Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Rajkumari song’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5174 Post No. : 17145

Today’s song is from the film Nagad Narayan-1943. This was a film made by New Hans Pictures, Bombay. The director was Hindi/Marathi veteran- Vishram Bedekar. Songs were written by Kavi Bekal, Kavi Shamim and Munshi Dil. The MD was Shridhar Parsekar.

Film Nagad narayan was a bilingual film made in Hindi and Marathi (with a title of ‘ पैसा बोलतो आहे ‘ means The money is talking ). Marathi was the first language to make bilingual Talkie films regularly since 1932. The very first Marathi Talkie film- अयोध्येचा राजा , was also made in Hindi as Ayodhya ka Raja, simultaneously. This was purely a business move on the part of Marathi film makers. Though the Marathi film industry was growing by the day, it also wanted to capture the biggest All India Hindi market.

This was followed by the Bengal film industry and every successful Bengali film was remade in Hindi or was simultaneously made bilingual in Bangla and Hindi. By this, not only the filmmakers were benefited, but the audience of All India was also enjoying the feast of the best of Bangla and Marathi films. One offshoot of this bilingual game was that many Marathi artistes – actors, directors and MDs and singers also entered the Hindi films. Thus along with the audiences, the industries also benefited by this activity.

In due course of time i.e. by 1948, the Southern film industry too entered this fray of Multilingual films. In the South, the trend was to make films in 3 or more languages at the same time or make their remakes later in Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Hindi. Comparatively Malayalam and Kannada film industries were late to play this multilingual game. By the decade of 1950, the Marathi and Bangla film industries had their own playing fields in sufficiently big size and they reduced making bilingual films. The South took the advantage and continued making films in Hindi even in the from the 50’s to the end of the 70’s decades. Later on Dubbing the Southern films became cheaper and more frequent than making bilingual or remaking the films in Hindi.

Because of the Bilingual system of Marathi and Hindi films, many Music Directors from Marathi entered Hindi films. MDs like Dada Chandekar,Govindrao Tembe, Keshavrao Bhole, S.P.Rane, Prof. B.R.Deodhar, Baurao ketkar, Annasaheb Mainkar, K.R.Gore, Master krishnarao, Datta Korgaonkar (K.Datta) etc gave music to early Hindi films. It was followed by Vasant Desai, Datta Davjekar, Snehal Bhatkar, Sudhir Phadke etc etc.

There were many small-time MDs from Marathi films like C.Balaji aka Balaji Chaugule-for example, who remained unknown. In this rush and jumble of competetion for survival few really meritorious but commercially unsuccessful Music Directors appeared like Comets and disappeared.

Shridhar Parsekar, composer of today’s film, was one such Gem, who had immense talent but insufficient Luck. And when he became famous and in demand for his music, he fell victim of Alcohol and embraced death in very pitiable conditions. Here is his story….

From the crop of Musicians from GOA,there was one outstanding Musician- SHRIDHAR PARSEKAR, who was a singer,an All India Famous Violin Player,composer of many Marathi songs/films/dramas and few Hindi films.He was an expert in playing almost 10 different instruments.

SHRIDHAR PARSEKAR was born in 1920 in Goa. From the childhood he was a lover of Music and learnt classical Music first from his uncle Parshuram buwa Parsekar and he was trained by him in playing various instruments like Harmonium, Jaltarang, Tabla and Violin.He was a disciple of Gajanan Buwa Joshi a noted musician.He operated a Band in Bardez-Goa and played Violin,Clarionet,harmonium and many other instruments.He was a Genius and soon became a name for playing Violin.

He came to Mumbai and continued learning Music here under many well known gurus, like Khadeem Hussain Khan, Natthan Khan and Awar Hussain. Soon he was performing in stage shows doing Jugalbandis with stars of the day like Ravishanker, Vilayat Khan and Akbar Ali Khan. Kishen Maharaj was very pleased with him. For some time he joined AIR-Bombay as a Musician and got friendly with Ustad Alla Rakha who also worked in AIR. R G Ramnathkar, who got him the Radio job, also taught him many Raaga/Raaginis. Parsekar did Radio work for 6 years.

