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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1980s (1981 to 1990)’ Category


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4045 Post No. : 15173 Movie Count :

4169

Today (15 august 2019) is not only the independence day, it also happens to be the festival of Rakhi.

I have managed to post one independence day song on this occasion. Now it is time I cover a Rakhi festival song as well, before the day wears off.

This raakhi festival song is from “Dav Pech”(1989). The correct spelling should be “Daanv Pench”. This movie was produced by Padmini Kolhapure and directed by Kewal Verma for Padmini Films Private Limited, Bombay. The movie had Jeetendra, BhanuPriya(south),Prem Chopra, Dinesh Hingoo, Chandrashekhar,Shakti Kapoor, Bob Christo, Sunil Dhawan, Renu Joshi,C.S.Dubey, Manik Irani,Kamaldeep, Neeta Kapoor,
Sangeeta Kapoor,Master Rinku,Gurbachchan Singh, Gauri Verma,Jugnu, Azad Irani,Umesh Khanna, Surbhi Zaveri etc in it.

This rakhi song had two versions. The duet version (happy version) was sung by Sadhana Sargam and Shailendra Singh. It was picturised on Gauri Verma, Jeetendra and Master Rinku. The sad female solo version was just one stanza long and it was sung by Sadhana Sargam.

Indeewar is the lyricist. Music is composed by Anu Malik.

Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra long back.

With this song, “Dav Pech”(1989) makes its debut in the blog.

I take this opportunity to wish our visitors happy Raakhi and also happy independence day.

Duet

Female solo

Song-Main har janam teri bahna banoon (Daanv Pench)(1989) Singers-Sadhana Sargam, Shailendra Singh, Lyrics-Indeewar, MD-Anu Malik
Both

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)
———————————
Duet version
———————————

hoooo…oooooo…ooooo
oooo…oooooo…….oooooo

main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyyaa bane
main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyyaa bane
ek janam kyaa
saaton janam
teraa hi saayaa
sar pe rahe ae
main har janam teraa bhaiyyaa banoon
tu har janam meri behnaa bane

rishte naate bahut hain jag mein
koyee na rishtaa aisaa

bhai behan kaa pyaar hai paawan
gangaa jal ke jaisaa
main uss ghar ki karoon hifaazat
tu jis ghar ka gehnaa bane ae

main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyyaa bane

des rahen pardes rahen hum
badlenge naa iraade

raakhi ke dhaagon mein chhupe hain
pyaar bhare kuchch vaade
buri nazar koyee
chhoo na paaye
tu meraa laaj rakhaiyyaa bane ae
main har janam teraa bhaiyyaa banoon
tu har janam meri behnaa bane

ek janam kyaa
saaton janam
teraa hi saayaa
sar pe rahe ae
main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyyaa bane
hooooo….oooooooooo…ooooo ooooo….oooooooooo…..
ooooo….hoooooooooo……….ooooooooooooo….ooooo

————————————-
Lyrics (Sad female solo version)
————————————-
main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyya bane
ek janam kyaa
saaton janam teraa hi saayaa sar pe rahe ae
main har janam teri behnaa banoon
tu har janam meraa bhaiyya bane
tu har janam meraa bhaiyya bane

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4043 Post No. : 15168 Movie Count :

4167

I had not heard of a film named ‘Chatran’ (1988) until recently. The title of the film was unusual. I was wondering as to why the film in which Gulzar and R D Burman were associated, has remained obscure. After a search on the Google, I got the answer.

There was a Japanese film ‘Koneko Monogatari’ (1986) which became the most popular film in Japan in 1986 and continues to get earnings from this even now. Due to the film’s popularity, Columbia Pictures Industries (now Sony Pictures) dubbed the film in English under the title ‘The Adventures of Milo and Otis’ (1989). The English version film also became a box office hit.

But, before the English version of the film was released, the Indian film producer, Gul Anand got it dubbed in Hindi, titled ‘Chatran’ (1988). The film’s cast consisted of only the animals who did the live actions in the film. It is the story of a friendship between Chatran (the kitten) and Poosky (the pug-nosed puppy). So there were no dialogues in in all the versions of the film. The dubbing part is only of the narrators in the films. I watched the Hindi version of the film on the internet. The film is of 70-minute duration. The gist of the story is as under:

On a farm, a cat gives birth to seven kittens of which one of the male kittens, Chatran is naughty and is curious about its surroundings which sometime lands him in trouble. Chatran becomes friendly with mild-mannered Poosky and they become inseparable. They play ‘hide and seek’ game in the court yard of the farm in which Poosky is always a seeker and Chatran, a hider. But in this game, sometime Chatran gets in to trouble due to his curiosity. For instance, Chatran gets trapped in a chimney and with great difficulties, comes out of it with an ashen face.

One day, both Chatran and Poosky go towards the shore of a stream. Out of curiosity, Chatran enters into a wooden box lying in the stream water at the shore. Because of Chatran’s playful nature, the wooden box gets drifted to flowing stream. Poosky tries to save him by jumping into the stream but the wooden box gets drifted away from him. Poosky keeps trailing Chatran from the shores of the stream. From here onward, Chatran’s adventure starts.

Rest of the film is about how Chatran faces the problems and escapes on each occasion. He faces a bear but in nick of the time, Poosky comes to his rescue and fights with bear. Once Chatran comes out of the stream, he wanders in the forest and gets into trouble with snakes, bear and seagulls etc but successfully escapes. The positive side of his adventure is that during his wandering in the forest, he is sheltered by a deer and a pig with her piglets.

Finally, Chatran and Poosky unite in a vast meadow. They come back to their farm. They find their own mates and leave separately. They raise their own kittens and puppies. The film ends with Chatran and Poosky meeting each other with their extended family in the old farm house.

There were charges levelled against the original Japanese and English version films by Animal Rights Activists that there were cruelties to animals used in the filming. For example, there was a scene in which kitten plunges from a cliff and falls in the sea. Also, there was fight between the puppy and the bear. But the charges were never substantiated. However, I did not find any such problem for the Hindi version of the film from animal rights activists like PETA in India. Incidentally, the original Japanese film was of the duration of about 90 miniutes. But both the English and Hindi versions were of the duration of about 70 minutes. It is quite likely that some scenes which might have invited the wrath of Animal Rights Activists may have been deleted.

After watching the film, I personally felt that the scene in which the Chatran (the kitten) meows in pain when bitten by a crab (or scorpion?), looked to me real. Also, Chatran appeared stressful when he was drifting in the wooden box in the stream. And it is one of the longest scenes in the film. I do not know whether an animal put into such a stressful situation by a person, comes under the definition of ‘cruelty to the animal’.

As in the case of the Japanese and English versions of the film, the Hindi version,’Chatran’ (1988) has a ‘Sutradhaar’ (Narrator) and that function was superbly handled by Gulzar. At some places, he appears to have deviated from the original version. For example, in the beginning of the film, his narratives have unusual imageries which are not in the original Japanese version as well as in English version of the film:

Do bade bade sansaar hain ye, pariwaar hain ye.
Aakash aur dharti achche rishtedhaar hain ye.
Raat aakaash ki beti hai.
Kuchh kaali hai.
Aakaash ne gore chaand ki bindi de kar
isko chunmun karke taaron ke gahane pehanaayen hain.
Aur din aakaash ka beta hai.
Gora bhi hai magroor bhi hai.
Dharti par uski fazaa bhi hai.
Fazaa ke laakhon aur karodon chehare hain.
In cheharon se dharti par rounak rehti hai.
In sab mein zindagi behti hai.
In sab mein zindagi behti hai

The film has only one song of 4 stanzas, each stanza being played on 4 different occasion in the film. The last stanza is played with the montages of the film as credit titles roll. Asha Bhosle sings the words of Gulzar. The song is set to music by R D Burman.

With this song, ‘Chatran’ (1988) makes its debut in the Blog and also gets ‘yippied’ at the same time.

Video Clip(All the 4 parts)


Audio Clip(All the 4 parts)

Song-Zindagi zindagi zindagi (Chatran)(1988) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics

————————–
Part-1
————————–

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

khoobsoorat hai tu janm leti huyi
khoobsoorat hai tu janm deti huyi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

chhoo ke gujri hawa ke bahaane kabhi
aur shabnam mein utri nahaane kabhi
chhoo ke gujri hawa ke bahaane kabhi,
aur shabnam mein utri nahaane kabhi
ek mausum si gudgudi zindagi
zindagi

———————————-
Part-2
———————————-
na to dariya ruka na kinaara mila
door hota gaya jo sahaara mila
na to dariya ruka na kinaara mila
door hota gaya jo sahaara mila
dagmagaati huyi chal padi zindagi
dagmagati huyi chal padi zindagi
zindagi

————————————
Part-3
————————————-
dhoop chhaaon mein aisi buni zindagi
zindagi ne ye kaisi chuni zindagi
hans rahi thhi abhi ro padi zindagi
hans rahi thhi abhi ro padi zindagi
zindagi

————————————-
Part-4
————————————-
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

khoobsoorat hai tu janm leti huyi
khoobsoorat hai tu janm deti huyi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

pyaar hi pyaar hai kho gayi zindagi
ek se phir anek ho gayi zindagi
pyaar hi pyaar hai kho gayi zindagi
ek se phir anek ho gayi zindagi
ho gayi hai ye kitni badi zindagi
ho gayi hai ye kitni badi zindagi
zindagi
zindagi
zindagi

zindagi
zindagi
zindagi


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4038 Post No. : 15163 Movie Count :

4166

Naseeruddin Shah, in a chat with a newspaper journalist sometime in early 2014, had revealed that there were about 35 Hindi which have been completed in all respect but remained unreleased till that day. If the numbers are correct, it could be some sort of a dubious record for a Hindi film actor. But I am not surprised. Naseeruddin Shah has been mostly associated with the ‘parallel’ and the ‘middle of the road cinemas. And for such types of films, it is very difficult to get distributors to release the films.

Out of curiosity, I searched for the list of Naseeruddin Shah’s unreleased films on the internet but drew a blank. I could trace out names of his few unreleased films which included one untitled film directed by Mrinal Sen some time in 1970s, ‘Musaafir’ (1986) ‘Libaas’ (1988) directed by Gulzar, ‘Time Machine’ (1992) directed by Shekhar Kapoor, ‘Eelctric Moon’ (1992, English), ‘101 Days (1992), ‘Private Detective : Two Plus Two Plus One’ (1997), ‘The Coffin Maker’ (2013) ‘Chambal Safari’ (2014), ‘Company Ustaad’ (2014), ‘Mastaan’ (2014), ‘Thaak Jhaank’ (2016) etc.

From the above list, I found the film ‘Musaafir’ (1986) an interesting one for more than one reason. First, the film was directed by Dr. Jabbar Patel, an imminent Marathi theatre and film personality known for producing and directing classic Marathi dramas and ‘middle of the road’ Marathi films. This was Dr. Jabbar Patel’s first association with Hindi film as a director. Second, the film’s star cast included Rekha besides Naseeruddin Shah, Moon Moon Sen, Mohan Agashe, Usha Nadkarni and Pankaj Kapoor. Lastly, the songs were written by Gulzar which were set to music by R D Burman.

The film was based on a Marathi play ‘Ashi Pakhre Yeti’ (Aise Aaten Hain Panchhi or Here Comes the Birds) written by Vijay Tendulkar who wrote the film’s screen-play. Gulzar wrote the dialogues. The film was certified by the Censor Board sometime in 1984 but it could not get a theatrical release.

I searched for the film on the net but could not locate the DVD of the full film. Finally, I located the film which has been uploaded on YT in parts. From the quality of the video, I guess, the uploader has uploaded the video clips of the film ripping off from VHS tape. I also noticed that some parts of the film got repeated in the clips. So it was difficult for me to know as to the proper sequence of the story in the film. With these limitations, I give below a gist of the story of the film:

The story of the film can broadly be divided into two parts. In the first part, the story revolves around Naseeruddin Shah and Moon Moon Sen who have recently married and have been staying in a posh locality in Mumbai. While Naseeruddin Shah is a reserved type of man, Moon Moon Sen is an extrovert and tomboyish. She likes to spend the free time with her male friends. Being a daughter of a wealthy parents and convent educated, she has been brought up in a liberal environment.

Naseeruddin Shah resents his wife’s association with her male friends. But he is unable to tell so to his wife. He feels that if they start a family, perhaps she will have more time to spend with him than with her male friends. But his wife is afraid of child birth because of her earlier trauma of mis-carriage. His resentment inside him about his wife’s behaviour get worsen day by day. He has now become so paranoid that he starts suspecting his wife having an affair with one of her male friends (Benjamin Gilani) and fears that one day she would leave him. With these kinds of paranoid thoughts, he kills his wife by poisoning her and gets her admitted to a hospital in an unconscious state. After few hours of her admission, she dies. The doctors and police are waiting for the post-mortem report. Naseeruddin Shah decides to run away.

