Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Ghazal’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5049 Post No. : 16962

Today’s song is from an obscure film called Aisa Kyun-1947.

The film was made by Shri Raj Pictures, Calcutta. It was directed by A K Chatterjee and the music was by Anupam Ghatak. The cast of the film was Iftikhar, Radharani, Urmila, Pinky, Faiz, Tandon etc. Most people are not aware of the fact that besides New Theatres studio in Calcutta, there were many other film making studios in Calcutta. Hindi films were also made in Burma at that time by the indo-Burma productions.

Some of the studios based in Calcutta were East india film co., Madon Theatres, Aurora film corporation, Shree Bharat films, Laxmi pictures, Chitramandir, RBS Productions, Dev Datta films, Indra movietone, Kali films, Kamla Movietone, Moti mahal Theatres, Murli Pictures, New Popular Pictures, Quality Pictures, Radha film co., Sonoray Pictures, Star film co., Sunrise film co.and Tollywood studios. (source-Indian Cinematographers’ yearbook-1938) This is an old list of when many Hindi films were made in Calcutta. Of late, there must be a lot of changes now.

In olden days, there were 3 major film centres-Bombvay, Lahore and Calcutta. After 1947, all the Hindi film activity at Lahore shifted to Bombay. By mid 50’s even Calcutta almost stopped making Hindi films. Many Hindi speaking artistes in various disciplines of film making shifted to Bombay and finally Bombay became the only and the main Hindi film making Centre.

The year 1947 is a reminder not only for the Independence of India, but also for the upheaval that took place in the film industry that time. More than in any other industry in India, Muslims were plentiful, working in different sections and departments of the Hindi film industry. majority of them migrated to the newly formed Muslim Nation of Pakistan. This did create a lot of disturbance in the film industry. Right from the beginning of 1947, there were signs that soon the British would leave India – after dividing it into two Nations, India and Pakistan. When the month and date became known for the Partition, there was a great hurry among the filmmakers to complete their projects on hand and in process, compromising many factors like quality of the film, number of songs and such other things.

This resulted in the record number of films made in 1947 alone – 181 Hindi films and about 100 films in other languages in India. This was a record which remained unbroken till 1985, when 187 Hindi films were made. Thus from 1931 to 1985, this record remained unbroken for more than 50 years ! Obviously, this resulted in a big compromise on quality to achieve quantity with many films produced half heartedly. Most or rather many films made in 1947 remained obscure, unheard of and many flopped due to poor quality. Actually only few films were released in 1947, because many films were released in 1948 and 1949, with some films being released in Pakistan too.

Did you ever hear about films Amar Asha, Angoorbala, Attention, Barrister, But Tarash, Chalte Chalte, Chandrahas, Dagabaz Dost, Dehati,Ek kadam,Gaurav,Giribala, Heera, Intezar ke baad, Jhalak,Jurmana, Khaufnak aankhen, Lalaat, Mangalsutra, Moti, Sewa gram, Stage girl, Tohfa or Utho jago ? Of course not all films were below standards. Some of the landmark films were also made in 1947, like Shehnai, Mirza Sahiban, Jugnu, saajan, Naatak, Meera, Elan,Aap ki sewa mein, Dard, Do Bhai, Neel Kamal or Parwana etc. However by and large the picture was like this only.

I have not seen this film, so I have no idea about its story etc. For the film’s Heroine-RadhaRani Calcuttewali, this was her last Hindi film that she acted or sang in. She continued her work in Bangla films, I suppose. This Radha Rani was one of the “Same Name Confusion ” pair, as there was another Radha Rani-Bombaywali. The music director Anupam Ghatak also died in 1947 only.

The music Director Anupam Ghatak – the second-generation Bengali-Hindi composer (after Rai Chand Boral and Pankaj Mullick) was born on 4-12-1911 at Mymensingh(now in Bangladesh). He took music lessons from father Atul Ghatak and Keshav ganesh Dhekan. He became an excellent Flautist. After a short stint in AIR,as a singer in 1930, he joined as asst. to Bishen Chand Boral (brother of Raichand Boral) and later to R C Boral himself for Vidyapati-1937

First independent film score: Payer Dhulo. Later worked at Sagar Film in Bombay, composing Zia Sarhadi’s Bhole Bhale and a series of films for Badami, Luhar et al. (1939). Returned to Calcutta, notably for Barua’s Shapmukti; thereafter had assignments in both Calcutta and Lahore. Known for his wide range, from the sentimental Ekti paisa dao go babu in Shape Mukti to the experimental Gane mor kon indradhanu in Agni Pareeksha.

His Hindi film career started with ‘Tarzan ki Beti-38 and Bhole Bhale-39. He gave music to only 17 Hindi films, composing 153 songs.These included Ladies Only,Service Ltd.,Sadhana,Uski tamanna (all 1939), Civil marriage (1940), Sri Ramanuj-43 etc. In Lahore he did Champa -45,Badnami-46 and Shalimar -46 before Partition. His other films as MD were, Khush Naseeb-46, Aai bahar-46, faisla-47, Aisa Kyun-47 and Banjare-48 and Shamsheer-1953. He had also sung 4 songs in his first film Tarzan ki beti-1938. His last Hindi film was Shamsheer-53, which was released only in 1953,after he died on 5-2-1947 itself.

Today’s song is sung by Jaganmoy Mitra aka Jagmohan Sursagar. So much is already written about him on our Blog by me and others, therefore I will not repeat his Bio-data. However I reproduce here an article published in Bangla Paper ” Anandabazar Patrika,Calcutta ” after his death.
Jaganmoy Mitra passes away

(Translated from Anadabazar Patrika, September 5, 2003)

Jaganmoy Mitra, the legendary singer of “chithi” is very far from us now. (PDG: The opening lines of the song “chithi”(1952), MD: Sailesh Dattagupta, are “tumi aaj koto doore” which means “you are so far today”). He expired yesterday night after suffering a cardiac arrest in his house at Juhu, Mumbai. He was 85. He is survived by three sons and two daughters. Although he stayed away from Bengal for the greater part of his life, he admired Bengali music and culture till his last day.

“aami duranto baishaakhi jhad” (PDG: which means ‘I am a restless summer tempest, you are a fiery flame’, MD: Kamal Dasgupta, 1947) and “shaaon raate yadi” – romantic numbers like these have entertained numerous music lovers over more than five decades.

Besides Bengali, his popularity in Hindi music was also unsurpassable at one time. He was known to the rest of India as ‘Jagmohan’. Gandhiji was an admirer of his music. He has recorded over 400 songs in a career spanning over five decades. Besides Bengali romantic numbers he has also sung Rabindrasangeet,
Nazrulgeeti, and simultaneously in Hindi, Gujrati and Marathi.

His first record for HMV was the Nazrulgeeti “shaaon raate yadi” in 1938. This song propelled him to immediate popularity. He has recorded 100 plus Hindi songs. He scored music for the Hindi film “Sarhad”. (PDG: That should be Sardar(1955)).

He has received numerous awards and felicitations including Padmashri and Sursagar. But he always valued the admiration of his listeners above any awards. His music had taken him to the United States, Great Britain and East Africa. His autobiography is titled “shaaon raate yadi smarane aase more” ( which means ‘If you remember me on a rainy night’).

The song,which follows, is sung so beautifully that one is lost with the soft and melodious voice of Jagmohan. This was his speciality and for this style I simply adore him.


Song-Thhukra de jo nazron se (Aisa Kyun)(1947) Singer-Jagmohan Sursagar, Lyrics-Unknown, MD-Anupam Ghatak

Lyrics

Thhukra de jo nazron se
dil ka mere nazraana
apna na samajh usko
begaana hai begaana
Thhukra de jo nazron se

guzri huyi baaton ko o
o o o o o o o
dohraane se
kya aa aa haasil il
guzri huyi baaten to
afsaana hai afsaana
guzri huyi baaten to
afsaana hai afsaana
Thhukra de jo nazron se

main aen ae ae
thhak gaya samjha kar
apne dil e naadaan ko o o
deewaane ko kya kahiye
deewaana hai deewaana
deewaane ko kya kahiye
deewaana hai deewaana
Thhukra de jo nazron se


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4973 Post No. : 16848 Movie Count : 4583

Today’s song is from the film Kismatwala-1944.

There was another film with the same Title in 1986. Additionally, there came a film ‘Kismatwali’ in 1947. Thank God, filmmakers did not think of Kismat Wale ka Beta or Beti or Son of Kismat Wali or some other relatives ! The title Kismat was used for films 6 times-in 1943, 56, 68, 80, 95 and 2004. Titles having the word kismat were there in 12 movies from 1935 to 2012. Considering all Kismat titles, every 4 years there was a film having the word Kismat in its title !

Kismatwala – 1944 was a stunt film directed by stunt film specialist Nanubhai Vakil. He was an unusual person to join the film industry, because he hailed from an educated and respected family and he himself was highly educated- B.A., LL.B. He married one of his Heroines Sarojini and their daughter AZRA too became a Hindi film Heroine.

The film had 9 songs written by Shams Lucknowi and 2 Music Directors- Shanti Kumar Desai and Ratanlal. The cast included Navin Yagnik, Urmila, Prakash, Vatsala Kumthekar, Laxmi Kumthekar, Ansari, Narmada Shankar, Himalaywala and many others.