Later he worked as assitant to Music Director Annasaheb Mainkar and then started as MD for Marathi Films and stage dramas.His music in dramas like Bhakta Damaji, Paisa bolto ahe, Kuber and Kanyadaan was very popular.He also recorded many Bhavgeets and Natyageets from reputed singers in Marathi. HMV and Odeon took out his records. Singers like Jyotsna Bhole, Saraswati Rane, Hirabai Badodekar,Vatsala Kumthekar and Master Krishnarao Chonkar also sang for him. One of his songs- ” Vithal Vithal Gajari,awaghi dum dumali Pandhari ” ( विठ्ठल विठ्ठल गजरी, अवघी दुमदुमली पंढरी ) from Bhakta Damaji is so popular that it is sold even today.

With Marathi films, recording of private songs, stage shows with prominent musicians,Shridhar had every happiness with him.He had a Bungalow,cars,bank balance, name, fame and plenty of demand. He wrote a book on Music-‘Swar Ninad’.

And then it happened !

He became an Alcoholic. Normally, a person becomes Alcoholic when he is unsuccessful, but this was an opposite case. While on the top of success he became an Alcoholic. He used to drink day and night.

Once there was a jugalbandi programme of him with Ustad Vilayat khan. Shridhar came fully drunk to the Theatre. Vilayat Khan scolded him and left the show. Such things kept on happening leading to his downfall.

He stopped getting work and all his wealth, house, cars etc was sold for liquor. His condition was such that he would play Violin on streets and earn money. Lata Mangeshkar has narrated an incident, which I read in a book ” From Noorjehan to Lata ” by Isak Mujawar. Book says…

” one day Lata’s car stopped in the traffic. Out of curiosity she peeped out to see what happened. There was a person in tattered clothes playing a violin beautifully and people had gathered to listen to him. Some people gave him alms. She asked the driver if he knew that person. The driver replied that it was Parsekar buwa. She got down, went to Parsekar and told him to come with her. She will look after him now. On this, Parsekar replied that her father had asked him to look after their family, which he could not do, so why should she look after him. If she wants to help, just give some money. She gave him 50 rupees and he almost ran away from there….probably to the wine shop ! “-

Finally Shridhar Parsekar died of liver Cirrhosis on 10-9- 1964 ! He was only 44 years old !! Such a brilliant artist wasted by Alcohol.So Sad ! Pt.Ravi Shankar and Vilayat Khan had personally met his family after his death,so much was the respect for his talent !!

In addition to 7 Marathi films, Shridhar Parsekar gave music to five Hindi films like, Nagad Narayan-43,Mahakavi Kalidas-44, Meri Amanat-47, Andhon ka Sahara-48 and Gokul ka Raja-54. He composed 45 songs in these films. He sang 5 songs in 2 films, Andhon ka sahara-48 and Gokul ka Raja-54. Many famous singers sang for him, like, Minakshi, Khan Mastana, Rajkumari, Master Krishnarao, Mohantara, Vinodini Dikshit etc.

Pt. Ravi Shankar shared his memories of Sridhar-: “I knew Sridhar. He was a wonderful violinist, a disciple of Gajananrao Joshi. Sridhar Parsekar was a staff artist at AIR Bombay when Alla Rakha was also a staff member there. This is the period I knew him in the early forties. He was a smart young fellow, dark and very good looking. He came to hear me a lot and I also heard him a lot. I played one duet with him as I did with his Guru in the late 40’s in Bombay. It was a wonderful duet I played with him and Alla Rakha accompanied us. Along with many other musicians Kishen Maharaj was sitting in the front. I admired him as a musician and I have always felt very sad how he ruined his life and killed himself with his addiction to alcohol.”

In 1993, the violinist V.G. Jog said about Parsekar…. “Sridhar Parsekar was a tayyar and sweet violinist. Excellent presentation. SP used to call me Bandu Jog! The tragedy was that such a big artiste did not maintain his kala. Before preparing any students, he passed away and that caused me great sadness. Else there might have been excellent violinists in India today. When he was at his peak, I was just a student, but AIR programs were greatly appreciated and he was also a great composer especially for Marathi films. Ramakrishnabua Vaze blessed him. He learnt from Gajananrao Joshi and once he played a Jugalbandhi with Ravi Shankar.”
(Information from these sources also used herein- Marathi Chitrapat sangeetkar kosh, Marathi cinema in retrospect by Sanjit Narwekar, Purvasurinche soor by Dr. Suresh Chandvankar and the book ‘kalatmak Gomantak’-kala Academy,Panji-1972, blog parrikar.org. Thanks to all of them) .