The second part of the story starts in a village in Kerala where after wandering all over India, Naseeruddin Shah decides to settle in a village in Kerala. Impulsively, he visits a house of a middle class family and introduces himself as one of the past students of a local school where he had studied during his childhood and where the patriarch of the family was a teacher. He gets this idea to introduce himself from the photographs displayed in the varandah of the house. With this, a comfort level between the family consisting of father (Mohan Agashe), mother (Usha Nadkarni), daughter (Rekha) and son (Pankaj Kapoor) and himself have been established. The family allows him to stay with them for few days.

During his stays, Naseeruddin Shah comes to know that all four of them suffer from different problems arising from lack of confidence. With his wits and persuasion, he changes their lives to make them confident. In the meanwhile, the parents are scouting for a groom for their daughter (Rekha). She is presented to the prospective groom who has come to see her with his family. The groom’s family approves of her but she rejects the groom as she has fallen in love with Naseeruddin Shah who has taken shelter in her house.

Naseeruddin Shah tries to bring the rejected groom and the bride together to discuss as to the reason for her rejection of him. In this process, Naseeruddin Shah comes to know that the Rekha has developed a soft corner for him. He decides to leave the house without the knowledge of the family. But Rekha comes to know of his plans and confronts him as to why he leaving the village. Naseeruddin Shah gives many excuses but Rekha is not convinced. Finally, he reveals that he is a murderer and the police forces are looking for him. Rekha still thinks that he is lying just to justify his leaving the village. Knowing that he is determined to leave, she tells him that she would not now stop him for leaving the village.

Naseeruddin Shah returns to his apartment in Mumbai where he used to stay with his wife. He is overwhelmed with the nostalgia. While standing in front of a mirror in his bedroom watching his own reflection, images of his wife and Rekha come. The faster interchanges of images in the mirror of Moon Moon Sen and Rekha make him emotionally unstable. He commits suicide by a gun shot at his own head.

The film has three melodious songs of which I have chosen to present the song ‘thhak gaya hoon mujhe sone do’ sung by Kishore Kumar. This song is played as a background song which comes in the film at a crucial stage. Naseeruddin Shah is running away from Mumbai after killing his wife. The song symbolises the transition from his Mumbai story to the next story in a Kerala village to start his life afresh.

The song is also available in studio recording version with somewhat different orchestrations with an additional antara. I like this version more than the film’s sound track version for its orchestration. From the studio version, one can notice that before Kishore Kumar starts singing, there is a faint voice (probably of R D Burman) saying ‘1, 2, 1, 2, ‘start’. After the second antara of singing, Kishore Kumar makes a mistake by repeating the second antara. There is a faint voice saying ‘cut’ and he stops singing. Some instructions to Kishore Kumar, probably from R D Burman in faint voice can be heard after which R D Burman repeats his part of singing and Kishore Kumar takes over his singing of third antara. In the lyrics given below, I have omitted the repeat portion.

It is a melancholic song in keeping with the situation in the film. Gulzar saab’s lyrics are simple but conveys the depressing situation in his trade-mark style. The tune is melodious and the orchestration is good in the context of the song.

Audio (Studio recording version)

Video

Song-O bahut raat huyi (Musaafir)(1986)(UR) Singers-Kishore Kumar, R D Burman, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics(Based on the studio recording version)

o bahut raat huyi
thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi
o chaand se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
chaand se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

zindagi ke sabhi raaste sard hain
zindagi ke sabhi raaste sard hain
ajnabi raat ke ajnabi dard hain
yaad se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
yaad se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

aashiyaan ke liye chaar tinke bhi thhe
aasre raat ke aur din ke bhi thhe
dhoondhte thhe jise wo zara si zameen
aasmaan ke tale kho gayi hai kahin
dhoop se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
dhoop se keh do utar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi

o maloya….aa
chalo dheere dheere
o maloya….aa
chalo dheere dheere

yaad aata nahin ab koi naam se
yaad aata nahin ab koi naam se
sab gharon ke diye bujh gaye shaam se
waqt se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
waqt se keh do guzar jaaye
bahut baat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
o bahut raat huyi
main thhak gaya hoon
mujhe sone do
(o maloya….aa)
main thhak gaya hoon
(chalo dheere dheere)
main thhak gaya hoon
(o maloya….aa)
mujhe sone do
(chalo dheere dheere)


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4037 Post No. : 15161 Movie Count :

4164

Hullo to all in Atuldom

I simply love this app called YouTube on the internet, and when Rajaji reads this he will agree that YouTube is a lovable app. This app has a feature whereby after you finish seeing a video or song, it suggests similar songs which might match what you have just seen in genre etc. And it gives some very good suggestions.

A few days back I was seeing the video of a song from the 1980s’ movie “Utsav”. I was seeing the Suresh Wadkar song “saanjh dhaley gagan taley” as I was trying to zero in on a song for Suresh Wadkar’s birthday. At the end of that song this song began playing. I was floored by the rendition by the female singer on the stage. This was a song I had never heard before inspite of it being from a Prakash Mehra movie that I was aware of. The said song is from the Farha Naaz- Sanjay Dutt- Sumeet Saigal- Rohan Kapoor & Pran starrer “Imaandaar” (1987) which was directed by someone called Sushil Malik.

This movie had Anjaan, Maya Govind and Prakash Mehra as lyricist and Kalyanji Anandji as music composers. And I felt that this will be the perfect song to wish Suresh Ishwar Wadkar on his birthday. It is a semi-classical song with two female singers – Sadhana Sargam and Alka Yagnik singing with Suresh Wadkar. All the three singers have great voices, control over ragas and raginis. The song just sounded so divine and I was sure that all those who complain, that songs of the 80s lacked in melody and was all disco only, will definitely appreciate the song.
And then I heard the song again on the audio link available on YouTube and noted the lyrics and found it difficult to note down the ‘swaras’ that occur in the song as they are rendered at a faster ‘taal’ than the rest of the song.

The song was just growing on me and so I looked up for its video which is easily available. And Then The Anti-climax occurred. It made me feel I should not have seen the video. My first reaction was who in his sanest of senses would give this kind of choreography to this lovely song. That it was filmed almost on the lines of a disco that is a stage show was bad and to make things worse we have Sanjay Dutt on stage.

Here I shall make it very clear that I am not against Sanjay Dutt the actor, only that I was never his fan. In the 80s when he made his debut, almost parallel to Kumar Gaurav there was a clear divide among the young females as to who was a better actor/ looker. Kumar Gaurav won on the looks front and Sanjay Dutt had his followers who felt he was the better actor. And as things stand now after all these years Kumar Gaurav has vanished and Sanju baba (his pet name) is still around and going strong and he has just turned 60 last week on 29th July. So this song can serve as an example of how he used to be.

But let us keep prejudices aside and enjoy this Kalyanji Anandji creation for the melody that Suresh Wadkar, Sadhana Sargam and Alka Yagnik pour into our ears.

Here is wishing Suresh Wadkar on his 64th birthday. Suresh Wadkar -who made his Bollywood debut with Rajshri Pictures “Paheli” in 1977 under Ravinder Jain and followed it up with “seene mein jalan” in “Gaman” in 1978 under Jaidev. He has various awards from different state organisations but the Filmfare has eluded him inspite on record number of nominations.
So here is the song.

Video

Audio (Full)

Song-More ghar aaye sajanwa (Imaandaar)(1987) Singers-Suresh Wadkar, Sadhana Sargam, Alka Yagnik, Lyrics-Maya Govind, Prakash Mehra, MD-Kalyanji Anandji
All

Lyrics

o o o
o o o
o o o o
o o o o
o o o o
o o o o
o o o o o
aa aa aa
dh ani sa nee sa
(am not able to catch the swar here)
o o o
o o o o
o o o o o

more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
daal daal kooke koyaliya
daal daal kooke koyaliya
mann mayur naache aanganwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa

ang ang chhalke madhu madira
ang ang chhalke aeeee
o o o
ooooo
oooooo
ooooo
ang ang chhalke madhu madira
chhede chhailwa madir nainwa
chhede chhailwa madir nainwa
jhoom jhoom dole re mannwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa

mitwa aaa mitwa aa
mitwa aaa mitwa aa
mitwa aaa mitwa aa
tu kahaan
bin meet mera dil soona
bin preet mera dil soona
bin meet mera dil soona
bin preet mera dil soona
re mitwa
tu kahaan
tu kahaan

more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa

na koyi humdam na humsafar
na dilruba na koyi dilbar
na koyi humdam na humsafar
na dilruba na koyi dilbar
dhoondh rahee hai meri nazar
dhoondh rahee hai meri nazar
mil jaaye kahin koyi
mitwa aa
mitwa aa
mitwa aa

more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa

ho sapna dekhu har pal yahi
apna mujhko keh de koi
sapna dekhu har pal yahi
apna mujhko keh de koi
aisa bhi din aaye kabhi
aisa bhi din aaye kabhi
mil jaaye kaheen koyee
mitwa aa
mitwa aa
mitwa aa

more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
daar daar kooke koyaliya
mann mayur nachein aanganwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
more ghar aaye sajanwa
sa sa sa sa
sa dha ma sa sa sa
sa dha ma sa sa sa
sa dha ma sa sa sa
la la la la la la la la
la la la la la la la la
la la la la la la la la

sa sa sa dha ma sa
la la la la la la
sa re re ga ga ma ma dha ni ni sa
sa re re ga
la la la la la la la la
sa ni sa ni dha
la la la la la la la la
ga re ga re sa
la la la la la la la la
sajanwa
aaja ghar aaja re mitwa
aaja ghar aaja re mitwa

sa sa sa sa sa sa
ni ni ni ni ni ni
sa sa sa sa sa
sa sa sa sa sa
(again unable to catch the swar)
Ni dha ma dha ni
Sa sa sa sa sa
Ni dha ma dha ni
Sa sa sa sa sa
Ni dha ma dha ni
Sa sa sa sa sa
Aaaaaa aaaaa


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4029 Post No. : 15146

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 8
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The previous post in this series was delayed by about a week or so. And today’s post, I have been saving this medley song to write about this person, but not sure about which date to bring it on. A chance reminder three days ago, brought up this song and this post, almost immediately.  But then, other priorities intervened as usual, and this post is late by three days. 🙂

The person I write about, in this post, is Ravi Baswani. Yes, the sidekick companion of Naseeruddin Shah in the cult classic ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’ of the year 1983.  Coincidental that the posts for these two friends are coming up one after the other. And both are in the same series, and both posts are a medley of songs from the earlier years. One difference is the nature and the composition of the medley of songs – I will come to this point again a little later in the write up. And the second difference – for Naseer we celebrated a birthday anniversary, but for Ravi, the occasion is his remembrance day. Yes – 27th July in the year 2010, he suffered a massive cardiac arrest, quite unexpectedly, and was no more. He was in Haldwani, on the way back to Delhi from Nainital, where he had gone for location scouting for his first full length feature film, as a director. In the prime of his health, and on the top with his career in cinema and theatre – leaves a regret in the mind, that it was not a time to go.

Ravi was born on 29th Sept in the year 1946, in the city of Bulandshehar in UP. His father, Balram Singh, was a doctor by profession, and his mother, Shingaar Kaur, a homemaker. Practically everyone who knows him or knows about him, always presume him to be a Sindhi – Baswani <> Vaswani and so on.  Interestingly, he is not. He belongs to a Jat family, whose correct family name is Baswan. How this surname got transformed into Baswani is an interesting tale by itself. It is a case of a clerical zeal.

As per his own description, his father applied for a passport sometimes in the late 1930s. His application form was processed by a Bangla person. It just came to his mind and he decided that the surname ‘Baswan’ is spelt incorrectly. He assumed in his mind that the correct surname should be Vaswani – a name that one is more familiar with. And being a Bengali speaking person, he decided that the spelling of the surname should be Baswani – i.e. the Bangla version of the pronunciation of Vaswani. The passport got processed, and Ravi’s father’s name was transformed to Balram Singh Baswani for good. All for the zeal of a processing official to set right the name of the applicant. As his father appeared for and got selected for study of medicine, his name was taken from the passport as a reference. And surely enough, the doctor’s degree pronounced his name as Baswani. Beyond that point, his father then made no attempts to get the name rectified. And Baswani got carried into the next generation. Of course, all his uncles and cousins were not so affected – the rest of the clan still continues to be Baswan.