The Indian Film Industry and Indian Political system have one thing common in them. They both try to promote their kith and kin into their own profession, where they have succeeded. One can understand if children are handed over the reins of family business, which is run by many Generations. But Political Leadership or Acting or Singing is surely not a ‘business’. Their position is earned by doing hard work or by individual Good luck. Most of the people forget this and they try to pass on their place to their kith and kin as if it is a mantle or the Olympic Torch. They try to install their children in the seat which they have earned through hard work. The result, most times, is disastrous, because without hard work or extraordinary luck,it is difficult to succeed in these two professions.

We have seen many such cases in Politics as well as film line. Successful Actors or Actresses tried to promote their sons/daughters, but most of them were flops. Barring a few cases of successes like Sanjay Dutt and few others, there are hardly any new generation successes. Kishore Sahu ( Naina), Leela Chitnis (Ajit), Balraj Sahni ( Parikshit Sahni), Raaj Kumar ( Puru ), Vasant Joglekar ( Meera), Hemen Gupta (Archana), Kidar Sharma (Ashok) and many more examples establish the fact that only a successful parent or a sibling is not enough to guarantee success in film line for their descendents.

Same is the case with Music too. Just because the parent or a sibling was a known Musician or a Singer was not a guarantee to succeed. Cases of Amit kumar (Kishore Kumar), Basant Prakash(Khemchand Prakash), Chandru Atma (C.H.Atma), Khalid Mehmood (Talat Mehmood), Varsha Bhosle( Asha Bhosle) are some known examples of Kin failures. There are so many cases in both groups. This point is relevant here because there are 2 such cases in this film’s credits.

MD Ratanlal was the younger brother of the famous Music Director Khemchand Prakash. Ratanlal gave music to only 8 songs in just 2 films as a Music Director- Baraat-42 and Kismatwala-44. In film Baraat-42 he was co-MD with his brother Khemchand Prakash, who had taken the name as Khemraj for this film.

Another sibling was Laxmi Kumthekar, who was the younger sister of actress-singer Vatsala Kumthekar. C. Ramchandra writes an anecdote about this Laxmi and Vatsala, in his autobiography. Here is that excerpt from the English version book “The life and times of C.Ramchandra” by D.S.Phansalkar….

” The well known Marathi singer of the 40’s, Vatsala Kumthekar used to visit the studio now and then, at times with her younger sister. She was a teenager of about 18 years, very beautiful and fresh faced. She visited my music department and listened to the songs. I was not aware that she was fond of me. I came to know about it when she fell ill.

One day Vatsala came rushing to me , puffing and scared. She said, ‘Anna, I want to have a word with you.’

‘Sure, no need to ask me.’

‘My sister is quite unwell.’

‘Yes,I know, how is she now ?’

‘She has a high fever, becomes unconscious, talks endlessly and she keeps calling you.’

I guessed what she was trying to aim at. I told her in strong words, ‘Look your sister is mistaken about something.’

‘What do you mean ?’

‘I am newly married and I love my wife.’

‘Is that so ?’ She fumed and left the room stomping her feet !

In the cast you can see an unusal name Himalaywala. Let us know more about him.

From the cast listing, an interesting name is that of A Himalaywala. His name was Mohd Afzaluddin. He was born on 15th March 1916, at Dehradun. After school education he joined his brother, Mohd Misaluddin’s firm – The Himalaya Drug Company, a leading Pharma company of repute (even today). He worked there for 10 years and after a dispute with his brother, left the company. He came to Bombay to join films.

First he had thought of starting a company, but looking at the situation, he decided to do acting only. His first film was ‘Kiski Biwi’ (1942), directed by MA Mirza. His name was changed from Afzal to A Himalaywala (since he came from the Himalayan town of Dehradun, like Kashmiri from Kashmir), by Shaukat Hussain, husband of Noorjehan. However in many films he was credited as Afzal only. He worked in few films like, ‘Vishwaas’ (1943), ‘Ankh Ki Sharm’ (1943), ‘Dost’ (1944), ‘Kismatwaala’ (1944), ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Humayun’ (1945), ‘Nal Damayanti’ (1945), ‘Jagbeeti’ (1946), ‘Samrat Ashok’ (1947) and ‘Elaan’ (1947).

He was an outspoken and straightforward person, fond of hunting, football and travelling by car. He toured all of India twice in his car. In 1943, he married actress singer Amirbai Karnataki. After marriage he banned her from acting in films. Within 2-3 years, on this and other issues, they could not get along. He used to hit her and take all her money. At last, it was rumoured that he gave her talaaq after taking 2 lakh rupees and her car. Even after this he was stalking her. She stayed with her elder sister Ahilya Bai. Then one day, she was kidnapped by Himalaywala, from the recording room. She was kept locked in a room and beaten daily. She somehow managed to inform her sister.

Ahilyabai then got in touch with her acquaintance Mr Rasiklal Vyas and his brother Chhailabhai Vyas – one of the best criminal lawyers of Bombay. With their political and social connections, they forced the police to register an FIR, which was refused due to Himalaywala’s bribe. Meanwhile Himalaywala was alerted by his cronies. Within a few hours Amirbai was escorted back to her sister’s place, by Himalaywala. All this episode is described in full detail in the book ‘Aap Ki Parchhaiyaan’, by Rajnikumar Pandya ji. Amirbai later married Gujarati Journalist Badri Kaanchwala.

After partition, Himalaywala migrated to Pakistan. There the lady luck smiled on him and he did very well. Urdu film Shahida (1949) was his first film in Pakistan, which celebrated silver jubilees in Delhi and Lucknow.

Himalaywala was in leading role in Pakistan’s first silver jubilee Urdu film 2 Aansoo in 1950. He was the main villain actor in most of the 1950s movies. He played the Akbar The Great role in the musical film Anar Kali in 1958. His other famous moves were Kundan (1950) Chan Way(1951), Ghulam (1953), Gumnam, Ruhi (1954), Shoni(1955),Qatil (1955), Sarfarosh (1956)Saat Lakh (1957), Gumrah, Naghma-e-Dil (1959), Farishta (1961), Watan(1960) and Azra (1962).

He was seen in 33 movies, only two of them were in Punjabi language. His last film was Yahudi Ki Larki in 1963.He became successful as an actor and was also famous. His role of Akbar in the film ‘Anarkali’ (1957) was particularly appreciated very much. Mohd Afzuluddin Himalaywala married Begum Perveen, in Pakistan. He died on 1st January 1984 in Lahore. (Thanks to Film directory-46, http://www.pak.mag.com, Shishir krishna Sharma ji, book Aap ki parchhaiyan by Rajnikumar Pandya ji and my notes, for information used herein.)

Today’s song is sung by Kalyani Bai. With this song, the film Kismatwala-1944 makes its Debut on this Blog. I thank Mr. Sadanand ji Kamath for this song.


Song- Dhoondhta hai dil bahaana jaan khone ke liye (Kismatwaala)(1944) Singer- Kalyani Bai, Lyricist- Shams Lucknowi, MD- Shanti Kumar Desai

Lyrics

Dhoondhta hai
Dhoondhta hai
dil bahaana
jaan khone ke liye ae
maut ki aagosh mein
raahat se sone ke liye
maut ki aagosh mein
raahat se sone ke liye

dekhiye kismat ki khoobi
dost bhi dushman huye ae ae ae ae ae ae
dekhiye kismat ki khoobi
dost bhi dushman huye ae ae ae ae ae ae ae
phool kaante
phool kaaante ban gaye ae ae
nashtar chubhone ke liye
phool kaante

rote rote hijr mein
aen aen
rote rote hijr mein
aen aen aen aen aen aen aen aen
aen aen
rote rote
rote rote hijr mein
dariya bahaaye is qadar
aankh mein aansoo nahin
baaqi hai rone ke liye
aankh mein aansoo nahin
baaqi hai rone ke liye

dhoondhta hai
dil bahaana
jaan khone ke liye ae


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4691 Post No. : 16375 Movie Count :

4448

‘Bahurani’ (1940) was produced by Kishore Sahu under the banner of the then newly set up, India Artists Ltd. The star cast included Kishore Sahu and Rose in the lead roles with Anuradha, Mubarak, Pratima Devi, Masood, Nana Palsikar etc in the supporting role. The film had its mahurat shot taken in January 1940 under the direction of Mubarak. In February 1940, R S Junnarkar was assigned the direction of the film along with Mubarak. So, it was their joint directorial venture. For Mubarak, it was his maiden attempt as a director which happened to be his last film as a director. R S Junnarkar was a screen-play and dialogue writer for Huns Pictures of Master Vinayak. It was also his first Hindi film as a director.

The film was expected to be released in April 1940. However, it was finally released on June 20, 1940. The film’s premier was held in Excelsior theatre and Dada Saheb Phalke, the father of the Indian film industry was the guest of honour among many big wigs of Hindi film industry who attended the premier.

Kishore Sahu started his filmy career as a lead actor in Bombay Talkies ‘Jeevan Prabhat’ (1937) which was a box office success. Probably, his entrepreneurial ambition made him to leave Bombay Talkies and float a film production company. In his ambition, Seth Ramnath Daga, a Bikaner based multi-millionaire, supported him with the finance required for such a venture. It was the brain child of Seth Ramnath Daga to set up a film production company called ‘India Artists Ltd’ for which he appointed Kishore Sahu as the Managing Director. He was assisted by Seth Ramnath Daga’s educated son, Dwarkadas Daga.