Film Nagad Narayan was directed by Vishram Bedekar. Born as Vishwanath Chintamani Bedekar,on 13-8-1906 at Amravati,Maharashtra,he took the name Vishram,once he started writing. After graduation,he did his Post-graduation in English Literature from Nagpur university. He went to Poona in 1930 to do a Teaching job. Here he met his student cum future wife Balutai Khare…who was one of the First girls riding on Bicycles to college,in those days. They got married in 1938.She became Malati Bedekar,a famous Marathi writer later on. His first novel ” Ranangan” came out in 1939,while he was in the film business.

He started with Sangeet Natak company Balwant Sangeet Mandali as playwright-lyricist. Moved to film-making when the theatre group expanded its box-office draw by producing Krishnarjun Yuddha, starring the group’s writer-actor Chintamanrao Kolhatkar. Unlike other films produced by Sangeet Natak companies (e.g. Lalit Kaladarsh), the film succeeded commercially and he co-directed three more with the group’s owner-producer Vamanrao N. Bhatt. Scripted the mythological Pundalik (1936) and, according to his autobiography, co-d the film with V.N. Bhatt. Briefly studied film-making in the UK (1938); published his first novel, Ranangan (1938), on his return. Joined Prabhat briefly to write Shantaram’s Shejari/Padosi (1941), returning to the studio to script Ramshastri (1944, a re-edited version of which, credited to him, was later released as a children’s film entitled Ramshastri Ka Nyay) and to direct Guru Dutt’s début, Lakhrani. This was the first film in which Guru Dutt played a role and also did its Choreography. It was here that Guru Dutt met Dev Anand,who had joined Prabhat as an apprentice.

He made classic melodramas for Baburao Pendharkar’s New Huns, Baburao Pai’s Famous Pics and Minerva Movietone. Wrote Shantaram’s Amar Bhoopali (1951). Directed some of the Ramsay Brothers’ early productions (Rustom Sohrab, Ek Nannhi Munni Ladki Thi). Works in the modernist frame defined by K. Narayan Kale’s generation and G.B. Shaw; most of his literary and filmic work recasts stereotypes of pre-WW1 Marathi social reform novels into the declamatory style of prose melodrama with increasingly complex storylines. As playwright, works include Brahmakumari, Vaje Paool Apule and Tilak Ani Agarkar (1980). Also scripted his films. Published autobiography, Ek Jhaad Ani Don Pakshi (1985).

Vishram Bedekar divided his life and time between writing and films. He was a trained Cinematographer and Director from London in those days. He wrote several Dramas in marathi. After directing 28 films in Marathi and Hindi,he left films after doing Bharat ke shaeed-1972. In 1985 he wrote his autobiography in Marathi- एक झाड आणि दोन पक्षी-. He got the Sahitya Academy Award for this book. He is the only Film director with such laurels. Vishram Bedekar died in Pune on 30-10-1998,at the age of 92 years. (based on Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema and marathifilmdata.com information. with thanks.)

Here is an excellent song from the film Nagad Narayan-1943, sung by Rajkumari, Khan mastana and chorus. The song was provided to me by our friend Deepak Choudhari ji and was uploaded for me by another stalwart Sadanand Kamath ji. Thanks to both.


Song – Dekho raar karo na mil ke raho jee (Nagad Narayan)(1943) Singers – Rajkumari, Khan Mastana, Lyrics-Kavi Bekal, MD – Shridhar Parsekar
Chorus

Lyrics

Dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee
dekho raar karo na
milke raho ee
milke aage badho
hanske aage badho
milke aage badho
hanske aage badho
ladkar jeet dikha do
ladkar jeet dikha do
dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee
dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee

loota hamin ko
loota hamin ko
hamin hain bhikaari
loota hamin ko
hamin hain bhikaari
mushqil mein aayi hai jaan hamaari ee
mushqil mein aayi hai jaan hamaari

aaho(?) ab door hato jee
aaho(?) ab door hato jee

dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee
dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee

duniya ko sab cheez tum apni bataa do
duniya ko sab cheez tum apni bataa do
uthho aur julmo sitam ko mita do
uthho aur julmo sitam ko mita do

jaan ganwaa do
jaan ganwaa do
par tum desh bachaa lo
desh bachaa lo
desh bachaa lo

duniya ?? tum apni bata do
photo aur cinema se sabko dikha do
jaan ganwaa do
jaan ganwaa do
par tum desh bachaa lo
desh bachaa lo
desh bachaa lo

dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee
milke aage badho
hanske aage badho
ladkar jeet dikha do
dekho raar karo na
milke raho jee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5166 Post No. : 17133

Today’s song is a melodious song from a less known film on a well known historical name – ‘Panna Dai’ (1945). The film was made by Pradeep Pictures, Bombay. Directed by Ram Daryani, its MD was Gyan Dutt and the songs were written by Dina Nath Madhok. It had a very sparkling star cast of Durga Khote, Chandra Mohan, Meenakshi, Mubarak, M Ismail, Master Vithal, Gope, Gulab, Leela Mishra, Nana Saheb Phatak, Azuri, Baby Nalini, Ratan Piya and many others in a long list suitable for such a historical movie.