He further says that he could have made a choice to revert to his original family name, when he started his filmi career. But then, when he signed up for his debut film – ‘Chashm e Baddoor’, his father had then passed away just a few weeks earlier. Somehow emotionally he felt compelled not to desert his father’s surname, and decided to keep it.  And that is the name he signed up for life then.

The family moved to Delhi in 1946-47 and settled down in the Connaught Place area. Ravi’s education happened at St Columba’s School and Kirori Mal College (Delhi University). As per his own declaration, there is nothing in his lineage before him remotely connected with stage and acting. But inside him, there was an actor that expressed itself, both at school and at college. He made his debut on stage at the age of six, in a school play. As per his own admission, he fell in love with acting and dramas during his years at the Kirori Mal College.

The dramatics society at the Kirori Mal College, called simply ‘The Players’ is one of the most vibrant, and famous theatre groups in Delhi. Founded by the legendary dramatist, Frank Thakurdas in 1957, this theatre group boasts of some of the biggest names in theatre and cinema, who learned their craft here. The list will impress you – Amitabh Bachchan, Dinesh Thakur, Shakti Kapoor, Satish Kaushik, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, and many more names of the current TV and cinema scene. During his college days, he won the Delhi University’s Best Actor award, at the university lever drama competition.

Ravi says that of course, he had no intention of pursuing acting as a career.  After college, he quite dutifully joined the sales department of a large company. He worked there for two years. During the later part of these two years, something happened. Ravi came down with a case of jaundice, which he himself attributes to excess of alcohol, and was resting up, away from work. During this time, he went to see a play one day. The play was the iconic ‘Evam Indrajeet’, by the famous dramatist Badal Sircar. It was directed by Shyamanand Jalan and Kalyan Chatterjee played the title role. The play is based on the legend of Sisyphus from the Greek mythology. Sisyphus is cursed with the task of pushing and rolling a large rock up a hill. When he reaches the top, the rock rolls down the other side, and he starts all over again, pushing the boulder up the hill now from the other side. This lifelong curse simply continues forever without any respite.

Ravi says, it suddenly struck him right between the eyes – that is what his life was all about. And he asked this question of himself – is that all that there is to life? As soon as he was well enough to go the office, he went into his manager’s room and tendered his resignation, bidding a good farewell to a budding corporate career, once for all.

With no plan for the future in mind, and very little finances to support himself, he took on free lancing in the Delhi theatre circle. He remembers with fascination, the privilege that he had to work with stalwarts of the theatre world such as BM Shah, Mohan Upreti, Om Shivpuri, MK Raina, Joy Michael, Bansi Kaul and Ebrahim Alkazi!

Realizing that acting alone would not support a life, he also started training himself to be stage designer and director. During this time, he got together with some other free lancers like himself and set up a theatre group which was, quite interestingly named Non-Group. In a matter of a short time, this group became a force to reckon with in Delhi’s theatre circuit. Their crowning achievement was organizing non-stop 24 hour play festivals on the leap day (29th Feb) in the years 1976 and 1980, which included dance, drama, music, films and the fine arts.

Ravi notes that the turning point in this wayward journey as a freelancer came his way close to the end of 1970s. Naseeruddin Shah, a very old and close friend on the theatre circuit, landed in Delhi with the script of the film ‘Sparsh’ (1980) in his hands. As Ravi went over the script with Naseer, he writes that he was convinced – here was a National Award in the making for Naseer. His gut feel did pan out as reality a couple of years down the road, as Naseer bagged his first National Award as the best actor, for his sensitive portrayal of a blind man’s challenges in the apathetic world of the normal people.

Ravi writes that after going through the script, he was quite sure it had no role for him, but being the buddy of Naseer, he would have been quite content to even be his light boy. As the things unfolded, Sai Paranjpye, the producer director of this film, assigned the task of props design and management for the film to Ravi. This was his first real introduction to the world of cinema. The one great positive outcome of this endeavor was establishing a great relationship with Sai Paranjpye. So much that when Sai started work on ‘Chashm e Baddoor’ (1981), this time around Ravi had a very meaty role – his debut in the film world, in front of the camera this time.

His role in ‘Chashm e Baddoor’ was nominated for the Filmfare’s Best Comedian award. This was followed up with two more nominations in 1983, for – oh so quite expectedly – ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’ and ‘Ab Aayega Mazaa’. He bagged the award for ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’ in face of stiff competition against himself (for ‘Ab Aayega Mazaa’), and Satish Shah (for ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’). That does create a record of sorts – three nominations for Filmfare award for the first three films of his career; quite so.

Quite early one might say, but he moved into the small screen in 1984 with the comedy serial ‘Idhar Udhar’. And very soon, turned a director for TV serials with ‘Hakke Bakke’ in 1988, and more with ‘Kisse Miyan Biwee Ke’ and ‘Panchhi’. And then on to Sony channel with ‘Just Mohabbat’ and ‘Jassi Jaisi Koi Nahin’.

Twenty five feature films in about three decades. He picks the following as his best performances – ‘Ab Aayega Mazaa’ (1983), ‘Yaatna’ (1985), ‘Monsoon’ (2005) and ‘Yun Hota To Kya Hota’ (2006). He worked with children theatre a lot – about 400 plays he directed for children of ages from 5 to 17. Best of my work, he says – it left him being a child, permanently.

And then, at the peak of his active life, and in the midst of numerous projects, he was gone – just like that, nine years ago.

Coming to the song – another unlisted repeat song, or rather a medley of songs, from the film ‘Chashm e Baddoor’. This film is one of the most memorable comedies in my listings. It is funny tale of three very close friends, college going students, who live through the most normal college going life and activities for singles of the male species i.e. pursuing girls to strike a relationship. The three friends – Siddharth (Farooque Sheikh), Jomo (Ravi Baswani) and Omi (Rakesh Bedi), share an apartment. There are fun capers of sharking cigarettes on loan from the corner pan-beedi waala (role played by Saeed Jafrey), biking around aimlessly – three on a mobike, efforts to catch attention of ladies, who would be less than interested in their types, etc. Then one day, a new family moves into the neighborhood. There is a young lady Neha in that family (role played by Deepti Naval). And once having seen her, they, or at least the two – Omi and Jomo, are desperate to contact her, and try to build a friendship. With great difficulty they are able to locate her address. And then there is a wager. They will each make an effort to strike a friendship with the lady, and may the best man win.

Omi goes in first, he is mistaken for plumber, asked to make plumbing repairs. Of course he does not know the right end of the tap or the wrench, and has to escape from the house with his dignity and physical features intact.

Jomo goes in second. He masquerades as the younger brother of a Bombay film producer who has come to Delhi in search of fresh talent. He gets into the house, but his outcome is worse than Omi – watch the video clip.

The fun part is that both of them, on return to their penthouse apartment (called a barsaati in Delhi – a single isolated room on the terrace of a house), both of them spin a false yarn on how they were able to impress the lady, and have a initial go ahead for a relationship.

The clip that I have uploaded, gives the Jomo episode from start to finish – the way he loses his dignity and also physical features, and the tall tale that he tells to his friends on return. This clip is a favorite – vintage Ravi Baswani at his best.

And in the bogus and fictitious tale that he spins for his friends, he falls back on a string of old Hindi film songs, to create and convey the lovey-dovey mood of success in setting up a friendly relation with the lady.

Unlike the previous episode, where we had a typical set of songs – all Rafi-Shammi Kapoor songs – this medley has a mix of male, female and duet songs, with multiple singing voices. The treat in this medley is Ravi Baswani, taking on the mantle of Dilip Kumar, Rehman, Joy Mukherjee, Shammi Kapoor, Rajesh Khanna, Sanjeev Kumar, Feroze Khan, Dev Anand, and Sunil Dutt – all short cameos of a few seconds each. My personal favorite is the imitation of Dev Anand – one just has to see to believe it.

Closing this episode and also bringing to close the brief bio on this multi-talented actor and comedian – he never pursued a career. It was the career that kept hounding after him all his life. Alas, gone too soon. Good bye Ravi. . .

[Author’s Note: A fair part of the material for the write up on Ravi Baswani is taken from Ravi’s personal website, which, interestingly, is still active.]

Song – Karna Tha Inkaar, Magar Iqraar Tumhi Se Kar Baithe (medley)  (Chashm e Baddoor) (1981) Singers – Female Voice, Male Voice [Multiple], Lyrics – [multiple], MD – [multiple]
Female Voice + Male Voice

Lyrics

karna tha inkaar
magar iqraar
tumhin se kar baithe
na na karte pyaar
tumhin se kar baithe. . .

pyaar kiya koi chori nahin ki
chhup chhup aahen bharna kya
jab pyaar kiya to darna kya
pyaar kiya to darna kya
jab pyaar kiya to darna kya. . .

hum chhod chaley hain mehfil ko
yaad aaye kabhi to mat rona
is dil ko tassalli de dena
ghabraaye kabhi to mat rona
hum chhod chaley hain mehfil ko. . .

na jaao sainyaan
chhuda ke bainyaan
kasam tumhari main ro padungi
ro padungi. . .

sheesha ho ya dil ho..oo..oo
aakhir . . . toot jaaata hai
toot jaata hai
toot jaaata hai
toot jaaata hai

o o aa ja
aa aa aa ja
a a a aa ja
aa aa aa ja
a a a aa ja
aa aa aa ja
a a a aa ja
aa aa aa..aa. . .

tum ne pukaara aur
hum chale aaye
dil hatheli par ley aaye re..ea..ea
tum ne pukaara aur
hum chale aaye. . .

aap jaisa koi meri zindagi mein aaye
to baat ban jaaye
haan haan baat ban jaaye
aap jaisa koi meri zindagi mein aaye. . .

aah
chhod do aanchal
zamaana kya kahega
oo oo oo
chhod do aanchal
zamaana kya kahega
ha ha ha
in adaaon ka
zamaana bhi hai deewaana
deewaana kya kahega
oo oo oo
chhod do aanchal
zamaana kya kahega. . .

logo. . .
na maaro isey
yahi to mera
dildaar hai. . .

ab chaahe sar phoote ya maatha
maine teri baanh pakad li
ab chaahe sar phoote ya maatha
maine teri baanh pakad li. . .

hum tum
yug yug se ye geet milan ke
gaate rahe hain
gaate rahenge..ea..ea
hum tum
jag mein jeevan saathi ban ke
aate rahe hain
aate rahenge..ea..ea
hum tum. . .

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
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करना था इंकार
मगर इक़रार
तुम्हीं से कर बैठे
ना ना करते प्यार
तुम्हीं से कर बैठे॰ ॰ ॰

प्यार किया कोई चोरी नहीं की
छुप छुप आहें भरना क्या
जब प्यार किया तो डरना क्या
प्यार किया तो डरना क्या
जब प्यार किया तो डरना क्या॰ ॰ ॰

हम छोड़ चले हैं महफिल को
याद आए कभी तो मत रोना
इस दिल को तसल्ली दे देना
घबराए कभी तो मत रोना
हम छोड़ चले हैं महफिल को॰ ॰ ॰

ना जाओ सैंयां
छुड़ा के बैंयां
कसं तुम्हारी में रो पड़ूँगी
रो पड़ूँगी॰ ॰ ॰

शीशा हो या दिल हो
आखिर ॰ ॰ ॰ टूट जाता है
टूट जाता है
टूट जाता है
टूट जाता है॰ ॰ ॰

ओ ओ आ जा
आ आ आ जा
अ अ अ आ जा
आ आ आ जा
अ अ अ आ जा
आ आ आ जा
अ अ अ आ जा
अ अ आ॰॰आ॰ ॰ ॰

तुम ने पुकारा और
हम चले आए
दिल हथेली पर ले आए रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
तुम ने पुकारा और
हम चले आए॰ ॰ ॰

आप जैसा कोई मेरी ज़िंदगी में आए
तो बात बन जाये
हाँ हाँ बात बन जाये
आप जैसा कोई मेरी ज़िंदगी में आए॰ ॰ ॰

आह
छोड़ दो आँचल
ज़माना क्या कहेगा
ओ ओ ओ
छोड़ दो आँचल
ज़माना क्या कहेगा
हा हा हा
इन अदाओं का
ज़माना भी है दीवाना
दीवाना क्या कहेगा
ओ ओ ओ
छोड़ दो आँचल
ज़माना क्या कहेगा॰ ॰ ॰

अब चाहे सर फूटे या माथा
मैंने तेरी बाँह पकड़ ली
अब चाहे सर फूटे या माथा
मैंने तेरी बाँह पकड़ ली॰ ॰ ॰

हम तुम
युग युग से ये गीत मिलन के
गाते रहे हैं
गाते रहेंगे॰॰ए॰॰ए
हम तुम
जग में जीवन साथी बन कर
आते रहे हैं
आते रहेंगे॰॰ए॰॰ए
हम तुम


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4027 Post No. : 15141 Movie Count :

4159

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 7

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A birthday greeting that is now a week ago (plus one more day 😉 ). Many many happy and healthy returns Naseer ji – may we all be blessed with a few more decades of accomplished performances by yourself.