‘Bahurani’ (1940) was the first film produced under India Artists Ltd. The vision of the banner was to make socially relevant films. During the making of the film, Kishore Sahu had creative differences with Seth Ramnath Daga, the main financial supporter of the banner. After the release of “Bahurani’ (1940), Kishore Sahu resigned from the company and returned to Bombay Talkies to take the lead role in the film ‘Punar Milan’ (1940) opposite Snehprabha Pradhan. It took another 4 years for Kishore Sahu to float his own film production banner, Hindustan Chitra under which he produced and directed ‘Sharaarat’ (1944) and many more films thereafter.

The story of ‘Bahurani’ (1940) was adapted from a Hindi novel ‘Mimansa’ (1937) written by Hindi laureate, Anuplal Mandal who is regarded as ‘Premchand of Bihar’. The screen-play and dialogues were written by another Hindi laureate, Amritlal Nagar. The film was reviewed in ‘Filmindia’ magazine and for a change, the reviewer had praised the film for its story, screen play/dialogues and the performances of the main actors viz, Kishore Sahu, Rose and Anuradha (real name: Khursheed). Based on the review of the film. I have summarized the story as under:

Vijay (Kishore Sahu), a young landlord meets Aruna (Anuradha), a poor village girl born out of wedlock, during a village wedding. He likes Aruna and visits in her house where her mother is seriously ill. She takes a promise from Vijay that he would take care of Aruna if she did not survive. The mother soon dies. As promised, Vijay brings Aruna to his house and is treated as a child of the family by Didi (Pratima Devi) the elder widowed sister of Vijay. Diwanji (Mubarak), the trusted servant of the family is aware of Aruna’s background. But he keeps quite about it.

Soon, Vijay goes to the city for completing his education. He meets Mallika Rai (Rose), a sophisticated girl in the college. Vijay finds her on the same wave length as his in his idealistic approach. After completion of his education, Vijay returns home and finds Aruna now grown up and charming. Vijay falls in love with her and proposes her for the marriage. After overcoming a minor resistance from the family, Vijay and Aruna get married. The couple respects each other and Didi loves Aruna like her own daughter. The life goes on very well. But behind her happiness, there is a lurking fear in Aruna’s mind as to what will happen if Vijay and Didi comes to know about her background of a girl born out of wedlock.

In the meanwhile, Didi leaves for few days to visit her relatives. Vijay is busy with his involvement in the village upliftment activities and to support his growing activities, he calls Mallika to join him. She is given accommodation in Vijay’s house. Both Mallika and Aruna likes each other, Mallika likes Aruna for her simplicity and Aruna likes Mallika for her woman supportive views. Most of the day, Vijay is in the company of Mallika in the village upliftment activities and in course of time, both become close to each other. Aruna is aware of their closeness but pretends to both as if she is not aware of their relationship.

Under these circumstances, Lallan (Masood), the younger brother of Vijay returns home after completing his education. He gets to know the stigma attached to Aruna and tries to blackmail her to satisfy his lust. The stress of ‘affair’ of her husband with Mallika and the blackmailing by Lallan affects her health and she becomes bedridden. How, Vijay and Aurna comes out of the difficult situations and find a solution to a happy ending for everyone is not revealed in the film review.

I was interested to know as to how the story end to the satisfaction of all the main characters. Fortunately, the novel ‘Mimansa’ is available to read on-line in Hindi. I read the entire novel (203 pages). It is really a moving story in a realistic setting. At the end, the main character in the story – Vijay, Aruna, Mallika, Didi will surely get sympathy from the readers. Incidentally, the film has used the same names for the characters as in the novel.

The film has followed more or less the same story as depicted in the novel up to the entry of Lallan who has been shown as a villain in the film. To some extent, Mallika has also some shade of villain, being the ‘other woman’ in the life of Vijay. However, in the novel, no character has been depicted as villain.

Both Aruna and Mallika have cordial relations though some mild arguments do take place between them. But the respect for each other overwhelms such ‘noise’ in their relationship. Again, Aruna and Lallan have good relations. The only villainous streak in him is that he reveals to Didi the background of Aruna which makes her, in turn, to reveal the secret to Vijay. The novel makes the society at large as the main villain for the likes of Aruna.

The end is somewhat dramatic to the relief of Aruna. Didi has already written a letter to Vijay about the background of Aruna which makes Aruna jittery. To add to her misery, Vijay has become close to Mallika. The intense stress in her life makes Aruna ill. Vijay arranges the best doctors and medicines. But she is not recovering from her illness. The servants tell Vijay that bahurani is not taking medicines and is not allowing doctors to check her. Both Vijay and Mallika think that Aruna has no will to survive from her illness.

Both Mallika and Vijay visit Aruna separately to make her understand to take medicines. During the conversations, Mallika realises that Aruna’s love for Vijay is undiminishing despite their affair. The greatness of Aruna is that she is not blaming either Mallika or Vijay for what is happening to her life. With a lot of deliberations, Mallika decides that it is better to detatch herself from Vijay. She leaves Vijay’s house without informing anyone and goes back to her city. Before leaving, she writes a letter address to Vijay to take care of Aruna and suggests him to take Aruna for a long outing for a change.

The story in the novel ends with Vijay and Aruna travelling to Puri. While in the train, Aruna hands over a letter written by Didi revealing the stigma attached to her. Vijay reads it and tears off the letter by telling Aruna that he was already made aware of her background by Diwanji when he proposed her for the marriage. It was his conscious decidion to marry her and he was capable of facing the repurcussion even now. But nothing will break their union.

The film had 9 songs written by J S Cashyap and Azad. However, individual credit to the songs is not available. All the songs were set to music by Rafique Ghaznavi. I am presenting the film’s first song, ‘zara muskura kar milaao nazar hi’ to appear on the Blog. HFGK mentions Zohra as the singer of the song. The voice in the song does not sound like that of Zohrabai Ambalewaali.

In the 1930s, there was an actor-singer called Miss Zohra Jaan who was a star in her own right. She had two sisters – Mushtari Bai who was also an actor-singer in early 1930s. Unfortunately, she died in her teenage in 1934. The other sister was Khursheed (known as Anuradha in Hindi films). Shri Arunkumar Deshmukh has painstakingly collated the rare information on ‘Zohra Sisters’ and has covered in an article, mere baba ne baat meri maan li.

Rafique Ghaznavi, the music director of the film was married to Zohra Jaan in the 30s. After divorcing her in early 1940s, he married her sister Khursheed (Anuradha). Since Anuradha is in the film under discussion, it further strengthens my belief that the singer of the song is Zohra Jaan.

The song is written in Ghazal style, fit for a mujra. Towards the end of the song, there is a long music suggestive of a mujra dance, It is quite possible that the song may have been picturised on Zohra Jaan herself who was also a good mujra dancer though her name does not appear in the credit. But there are cases where some of the actor-singers appeared in the films uncredited.

With this song, ‘Bahurani’ (1940) makes its debut on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Zara muskura kar milaao nazar hi(Bahurani)(1940) Singer-Zohra Jaan, MD-Rafiq Ghaznavi

Lyrics

haan aa aa
zara muskura kar milaao nazar hi
zara muskura kar milaao nazar hi
meri jaan ham bhi
aa aa aaa aa
aa aaa aa aa
meri jaan ham bhi khade hain idhar hi
meri jaan ham bhi khade hain idhar hi

na jaao jagaao o o aa aa
na phir phir ke dekho o o o
mujhe chhod do haan aan aan aan
mujhe chhod do bas mere haal par hi
mujhe chhod do bas mere haal par hi

sambhal kar meri jaan aa aa aa aaa aa
na khanjar uthhaana aa aa aa aa aa aa
kahin bal na khaa jaaye aa aa aa aa aa
kahin bal na khaa jaaye teri kamar hi
kahin bal na khaa jaaye teri kamar hi
shab-e-hijr kaa aa aa aa aaa
fasl ki chabri()?? ee ee ee ee ee
ke haan haan mein naa naa
haan aan aan aan aan
ke haan haan mein naa naa rahi raat bhar hi
ke haan haan mein naa naa rahi raat bhar hi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4618 Post No. : 16259

‘Lalaji’ (1942) was produced by Mehboob Khan under the banner of National Studios and was jointly directed by Chimanlal Gandhi and Lalitchandra Mehta. The star cast included Krishnakant, Yashodara Katju, Yakoob, Vatsala Kumthekar, Amar, Sunalini Devi, Maya Devi, AR Kabuli, Kayam Ali etc. I have no idea about the story of the film. The montages of the film indicate that it was a comedy film with Yakub having an important role as Hiralal and A R Kabuli as Lalaji though the lead pairs of the film were Yashodara Katju and Krishnakant.

There were 12 songs in the film of which one song has been covered in the Blog. As many as 8 songs were written by Arzoo Lucknawi. Two songs were written by Neelkanth Tiwari. The name of the lyricist was not mentioned in respect of one song. That leaves one song which created some curiosity in me as this song was a ghazal attributed to Mirza Ghalib. However, I could not locate the audio clip of this ghazal on any video sharing platform. Finally, I could listen to this song in full on gaana.com and got it confirmed that this ghazal was written by Mirza Ghalib as his name de plume, ‘Ghalib’ appears in the last she’r of the ghazal.