When silent films started in India in the first decade of the previous century, by the time the films became an All India attraction in subsequent years, people were attracted to this new medium of entertainment. The Radio had also started during this period – around 1923 or so – first in Bombay, then Calcutta and finally in Madras in 1924. The organised broadcasting started on 23-7-1927. However it was only audio entertainment and available only in bigger towns and with wealthy people. Films gave the visual satisfaction and from 1931 films became ‘talkie’, providing audio and visual pleasures. No wonder this medium became popular more quickly. With portable equipment, films reached nooks and corners of the entire country.

As the talkie films started, well known artistes in different fields like literature, singing, music performers and stage actors wanted to join this industry. This applied to even the most respected and well known people. The industry was also keen to get such well known artistes and hence some such people did join the industry- albeit for a short period.

Initially, Bombay being the major center for films, the local famous artistes from the Marathi community represented a sizable number in this industry. No wonder then that the famous and well known authors, stage actors, singers and musicians contributed their share in films. Famous stage actors like Bal Gandharva, Bapurao Pendharkar, Hirabai Badodekar, Sureshbabu Mane, Govindrao Tembe, PL Deshpande, GN Joshi etc. sang, gave music and acted. Writers like VS Khandekar, NS Phadke, PK Atre, HN Apte etc. wrote stories, songs and screenplays in Marathi and Hindi films.

It was not only the Marathi bigwigs from stage and literature but even from the Hindi and Urdu famous artistes came to films to give their bits. People like Narayan Prasad Betab, Pt Sudarshan, Agha Hashra Kashmiri, Pt Narottam Vyas, Amritlal Nagar, Kanhaiyalal Munshi, Safdar Aah Sitapuri, Kazi Nazrul Islam, Jigar Muradabadi etc. did some work in films.

From Gujarat too such contributors like Master Vasant, Raghunath Bramhabhatt etc. came and from Bengal a host of writers and stage actors flooded the film industry. (Names of all language artistes are only indicative and not exhaustive).

All these ‘outsiders’ contributed, enriched the films and left for their own respective fields again. One such highly respected and well known stage actor from Marathi dramas was Nana Saheb Phatak. He acted only in 4 Hindi films including today’s film ‘Panna Dai’ (1945). (Bal Gandharva did only 2 Hindi films). Here is a short bio data of Nana Saheb Phatak. it is very difficult to get such information.

‘Nana Saheb’ Phatak was a great actor in Marathi theater who left a memorable impression with his deep voice and powerful dialogue interpretation. Born Gopal Govind Phatak on June 24, 1899, he was drawn to the stage at a very young age. He is believed to have been initiated into Marathi theatre through the play ‘Raksha Bandhan’, in which he played the role of Giridhar. One of his earliest performances was in Yashwant Tipnis’s ‘Matsyagandha’ in 1919 as the old king Shantanu.

With the help of his guru, Shri Ganpatrao Joshi, a veteran actor popularly known as ‘The Garrick of Maharashtra’, Phatak reached the height of his career during his time with the Lalitkaladarsha Natak Mandali – from 1921 to 1936. The Lalitkaladarsha Natak Mandali was founded by veteran singer-actor Sangeet Surya Keshavrao Bhosale. On September 20, 1913, the mandali (troupe) premiered a new play, ‘Rakshasi Mahatvakanksha’ (‘Demonic Ambition’), written by the highly respected playwright Veer Vamanrao Gopal Joshi, at the Bombay theater. The play established Lalitkaladarsha Natak Mandali as a reputed company in the industry, and prominent playwrights began to hand over their plays to be staged by the troupe. Keshavrao Bhosle also pioneered the use of red velvet curtains in Marathi theater. During his tenure with the mandali, Phatak gained tremendous popularity performing in plays including ‘Rakshasi Mahatvakanksha’ in 1914, Warerkar’s ‘Sanyasyacha Sansar’ (‘Sanyasi’s Life’) in 1919, and ‘Sonyacha Kalash’ (‘Golden Spire’) in 1932.