Memories do always seem to connect as if yesterday. Maybe it is the ‘me’ inside me that is never changing in this ever changing world, and so every memory, every remembrance of every person, place, happening, event, vision, hearing a song on the radio, and yes, seeing films in black and white on the TV screens in neighbor’s homes – everything seems to have happened just yesterday.

The film was ‘Manthan’ (1976). And the days were when we would just sit and watch a film on TV for no reason – just that it was a Saturday / Sunday and Doordarshan would be airing a feature. Much later in life I would surprised to find out that some of the films I had watched on TV were actually color films. But then, those black and white images in the memory are more prized and dear now, than the actual color visuals captured later in the day (yesterday, I mean – as I said, everything seems to have happened yesterday).

So, ‘Manthan’ it was. A film that was part of the earliest batch of New-Wave cinema in India. From the first viewing, the memory that I have is, that I do not remember anything about the film or its storyline, its characters, their names, performances etc. Everything that I know about this film is from later viewings. But there are two items that are stuck in the storage from that viewing – one is a visual of a man driving a jeep, a woman trying to follow him on foot, and the song playing – “Mero Gaam Kaathha Paarey”. And the second is a funny mention – a belligerent villager pronouncing the word ‘society’ as ‘sisoti’ (सीसोटी). That is the earliest data byte stored in memory about this exemplary and infinitely versatile performer – Naseeruddin Shah.

Beyond that of course, getting in later teens and going to college, it was trendy and fashionable to go see new wave films – and so a much crowded occupancy of memories related to his films. The list seems to go on and on – ‘Nishant’ (1975), ‘Bhumika’ (1977), ‘Godhuli’ (also 1977), ‘Junoon’ (1978), ‘Sparsh’ (1979), ‘Aakrosh’, ‘Albert Pinto Ko Gussa Kyon Aata Hai’, ‘Bhavni Bhavai’ (all three in 1980), then ‘Chakra’ and ‘Sazaay e Maut’ (what a solid psychological thriller this one is), both from 1981, ‘Bazaar’ (1982), then a ton of them in 1983 – ‘Katha’, ‘Mandi’, ‘Ardh Satya’ and the peerless cult classic ‘Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro’, then ‘Paar’, ‘Mohan Joshi Haazir Ho’ and ‘Khandhar’ in 1984, ‘Mirch Masala’ in 1985, and in 1986, ‘Musafir’, and ‘Genesis’ – the unforgettable film of primeval emotions and human relations, by Mrinal Sen.

On the way, his career merged into the commercial circuit, and, with some of the then current group of parallel cinema performers, he established himself as a performer at home both with ‘sisoti’ and “Oye Oye Aaaa. . . O Tirchhe Nainon Waali” (‘Tirchhi Topi Waale’, 1998). The ease with which he has straddled both the streams is really heartwarming. It simply goes to underline his openness and his versatility. Starting with ‘Hum Paanch’ in 1980, he entered into the mainstream commercial Hindi cinema and has made an enviable position for himself in the industry with creditable performances in films like ‘Umrao Jaan’ (1981), ‘Dil Aakhir Dil Hai’ (1982), ‘Masoom’ and ‘Who Saat Din’, (1983), ‘Ghulami’ and ‘Trikaal’ (1985), ‘Karma’ (1986, in the esteemed company of Dilip Kumar), ‘Ijaazat’ (1987), the fabled ‘Pestonjee’ in 1988, along with ‘Hero Hiralal’ and ‘Maalamaal’. In the 1988 Merchant-Ivory production of the crime thriller ‘The Perfect Murder’, he plays the pivotal role of Inspector Ghote. Then on to ‘Tridev’ in 1989, ‘Police Public’ in 1990. . . and then there are many, too many to be listed here. A sampler of important ones –‘Vishwatma’ (1992), ‘Sir’ (1993), ‘Mohra’ (1994), ‘Himmat’ (1996), ‘Chinagate’ (1998), ‘Sarfarosh’ (1999), ‘Hey Ram’ – the role of Mahatma Gandhi (2000), ‘Monsoon Wedding’ (2001), ‘3 Deewaarein’ and ‘Main Hiin Na’ (2004), ‘Iqbal’ (2005), ‘Omkara’ and ‘Banaras’ along with ‘Yun Hota To Kya Hota’, his debut as a director in (2006), ‘Parzania’ (2007), ‘Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na’ in which he plays the role of a portrait on the wall, and ‘Mere Baap Pehle Aap’ in 2008. . . As I said, his notable performances are simply too numerous to be sampled.

Naseer was born in Barabanki (UP) on 20th July, 1949. His parents, Aley Mohammed Shah and Farrukh Sultan, are originally from Meerut. His school education happened at St. Anselm’s in Ajmer and St. Joseph’s College in Nainital. After doing his BA from Aligarh Muslim University, he joined the National School of Drama in Delhi. From there on, the rest is all fairly recent history. His work, on stage and on screen is the story of his life.

On the way, he has earned two National awards for the best actor – ‘Sparsh’ in 1979 and ‘Paar’ in 1984, and one National award for the best supporting actor in ’Iqbal’ (2006). He also has to his credit three Filmfare awards for Best Actor –  ‘Aakrosh’ (1981), ‘Chakra’ (1982) and ‘Masoom’ (1984). He also won the Volpi award for the best actor at the Venice Film Festival in the year 1984 for his performance in ‘Paar’. He has also been honored with the national awards of Padam Shri (1987) and Padam Bhushan (2003).

The song being presented today is a repeat category item with a slight difference. It is a medley of 6 songs, that have been strung together into a wonderful imitiation performance by Naseer. There is a specific similarity in this set of songs. All are rendered by Rafi Sb, and all are Shammi Kapoor songs on screen. The audio segments edited together are all original renditions, with no effort to re-record or improvise.

The choice of Shammi Kapoor songs all – you may ask. Yes, the interesting background to this song does indeed involve Shammi Kapoor as an important figure in the storyline, albeit in absentia.

The film is ‘Sitam’ from 1984. The film is produced by Vikram, and is directed by the husband wife team of Aruna Raje and Vikas Desai. The main cast of actors is Naseeruddin Shah, Smita Patil, Vikram. Asrani, Sulabha Deshpande, Seema Deo, Vikas Desai, Arun Sarnaik, Keith Stevenson amongst others.

Subhash Munkur (role played by Naseeruddin Shah) is a lively, jolly fellow who loves to live the life to its fullest. He is a middle income family person, working in a certain office. He is an avid football player and is the captain of the homegrown team in his company. He is also a very fervent fan of Shammi Kapoor, and imitates his acting and sings his songs. His wife, Meenakshi (role played by Smita Patil) is a home maker, and they have a small son to complete their small dream world.

One day, suddenly, this dream world is mortally shattered. Subhash passes away in a freak inadvertent accident on the football field. Meenakshi is devastated and crushed – she had a very loving relationship with her husband.

This song medley appears in the film a little while after the accident. Meenakshi is alone at home and the memories of Subhash are all around her, and she is traumatized by them. She envisions him still in the home, and singing Shammi Kapoor songs as he used to, to woo her and also to irritate her. Whichever part of the home she goes to, there is a song and a vision attached with it, and she continues to see him singing, in the balcony, in the kitchen, in the bedroom, on the dining table – everyplace in the home. She is not able to hold her grief, and is sobbing and in tears all the time, while this ‘dream of wide open eyes’ is being enacted around her.

So here is a treat of Shammi Kapoor songs, performed quite well by Naseeruddin Shah. Of course the original personality is the big difference, but still, it is a creditable imitation. Once again, this medley is not listed in the EP of the film or in the Geet Kosh and is available only on the film track.

The rest of the story is an interesting premise. Inder (role played by Vikram), the person who inadvertently caused the accident on the football field, is till then unknown to Meenakshi. He locates her and tries to become friendly with her and her son. He is guilt ridden and some how wants to make some amends, he knows not how. But then Meenakshi discovers the truth behind his visits. She further accuses him, berates him and in anger asks him to leave her home. Inder goes back and attempts to commit suicide by slashing his wrists. He is taken to the hospital and saved, but now the guilt factor in his mind has multiplied manifold. He becomes suicidal and a mental patient, and is shifted to the mental ward. The doctors understand his situation that the only remedy for him is to get forgiveness from Meenakshi. And of course, Meenakshi, in her own shattered state of mind, is in no condition or frame of mind to forgive Inder.

This is actually where the film starts. The earlier events are presented as a flashback, and the rest of the film is about how Meenakshi comes to terms with her grief, and ends up forgiving Inder. The film is a very interesting psychological narrative.

Enjoy this replay of six of the famous songs of Shammi Kapoor. I have listened to and viewed this clip so many times now, and every time, it seems to end just too soon. One does not realize that more than three minutes have passed. And the mind actually waits for yet one more song segment.

And the added bonus is the improvised performance by Naseeruddin Shah. Great performer, great actor – I am sure you will agree.

 

Song – Kisi Na Kisi Se Kabhi Na Kabhi (medley)  (Sitam) (1984) Singers – Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – [multiple], MD – [multiple]

Lyrics

kisi na kisi se
kabhi na kabhi
kahin na kahin dil lagaana padega. . .

tum ne mujhe
dekha
ho kar
meharbaan
ruk gayi ye zameen
tham gaya aasmaan
jaan e mann
jaan e jaan
tum ne mujhe
dekha. . .

badan pe sitaare lapete huye
o jaan e tamanaa kidhar ja rahi ho
zara paas aao
to chain aa jaaye
zara paas aao
to chain aa jaaye
badan pe sitaare lapete huye
o jaan e tamanaa kidhar ja rahi ho
zara paas aao
to chain aa jaaye
zara paas aao
to chain aa jaaye. . .

kya haseen mod par aa gayi zindgani
ke haqeeqat na ban jaaye meri kahaani
jab aahen bhare ye thandi pawan
seene mein sulag uth’ti hai agan
tujhe dekh ke kehta hai mera mann
kahin aaj kisi se mohabbat na ho jaaye. . .

dil ke jharokhe mein tujh ko bitha kar
yaadon ko teri main dulhan bana kar
rakhunga main dil ke paas
mat ho meri jaan udaas
dil ke jharokhe mein tujh ko bitha kar
yaadon ko teri main dulhan bana kar
rakhunga main dil ke paas
mat ho meri jaan udaas. . .

tum ne kisi ki jaan ko
jaate huye dekha hai
wo dekho mujh se rooth kar
meri jaan ja rahi hai
wo dekho mujh se rooth kar
meri jaan ja rahi hai
tum ne kisi ki jaan ko
jaate huye dekha hai
wo dekho mujh se rooth kar. . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

किसी ना किसी से
कभी ना कभी
कहीं ना कहीं दिल लगाना पड़ेगा॰ ॰ ॰

तुम ने मुझे
देखा
हो कर
मेहरबान
रुक गई ये ज़मीन
थम गया आसमान
जान ए मन
जान ए जान
तुम ने मुझे
देखा॰ ॰ ॰

बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जान ए तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ
तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ
तो चैन आ जाये
बदन पे सितारे लपेटे हुये
ओ जान ए तमन्ना किधर जा रही हो
ज़रा पास आओ
तो चैन आ जाये
ज़रा पास आओ
तो चैन आ जाये॰ ॰ ॰

क्या हसीन मोड़ पर आ गई ज़िंदगानी
के हक़ीक़त ना बन जाये मेरी कहानी
जब आहें भरे ये ठंडी पवन
सीने में सुलग उठती है अगन
तुझे देख के कहता है मेरा मन
कहीं आज किसी से मोहब्बत ना हो जाये॰ ॰ ॰

दिल के झरोखे में तुझको बिठा कर
यादों को तेरी मैं दुल्हन बना कर
रखूँगा मैं दिल के पास
मत हो मेरी जां उदास
दिल के झरोखे में तुझको बिठा कर
यादों को तेरी मैं दुल्हन बना कर
रखूँगा मैं दिल के पास
मत हो मेरी जां उदास॰ ॰ ॰

तुमने किसी की जां को
जाते हुये देखा है
वो देखो मुझसे रूठ कर
मेरी जान जा रही है
वो देखो मुझसे रूठ कर
मेरी जान जा रही है
तुमने किसी की जां को
जाते हुये देखा है
वो देखो मुझसे रूठ कर॰ ॰ ॰


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4018 Post No. : 15127 Movie Count :

4154

In the blog, Sudhir Jee sometimes describes me as Ranchiwala Gaanewaala.