The problem was not yet over as the audio quality of the ghazal was not up to the mark. Moreover, there were some high sounding Urdu/Persian/Arabic words used in the ghazal which made my task difficult to decipher the ghazal. http://www.rekhta.org came to my rescue as fortunately, this ghazal was listed under Mirza Ghalib.

I am presenting the second song from the fiim, ‘Lalaji’ (1942) – hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din which is a ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib and sung by Vatsala Kumthekar and Amar. The ghazal is set to music by Vasant Kumar Naidu.

The original ghazal have 5 she’rs while the ghazal in the film has 4 she’rs. But the second she’r in the ghazal used for the film is not a part of the original ghazal of Mirza Ghalib. Even while reading the ghazal, the second she’r sounds off-kilter with the rest of the ghazal. My own guess is that probably, Arzoo Lucknawi who had written 8 songs in the film may have written this she’r keeping in view the situation in the film.

The ghazal is written as imageries of conversation of the poet with his beloved. Let me attempt English translation of 3 she’r of the original ghazal included in the song with the help of the meanings of some of the high-sounding Urdu/Persian/Arabic words, given by Ali Sardar Jafri in his book ‘Diwan-e-Ghalib’.

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din

ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti= at the time of drinking wine.
uzr-e-masti= pretext of pleasure (intoxication)

You be frank and open up to me while I am drinking wine some day.
Or else, in the pretext of drunkenness, one day, I will tease you (creating a nuisance).

qarz ki peete thhe mai lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din

faqa-masti=pleasure in adversity.

I drank wine on credit and yes, I thought that my wine-induced
cheerfulness in the midst of debt would be rewarded one day.

dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’ pesh-dasti ek din

dhaul-dappa=fist-fight

saraapa-naaz= proud from head to toe, coyness from head to toe.

shewa=habit, manner.

pesh-dasti=taking initiative, first move.

She, who is coquettish from head to toe is not in the habit of fighting.
I was the one who did the first move one day to make that (fight) happen.

The role of Vatsala Kumthekar as I understand from IDMb is that of a mujra dancer. Since Amar is acting in the film and is also singing along with her in this ghazal, I thought that the song may have been picturised on Vatsala Kumthekar and Amar. But the last she’r of the ghazal gives a hint that Amar may have sung this song for Yakub when he sings ….

hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’
nahin nahin
hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Hira’ pesh-dasti ek din

In this film, Yakub plays the role of ‘Hiralal’.

Audio Link:

Song-Hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din (Lalaji)(1942) Singers-Vatsala Kumthekar, Amar, Lyrics-Mirza Ghalib, MD-Vasant Kumar Naidu

Lyrics

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din

tujh se aankhen lad gayin aur dil machal kar rah gaya
kaise
tujh se aankhen lad gayin
aur dil machal kar rah gaya
doob gayi re
lut gayi
haay
haay
lut gayi re lut gayi is dil ki basti ek din
lut gayi re lut gayi is dil ki basti ek din

aa aa aa aaa
qarz ki peete thhe mai
lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
haan aah aaah
qarz ki peete thhe mai
lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din

dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
hum bhi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’
nahin nahin
hum bhi kar baithhe thhe ‘Hira’ pesh-dasti ek din

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4533 Post No. : 16095 Movie Count :

4394

Today, December 14, 2020 is the 86th birthday of Dadasaheb Phalke Award winner and Padma Bhushan Shyam Benegal who was born on December 14, 1934 in Hyderabad. He set a bench-mark for Hindi film industry by successfully making parallel films. His films became inspirations for some Hindi film producer-directors to venture into the ‘middle of the road’ films (a cross between mainstream and parallel films).

From the childhood, Shyam Benegal was familiar with a movie camera as his father owned a 16mm movie camera to shoot some family events. Besides, he was also exposed to English, Hindi and South Indian films which he used to watch in a theatre in an army cantonment in Secundrabad where his father worked as a professional photographer. In one of his many interviews, he had admitted that in his childhood, he was a film junkie and would watch any type of films.

At the age of 12, Shyam Benegal made his first amateur film of about 10 minutes duration from his father’s movie camera covering the visits of his family friends and relatives in summer vacations and going with them for picnics etc. As he grew up, he had already made up his mind to become a film maker. The success of ‘Baazi’ (1951) made by his cousin, Guru Dutt inspired him to the extent that ‘if Guru Dutt could do it why not me’? But those days, there was not much opportunity to pursue film-making in Hyderabad.

In 1955, Shyam Benegal visited Kolkata and met his uncle who knew that he was interested in film-making. He advised him to first watch a Bangla film made by an unknown person who was a commercial artist and let him know his reaction. The film he watched was Satyajit Ray’s maiden film ‘Pather Panchali’ (1955). For the first time, Shyam Benegal felt that this film was quite different from what he had so far seen in the theatre which included films from Prabhat, New Theatres,Bombay Talkies, Mehboob Khan and even some English films. He took a decision that if at all he became a film maker, he would make films which would be different from the mainstream films and would have his stamp of film-making.

In 1959, after completion of M.A. in Economics from Osmania University, Shyam Benegal came to Mumbai in his pursuit to become a film maker. Much earlier, Guru Dutt had invited him to join him as Assistant Director. But he had declined the offer as he did not want to take that route to become a film-maker. After remaining unemployed for about 6 months, he got a job in an advertising agency as a copyrighter. Within a short period, he became its creative head. During his stints in advertising companies in 1959-66, he made over 900 advertising and documentary films.

The working in advertising and documentary films gave Shyam Benegal the ‘hands on’ experience of all the major departments of film-making. During 1966-73, Shyam Benegal taught at Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) in Pune.

During college days, Shyam Benegal had written a script based on what he had witnessed during Telangana Peasants Movement (1946-51). Having gain the experience of film making, he had decided to make a full-length feature film based on his script. For such type of a film, it was difficult to get a financier and more difficult to get a distributor even if the film was made. After many attempts, at last, he got a financier, Mohan Bijlani of Blaze Films for his first film. Blaze Films had distributed many of Shyam Benegal’s advertising films. The title of the film ‘Ankur’ (1974) was suggested by Anant Nag for whom it was his maiden Hindi film.

The success of ‘Ankur’ (1974) resulted in Shyam Bengal’s partnership with Blaze Films in some of his subsequent films like ‘Nishaant’ (1975), ‘Bhumika’ (1977) and ‘Mandi’ (1983). During 1979-81, Shyam Benegal got the opportunity to make ‘Junoon’ (1979) and ‘Kalyug’ (1981) with Shashi Kapoor who not only produced these films but also acted in them.

By 1983, Shyam Benegal had proved his credential as a successful parallel film maker. Almost all his feature films not only recovered the cost of production, but also made money in some films. Despite this, Shyam Benegal had somewhat lean period after “Mandi’ (1983). During this time, Shyam Benegal kept himself busy with directing TV serials – a 15-part ‘Yatra’ (1982) for Indian Railways and a 53-episode ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) for Doordarshan which are regarded as Shyam Benegal’s classic T V serials.

Shyam Benegal was back to the films with his Muslim trilogy, ‘Mammo’ (1994), ‘Sardari Begum’ (1996) and ‘Zubeida’ (2001). He continues to make films of his choice which are different not only from the mainstream cinemas but also from his earlier films.

I had become aware of Shyam Benegal from his very first film ‘Ankur’ (1974) which I saw in the theatre after its release. Afterwards, I had no opportunity to see any of his subsequent films until I watched some of them in the digital era during the last 5-6 years. So, subsequent to ‘Ankur’ (1974), I always related his name with the Doordarshan serial, ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) which I had watched almost all the episodes during its first telecast.

Before ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’, I had watched other serials shown on Doordarshan like, ‘Hum Log’ (1984), G P Sippy’s ‘Buniyaad’ (1986), Kundan Shah’s ‘Nukkad’ (1986). Ramanand Sagar’ ‘Ramayan’ (1987) etc. But, in my view, none of these could match ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) in terms of grandeurs, technical excellence, performances of the actors, music and above all the brilliant filming of each episode by the director, Shyam Benegal. It was a monumental series encompassing the period from Indus Valley Civilisation to India’s independence. And this vast history and culture of India was to be covered in 53 episodes. I regard ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) as the top classic Doordarshan serial of an epic proportion which is yet to be qualitatively matched by any of the subsequent T.V. serials.

Shyam Benegal had said after many years that it was his sheer madness that made him to undertake such a mammoth work as it involved a lot of research, coordination with the actors and crew members especially when some of them were also working in the films. Furthermore, it was a risky venture involving religious, political and social commentaries over a period of 5000 years of history. Fortunately for him, there was no interferences from Doordarshan, political parties, religious and social organisations during the making as well as during its telecast. After the completion of the shootings, he was glad that he took upon himself this project giving him a great satisfaction and an experience of life time.

The genesis of making ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ for Doordarshan as revealed by Shyam Benegal in a Doordarshan interview goes back to the year 1985 when Doordarshan had already commissioned the serials ‘Ramayan’ (1987) and ‘Mahabharat’ (1988). Once these two religious serials were ready for telecast, they wanted to commission another serial on India’s history and culture for which Shyam Benegal was invited for discussion. He was already in the making of a serial ‘Yatra’ (1986) for Indian Railways to be telecast on Doordarshan.