Phatak also performed in films, and his major screen credits include the silent movie ‘Bajirao-Mastani’ in 1925, his role as the evil Kamsa in ‘Akashvani’ in 1934, the hero Mansingh in ‘Rajput Ramani’ in 1936, the rival poet in ‘Pratibha’ in 1937, in ‘Panna Dai’ and Shivaji in ‘Thoratanchi Kamala’ in 1941. (Only Marathi)

In 1945, he played the role of Sudhakar, the drunkard in Gadkari’s ‘Ekach Pyala’, which set a new standard for other Marathi theater performers. Phatak played this role for over 15 years. His ability to embody a variety of characters led him to perform across genres in drama, ranging from historical to mythological and social to Shakespearean. In 1954, the eminent Marathi writer Vishnu Vaman Shirwadkar, popularly known by his pen name Kusumagraj, adapted Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’ for the Mumbai Marathi Sahitya Sangh as ‘Rajmukut’ in Marathi. The play was directed by Herbert Marshall, a British director, and starred Nana Saheb Phatak as Macbeth and Durga Khote as Lady Macbeth. Despite stellar performances by these veteran actors, the production did not go well. Art and theater critic Dhyaneshwar Nadkarni would later attribute this failure to ‘the Indianising of Macbeth’.

Phatak continued to be interested in Shakespeare. Shirwadkar said that Phatak once asked him to write a play to suit old-school actors, so he adapted Shakespeare’s ‘King Lear’ as ‘Natasamrat’ (‘The Actor-Emperor’) in 1970 with Phatak in mind. Unfortunately, Phatak could not act in it.

Nana Saheb Phatak remained a dominant figure on the Marathi stage for over 35 years. He was bestowed with the Akademi Award for Marathi Stage Acting in 1959. He passed away 15 years later on April 8, 1974.
[Thanks to articles from map.sahpedia.org, http://www.marathifilmdata.com, and Natya kalawant from Rasrang.]

Panna Dai’s name is famous in Indian History for her personal sacrifice. She substituted her own son to save the life of the heir of the Kingdom. Her son was killed before her eyes mistaking him for the heir. Here is some information about her.

Panna Dai was a 16th century nursemaid to Udai Singh II, the fourth son of Rana Sanga. She was a Khinchi Chauhan Rajput.
In Hindi, Panna means ’emerald’ and Dai means ‘nurse’. Udai Singh was left in care of Panna, after Rani Karnavati committed Jauhar in 1535. When Udai was attacked by his uncle Banvir, Panna Dai sacrificed her own son’s life to save him.

Panna Dai was the nurse of Rani Karnavati, who was the wife of Rana Sanga. In 1531, Vikramaditya, the second son of Rana Sanga, succeeded the throne after his brother Rana Ratan Singh II. He was known for being insolent and arrogant. In 1535, Chittor was attacked by Bahadur Shah, causing Karnavati to call nobles and ordinary soldiers to defend Chittor. Those who were forced to leave Mewar or were disgruntled, joined. Unfortunately, the battle was lost, leaving Chittor sacked. However, Rajputs occupied the fort as soon as Bahadur Shah left. With the fort back in Rajput control, Vikramaditya came back from Bundi to rule again.

After the defeat, Vikramaditya’s temperament didn’t improve, causing him to physically abuse a respected chieftain at the court. In this situation, Banvir (Rana Sanga’s nephew), who was the son of a non Rajput concubine of Prithviraj, joined the court. Banvir was ambitious and in 1536, he assassinated Vikramaditya. To remove all obstacles of his claim to the throne, Banvir attempted to assassinate Udai Singh. However, Panna was alerted of the situation, and she was assisted by a woman of Bari caste, who smuggled out Udai Singh from Chittor, carrying him in a basket, while Panna placed her own son, Chandan, in Udai’s place. Banvir came soon after, asking for Udai. Panna pointed at the bed, now occupied by her son, and watched as he was murdered. Banvir arranged a meeting of the court and informed the chiefs that both the heirs were deceased. He then claimed his right to the throne and appointed himself king of Mewar. Panna and Udai fled to Kumbhalgarh, where the governor was a Maheshwari Mahajan, Asa Depura, who agreed to grant Udai protection. Udai Singh was nearly 15 years of age then.

When the rumours of Udai Singh being alive reached Banvir, he called him impostor, but since Udai Singh was around 15 years of age and his maternal relatives from Bundi could recognize him, Udai Singh started getting more and more support. In 1540, Udai and a considerable force from Mewar, marched into Chittor to reclaim his throne. Banvir sent out an army to repel the attack, but he was defeated. Udai Singh was crowned the 12th Rana of the Sisodia Dynasty. His eldest son and successor Maharana Pratap was born in the same year.