I have spent the formative years of my life in Ranchi. But when I think about it now, I find that the last time I visited Ranchi was in 1991 ! So it has been 28 years since I lost touch with Ranchi ! More than a quarter of a century !

I would dearly love to go to Ranchi and relive my memories of that place. It will be an emotional, sentimental and nostalgic visit whenever I go there.

But do I have to actually go there to relive the memories of that place ? Now a days it is possible to try and relive those memories online as well. So, I tried to see if I could relive some of my memories through online technologies.

My father was a railwayman who joined Railways in 1958, before I was born. He was posted in Ranchi. Initially he lived here and there in rented accomodations and finally he got a railway quarter in Ranchi railway colony in 1964. He retained this quarter till 1992. It was vacated after he retired.

So, this small quarter in Ranchi was my base for more than a quarter of a century. Of course, I had left Ranchi in 1983 to pursue Engineering (in Railways itself).

I studied upto class V in one school. It only had classes upto V, so later I was admitted to another school from where I passed my matriculation in 1978. Then I joined college. So these were the three places where I went to study while at Ranchi.

On searching online, I found a few photographs of Ranchi Railway station and I noticed that the main building of Ranchi Railway station was virtually unchanged from what it was in 1970s.

I fired up google earth and zeroed it in to Ranchi Railway station. On zooming it in, I began to see many familiar locations. On North of the Railway station, there was a playground. It was Railway sports ground, now called SERSA (South Eastern Railway Sports Association) stadium. Till 1970s, it was an open field where buffaloes used to roam all around. When I used to commute between my home and school on foot, I would take this route (via the sports ground) while returning. In case some football matches were going on in the evening, I would stop and start watching the football match, postponing my return to home. 🙂

One Railway inter departmental football tournament was held during december 1974 and its final was played on 1 january 1975. There was a good crowd to watch the final, and naturally I too was there. The team that I was supporting (it was the team belonging to my father’s department) played well, but the opposition team, despite being outclassed on the field, managed to emerge winners, much to my disappointment. The teams were awarded by the Chief Guest and his wife. I wondered why he was the chief guest. Much later I came to know that he was the chief guest because he was the boss of Adra Division (Ranchi Railway station was under Adra division). His designation was Division Superintendent. Now this designation is changed to Divisional Railway Manager. The gentleman who was the DS was from the same service to which I would belong more than one decade later. I met that gentleman, named S M Bhargava much later in 1990s when I was posted in Secunderabad and he was settled there after retirement.

On google earth, I could also locate my school where I studied upto matriculation. This school has since been relocated to another far off place and it has been converted as an Ashram. The locals opposed this move, but the school authorities succeeded in converting it into an Ashram. On zooming the place, I could locate my erstwhile school (now an ashram). I could see the place which used to be our playground within the school, where we would play during lunch break.

Likewise, I was able to locate my earlier school and also my college on google earth.

What about locating my quarter ?

I zoomed in to the area south of Railway Station. I got disillusioned and disappointed because the area appeared totally unfamiliar. So what has happened. Has the Railway colony been totally changed and rendered unrecognisable ? I felt despondent and thought that a major part of my younger days has been robbed off.

Then I braced myself, and began to look again. This time I began to look with more concentration and this time I started to recognise places. Then I zeroed in to a place which had to be my quarter which was my base for 28 years. I compared it with other landmark. I became more and more convinced that this is indeed the place. I could recognise the other landmarks as well.

The quarter indicated with hand was my place.
When I looked at adjacent quarters, I recalled the persons who stayed in those quarters. I also located the river (Harmu River) that flowed may be 200 metres from the quarter.

What about my neighbours in the colony ? Can I locate some of them online. Likewise, what about my school mates, college mates ? Is it possible to locate someone.

I realised that locating the neighbours would be a tall order. I knew them mostly by their nicknames, not by their actual names. And in most cases, I was not even aware about thei names.

I decided that my best (and only) bet was to locate Josephs. Mr Joseph lived on the quarter adjacent to our quarter. He was a Railway driver. In one of my nostalgia pieces, I have mentioned that some of my neighbourhood kid used to have the best quality hoop made out of steam locomotive piston rings. I was talking about the Joseph kids.

How do I locate these Joseph Kids ? The one kid in my age group was known to us by his nickname of Chikkoo. But what was his real name ? I wrecked my brain, and remembered that his “school” name was Christopher. So I looked for Christopher Joseph on facebook. I located one, who had mentioned that he lived at Ranchi. I remembered that the Joseph’s had bought plot near the railway colony and had built their home there as Mr Joseph was nearing retirement in early 1990s. So it made sense that Christopher Joseph, the eldest available son would inherit that home after his father and would stay there.

But the facebook page contained little information and not even any DP. But when I looked at his facebook friends, I came across one person called Eugene Joseph. This person had his photograph in his facebook page. This person was unmistakably Eugene Joseph, the younger brother of Christopher Joseph. He was born in february 1966 in their railway quarter and the young neighbourhood kids including me were allowed to see the newborn brother of Chikkoo on that very day. He was named Eugene. Kids had difficulty pronouncing the name and they called him “Engine”. Later their younger brother was born and he was named Ashley. Obviously this name too was difficult to pronounce for kids and he was promptly renamed Asli by the kids. 🙂 The kids were like that. I recall that they had trouble pronouncing a kid called Shakeel and they would call him “cycle”. 🙂

I tried to locate some more neighbourhood kids but drew a blank mainly because I was not aware of their formal names.

What about locating my school mates and college mates by the same method ? I had tried that in the past and I was able to locate a school kid called Shyamal Kumar Dey. We were in the same class in school and later on both of us got admitted to St Xavier’s college, Ranchi in 1978. His facebook page mentioned that he had done Engineering from West Bengal and had then joined a PSU. He was incidentally posted in Ranchi itself which was the HQ of his PSU.

In 2018, when I first located him on facebook, I sent him an email message. He did not respond. Perhaps he could not remember me or may be he did not consider me worthy of responding.

What about someone from college, apart from Shyamal Dey ? I could locate one.

St Xavier’s college, Ranchi admitted only the “brightest” students where brightness was judged by marks obtained in the matriculation examination. The Bihar Board topper among girls, who had achieved fourth rank overall in the state was a resident of Ranchi and she had also joined St Xavier’s college. The students were divided into two sections, viz section A and B. Each section had batches. All girls were in the same batch. Some boys were also in that batch. I was among the boys who were in the batch alongwith girls. Needless to say that boys of other batches envied the boys of this batch. 🙂 Personally I think that most boys of this batch were quite simple and “bhondoo”, Amol Palekar type. 🙂 I do not recall interacting much with any of those girls. Once while doing chemistry practicals, I by fluke had produced a perfect bead while doing borax bead test. The instructor showed this bead to all including the girls telling them that it was created by one among them. 🙂

More than one decade later, I was in Delhi, as part of my probation as a Railway probationer. We were doing parliamentary training, where we would attend a three day seminar on how parliament functions. On one day we were also taken to Parliament to watch how it functioned. We saw Parliament hall from visitor’s gallery and watched the then PM V P Singh replying to some parliamentary question.

The parliamentary training batch had members of two other services in addition to Railways. The participants had their names written in front of them. I found the name of a lady participant matching the name by which we knew her in our college. It was unmistakably the same lady. Her surname differed which was only to be expected because she must have been married by that time.

Next day I mustered enough courage to approach her and talked to her. It turned out that she was indeed the same lady. She informed me that she had married an IAS officer who was then posted as an ADC to the Governor of that state.

That was nearly three decades ago. While searching for my college time mates, I came across the name of this lady once again. I found that considerable information was available on her online. Her husband had reached the top viz had become Principal Secretary of that state. They had two sons and one of them was an IAS officer as well. So this class mate of mine, who was the topper among girls in matriculation examination of Bihar that year was doing very well in her life. I felt happy for her.

I tried to locate some people, but drew a blank. I think that I need to physically go to Ranchi and visit the familiar landmarks, including the place where I stayed and try to find some old acquaintances who may actually be staying in Ranchi even today. That I suppose would be a tall order. Most people may have been staying elsewhere by now.

Ranchi itself has changed considerably, as I have been informed by those who are more current with developments in Ranchi. I was able to locate a few relatives of mine who were settled in Ranchi but they were too young for me to find much in common with them. I tried to locate their parents instead but they were not on facebook. In one of my posts on Binaca Geetmala 1971 finals, I have mentioned my Mama with whom I was going to Ranchi but had an unscheduled night halt in another town. I could locate his children on facebook but not the mama himself. Those kids were not even born by that time. The mama himself was not on facebook.

When I thought of a song to accompany my reminiscences about Ranchi, I was very clear about the movie the song was to be from. The movie had to be “Hip Hip Hurray”(1984). One clear reason is that the story of this movie takes place in Ranchi ! So, it is a perfect movie for my purpose.

“Hip Hip Hurray” (1984) was produced by Manmohan Shetty and Pradeep Uppoor. It was the debut movie of Prakash Jha as a movie director. The movie had Raj Kiran, Deepti Nawal, Deepa Rani, Nikhil Bhagat, Shafi Inamdar etc in it.

I would have saved my effort by quoting the story of this movie from wikipedia or imdb, but the story as contained in these sites are horrible. So I have provided my own summary of the story here:

Sandeep Chaudhary (Raj Kiran), a resident of Mumbai is a computer science and Electronics Engineering graduate as well as a sports enthusiast. After his graduation, he appears for some job interviews, including one interview for a multinational computer company (called IDM 🙂 ). The people taking interview on behalf of the company seem to be totally clueless about computers going by the kind of questions he ask (more seriously, it is a reflection on the dialogue writer’s lack of knowledge of computers. Our venerable Gulzar is the dialogue writer.)
He has a smart and pretty career minded and fast life loving girl friend Uma(Deepa Rani).

While Sandeep Chaudhary is waiting for offer from IDM, which is likely to take three months, his uncle asks him to use this time fruitfully by joining as a sports teacher in a school at Ranchi whose principal is known to him.

So Sandeep Chaudhary boards a train and arrives Ranchi Railway station. He takes a rickshaw and reaches the school. The school Jamnadas school (a fictional school-scenes of this school were shot in Vikas Vidyalaya and Bishop Westcott Boys’ School in Ranchi ) is full of incompetent and careless teachers as well as disinterested, disillusioned and indisciplined students.

School teachers there ask him -” Mr Chaudhary, Bambai ke kis school mein padhaate thhe aap ?”
Sandeep Chaudhary- “jee main engineer hoon. computer science aur electronics mein”.

Hindi teacher- “electric mein hain ? Aap electrician hain. To khel kood mein kahaan se aa gaye?”

Hindi teacher gives his gyan- “Khel kood se is desh ki pragati sambhav hai kya. Ab aap hi bataaiye. Hamaare desh ke jo bhi mahaan neta thhe.
Mahatma Gandhi, Nehru, Subhash, Guru Nanak, Kabir aur kaun sa footbaal ya hockey khela karte thhe ye log ?”

Sandeep Chaudhary tries to bring discipline in the sports field and is met with resistance by students, led by the rouge student Raghu (Nikhil Bhagat). Raghu, who has failed four years in a row in the same class is a school bully and he has a teenager’s crush on lady teacher Miss Anuradha Roy (Deepti Nawal).

It is clear that the ambitions and temperaments of Sandeep Chaudhary and his fiancee do not match. With Sandeep Chaudhary in Ranchi and not in habit of keeping in touch with his near and dear ones through letters (the usual way of keeping in touch those days), Uma writes to him that there was little point continuing this relation and they should part ways. And she wishes him best of luck for future.

Sandeep Chaudhary decides to build a school team despite resistance from all concerned, viz teachers, students as well as parents. He presses on regardless. The experience of the first football match is disastrous though, because the school team loses 0-12. Sports teacher of the other team (played by Shafi Inamdar) mocks him- “aapko sport teacher kisne bana diya Mr Chaudhary ?”

Sandeep Chaudhary renews his efforts to built a stronger team. He gradually wins over those good players (led by Raghu) who had kept away from playing the earlier match. Gradually, all of them except Raghu join in. Raghu, who thus finds himself isolated does not like it and he retaliates by attacking Sandeep Chaudhary. And he then falsely implicates Sandeep Chaudhary of roughing him up. This lie gets busted because of the evidences provided to the Principal by Miss Anuradha Roy, who herself is a victim of stalking by Raghu. The Principal decides to expel Raghu from school. But Sandeep Chaudhary intervenes and prevents his expulsion. A chastened Raghu grudgingly falls in line and starts practicing with the football team.