During the school days, one of the relatives of Shyam Benegal had gifted him a book ‘Discovery of India’ (1944), written by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru while he was in Ahmednagar jail during 1942-46 following his participation in ‘Quit India’ movement in 1942. Shyam Benegal had read this book many times as he grew from boy into his adulthood. He was enamored by the history and diverse culture of India as enumerated in the book. He discussed this subject with the Doordarshan authorities and they approved the subject.

By early 1986, Shayam Benegal started the preliminary work on the T.V. serial for writing the script of ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ with a team of 10 writers which included himself, Shama Zaidi, Vasant Deo, Ashok Mishra among others and 22 eminent historians, each with their specialised fields. Simultaneously, he sent his Art Director and the Production Designer with a team of assistants to Archaeological Survey of India’s Office at New Delhi to research on the relevant periods of artifacts, costumes etc. After spending about 8 months in Delhi and other places all over India, they submitted their works.

After the script, screen-play and dialogues were completed, the shooting started in early 1988 which continued for the next 18 months. A major part of the shooting of all the 53 episodes was done at the Film City, Goregaon where as many as 144 sets were erected during the period of 18 months. Some shootings were also done at few historical locations in some parts of India and the shooting in the open ground and forests in the Western Ghats. Over 500 actors mostly drawn from FTII. National School of Drama and other film training institutes were involved in the shooting. Some of the prominent actors included Shabana Azmi, Naseeruddin Shah, Om Puri, Amrish Puri, Roshan Seth, K K Raina, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Pallavi Joshi, Aloknath, Pankaj Berry, Ila Arun, Irfan Khan, Vijay Kashyap, Anjaan Srivastav, Mita Vashisht, Tom Alter, Jalal Agha, Urmila Bhatt, Surendra Pal and many more. Some of them had done multiples roles in the serial.

I have given all these details of the serial just to get the readers the enormity of the project which was a herculean task for Shyam Benegal to manage. The end result was that ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ was as popular in terms of viewership as ‘Buniyaad’ and ‘Mahabharat’ according to Doordarshan. Another end result of this serial as Vanraj Bhatia said in a lighter vein was that after the end of 18 months of shooting, Shyam Benegal looked much older than his age.

On the occasion of Shyam Benegal’s 86th birthday, we wish him a happy birth day and pray for his good health and an active life as a film-maker. He has said in an interview a couple of years ago that film-making will remain his passion at any age as long as he is active.

On the occasion of Shyam Benegal’s 86th birthday, I felt that I should select one of many songs from his extravagant T.V. serial, ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) which he considers to be the toughest assignment he had undertaken so far. Only a couple of songs from this serial have been uploaded on a video sharing platform of which I have selected a Sufi ghazal, ‘zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful’ in Episode-27. This Amir Khusrou’s ghazal is sung in qawwali stayle by Murlidhar who is a singer-actor in Nepali film industry. He is one of the deciples of Pandit Jasraj. I have seen him in an interview on one of the Nepali T.V. Channels and I feel that qawwali may have been picturised on him as well. Vanraj Bhatia is the music director assisted by Kersi Lord and Ashok Patki.

In the serial, the qawwali is preceded by a devotional song of Sant Tukaram. Both the song and the qawwali are reflections of the influences of thoughts and culture of Hindus on Muslims and vice versa during the start of the Bhakti Movement in North India.

One of the main features of the ghazal is that the lines in the first couplet is written half in Persian and other half in Brij Bhasha. Thereafter in rest of the two couplets, the first line is in Persian and the second line in Brij Bhasha.

The actual ghazal has been written as under:

zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan

shabaan-e-hijraan daraaz choon zulf wa rooz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan

ba-haqq-e-aan mah ki roz-e-mahshar ba-daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
sapit mann ke duraaye rakhoon jo jaaye paaun piya ki khatiyaan

The English translation of the ghazal is on the video clip.

There are two more she’rs in the ghazal which have not been included in the qawwali. The omitted two she’rs are as under:

yakayak az dil do chashm jaadoo ba-sad-farebam ba-burd taskeen
kise padi hai jo jaa sunaave piyaare pee ko hamaari batiyaan

choon sham-e-sozaan choon zarra hairaan mehr-e-aan-mah bagashtam aakhir
na neend nainaan na ang chainaan na aap aave na bheje patiyaan

Acknowledgement: Some of the information for the article is taken from the following sources:

1. ‘Yaadon Ke Saaye’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal by Irfaan on Rajya Sabha TV.

2. ‘Dil Se’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal on a TV Channel.

3. The making of ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal conducted on Doordarshan.

Video Clip:

Song-Zihaal e miskin makun tagaaful ( Bharat Ek Khoj)(1988) Singer-Murlidhar, Lyrics-Amir Khusro, MD-Vanraj Bhatia
Chorus

Lyrics

aa aa aaaaaaaa
aa aa aaaaaaa aa aaaa
aa aa aaaaaa aa aa
aaaaaaaaa
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chhatiyaan
ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan

ki taab-e-hijraan
nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaahe lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chhatiyaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

shabaan-e-hijraan daraaz choon zulf
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah

sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon
to kaise kaatoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan

ba haqq-e-aan mah ki roz-e-mahshar
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
jo jaaye paaun piya ke khatiyaan
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
jo jaaye paaun piya ke khatiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4441 Post No. : 15885

Non Film Songs of Mukesh – 02
————————————-
These days, new-borns, barely a few hours old are made to wear full pants. It was not the case three and a half decades back at least in my case.

I got my full pant stitched only when I entered High School from primary grade. And, that too since it was mandatory for boys to start wearing full pants from VIII standard. Else, who knows, I would have had to wait for another 3 years for this luxury when I would step into college life. Jeans and readymade pants were an ultra-luxury which would have to wait for some more time.

What “aspect” of the body of a 12-year-old boy gets covered by wearing full pants is something which I have never been able to contemplate till today. Now at 46, I prepare wearing shorts even when going to the market. 🙂 How times change.

With full pants, the amount of pocket money received from parents also started improving. Especially, during and after matriculation, along with the coins, times arrived wherein I started possessing currency notes of 1, 2, 5 and on rare occasions even 10 and 20.

Family visits to restaurants did happen frequently. However, unlike the popular Punjabi la carte option these days, it was more of a combination of 2-3 snacks even for dinner. After matriculation, I developed the audacity of visiting restaurants on my own and ordering food items of my choice. This was basically after returning from college classes which were not so stringent as that of school. Then there was the option of bunking classes too.

Onion uttappa with a cup of tea or limca were my preferred choices. Sitting alone in restaurants and savouring these dishes is an experience I will never forget. At Belgaum, the place from which I hail, there were a few restaurants known for their special dishes. A hotel named “New Grand” established in 1948, had a popular and unique taste of upma which continues to be the talk of the city even today. Recently, the hotel has been demolished and moved away to a nearby location. But the ambience and the taste of food items no longer exits.

There is also a restaurant called “Ajantha” famous for its missal. It continues to be served to this day, but then again, the aroma and the taste of the bygone era is lost forever. Soft and fluffy idlis with unique taste of coconut chutney and sambar continue to be much preferred dish in this hotel to this day.

Quite adjacent to “New Grand” hotel was a theatre named Rex, which has also been now modified into a mini-mall/coffee shop etc. It was in this theatre that I saw my first and only “old Hindi movie” on a big screen.

The movie name was Neel Kamal released in 1968 which I saw in 1991/1992. I basically went to see it for the Rafi saab number Tujhko pukaare meraa pyaar. The storyline was quite annoying for me. Waheeda Rehman must have had a good walking exercise while the film was being made. 🙂

However, apart from the Rafi numbers, I came out of the theatre appreciating Asha Bhosale’s rendition of He rom rom mein basnewaale Ram. Listening and watching these songs which I had heard on radio/tape recorder on the big screen was quite a thrilling experience for me.

Born in 74, by the time I was 18, it was early nineties. Readers of the blog may well acknowledge that I write and present songs mainly from 40’s to 60’s. I sometimes venture into 70’s in case the need arises. So, basically, I discuss songs from an era before I was born. 🙂

Coming to watching old Hindi movies, I must admit that I score very badly on this front. I am yet to watch even classics such as Barsaat (49), Anmol Ghadi (1946), Deedar(1951), Andaz (1949) and a host of such movies. I did buy CD/DVD of many such movies but never cared to watch them.

Coming back to pocket money and my newfound freedom to spend on my own, I got myself involved into buying stamps, coins, books, novels, audio cassettes etc.

During one such venture in a cassettes shop, I came across a two-cassette pack of non-film ghazals of Mukesh. While I was quite familiar with filmi songs, it was on very odd occasions that I heard the NFS of Mukesh on Radio Ceylon. My joy knew no bounds when I caught sight of this pack. However, the joy seemed to be short lived. Let me explain.

The two-cassette pack was priced 55 and I must have hardly had 30 rupees. I was adamant on buying whatever 30 rupees could buy. The shop keeper explained that since it is a pack of two, individual cassettes cannot be sold. And for me to collect another 25 rupees would have taken months. I spent quite a while with him imploring and pleading to sell one of them. After much cajoling he did agree to sell Cassette No 01 priced 27.5 rupees.

