenge. When you’re complaining about a more powerful party, the system will bend towards that party. The police will either discourage you from giving your complaint, or will mock you, or will flatly refuse to write an FIR.

If you do get past the police hurdle, you still have the rest of the justice system to deal with. Courts which will insist on evidence – which in most cases of this sort is just not available.

Besides, the other party being much more powerful, he can ensure your life is made miserable.

So justice through the normal justice system (which is often referred to as “due process”) is almost always a pipedream.

To help matters, at least in the workplace, new legislation was brought in in 2013, replacing the earlier Vishakha guidelines which laid out steps to be taken at a workplace to deal with sexual harassment complaints. An employer is supposed to set up an Internal Complaints Committee (ICC) and so on.

I won’t go into all the details, but the reality is that many employers have not even set this up. And even where this is theoretically in place, women who have complained have failed to get justice. On the contrary, it has boomeranged on them – they’ve been marked as “trouble-makers” in the organisation. Remember, they are complaining about someone who is almost invariably in a higher power position in the company.

With this being the stark reality, whether we like it or not, is it surprising that many women have just kept their pain buried within themselves? They have tolerated harassment but not brought it out in the open. Maybe they didn’t want to jeopardize their careers – after all, it is the woman who tends to bear the brunt of any negative fallout in these matters.

But now we have #MeToo.

Some women at least have decided enough is enough. It is not their shame to bear, so why should they? So they have decided to come out with their story. It is cathartic for them – it must be so hard to keep this buried within you for years.

Some of them have disclosed their identity, some have not. Some have disclosed the identity of the predator, some have chosen not to specifically name him (although there are usually enough hints in their story). It’s upto each person to decide what level of comfort she has – no one can demand she behave in a particular way.

One complaint about #MeToo is that many of these stories are coming out after many years. Ten years, even twenty years. Why didn’t they come out earlier? How can we possibly believe something that might or might not have happened a decade ago?

I feel this is unreasonable. I’ve already explained how the odds are stacked against the woman – the situation was even worse a decade ago. Besides, when women have been constantly shamed, why would they invite further ridicule by complaining, especially when they have no hope of justice?

It is only now, that thanks to the #MeToo movement, they are coming out with their story – hoping to get closure if nothing else. If they get justice, great – if not, at least they’re hoping for closure.

Many have complained that outing men on social media is not the right way to go about this. That women should follow due process – that is, go through the justice sytem of police and courts, or through the workplace structures for this purpose.

And that has worked, right? After trying all that, and hitting their heads against a wall, women have finally chosen social media as their hope for getting their message across. And who can blame them? It’s not like they didn’t want due process – it is that “due process” failed them completely.

Another criticism of #MeToo is that it is often just accusation, without evidence. And no court can possibly accept that. There’s a chance that an innocent person is maligned out of malice or whatever other reason, and his reputation totally destroyed by a #MeToo accusation.

Yes, this is possible. In the spate of accusations, it is possible that some are fake too. Which is why every accusation needs to be attempted to be vetted to the extent possible. Having said that, it is also very unreasonable and unrealistic to expect evidence in cases of sexual harassment, because of its very nature. It tends to happen behind closed doors. So there will be many cases where such evidence is just not available.

Yet another criticism is that #MeToo is about the urban elite and about sometimes seemingly trivial harassment, while women in rural India suffer far worse.

I think this is unfair. Yes, rural women suffer harassment too – possibly much more. Does that mean urban women should be silent? What sort of logic is that? Rather, we should hope the movement spreads to rural India too. Most movements anyway start with those who have relatively more agency – and then spread.

All in all, I think #MeToo in India was long overdue. It started in the US almost exactly a year ago, and exposed many well-known Hollywood personalities like Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey. Around that time, an Indian in the US, Raya Sarkar, prepared a list of predators in academia – but she was unfortunately criticized and the movement did not pick up steam then in India.

Now it has.

No one knows how it will go from here. Will it evolve further? Or will it fizzle out?

I’m sincerely hoping it evolves further. I’d like to see it grow – go beyond urban India, go beyond the few sectors it has so far been largely restricted to (films, media, advertising). There must be many more cases in politics, in government and corporate India, where power is most prone to abuse. Maybe those stories are slow in coming because the women involved are less comfortable coming out with their stories.

And that’s only fair. Each person has to decide for herself – she has to weigh the consequences of her actions. We need to respect that.

One huge positive impact of #MeToo has been that men themselves seem to be re-assessing their behaviour. Not just in the past but also in the present. They seem to be becoming more sensitized and aware of boundaries and space. And about consent. At least I hope so.