The students practice with great motivation, waking up early in the morning and reporting at the sports field for practice. There are murmurs of resistance though. Parents of one Kid prohibits their son from participating in football citing his poor academics as the reason. Sandeep Chaudhary goes and meets them to try and persuade them.

“pichhle saal wo ek baar fail kar chuka hai.”- mother of the boy states.

“lekin, pichhle saal to koi games nahin thha hamaare school mein.”- Sandeep Chaudhary points out.
“toh tum kya kehna chaahte ho. Football khelne se uska maths aur science theek ho jaayega.”- is the sarcastic retort by the father.

“No Sir. Mere kehne ka matlab hai games mein hissa na lene ka matlab zaroori nahin hota hai ki padhaai achchi ho jaati ho. Haan ye zaroor hota hai ki bachche jo school se bhaage rahte hain unka school mein dil lagne lagta hai. Aur phir, rahi baat maths aur science ki main Inder se pehle hi kah chuka hoon main usey tuition khud doonga na.”- Sandeep Chaudhary tells the father.

The father mocks him-“Come on, it is not football. Main physics, chemistry aur chemistry ki baat kar raha hoon.”

“I know sir, Main electronics aur computer science mein graduate hoon.”- Sandeep Chaudhary breaks this information to the stunned parents who look at each other in bemusement.

The rematch takes place with the team that had won the last time by 12-0 margin. This time the enthusiasm is palpable not only among the players and students, but among teachers as well. The match begins, with the opposite team coach Shafi Inamdar as dismissive of his opponents as earlier.

The match begins, and by halftime the team is down 0-2. Will history repeat itself ?

The tide slowly begins to turn in the second half. The team pulls one goal back, and then the second one two. In the dying minutes, Raghu, after a dodging a few defenders as well as the goal keeper puts the ball into the net.

The school secures a memorable and first ever win over their arch rival school. The whole school fraternity is overjoyed.

Sandeep Chaudhary receives a letter which is the job offer from IDM. He is naturally happy, but the happiness is naturally tempered.

Miss Anuradha Roy goes to meet Sandeep Chaudhary. He is still asleep, the attendant opening the door explains.

Miss Roy goes to the bedroom-“Sandeep, pata hai saadhe saat baj rahe hain. Janaab abhi tak bistar mein pade hain. Chalo uthho. Naha dho lo. Thanda lagta hai to paani garm kar deti hoon.” She proceeds to leave the bedroom.

“Anu, idhar aao”- Sandeep Chaudhary beckons him, still lying in bed.

Anu goes to him.
“Mujhse shaadi karogi”- he pops the question.
“nahin”- pat comes the reply, there is absolutely no connection between verbal language and body language.
“badmaash!”-remarks Sandeep Chaudhary so the deal is finalised.

A party is held to celebrate the win. Teachers as well as players are invited. The students wonder if the sports culture that he inclucated in the school was ephemeral. Will the school sports go back to its previous days ? Raghu offers to take up the responsibility of sports in the school and vows to return as a sports teacher to the school after passing out from the school.

The movie ends with Sandeep leaving the school premises for the station.

This movie was the debut movie of Prakash Jha as a director. And this movie is like scoring a century on debut. It is a movie that I have fallen in love with. What is there not to like and love in this movie.

1. The story is set in Ranchi.
2. The characters are totally real life and believable.
3. I was in the right age group as well as temperament to totally identify with the hero.
4. The movie is inspirational.
5. It is a different film. It is a film about sports.

Unlike usual movies, this movie does not have the usual formula based songs- a love song, a separation song, a cabarat etc. My guess is that the director did not want any songs in it but later on compromised and had some songs playing in the background. I find that the first two songs (that I shortlisted to go with this writeup) are both picturised almost in identical manner. It is as if the same picturisation was used for both songs.

I have finally decided to go with the first song. This song is movie opening song. The song plays in the background as Sandeep Chaudhary and his girl friend Uma go around places in Bombay.

The song is sung by Yesudas. Gulzar is the lyricist. Music is composed by Vanraj Bhatia.

With this song, “Hip Hip Hurray” (1984) makes its debut in the blog. Though I can hardly sit through movies these days, it is one movie that has the ability to hold my attention. I highly recommend this movie to anyone who is interested in watching good well made movies.

Going by the casting, the lady, who plays the fiancee of Raj Kiran is Deepa Rani. She looked quite impressive. I wonder why she failed to have a long innings in movie world.

Another impressive character was Raghu, played by Nikhil Bhagat. He too vanished from movies after this impressive role. 31 years later, he reappeared in “Tamasha”(2015), this time playing the role of Deepika Padukone’s father. Unlike others, Nikhil Bhagat was not enamoured of showbiz so he decided to concentrate on business. He has a business of leather goods. He was persuaded to come back to films by Imtiaz Ali, the director of “Tamasha”(2015) who had watched “Hip Hip Hurrray” (1984) during its time and who was suitably impressed with the movie as well as the actor.

I hope that the lady Deepa Rani too resurfaces some time in future, like Nikhil Bhagat.

Today (19 july 2019) marks eleven years of continued existence for this blog. Over fifteen thousand one hundred songs have been covered in the blog during the 4018 days of existence, which means that the blog has been buzzing with activity, covering songs at the rate of just under four songs daily. We have run up some impressive statistics associated with the songs covered in the blog. But more important that the numbers is the fact that the blog has given rise to a musical bandwagon, and a close knit team of music lovers who have gradually become close friends, online as well as offline.

I have loved this eleven year long journey. I have grown up considerably as a human being thanks to my interaction with so many like minded individuals during this musical journey.

I take this opportunity to thank one and all for their continued support, encouragement, contributions etc. May this association go on and on.

Audio

Video

Song-Ek subah ek mod par (Hip Hip Hurray)(1984) Singer-Yesudas, Lyrics-Gulzar, MD-Vanraj Bhatia

Lyrics

ek subah
ek mod par
maine kahaa
usey rok kar
ek subah ek mod par
maine kahaa usey rok kar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar

roz tere jeene ke liye
ek subah mujhe mil jaati hai
roz tere jeene ke liye
ek subah mujhe mil jaati hai
murjhaati hai
koyi shaam agar to
raat koyi khil jaati hai
main roz subah tak aataa hoon
aur roz shuroo karta hoon safar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar

tere hazaaron chehron mein
ek chehraa hai mujhse miltaa hai
tere hazaaron chehron mein
ek chehraa hai mujhse miltaa hai
aankhon kaa rang bhi
ek saa hai
aawaaz kaa ang bhi miltaa hai
sach poochho to ham do judwaan hain
tu shaam meri main teri sahar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar
ek subah ek mod par
maine kahaa usey rok kar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar
haath badhaa ae zindagi
aankh milaa ke baat kar
ek subah
ek mod par
maine kahaa
usey rok kar
maine kahaa
usey rok kar
maine kahaa
usey rok kar


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3996 Post No. : 15092 Movie Count :

4142

Today 27th June 2019, is the eightieth birth anniversary of Rahul Dev Burman (27th June, 1939 – 4th Jan, 1994). We fondly remember him on this occasion and will be always thankful to him for giving us all those great nostalgic songs, great music and many everlasting gems.

As I was looking for a special song for this occasion and while going through his filmography, I decided to select a song penned by Nida Fazli. I thought they worked together in very few films so I was interested to introduce a new movie and I finally zeroed on this lesser known movie ‘Mangal Sutra’ (1981). I think even the song of today is a very lesser known and this might be because of this movie going unnoticed then. Even the filmography of RDB on ‘wiki’ does not have this movie in that list. (Since I could not prepare the details of RDB-Nida Fazli movies together I am deferring it for a post in the future).

‘Mangal Sutra’ was directed by B Vijay for Gaurav Films International, Madras. It was produced by Ravi Kumar. Mrs. Chandrika Shah and Mrs. Era Kalra were Associate Producers of this movie. It had Rekha, Anant Nag, Prema Narayan, Jagdeep, Madan Puri, and Om Shivpuri. The supporting cast included Keshto Mukherjee, Asit Sen, Rajendranath, BM Vyas, Chand Usmani, Jayshree T, Meena T, Guddi, Jezbel, Swaraj, NS Bedi, Shankar Singh, Vinod, Neeta, Sharma, Jailata, Baby Reema, Viju Khote and Madhu. Shashi Puri makes a guest appearance in the movie. And this movie introduced Master Vineet.

Story and screenplay of this movie was written by MD Sundar. Dialogues were written by Snehlata Verma. Editing of this movie was done by P Bhakthavathsalam. Vijaykumar Raichura was the Associate Director of this movie. The movie was passed by Censor Board on 13.03.1981.

This movie had total five songs penned by Kavi Pradeep (one song) and Nida Fazli (four songs). Asha Bhonsle, Bhupinder Singh, Dilraj Kaur, Lata Mangeshkar, Meena and SP Balasubramaniam had given their voices to the songs in this movie. Music for this film was composed by RD Burman.

One movie by the same title was also made in 1947 (as per note in HFGK-Vol-VI), however no songs from this movie seem to be available as of now.

In the movie this song happens to be on the ‘suhaag raat’ of Anant Nag and Rekha. When I listened to this song for preparation of this post I remember to have listen it somewhere earlier but I had forgotten it. This song is nice duet and as mentioned above in the movie it is on the ‘milan ki raat’ where the newlywed couple sings this song. And for that matter I think this song is for all couples even if they are not ‘just newly wed’, they can enjoy it on anniversary or anniversaries or even on the ‘silver –jubilee’ of their marriage 🙂 . The song is sung by my favourite singers Asha Bhonsle and Bhupinder Singh.

It is unbelievable that twenty five years have passed since our beloved RD Burman has left us in 1994. He left us in January 1994. I was posted at Kota then. I got married in June (on his birth anniversary) and I remember the first Hindi movie me and wife watched together at Kota was ‘1942 – A Love Story’. . .

Once again thanking Pancham Da for the lovely, beautiful, exciting music and moments its music has given to us. Let us now enjoy today’s song. With this song the movie ‘Mangalsutra’ (1981) makes its debut on the blog.

Video

Audio

Song – Raat Banoon Main Aur Chaand Bano Tum  (Mangalsutra) (1981) Singer – Bhupinder Singh, Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Nida Fazli, MD – RD Burman
Bhupinder + Asha Bhosle

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
ho ho oo oo

raat banoon main
aur chaand bano tum
deep banoon main
aur jyot bano tum
kuchh na sunoon main
kuchh na kaho tum
aao baahon mein aao

raat banoon main
aur chaand bano tum
deep banoon main
aur jyot bano tum
kuchh na sunoon main
kuchh na kaho tum
aao baahon mein aao o
raat banoon main
aur chaand bano tum

naya naya main hoon
nayi nayi tum
yoonhi naa kho jaaye raat
anjaani raahon ke raahi hai hum
chhoote na haathon se haath
naya naya main hoon
nayi nayi tum
yoonhi na kho jaaye raat
anjaani raahon ke raahi hai ham
chhoote na haathon se haath
jaaun jahaan main saath chalo tum
aao baahon mein aao

chaand banoon main
aur raat bano tum
jyot banoon main
aur deep bano tum
kuchh na sunoon main
kuchh na kaho tum
aao baahon mein aao o
chaand baoon main
aur raat bano tum

aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa

tum se hi tan hai
tum se hi mann
dil mein chhupaa lo mujhe ae
baahon mein le ke mere sanam
mujh se churaa lo mujhe
tum se hi tan hai
tum se hi mann
dil mein chhupaa lo mujhe ae ae
baahon mein le ke mere sanam
mujh se churaa lo mujhe
neend banoon main
aur khwaab bano tum
aao baahon mein aao o

raat banoon main
aur chaand bano tum
aa aa
deep banoon main
aur jyot bano tum
aa aa
kuchh naa sunoon main
kuchh naa kaho tum
aao baahon mein aao o

laa laa laa
laa laa laa aa

ho jab se basi ho aankhon mein tum
aa haa
lagti hai duniyaa haseen
aa
o main hoon safar meri manzil tum
tum jo nahin main nahin ee
ho jab se basi ho aankhon mein tum
aa aa
lagti hai duniyaa haseen
o main hoon safar meri manzil tum
tum jo nahin main nahin ee
rang banoon main
maang bharo tum
aao baahon mein aao
chaand banoon main
aur raat bano tum
deep banoon main
aur jyot bano tum
kuchh na sunoon main
kuchh na kaho tum
aao baahon mein aao o
aao baahon mein aao o
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————-