The episode did not end with my purchase of one cassette. My next demand (off course free of cost) was the cover of the pack with a debonair looking Mukesh in excellent print staring straight into the eyes of the beholder. With special permission from the bosses, I am reproducing the picture of the cassette cover. I have always been awestruck with the gaze in the eyes of Mukesh in this picture.

The same snap of Mukesh was on the main cover. Now tell me, which Mukesh fan would walk away without possessing this poster.

Digressing, “poster” reminds me of my other craving and madness of collecting model Deepti Bhatnagar’s posters, calendars, advertisements or whatever my eyes would set upon featuring the beauty. This will require a separate and detailed article altogether and thankfully this series gives me ample scope and opportunity of indulging in such revelations. As the film trailers would shout “Coming soon at a theatre near you “, I have revealed the model’s name to keep the post awaited. 🙂

Coming back to the cassette story, the shopkeeper was in no position to yield stating that he himself is not sure if the other cassette would be sold as I had just bought only one. He even threatened to take back what he had just sold and return my money. Counting my blessings, I ran away with this single cassette. The date on which I had bought it was 30 January 1992. The cassette was released by HMV 4 years earlier in February 1988. I know these details since the cassette cover is still in my possession and I had this good habit of writing the date on which I bought such things.

At the shop, it did not cross my mind that I should have tried taking a photostat copy of the back of the pack or even noting the details of the songs that were printed. As for me, mobile phones in 1992 were only in the books of George Orwell, Arthur Clarke etc. 🙂

Well, after a couple of months, I did go back to the shop to purchase the second cassette. Yes, along with the pack cover ofcourse. 🙂

Unfortunately, the shop was selling some other commodities and the cassette guy had vanished. On enquiry, I was told that the earlier guy had closed shop for whatever reasons. I only prayed to God that the reason should not have been the sale of a single cassette for what should have been sold in a pack of two.

For many years, I always wondered what songs Cassette number 2 contained. Now with the advent of internet and the ease with which anything under the sun can be searched, I have got the full details of the cassettes. Interested readers may visit this site for the same.

Readers may be aware that I have posted two articles on the association of Mukesh with Khaiyyam saab in my other series. One article with the filmi songs of the combo and the other featured all the NFS.

Here is the post which covered the all NFS of Mukesh with Khaiyyam saab..
Coming to today’s NFS, I have chosen a Ghalib ghazal composed by Khaiyyam saab. Needless to mention, this ghazal is one of the ten songs in cassette number 01.

This ghazal was first released on records in 1963, as can be seen from the record label above.


Song-Ham rashq ko apne bhi gawaara nahin karte (Mukesh NFS)(1963) Singer-Mukesh, Lyrics-Ghalib, MD-Khayyam

Lyrics

ham rashq ko apne bhi gawaaraa nahin karte
ham rashq ko apne bhi gawaaraa nahin karte
marte hain vale un ki tamannaa nahin karte
marte hain vale un ki tamannaa nahin karte

dar pardaa unhen ghair se hai rabt-e-nihaani ee ee ee
dar pardaa unhen ghair se hai rabt-e-nihaani ee
zaahir kaa ye pardaa hai ki pardaa nahin karte
zaahir kaa ye pardaa hai ki pardaa nahin karte
marte hain vale un ki tamannaa nahin karte

ye baais-e-naumeedi-e-arbaab-e-hawas hai ae ae ae ae
ye baais-e-naumeedi-e-arbaab-e-hawas hai ae
Ghalib ko buraa kahte ho
Ghalib ko buraa kahte ho achchhaa nahin karte ae
Ghalib ko buraa kahte ho achchhaa nahin karte ae
Ghalib ko buraa kahte ho achchhaa nahin karte ae
ham rashq ko apne bhi gawaaraa nahin karte ae ae ae


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4421 Post No. : 15832

Today, August 25th is 51st Remembrance Day of Shaayar-e-Inquilaab, Makhdoom Mohiuddin, an Urdu poet, a dramatist and a politician whose name may not ring bell for many of the lovers of Hindi film songs. They may, however, be aware of a couple of his popular Hindi film songs such as ek chameli ke mandve tale from’Chaa Chaa Chaa’ (1964) and aapki yaad aati rahi raat bhar from ‘Gaman’ (1979).

Makhdoom Mohiuddin (04/02/1908 – 25/08/1969) was born in Medak in the then Hyderabad state (present day Telangana). He belonged to the family of religious teachers and preachers. He lost his father, when he was 6. Subsequently, his mother remarried and went away in her separate way making Makhdoom Mohiuddin almost like an orphan. He was brought up by his paternal uncle. It is said that Makhdoom was influenced by his uncle’s leaning towards the leftist ideology.

After completion of his school in the various villages in Hyderbabd State, Makhdoom moved to Hyderabad in 1929 and completed graduation and post-graduation from Osmania University by 1936. During this period in Osmania University, he wrote dramas in which he also acted in them. He got employed as an Urdu lecturer in the City College of Hyderabad. Later on, Hyderabad was to become his residence from where he got involved in the fight against British Rule for which he was jailed. He founded the Communist Party of India (CPI) in Hyderabad State and became the union leader for Electricity, Railways and Municipal workers under AITUC (the union wing of CPI). He was instrumental in creating the Hyderabad chapter of the Progressive Writers Association. In 1946-47, he joined the Telangana Agitation against the Nizam of the then Hyderabad State. After the police action against the Nizam of Hyderabad and its merger with India in 1948, Makhdoom Mohiuddin led the Teleangana Peasants’ Movements for land reforms. He successfully went on hunger strike for making available rice at a fair price for the lower strata of the population. Before that Makhdoom had led an arm rebellion against the Government for which he went underground for nearly 5 years.

In 1952, when the first general elections were announced, Communits Party decided to give up the arm rebellion and instead decided to participate in the election. Makhdoom Mohiuddin successfully contested the first general election as a candidate of CPI from Huzurnagar for Hyderabad State assembly and became the leader of the opposition. From 1956 until his death in 1969, he was the member of legislature council of Andhra Pradesh.

In his youth, Makhdoom was influenced by Munshi Premchand’s writings as also of Urdu poets like Daagh Dehlvi, Amir Minai and later Akhtar Sheerani and Hasrat Mohani. With the success of his play ’Murhsid’, during his university days, Makdhoom became a known personality among the circle of artists and intellectuals. During this time, he came into contact with Sarojini Naidu and though her with some of the top political leaders of that time including Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru.

In the pre-independent India, Makhdoom found time to write poetry in jails and during the period he was underground. Post-independence, he had an active literary life by reciting his poetry in political rallies and mushairas. During this period, he published his second collections of poems called ‘Gul-e-Tar’ (1961), the first being ‘Surkh Savera’ (1944). His poems are mostly in the genre of revolutionary and romance.

Makhdoom Mohiuddin died of heart-attack in Delhi on August 25, 1969. He was buried in Hyderabad. At the time of his death, he did not have a house of his own. The Communist Party raised money to buy a small house for Makhdoom’s family in Hyderabad. As a tribute to Makhdoom, Faiz Ahmed Faiz wrote a ghazal, taking the refrain from Makhdoom’s ghazal ‘aap ki yaad aati rahi raat bhar’ and in the same metre with a title ‘Makhdoom Ki Yaad Mein’:

आपकी याद आती रही रात-भर
चाँदनी दिल दुखाती रही रात-भर

गाह जलती हुई, गाह बुझती हुई
शम-ए-ग़म झिलमिलाती रही रात-भर

कोई ख़ुशबू बदलती रही पैरहन
कोई तस्वीर गाती रही रात-भर

फिर सबा सायः-ए-शाख़े-गुल के तले
कोई क़िस्सा सुनाती रही रात-भर

जो न आया उसे कोई ज़ंजीरे-दर
हर सदा पर बुलाती रही रात-भर

एक उमीद से दिल बहलता रहा
इक तमन्ना सताती रही रात-भर

After going through the chronicles of Makhdoom’s life, especially during the pre-independent India, it is admirable that he could find time to write both romantic as well as revolutionary poems in the midst of a very active political life. Makhdoom Mohiuddin’s personality has been best summed up by Khwaja Ahmed Abbas as under:

He was a glowing flame as also cool drops of dew. He was the call of revolution as also the soft tinkling of anklet. He was knowledge, he was action, he was wisdom. He was the gun of the revolutionary guerrilla and also the sitar of musician. He was the odour of gun powder and the fragrance of jasmine.

Makhdoom Mohiuddin did not specifically write lyrics for any Hindi films. However, his published poems were used in the films in ‘Usne Kaha Thha’ (1960), ‘Chaa Chaa Chaa’ (1964), ‘Insaaf Kahaan Hai’ (UR, 1978), ‘Gaman’ (1979), ‘Baazar’ (1982) and ‘Mandi’ (1983).

On the occasion of 51st Remembrance Day of Makhdoom Mohiuddin, I am presenting his ghazal ‘ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate’ which was used in the film ‘Mandi’ (1983). The ghazal is rendered by Asha Bhosle which is set to music by Vanraj Bhatia. In the film, the song is picturised on Smita Patil who sings for about one minute of duration in tune but without the accompanying music. The audio version contains the full ghazal with orchestration. unfortunately, video clip is not separately available online.

Acknowledgement: The biography of Makhdoom Mohiuddin in the article is based on T V Serial ‘Kahkashan – Makhdoom Mohiuddin (1991) and a Ph.D thesis, ‘Makhdoom Mohiuddin – Life, Works and Times’ by Afrose Fatima Ahmed (May 2011).