[Adapted from ‘History of Rajputana’ by Raja Rajwade and wikipedia, with thanks.]

This film was the last film for Master Vithal. After this film, he retired from Hindi films (which he regretted later) and settled in Kolhapur till his death.

Let us now enjoy the second song from this film on this Blog.


Song- Neele gagan par laali chhaayee (Panna Dai)(1945) Singer- Raj Kumari, Lyricist- Deena Nath Madhok, MD- Gyan Dutt
Chorus

Lyrics

neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
satiyaan tilak laga len
sooraj thhaal mein kesar laaya hai
thhaal mein kesar laaya hai
satiyaan tilak laga le
sooraj thhaal mein kesar laaya hai
thhaal mein kesar laaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai

maa bete ko choom rahi hai
kaan mein uske kahti hain
maa bete ko choom rahi hai
kaan mein uske kehti hain
bhoomi ka dena kab denge
bhoomi ka dena kab denge
aaj wo shubh din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai

tod rahi hain jag se naata
nirmal jal ki dhaara mein
tod rahi hain jag se naata
nirmal jal ki dhaara mein
bahte paani mein satiyon ne
bahte paani mein satiyon ne
man ka moh bahaaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai

ek sotk se hain parwaane ae ae ae ae
ek saath jal jaayenge haan
ek saath jal jaayenge haan
ek saath jal jaayenge haan
ab tak inhi patangon ne
ab tak inhi patangon ne
jyoti ko amar banaaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
satiyaan tilak laga len
sooraj thhal mein kesar laaya hai
thhaal mein kesar laaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai
neele gagan par laali chhaayee
holi ka din aaya hai

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————

नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
सतियाँ तिलक लगा लें
सूरज थाल में केसर लाया है
थाल में केसर लाया है
सतियाँ तिलक लगा लें
सूरज थाल में केसर लाया है
थाल में केसर लाया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है

माँ बेटे को चूम रही है
कान में उसके कहती है
माँ बेटे को चूम रही है
कान में उसके कहती है
भूमि का देना कब देंगे
भूमि का देना कब देंगे
आज वो शुभ दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है

तोड़ रही हैं जग से नाता
निर्मल जल की धारा में
तोड़ रही हैं जग से नाता
निर्मल जल की धारा में
बहते पानी में सतियों ने
बहते पानी में सतियों ने
मन का मोह बहाया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है

एक सोत्क से हैं परवाने ए ए
एक साथ जल जाएंगे हाँ
एक साथ जल जाएंगे हाँ
एक साथ जल जाएंगे हाँ
अब तक इन्हीं पतंगों ने
अब तक इन्हीं पतंगों ने
ज्योति को अमर बनाया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
सतियाँ तिलक लगा लें
सूरज थाल में केसर लाया है
थाल में केसर लाया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है
नीले गगन पर लाली छाई
होली का दिन आया है


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5111 Post No. : 17053

———————————————–—————————————
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2012-2022) – Song No. 70
————————————————————————————–

This date ten years ago (viz 16 July 2012) saw five songs from five different movies getting covered in the blog. Here are the details:-

Blog Post number Song Movie (Year) Remarks
6247 Chaandni raat hai haay kyaa baat hai Chaandni Raat (1949) Movie YIPPEED by now
6248 Badnaseebi ka gila ae dil e naashaad na kar Bewafa (1952) 6 songs out of 9 covered so far
6249 Qismat mein yahi likha thhaa Hanste Aansoo(1950) 6 songs out of 11 covered so far
6250 Hai dil mein milan ki aas Bindiya(1955) One song out of 10 covered so far
6251 Arre kaise mitti ke maadho se paala padaa Imaan(1974) One song out of 5 covered so far

We can observe that one movie (out of five) has been YIPPEED by now. So four movies are eligible for Blog Ten year challenge today (16 July 2022).

“Hanste Aansoo”(1950) is one of the eligible movies.

“Hanste Aansoo”(1950) was produced and directed by K B Lall for Akash Chitra Productions Bombay. The movie had Motilal, Madhubala, Manorama,Gope, Mirza, Jankidas, etc in it.

The movie had 11 songs in it. Six songs have been covered so far.

Here is the seventh song from “Hanste Aansoo”(1950) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Rajkumari. Ghulam Mohammad is the music director. HFGK is silent about the lyricist.