हम्म हम्म हम्म
हम्म हम्म हम्म
हो हो ओ
रात बनूं मैं
और चाँद बनों तुम
दीप बनूं मैं
और ज्योत बनो तुम
कुछ ना सुनूं मैं
कुछ ना कहो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ
रात बनूं मैं
और चाँद बनों तुम
दीप बनूं मैं
और ज्योत बनो तुम
कुछ ना सुनूं मैं
कुछ ना कहो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ ओ
रात बनूं मैं
और चाँद बनों तुम

नया नया मैं हूँ
नयी नयी तुम
यूंही ना खो जाए रात
अनजानी राहों के राही है हम
छूटे ना हाथों से हाथ
नया नया मैं हूँ
नयी नयी तुम
यूंही ना खो जाए रात
अनजानी राहों के राही है हम
छूटे ना हाथों से हाथ
जाऊं जहां मैं साथ चलो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ

चाँद बनूं मैं
और रात बनो तुम
ज्योत बनूं मैं
और दीप बनो तुम
कुछ ना सुनूं मैं
कुछ ना कहो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ ओ
चाँद बनूं मैं
और रात बनो तुम

आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ

तुम से ही तन है
तुम से ही मन
दिल में छुपा लो मुझे ए
बाहों में ले के मेरे सनम
मुझसे चुरा लो मुझे
तुम से ही तन है
तुम से ही मन
दिल में छुपा लो मुझे ए
बाहों में ले के मेरे सनम
मुझसे चुरा लो मुझे
नींद बनूं मैं
और ख्वाब बनो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ ओ

रात बनूं मैं
और चाँद बनों तुम
आ आ 
दीप बनूं मैं
और ज्योत बनो तुम
आ आ 
कुछ ना सुनूं मैं
कुछ ना कहो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ ओ

ला ला ला
ला ला ला आ


हो जबसे बसी हो आँखों में तुम
आ हा 
लगती है दुनिया हसीन

ओ मैं हूँ सफर मेरी मंजिल तुम
तुम जो नहीं मैं नहीं ई

हो जबसे बसी हो आँखों में तुम
आ आ
लगती है दुनिया हसीन
ओ मैं हूँ सफर मेरी मंजिल तुम
तुम जो नहीं मैं नहीं ई

रंग बनूं मैं
मांग भरो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ
चाँद बनूं मैं
और रात बनो तुम

दीप बनूं मैं
और ज्योत बनो तुम
कुछ ना सुनूं मैं
कुछ ना कहो तुम
आओ बाहों में आओ ओ

आओ बाहों में आओ ओ
हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म

 


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3983 Post No. : 15070

——————————————————————————————
My Railway related reminiscences- 2
——————————————————————————————

Couple of days back, I discussed a song of 1991, with my reminiscences of Hyderabad/ Secunderabad, where I was based at that time. Those were the early days of my career and that was my first posting.

That post gave me an idea that I should discuss my experiences of my stays in various places of India during my career. When I began to think about my experiences of those days, many interesting memories came to the fore. So I thought that I should discuss those memories (alongwith movies that I saw at those places) in a series form. I decided to name this series “my reminisces in Railways”. The article accompanyng the 1991 song thus began the fist part of the series.

Secunderabad was my fist posting, but that was preceded by period of probation which was during late 1980s and early 1990s. Those were the days when we would visit various places in Indian Railways located all around the country and undergo “training”. I describe it as “training” and not training because very few people actually trained at these places. It was more like site seeing and getting a first hand experience of how to manage to travel in trains, often without confirmed reservations and often without any confirmed accomodations at the places of our “training.” Those experiences were the real learning experiences for us.

People would form small groups of a few probationers and would travel and “train” together. My group used to be the smallest possible, viz two of us. 🙂

Most of these trainings were of one or two weeks. At the end of the “training”, we would be interviewed by the head of that organisation and then we would get a certificate that we had successfully completed the training. We used to dread the interview and would hope that the head would spare us and give us the certificate without actually interviwing others.

One of these training programmes took us to New Katni junction. We were supposed to undergo training in Diesel shed there. After the end of two weeks, the most dreaded occasion, viz interview with the head of the diesel shed, arrived. The head, one Mr Marcus, a very strict disciplinarian, started to grill the two of us on what we had learnt about diesel locomotives. Both of us were largely clueless on the subject and so I hoped that interviewer would vent his frustration equally on the two of us. My groupmate, Suresh had managed to memorise a few buzz words of Diesel locomotives and I was not familiar with even those words. So, I was singled out by Mr Marcus and he gave me a mouthfull. Learn from Mr Suresh, he at least knows a few terms about Diesel locomotives, I was told.

Suitably chastened, I came out and resolved that I would actually take the training seriously in future. But it was a resolution that I could never keep. 🙂

But that experience gave me an important life and management lesson. When a tiger appears before a herd of deer, the deers need not outrun the tiger. They only need to ensure that they outrun the slowest deer among them. 🙂 The tiger would catch the slowest of the deers and the other deers would escape.

While most trainings were for small durations and they were for probationers in small groups, there were some centralised trainings in large groups and of longer durations in designated locations.

For example, all probationers of all services had to mandatorily undergo two trainings. The first was called “Foundation”” course and it was followed by “Induction” course. These courses would be of one month duration and they would take place at Railway Staff College, Vadodara.

The need for centralised training of Railway officers was first felt in 1920s in pre independence era and a “Railway Staff College” was established in Dehradun in 1930. Within two years, some senior Railway Man decided that training of Railway Officers was a luxury that Railways could ill afford and so that “Railway Staff College” at Dehradun was closed down. Its premises were sold to Army. The present day Indian Military Academy at Dehradun is located where the original “Railway Staff College” stood from 1930 to 1932.

Two decades later, it was once again realised that training of Railway officers was not a luxury but a necessity so Railway Staff College was again established. This time it was set up at Vadodara. Railways took Pratap Vilas Palace of Vadodara on lease in 1949. Subsequently Railways bought this premise outright in 1964.

The magnificent Pratap Villa Palace was designed by Charles Frederick Stevens in 1914. Readers may recall that Bombay VT was built by Frederick Williams Stevens in 1887, who was the father of Charles Frederick Stevens. I find it interesting that Charles Frederick Stevens, though an Englishman was named in Marathi-Gujrati manner, viz. Name of the person, followed by father name, followed by Surname. 🙂

The first principal of Railway Staff College, Vadodara was Mr P C Bahl, from 1952 to 1956. His son Lt Commander Rajnish Bahl of Indian navy married film actress Nutan.

It was in this Railway Staff College that I underwent my Foundation Course. There were around 40 probationers in the batch. They were accomodated in hostel rooms, two probationers in each room.

I had decided that I would take Foundation course seriously, and as a part of my seriousness, I chose a room partner who himself was a serious student. No, not the abovementioned Suresh, but another person named Rahul.

Vadodara was (it still is) a nice place. Classes were held in day time for five days a week. Saturday and Sunday were free.

We would typically go out to watch night show of movies in Vadodara after dinner time. It was on one such night that Rahul suggested that we should go watch a new movie called “Dil”(1990). This movie had two newcomers in lead roles. The hero was one Aamir Khan, who had made a successful debut with “Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak” (1988). The leading lady was Madhuri Dixit, who had become an all India rage after the song “ek do teen” in “Tezaab” (1988).

We went for the night show of “Dil”(1990). We left our hostel at 9 PM and we were worried that we would be late for the show. But when we arrived there, we found that we were well in time. The previous show was still playing. We kept waiting and waiting. The earlier show ended after 10 PM. Our night show began at 10-30 PM, which is too late for a night show to start.

It was well past 1 AM when the show finally ended. In my younger days, I would remain wide awake and aware and would not miss any moment of the movie, not even newsreels and ads. But those days were in the past. I was feeling sleepy throughout the movie. So I missed much of the story and so I was not aware what was going on in the movie.

This movie “Dil” (1990) is not yet covered in the blog. Here is the first song from the movie to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Udit Narayan and Anuradha Paudwal. Sameer is the lyricist. Music is composed by Anand Milind.

The song is picturised on the lead pair of Aamir Khan and Madhuri Dixit, both looking so young and fresh faced vis a vis today. But then this movie had come three decades ago !

The song from the movie under discussion is titled “mujhe neend na aaye” , but it was a case of “mujhe neend hi neend aaye” for me in the movie hall in that show. 🙂


Song-Mujhe neend na aaye (Dil)(1990) Singers-Udit Narayan, Anuradha Paudwal, Lyrics-Sameer, Anand Milind
Chorus

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa

mujhe neend na aaye
neend na aaye
neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
chain na aaye
chain na aaye

mujhe neend na aaye
ho
mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye jara dhundh ke laaye
najane kaha dil kho gaya aa
na jane kaha dil kho gaya
najane kaha dil kho gaya aa
na jane kaha dil kho gaya
mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya aa
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

aa aa aa aa aa aa

haalat kya hai
kaise tujhe bataaun main
karvat badal badal ke raat bitaaun main
haalat kya hai kaise tujhe bataaun main
karvat badal badal ke raat bitaaun main

poochho zara poochho kya haal hai
haal mera behaal hai
poochho zara poochho kya haal hai
haal mera behaal hai
koi samajh na paaye kya rog sataaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa aa

jaan se bhi pyaara mujh ko mera dil hai
uske bina ik pal bhi jeena mushqil hai
jaan se bhi pyaara mujhko mera dil hai
uske bina ik pal bhi jeena mushqil hai
tauba meri tauba kya dard hai
dard bada bedard hai
tauba meri tauba kya dard hai
dard bada bedard hai
kabhi mujhko hansaaye
kabhi mujhko rulaaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laaye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya

mujhe neend na aaye
neend na aaye
neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
chain na aaye
chain na aaye

aa aa aa aa aa aa

mujhe neend na aaye
mujhe chain na aaye
koi jaaye zara dhoondh ke laye
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya
na jaane kahaan dil kho gaya


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3982 Post No. : 15069

In some cases, it is the voice – some people will impress you, attract you with their voice. Girish Karnad’s voice has one of the most relaxing sound quality that I have heard. And his presence, his demeanor, his being in a scene, on screen or on stage, always had the same expression of comfort and relaxation as his voice. Seeing him, listening to him, one could never imagine if this person could be moved to a hasty or an impatient action.

He passed away, the day before. The news said that he was 82. I was surprised, it couldn’t be. Over the years since I had first seen him live in a drama in Delhi – almost a millennium ago, and then through films and media images, he always seemed to be the same, never changing, nor ageing. Be it the memories and images from the 60s, 70s, or even recent. He always appeared to be the same.

So when I read this one line in a media news item, I was very taken aback. Sure, I had not seen him active for the past few years, but the thought process probably had never projected far enough to make believe that he was past his 80th. In fact, as I reviewed his filmography in preparation for this article, I find that 5 of his upcoming films are slated for released through the rest of 2019.

Mid 1960s to 70s was an era for the theatre in India. One sees an upsurge in the quality of drama, the subject matter handling by the playwrights and the abilities of the dramatists. If it was Badal Sircar in Bangla (east), it was Vijay Tendulkar in Matathi (west); if it was Mohan Rakesh in Hindi (north), it was Girish Karnad in Kannada (south). These playwrights brought in some very incisive, some very timeless creations, that brought a completely fresh air, breaking new grounds in understanding the human psyche – how the humans interact, with each other and within themselves, how the social influences mould the individual behaviors, and in reverse, how the human expressions manipulate the social conduct. And together, how they shape the movement of history.

Girish K broke out a very crisp and a surprisingly innovative line of enquiry, with his very first play – ‘Yayati’. Most of the readers will be familiar with this episode from the epic, Mahabharat. Yayati is a king in the lineage of the Chandravansh, the lineage of Chandra, the Moon God. He is portrayed as an irresponsible king, consumed by his obsession with young age and the pleasures to be derived from it. He is afraid of getting old. His wife is Devyani, daughter of Rishi Shukracharya. Sharmishtha is the name of one of the ladies in waiting of Devyani. Actually a princess herself from another kingdom, Sharmishtha becomes a bounden server to Devyani due to certain events. As the events unfold furhter, Yayati has an extra marital affair with Sharmishtha, who bears three sons for him. Devyani too has three children, one daughter and two sons. Devyani complains to her father, who is the purohit (high priest) of the demon clan. Incensed by the behavior of his son-in-law, he curses him to a premature and a prolonged old age.