Hopefully films too will become more sensitized to gender from now on. I think it is already happening. Films in the past have been hugely misogynistic, often presenting stalking as romantic! And considering how much of an influence films/TV have on society, they might have playe thei role too in moulding society into what it is today.

But then, they were a function of their times – I don’t want to dwell on the past. We can’t change that anyway.

What we can change is the present and the future. And hopefully from now on at least, we will see better-behaved men, whether triggered by #MeToo or not.

Of course, we need much more to happen. Until we dismantle patriarchy there is always going to be victim-blaming and shaming. We all know that men are the root cause of the problem, yet we will continue to blame the women and expect them to “behave themselves”.

So much more needs to happen. We can all do our bit – by calling out patriarchy when we see it, even if it happens without our close circles. By bringing up the next generation with a better understanding of gender equality so that boys don’t grow up with a sense of entitlement. This is what manifests itself in most undesirable behaviour when the boy becomes a man.

Clearly we haven’t done enough in the last 60 years, since Sahir wrote “aurat ne janam diya” in 1958. It’s a sad reflection of our society that it feels relevant even in 2018.

I’d like a future generation to listen to it and say “Oh, how horrible things were for women in those days! Thank God things are so much better today, and women don’t go through all that!”

I know I’m dreaming – but you know what they say. Ummeed pe duniya kaayam hai.

Let’s do our bit to make it happen?

Thanks for listening.


Song-Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa na saki (Lakshmi)(1982) Singer-Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhianvi, MD-Usha Khanna

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Naa tera durbhaagya nayaa hai
Naa jag ka vyavhaar nayaa aa
Naa raahon ke shool naye ae
Naa patthar dil sansaar nayaa

Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai
Jo zulm teri taqdeer banaa
Jo zulm teri taqdeer banaa
Wo zulm yugon se zaari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai

Wo kanyaa ho ya garbhwati
Naari ko sadaa apmaan milaa
Wo kanyaa ho ya garbhwati
Naari ko sadaa apmaan milaa
Avtaaron ki nasl badhaa kar bhi
Patitaaon mein sthaan mila
Sadiyon se yahaan har ablaa ne
Sadiyon se yahaan har ablaa ne
Ro ro kar umar guzaari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai

Kehne ko to devi kehlaayee
Par naar yahaan daasi hi rahi
Kehne ko to devi kehlaayee
Par naar yahaan daasi hi rahi
Do pyaar ke meethhe bolon ki
Martey dam tak pyaasi hi rahi
Jo zehar miley wo peeti jaa
Jo zehar miley wo peeti jaa
Tu kaun si Janak dulaari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai

Maikaa chhoota sasuraal chhoota
Jaayegi magar jaayegi kahaan
Maikaa chhoota sasuraal chhoota
Jaayegi magar jaayegi kahaan
Ab Valmiki saa koyi rishi
Is dharti par paayegi kahaan
Ab tu ik bhatki hirni hain
Ab tu ik bhatki hirni hain
Aur mard ki aankh shikaari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai
Seeta bhi jahaan sukh paa naa saki
Tu us dharti ki naari hai

——————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
——————————————
ना तेरा दुर्भाग्य नया है
ना जग का व्यवहार नया आ
ना राहों के शूल नए ए
ना पत्थर दिल संसार नया

सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है
जो ज़ुल्म तेरी तकदीर बना
जो ज़ुल्म तेरी तकदीर बना
वो ज़ुल्म युगों से जारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है

वो कन्या हो या गर्भवती
नारी को सदा अपमान मिला
वो कन्या हो या गर्भवती
नारी को सदा अपमान मिला
अवतारों की नस्ल बढ़ाकर भी
पतिताओं में स्थान मिला
सदियों से यहाँ हर अबला ने
सदियों से यहाँ हर अबला ने
रो रो कर उम्र गुजारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है

कहने को तो देवी कहलाई
पर नार यहाँ दासी ही रही
कहने को तो देवी कहलायी
पर नार यहाँ दासी ही रही
दो प्यार के मीठे बोलों की
मरते दम तक प्यासी ही रही
जो ज़हर मिले वो पीती जा
जो ज़हर मिले वो पीती जा
तू कौनसी जनक दुलारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है

मैका छूटा ससुराल छूटा
जायेगी मगर जायेगी कहाँ
मैका छूटा ससुराल छूटा
जायेगी मगर जायेगी कहाँ
अब वाल्मीकी सा कोई ऋषि
इस धरती पर पाएगी कहाँ
अब तू इक भटकी हिरनी है
अब तू इक भटकी हिरनी है
और मर्द की आँख शिकारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है
सीता भी जहां सुख पा ना सकी
तू उस धरती की नारी है


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16067

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1234
Total Number of movies covered =4388

Total visits so far

  • 14,004,039 hits

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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