Audio Clip:

Song-Ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate(Mandi)(1983) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Makhdoom Mohiuddin, MD-Vanraj Bhatia

Lyrics

aa aa aa aaaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa

ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae ae
raat kate ae
dil ke angaare ko dahkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao

koī jalta hī nahin
koi pighalta hi nahin
mom ban jaao
pighal jaao
pighal jaao
ki kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao…o

hijr mein milne shab-e-maah ke ġham aaye hain
chaarasaazon ko bhi bulwaao
bulwaao
ke kuchh raat kate
raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao…o

chashm-o-ruḳhsaar ke aazkaar ko jaari rakkho
pyaar ke naghmen ko dohraao
dohraao
ke kuchh raat kate
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
dil ke angaare ko dahkaao ke kuchh raat kate ae
raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaao…o

aaj ho jaane do har ek ko badmast-o-kharaab
aaj ho jaane do har ek ko badmast-o-kharaab
aaj har ek ko pilwaaao
pilwaao
pilwaao
ke kuchh raat kate
koh-e-ġham aur giraan aur giraan aur giraan
ġhamzadon teshe ko chamkaao ki kuchh raat kate
kuchh raat kate
kuchh raat kate ae
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaao…o
ishq ke shole ko bhadkaaaao………o


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4302 Post No. : 15567 Movie Count :

4285

Recently, I came across a very rare song from an unreleased film ‘Rustom Aur Sohrab’ (1940s). The song was uploaded on video sharing platform by Giridharilal Vishwakarma sometime in 2018. Despite an extensive search on the website, I could not get details about the film such as producer, director, actors etc. Probably, this film may have been one among many films that had become the victims of partition in 1947.

The title of the film indicates that it was based on the legendary poem of the same name by the 10th century Persian poet, Firdausi which was a part of his epic, ‘Shahnameh’. I had some exposure to Firdausi in our History classes while covering the Persian Empire. I had also watched the ‘Rustom Sohrab’ (1963) on Doordarshan sometime in the 1980s. But I do not remember details of the story.

Just to recapitulate the details of the story as depicted in the film, a few days back, I watched the full film ‘Rustom Sohrab’ (1963) on VCD and in the process, I enjoyed Sajjad Hussain’s gems which have been well picturised. The surprise from watching the film was that after many years, I realised that the story of Rustom-Sohrab had some similarities with that of a story in a Yakshagana play in Kannada titled ‘Babruvahan Kaalaga’ (Babruvahan’s Battle) which I had watched during my childhood in the late 1950s. Of course. what ever may be the similarities, they are co-incidental.

During my childhood, I used to accompany our family to watch the artists performing Yakshagana which were generally held in the Cosmopolitan Sports Club ground in Matunga, Mumbai. Since it was staged in Kannada, I had difficulties in understanding the poetic renditions and dialogues. But I used to enjoy the dances, the costumes of the artists and the rhythm of ‘Chendu’ – a type of percussion. I can say that during my childhood, I have seen more numbers of Yakshagana performances than the films. A few of my relatives were also pursuing their hobby as Yakshagana artists. Because of this, I had easy access to their make-up and rehearsal rooms when Yakshagana plays were being staged.

Before I come back to the main subject, I need to explain what is Yakshagana Baylata (I guess, the word ‘baylata’ may have been derived from English word ‘Ballet). It is a dance drama, combining the poetic singing by a singer, called ‘Bhagvatar’ accompanied by music with artists dancing with expressions and gestures and thereafter delivering dialogues. The Yakshagana plays are mostly based on the stories from Ramayan and Mahabharat. This form of folk theatre is popular in the west coast of Karnataka from where it originated about 500 years back.

In the story in the Yakshagana play, ‘Babruvahan Kaalaga’ (Babruvahan’s Battle), there is a battle between Arjun and his son, Babruvahan. In the story of ‘Rustom Sohrab’ (1963), there is a battle between Rustom and his son, Sohrab. In both these stories, father and son are not aware of their relations until the battle comes to an end. Let me set out in details some similarities in the story of Arujun-Babruvahan battle versus Rustom-Sohrab battle.

While Pandavas were in exile, Arjun wandered into the kingdom of Manipura and paid a visit to the king who had a beautiful daughter, Chitrangada. During his stay, Arjun fell in love with her and asked the king for his daughter’s hand. King agreed on one condition that the son born after his marriage with Chitrangada would be the future king of Manipura. Arjun agreed and the marriage was solemnised. When Chitrangada was carrying Babruvahan in her womb, Arjun had to leave Manipura. In the intervening period, Arjun had no occasion to visit his wife Chitrangada and the son Babruvahan. Later, Babruvahan succeeded his grandfather as the king of Manipura.

In Rustom-Sohrab story, Rustom, a confident of the king of Iran, on a visit to Samangan, a neighbouring kingdom, rescues the chariot of Princess Tehminia and her entourage from a huge fallen tree by removing the tree by his sheer strength out of her way. The Princess is impressed. Before she could expressed her love for him, Rustom rides on his horse and moves back to Iran. To entice Rustom to come back to her, she arranges stealing of Rustom’s favourite horse. As expected, Rustom comes to Samangan, the Princes kingdom in search of his horse and meets her who reveals the truth behind stealing of his horse. Rustom likes the Princess. Both get married. In the meanwhile, trouble is brewing in Iran and Rustom must go back to Iran to save the kingdom. He leaves the Princess who is carrying Sohrab in her womb. Before leaving for Iran, Rustom gives the Princes a metal armlet with Rustom’s family logo with the instructions that she should put on the arm of their yet to be born offspring. She gives birth to Sohrab who over a period of time becomes as great a warrior as his father.

The trigger for Arjun-Babruvahan battle is the capture by king Babruvahan of the horse as a part of Ashwamedh Yagna. Arjun as the protector must get the horse released by defeating Babruvahan. In the battle, King Babruvahan defeats the army of Arjun and kills him with an arrow which was given to him by Ganga as a boon. When Babruvahan comes to know that Arjun was his father and by his act, he has made his mother widow, he tries to kill himself. But his step-mother Uloopi, using Nagamani (magical stone) as sanjivani, revives Arjun. So, this is a happy ending of father-son dual.

While in Rustom-Sohrab battle, just like in Arjun-Babruvahan battle, Rustom and Sohrab were unaware of their relations as father and son at the time of their fight. It is only when Rustom fatally injures Sohrab during the fight, and sees the armlet on the arm of Sohrab, he comes to know that he had fatally injured his own son and he repents. Sohrab dies in the arms of his father, Rustom. Thus, the story has a tragic end.

In both the stories, the killing of father by Babruvahan and killing of son by Rustom is to avenge the killings of the son of King Afsayed of Turanak by Rustom and killing of Bhishma, the son of Ganga by Arjun in Kurukshetra war. For instance, after the son of King Afsayed of Turanak is killed by Rustom while rescuing the King of Iran from their captivity in Turanak, Afsayed takes a vow that he would kill Rustom’s son. In the process, he comes to know that Sohrab is the son of Rustom. Having failed to kill Sohrab because he is as strong a warrior as his father, he lures him to fight Rustom on behalf of the Kingdom of Turanak so that in the fight, Sohrab will get killed by Rustom. In the case of Arjun, it is an arrow given as a boon by Ganga to Babruvahan to kill Arjun to avenge his killing of her son, Bhishma by deceit.

It is also interesting to note that in both the stories, a horse is captured albeit for different reasons.

‘Rustom Aur Sohrab’ the unreleased film of the 1940s had 6 songs. I am presenting the first song from the film ‘jo qaail-e-mahr-o-wafaa hi na ho’ which is sung by Nazira Begum. The name of the lyricist is not known. The song is set to music by Master Mohan which, I guess, is the same person as Mohan Junior who was the music director for film ‘Ajamil (1948) and ‘Dana Paani’ (1953). There was a music director, Master Mohan who has composed music for films during 1931-36.

The song is written in a ghazal format with high sounding Urdu words. From the wordings of the ghazal, I feel that this song fits well in a situation in the film equivalent to the situation of the song “ye kaisi ajab daastan ho gayi hai” in the film ‘Rustom Sohrab’ (1963).

Audio Clip:

Song-Jo qaail e mehr o wafaai na ho (Rustom Aur Sohrab)(1948) Singer-Nazira Begam, MD-Master Mohan

Lyrics

jo qaail-e-mahr-o-wafaai na ho
jo qaail-e-mahr-o-wafaai na ho
waade ka nibhaana kya jaane
waade ka nibhaana kya jaane
jo munkar-e-dard-ae-ulfat ho
jo munkar-e-dard-ae-ulfat ho
wo dil ka lagaana kya jaane
wo dil ka lagaana

kis tarah teer mohabbat ka
kis tarah teer mohobbat ka
pae wast(?) jigar mein hota hai
pae wast(?) jigar mein hota hai
iss raaz ko koi kya samajhe
iss raaz ko koi kya samajhe
ik dukh ko zamaana kya jaane
ik dukh ko zamaana kya jaane

ummeed kaa daaman chhoot gaya
ummeed kaa daaman chhoot gaya
aasaar bure hain furqat mein
aasaar bure hain furqat mein
ye aag lagaayi hai jisne
ye aag lagaayi hai jisne
wo isko bujhhaana kya jaane
wo isko bujhhaana

wo dil jo kabhi toota hi na ho
wo dil jo kabhi toota hi na ho
wo chot ki lajjat kya jaane
wo chot ki lajjat kya jaane
jis haath mein khanjar sajta ho
jis haath mein khanjar sajta ho
marham ka lagaana kya jaane
marham ka lagaana kya jaane
jo qaail-e-mahr-o-wafaai na ho
jo qaail-e-mahr-o-wafaai na ho
waade ka nibhaana kya jaane
waade ka nibhaana


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4178 Post No. : 15357

Commemorating Naushad Sahab’s 100th birth anniversary on 25th December 2019 :
————————————————————————————
Naushad Sahab’s journey as a music director is an astounding journey of 65 years beginning from 1940 to 2005. This is as in active working career. Born in Lucknow on 25th December, 1919, he completed his journey of the mortal existence on 5th May, 2006, in Mumbai. He is described as a composer, music director, film producer, writer, and a poet. Also credited for being the major contributor towards incorporating Hindustani classical into film music right from the 40’s.