Yayati is shattered. He goes to Shukracharya, begs for forgiveness and removal of the curse. Shukracharaya tells him that his curse cannot be reversed, but it can be transferred to a person willing to take on such a curse. Yayati is overjoyed, but the joy is short-lived as he finds out that no one is ready to accept his curse. Finally, one of his sons, Puru, agrees to take on the curse of his father, wanting to bring peace to his father. Yayati enjoys another one thousand years of youth, donated by his son Puru.

This is a well known tale, and it has its own share of interpretations, analysis and philosophical discourse in literary critique over the ages. Girish K stepped in and asked a question that was never asked for many a millennia. What about Chitralekha?

It is not clear whether this character by this name exists in the annals of Mahabharat. Girish K is alluding to, and enquiring about Puru’s wife. A man goes ahead and takes on the curse of old age for a thousand years. There is name and fame, for this sacrifice. But no one ever asked, what about his wife? What happened to her life and her time, and whether and how did she endure this abnormally changed circumstance foisted upon her. With certain modifications to the original plot, Girish K is the first scholar to ask this question.

This play came about during Girish K’s journey to England by ship in 1960. The version of Mahabharat by C Rajagopalachari was published in 1951. This version of the epic influenced Girish K, and he went on to create two great plays based on themes from this epic. By his own account, ‘Yayati’ came so naturally to him, almost as if someone was dictating and he was just transcribing. The writing of this play was completed on this sea voyage of three weeks. He was traveling to London, having been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship at the Oxford University. During his stay and studies, he completed a triple MA, simultaneously in philosophy, politics and economics. The second play, that was born out of the influence of Mahabharat, sat in his mind for almost three decades, and then was born as ‘Fire and Rain’, which was staged first time in 1995.

His other most celebrated theatrical creation is another view into the history of India. Titled ‘Tuglaq’, this play took the theatre world, the audiences and the socio-political commentators by storm when it was first staged in 1966. In 1972, this play was enacted by the National School of Drama, directed by Ebrahim Elkazi, and presented on the ramparts of the Old Fort (Purana Qila) in Delhi. Using the ruins of the Old Fort as the backdrop, the play was enacted, to a very critical acclaim. Personally, that was my first introduction to Girish K. Quite enchanted by the theatre scene in Delhi, I have seen this enactment of the play while I still was in school.

The play covers the last 5 years of the reign of Mohammed Bin Tuglaq. The protagonist, is portrayed as having great ideas and a grand vision, but his reign was an abject failure. He started his rule with great ideals of a unified India, but his kingdom degenerated into anarchy. His proclamation to move his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, resulted in a massive exodus that brought misery and sorrow to a huge population. This was seen by the commentators as an allegory to the Partition of the country in 1947, and mass movement of people from both sides of the border.

In his later discussions, Girish K has revealed that the play was not originally written with an intent to comment on the then current political scenario in the country. Writing about the commentary on his play, Girish K has stated – “I did not consciously write about the Nehru era, I am always flattered when people tell me that it was about the Nehru era and equally applies to development of politics since then. But, I think, that is a compliment that any playwright would be thrilled to get, but it was not intended to be a contemporary play about a contemporary situation.”

Girish K started his theatre career in Madras, with a drama group called the Madras Players. Starting with ‘Yayati’ we see the development of a multi-faceted career that has lasted for almost six decades – author, teacher, playwright, director, stage actor, film actor, director of FTII Pune, chairman of the Sangeet Natak Academy – there is so much in his career to write and tell about.

His association with the cinema begins with ‘Samskaara’ (1970) and ‘Vamsh Vriksh’ (1972), both in Kannada, and both well recognized and well awarded films. Girish K was also the co-director of ‘Vamsh Vriksh’. The storylines for both films are a very strong statement on the evolving nature of human relationships, as each individual passes through his or her own pleasures, travails, dreams and anguish. The stories tell of compelling human emotions that drive human beings, to behave in manners that are quite out of the ordinary expectations. In ‘Samskaara’, Praneshcharaya (role played by Girish K), a devout Brahmin, is so convinced of moksha being the ultimate goal of life, and being so focused to achieve it, marries an invalid, so he can remain a celibate all his life. His antithesis is life is Narayanappa, a Brahmin who has given up the traditions – he eats meat and lives with Chandri, a lady of lower standing in the society. As the events unfold, Narayanappa passes away. His final rites become a controversy – a non-Brahmin cannot perform his rites, and no Brahmin in the village is ready to perform the rites for one who has fallen from the tradition. In the midst of all this, Praneshcharya one night wakes up in the lap of Chandri. Unable to reconcile with his own actions, he leaves the village in despair. Chandri secretly performs the last rites of Narayanappa and leaves the village too. In the last scene, Praneshcharya is seen returning to the village. Did he confess and atone for his actions? – the question remains unanswered.

‘Vamsh Vriskh’ is a complex narrative of the progression in a family, the interrelationships, the hidden connects and the invisible knowns. The protagonist, Srinivasa Shrotri, goes through many a tribulation in life, and tries to keep his mental peace intact. Having lost or settled all his affairs, he finally renounces householder’s life to become a sanyaasi.

In 1974, Girish K appeared in a children’s film ‘Jaadu Ka Shankh’. Not much more information about this film is locatable.

In the next three years, we see Girish K in three films that are outstanding statements of the new-wave cinema. In 1975, we see him in ‘Nishaant’ as the timid but principled schoolmaster, whose wife is abducted by the brothers of the landlord. The film has a kind of idealist ending, with the schoolmaster fatally attacking the landlord during a religious celebration and the entire village rising up against the landlord and lynching him and his entire family. In 1976 came ‘Manthan’ – the story of the white revolution in India. Girish K has played the role of Dr Rao, a chemist assigned in the rural areas, to help villagers determine the quality of their milk and to help free them from the clutches of the milk contractors by establishing co-operative societies. In 1977, we see Girish K in ‘Swami’, assaying the role of Ghamshyam, an upright and principled eldest son in the family, after passing away of his father, handling the family matters and his own personal life very maturely and with wisdom, in the presence of a hostile step mother.

In the next four decades , Girish K has appeared in almost 100 films, in Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malyalam and Assamese. I remember seeing him in ‘Man Pasand’ (1980), playing the role of Kashinath, a close friend of Pratap, the protagonist (role played by Dev Anand). Later, I have seen him in ‘Aasha’ (1980), ‘Ek Baar Chale Aao’ (1983), ‘Tarang’ (1984), till the waning interest in newer films kept me away. Ah yes, he was part of the dear ‘Malgudi Days’ series on the television, playing the role of Swami’s father. In his other directorial outings, he has directed ‘Godhuli’ (1977) and ‘Utsav’ (1984), films that have earned a lot of critical acclaim. He has also made a number of documentaries, like one on the Kannada poet DR Bendre (1972), ‘Kanaka-Purandara’ (English, 1988) on two medieval Bhakti poets of Karnataka, Kanaka Das and Purandara Das, and ‘The Lamp in the Niche’ (English, 1989) on Sufism and the Bhakti movement in India. Many of his films and documentaries have won several national and international awards.

Girish K’s accomplishment as an actor is simply his complete comfort with being the character he is playing. Watching him on the screen, one has this confidence that he knows all the ins and outs of the character he plays, and that in some incarnation he has lived that role himself. The authenticity of portrayal is simply magnificent.

In 1985, he appeared in the role of Pandit Shiv Shankar Shastri in the film ‘Sur Sangam’. The film, and his portrayal of the senior patriarchic exponent of classical music, are my all time favorite. I have written about this film in an earlier article with the song “Aaye Sur Ke Panchhi Aaye”. The film revolves around classical music and the story of Pt Shiv Shankar Shastri, one of the greatest living exponents of this art form. The story line brings in Tulsi (role played by Jayaprada), who is musically inclined and who reveres Shastri ji. The turn of events brings a certain unexplainable element – Tulsi is sexually assaulted, and the man responsible also throws down the portrait of Shastri ji. In a fit of violent anger, Tulsi slays the man with a shard of glass from broken portrait, runs off into the night, and boards a train departing from the local station. As destiny would have it, she barges into a first class coupe whose sole occupant is Shastri ji, who is traveling for participating in an out of town program. The two travel together, and return. Tulsi starts living in the same house as Shastri ji. He is a widower and has a girl child. Slowly, Tulsi becomes a part of the household. Being inclined for classical music, she also starts to practice while staying at Shastri ji’s home. One night, there is a special celebration at the temple of Lord Shiv. Shastri ji is to perform. Tulsi accompanies him, as usual. With the performance about to begin, Shastri ji motions Tulsi to pick up and play the taanpura in accompaniment. At this, all his participating disciples become incensed and leave the stage one by one. Tulsi rushes back home (and then leaves the household for good), the audience leaves and Shastri ji is the sole person left in the temple. In the absence of any accompaniment and musical support, he resolves to make his musical presentation regardless, to the Lord. And he presents this song, alone in a deserted temple, to Lord Shiv.

I picked this song specially, to highlight one aspect of Girish K’s artistic expressions, which was probably hidden until then. An accomplished performer, he has performed the dance steps as part of this song. Every review of the film at that time, commented on the dancer in Girish K. He revealed in an interview that he had taken on special dance training to prepare for this song. You can see the performance for yourself. It is no less than an accomplished and well trained dancer, presenting these steps in unison with the music.

This one song, in my humble opinion, is the best artistic performance that I have seen from Girish K. See the manner in which he starts his dialogue with the Lord. His singing, his facial expressions, his gestures and movements, all coalesce into a fluid expression of a conversation with Lord Shiv. No one else is present so this is a very private conversation, in which Shastri ji is telling the Lord to listen to His own sound coming from inside him. This entire clip is a one wonderful performance by Girish K that probably has not been surpassed.

It is a sad goodbye that we bid today. The person, the artist, and a scholar – it is truly a great loss to the cultural landscape of this sub continent that may never be made up.

One commentator has written about Girish K’s creations, that “. . . Girish Karnad allowed his characters to ask the questions, to struggle with the inconclusive, and hence his stories truly never ended.” Yes, that is the legacy of this multi-faceted artist – his creations, his stories, his characters – all still have a lot be explored for. That “struggle with the inconclusive” is so appropriate a passage dealing with the complex realities and relationships in the course of a human life. His stories have not really ended. And neither has his legacy.

Girish K – Rest in Peace. . . Enduring Peace

 

Song – Hey Shiv Shankar, Hey Karunakar  (Sur Sangam) (1985) Singer – Rajan-Sajan Misra, Lyrics – Vasant Dev, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

hey..ey..ey shiv shankar
hey..ey..ey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
sun lo tum apna ye swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
yog raag ko hi maana
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
mere tan mann ko paawan kar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

rudra been jhankar tumhaari
rudra been jhankar tumhaari
shudra janon se rahi ansuni
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
apne mukh se sun apna swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar [

nabh chaaya ghan ghor bijuriya damke jhamke
adharon ki muskaan tumhaari cham cham chamke
aaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaa
ghir ghir aaye megh bhayankar garaj garajte
goonja nupur naad tumhaara thirak thirkate
jhuk gaya matha ki tum ne haan kaha jis pal umapati
sheesh ki ganga dharaa par utar aayi chhal-chhalaati
ga ga re ni re ga ma
dha ni re ga re sa
geet ki har lehar par tum jhoom kar naacho nateshwar
aaj is anand varsha mein nahaao tum maheshwar
aaa aaaaaa aaaaaaj is anand varsha mein
nahaa..aavoo tum maheshwar
shiv shankar
maheshwar
shiv shankar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हे॰॰ए॰॰ए शिव शंकर
हे॰॰ए॰॰ए करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
सुन लो तुम अपना ये स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
योग राग को ही माना
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
मेरे तन मन को पावन कर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
शूद्र जनों से रही अनसुनी
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
अपने मुख से सुन अपना स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

घन छाया घनघोर बिजुरिया दमके झमके
अधरों की मुस्कान तुम्हारी चम चम चमके
आsss आssss आssss आsssss आsssss
घिर घिर आए मेघ भयंकर गरज गरजते
गूँजा नूपुर नाद तुम्हारा थिरक थिरकते
झुक गया माथा कि तुमने हाँ कहा जिस पल उमापति
शीश कि गंगा धरा पर उतार आई छल-छलाती
ग ग रे नि रे ग म
ध नि रे ग रे स
गीत की हर लहर पर तुम झूम कर नाचो नटेश्वर
आज इस आनंद वर्षा में नहाओ तुम महेश्वर
आ आ आ॰॰आज इस आनंद वर्षा में
नहा॰॰आवो तुम महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
आsss आssss आssssss


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15100 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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