Only audio of this rare song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.

Lyrics of the song and other details were sent to me by Prakashchandra.

Audio link:

Song-Dil rotey rotey so gaya (Hanste Aansoo)(1950) Singer-Rajkumari, MD-Ghulam Mohammad

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

dil rotey rotey so gayaa
dil rotey rotey so gayaa
har su udaasi chhaa gayee…ee…ee
dil rotey rotey so gayaa

gham kee kahaani…ee kyon kahein
gham ki kahaani..ee kyon kahein
taaron ko bhee neend aa gayi
taaron ko bhee neend aa gayee
dil rotey rotey so gayaa

hansney kee hasrat
reh gayee..eee…ee..eee
reh gayi
hansney kee hasrat
reh gayee..eee…eee
reh gayi
roney se fursat naa milee
khushiyaan ghamon ne..ae chheen lee
khushiyaan ghamon ne..ae chheen lee
fariyaad lab par aa gayi
taaron ko bhee neend aa gayee..ee
dil rotey rotey so gayaa

duniya mein ab kyaa
reh gayaa…aaaa…aa
reh gayaa
duniya mein ab kyaa
reh gayaa…aaaa…aa
reh gaya
jiskaa ho dil ko aasraa
apney paraaye…aey ae ho gaye..ae
apney paraaye…ae..ae ho gaye
taqdeer bhee thukraa gayee
taaron ko bhee neend aa gayi
dil rotey rotey so gayaa
dil rotey rotey so gayaa
har soo udaasi chhaa gayee…ee…ee ee
ho o dil rotey rotey so gayaa…aaaa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 5022 Post No. : 16930 Movie Count : 4596

Today’s song is from an obscure old film – Chhote Sarkar-1938.

My today’s post is No.32 of this year i.e. 2022. Since 1st January 2022, the pattern of my poists seems to have changed perceptibly. Earlier I was known for writing on films of the 30’s and the 40’s on priority, but this year, till my last post (31 posts), I have written only 3 posts on films of the 30’s, only 11 posts on films of the 40’s but 17 posts on films of the 50’s. Come to think of it, there is no intentional shift in my policy or any purpose in doing so, but it looks like it is happening inadvertently. My today’s post will be only the 4th post on a film of the 30’s this year.

Do I have an inclination towards antique films ? YES is the answer. I like to bring the unknown, the less known and the not so famous artistes of the early era to light, to bring the pillars of the film industry in Limelight, so that the younger generation knows about them and becomes aware of the difficult times through which the stalwarts carried our film industry towards today’s Glory !

While doing so, I had to do the hard yards to dig information about these forgotten artistes, contact several Historians, buy and read many books, spend hours on the Internet and collect and record the information. I was singularly Lucky to get a suitable platform to showcase my results, in the form of Atul ji’s Blog. Atul ji’s help in publishing my posts untiringly has helped not only me but the Blog has also now become a storehouse of Credible, Reliable Information on the old timers in the film world, for the use of future students of film history. Thanks a million, Atul ji.

During the writing of my posts here since 2012 till date, I have noticed one thing. I am not sure of anyone else, other than Atul ji, who has also noticed it. I observed that in the early times of this Blog from 2008, the number of visitors kept on increasing and many of the visitors took pleasure in putting in their comments on almost every post. Comments on popular film songs were naturally more, but later readers also commented on other posts, about the artistes, songs, film making, their experiences and provided additional information. Therefore, visiting the Blog was a pleasure not only to enjoy the songs posted, but also to read different comments from the readers.

I remember there were several readers from abroad who used to write comments. There were comments from readers from Singapore, Fiji, Malaysia, Australia, Newzealand, Africa, European countries, UK, USA, Dubai, Pakistan and also from several cities of India like Lucknow, Delhi, Calcutta, Bombay, Pune,Andhra, Madras, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Kerala – in fact from all nooks and corners of India and the world. Many of them were quite knowledgeable too.

Unfortunately, from somewhere from 2016-17 onwards I saw a steady drop in the number of comments from readers. Notably comments from readers from abroad diminished considerably and as of today, their number is almost nil. What could be the reason for this change ? One guess is that the older generation which commented is now too old and hence not active. The other guess could be that initially, as the Blog was new, most songs posted were the popular and well known ones, which the readers knew well, but slowly that stock, naturally, thinned out and unknown and unheard new but old songs were being discussed, which were not known to many present readers to comment upon.