I have just now found a portion of the thumri extracted from the movie “Paakezah” where it plays in the background in one of the scene’s. I have often seen references to the lost thumris of “Paakeezah”. They all have been used in the film in different scenes.

This particular thumri is having a famous ghazal by Mir Taqi Mir ‘dekh to dil ke jaan se utthtaa hai …..ye dhuaan sa kahan se utthtaa hai”. This ghazal has been immortalized by many singers in recorded version too. One of those versions by Mehdi Hasan was used in the background of one scene in Sai Pranjpe’s “Chashme Bad-door”. That also is a one memorable scene, where the friends sharing accommodation in Delhi, sharing much more including their cigarette’s are Farooq Shaikh, Rakesh Bedi and Ravi Baswani, while this ghazal is playing in the background. The full ghazal’s link is here.

I am giving the link here as those interested can see the full ghazal and can try and understand the spirit of it through meaning of words and terms also.

In the stats page, there are 3 songs credited to Mir Taqi Mir, so this should be the fourth. Two songs namely Patta patta boota boota from “Ek nazar” and dikhaayi diye yoon ke bekhud kiya I could connect with Mir Taqi Mir. Third one I couldn’t find.

He finds mention in this Mirza Ghalib Sha’ir:

Rekhte ke ek tumhi ustaad nahi Ghalib
Kehte hain agle zamaane mein koi ‘Mir’ bhi thha
Actually in the portion of this ghazal used in the film is only two sha’irs with words in the matla’a changed. Actual words are like this :
ishq ik ‘Mir’ bhari patthar hai
kab ye tujh na-tawaan se utthta hai

Here is the word “na-tawaan”. I have just recently written a hindi poem, which has this word “na-tawaan”, which I simply must share here.

आहट
जो मैं सुनती हूँ अँधेरों में
वो आहट, क्या तुम्हें भी सूनाई देती है
इन दीवारों की गहरी खौफनाक दराडों में
अनगिनत नातवां चींटियाँ दफन हैं
इन चींटियों को क्या हक़ था
की वो महलों के ख्वाब देखतीं
खुद को बुलबुल जान कर
गुलिस्ताँ में चहचहाती
क्या यह उनका अपना गुलिस्ताँ था
फिर क्यूँ वो इतना खिलखिलाती थीं ?
फिर जो भारी गूंज उठी गुलिस्ताँ में
बुलबुलों का चहचहाना बंद हो गया
क्यूंकी एक खूबसूरत इमारत जो बननी थी
उस में कुछ खुश्क रंगों की ज़रूरत थी
अति सुंदर, रंगीन, अंतिम लिबादा ओढ़े
सामने वही खूबसूरत इमारत खड़ी है
जो मैं सुनती हूँ अँधेरों में
वो आहट, क्या तुम्हें सूनाई देती है ।
——- x ——–

This small portion of the ghazal in thumri format is composed by Naushad and singer is Naseem Chopra. This song is a debut for Naseem Chopra in the blog, as her name is not featuring in the ‘stats’ page.

Audio :

Video :

Song-Dekh to dil ke jaan se uthhaa hai (Paakeezah)(1971) Singer-Naseem Chopra, Lyrics-Mir Taqi Mir, MD-Naushad

Lyrics

Dekh to dil ke jaan se utthtaa hai ae
Ye dhuaan sa kahaan se utthtaa hai
Ye dhuaan sa kahaan se utthtaa hai
Ishq ek ‘Mir’ bhaari patthar hai
Ishq ek ‘Mir’ bhaari patthar hai
Bojh itnaa kahaan se utthtaa hai
Ye dhuaan sa kahaan se utthtaa hai

——————————
Devnagri script lyrics (Provided by nahm)
——————————-

देख तो दिल के जाँ से उठता है
ये धुआँ सा कहाँ से उठता है
ये धुआँ सा कहाँ से उठता है
इश्क़ एक ‘मीर’ भारी पत्थर है
इश्क़ एक ‘मीर’ भारी पत्थर है
बोझ इतना कहाँ से उठता है
ये धुआँ सा कहाँ से उठता है


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4164 Post No. : 15337 Movie Count :

4227

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 11
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Dhuli’ (‘The Drummer’ 1954, Bangla film) was directed by Pinaki Mukherjee. The main star cast included Prashanta Kumar, Suchitra Sen, Mala Sinha, Anil Chatterjee, Pahadi Sanyal, Chhabi Biswas etc. The film is available for viewing with English sub-titles on the video sharing platforms.

The main theme in the story of the film is music. The story also throws some points for the audience to ponder as to how a simple villager’s life is threatened by the modernity of the city life. Also, how the innocence of a villager is affected by the materialistic life in the city. At the end, the virtues of a villager triumph over the materilism of a city dweller, of course at the cost of the death of the former who was a talented singer from the village. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Parashar (Prashanta Kumar), the grandson of a celebrated drummer in his village develops interest in singing when he witnesses a singer singing a devotional song during Durga Pooja. However, his grandfather wants him to continue playing Dhol as his family has been playing it for ages in the village. After the death of his grandfather, Parashar moves to Calcutta (Kolkata) to learn singing from a renowned music teacher (Pahadi Sanyal) who has a daughter, Minoti (Suchitra Sen). Since Parashar has no place to stay in Calcutta, he is given a room to stay in his teacher’s house. Soon after the completion of his musical training, his music teacher dies leaving him and Minoti in the house. In due course of time, Parashar becomes one of the popular radio singers. He also trains Minoti for singing. Both Parashar and Minoti develops liking in each other’s company. Both of them refrain from telling that they love each other.

There is a musical competition in which Minoti and Ratri (Mala Sinha), the daughter of a wealthy family, are the participants among others. Minoti wins the competition. Ratri who comes second in the competition is upset. She manages to employ Parashar as her new music teacher to improve her singing. However, he has to leave Minoti’s house as this was a pre-condition put in by Ratri’s mother lest it may become a scandal that Parashar was sharing the house with Minota after the death of her father.

The training sessions bring Parashar and Ratri close to each other who started liking Parashar. The closeness of Ratri and the respect Parashar gets from Ratri’s family is not liked by Pulak, a family friend who also acts as a Manager for Ratri’s singing concerts who believes that in a concert, appearance is more important than the singing talent. He tries to create a rift between Ratri and Parashar. Pulak wants to commercially exploit the singing talent of Ratri through publicity much against the wishes of Parashar. This leads to some rifts between them.

In the meantime, Parashar’s grandmother in the village is very sick. His uncle comes to Ratri’s house to take Parashar to his village. It is at this point, Pulak comes to know that Parashar belongs to drummer’s community. Ratri is upset as she thinks that he deliberately concealed his low caste identity. Upset with Ratri’s outburst, Parashar leaves Calcutta to visit his village to see his grandmother. But the turns of events have so much shattered the mind of Parashar that he becomes vagabond without eating for days. One day, he collapses at the banks of a river due to exhaustion and weakness. Minoti who comes to know about Parashar being missing, finds him and brings him to her house. But he does not recover from his illness and dies. So, the end is unconventional for a love triangle of this type in which it is one of the heroines who usually dies at the end.

Being a musical film, there are many songs in the film which I have lost count because some of the songs are very short. But I have noted that there are at least 3 full-pledged Hindi songs of three different genre – ghazal, semi-classical and devotional.

I have selected a ghazal, ‘taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi’ sung by Pratima Banerjee. Since Pt. Bhushan’s name appears as one of the lyricists in the film, others being Narayan Gangopadhyay, Pranab Roy and Bimal Ghosh, I have taken him as the lyricist for this song which has been set to music by Rajen Sarkar. The song is picturised on a young Mala Sinha.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi (Dhooli)(Bangla)(1954) Singer-Pratima Bannerji, Lyrics-Pt Bhushan, MD-Rajen Sarkar

Lyrics

aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi

chupke chupke nigaahon ne
kya keh diya
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
jin ki har baat honthon pe aane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani sunaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani sunaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi

dard unke mohabbat ka badhne laga
chaandni raat jab muskuraane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani

jal rahi ee ee hoon tamanna ki aag mein en en en
meri kismat mujhe ae ae ae ae
aazmaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
zindagi pyaar ke geet gaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi
taar dil ke jawaani hilaane lagi ee ee ee


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 17000 song posts by now.

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