The second guess seems to be more convincing. Nowadays younger contributors are posting songs from the 70’s, 80’s and the 90’s and comments are trickling from equally younger readers, though not so many as in the past. I believe the trend of appreciation, encouraging and commenting changes with the change of Readers’ Profiles.

Today’s film Chhote Sarkar-1938 was made by Sundar Movietone (never heard of it). It was directed by Homi Master. He was one of the directors of the First Generation of Hindi films of the early era, who was a spillover from the Silent Film Era. Since his career as a Director ended in 1946, there is no chance that the younger generation readers would know about him, so here is some information on him.

Homi Master (1900–1949) was an actor-director of early Indian cinema. His work extended from the silent era to the talkie era and up to his death. He produced his best films for Kohinoor Film Company and he has been referred to as “silent cinema’s most successful film-maker”.

He acted as Duryodhan in the then-controversial film Bhakta Vidur (1921), as hero in Kala Naag and Kulin Kanta. Some of his important films were Bismi Sadi, Manorama, Do Ghadi Ki Mauj (1935), Samaj Ki Bhool (1934) and Gul Sanobar (1934). He was active from 1921 to 1949 and made over seventy-eight films. His later films in Gujarati and Hindi were termed as B movies. He died in 1949.

At the age of thirteen, Master joined a famous Parsi theatre group called Bilwala. He soon became a popular stage actor, with his performance in Pakzaad Parveen being appreciated. Following a brief stint at the Phalke Film company, he joined Kohinoor Film Company working initially as an actor. He went on to direct films for them starting with Bismi Sadi.

Homi Master acted in three films before getting a chance to direct. The three films, Bhakta Vidur (1921) (in the role of Duryodhan), Ajamil (1922) and Vratasur Vadha (1923), were directed by Kanjibhai Rathod. He played the lead role in Kala Naag, a film he helped co-direct with Rathod in 1924. A crime drama, it was the first “recorded example” using real-life characters and was based on the Champsi-Haridas Murder case in Bombay.

In 1924, Master started his career as a director with Dwarka Sampat’s Kohinoor Film Company. His first film for Kohinoor was Bismi Sadi, starring Raja Sandow, Miss Moti and Noor Mohammed Charlie. The film was about a hawker who becomes a mill-owner and goes on to exploit the people working under him. Manorama (1924) was based on the famous Gujarati romantic poet Kalapi’s autobiographical poem “Hridaya Triputi”. The film was made in the fantasy genre and broke “all records” when it ran for fourteen weeks.

Other significant films at this time were The Telephone Girl (1926), also called Telephone Ni Taruni, produced by Kohinoor, and starring Ruby Myers, Gohar and Raja Sandow. Educated Wife or Bhaneli Bhamini (1927), was another Kohinoor film with Gohar, Vaidya and Raja Sandow. They were social films that were successful at the box office.

Gul Sanobar (1928) was a fantasy production from Kohinoor Film Company, based on Persian fairy tale romances, and directed by Master. It starred the then-popular star Khalil with Miss Yakbal. The film was later remade in 1934, with the same name, directed by Master and produced by Imperial Film Company. The cast included stars of the time like Sulochana (Ruby Myers), D. Billimoria and Zubeida.

His 1934 film Samaj Ki Bhool, was a social film promoting a widow’s right to remarry. It starred Jamshedji, Lalita Pawar, Jilloobai, Dulari and Rafiq Ghaznavi, with music composed by Pransukh Nayak.

In 1935, he directed three films Do Ghadi Ki Mauj a social film produced by Imperial, starring Ruby Myers and D. Billimoria; Ghar Jamai, a social comedy, a Hindi/Gujarati bilingual, produced by Premier Films with story by Mohanlal G. Dave. (A story about a “resident son-in-law” that became a “major success” at the box office). The third film, Naya Zamana was again produced by Premier Films and starred Heera and Ghulam Mohammed with music by Khansaheb.

It was said that Master was sent abroad to Europe to market Phalke’s films . He teamed successfully with scenarist Mohan lal Dave and cameraman D.D.Dabke with actress Gohar to make many popular films. Gohar called him the most dramatic director , better than Mohan Bhavnani or even Chandulal Shah. His first Talkie film was Saubhagya Sundari-1933 and the last was Chamkati Bijli-1946.

He continued to direct films making ‘B’ class films and some in the Gujarati language. According to the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, he worked as a production manager at Kardar Studios towards the end of his career. He died in 1949. ( based on The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, wiki, Film world-1946 and my notes).

The cast of the film was Jal Merchant, Leela Chitnis, Panna, Heera, Meher Bano, Raj kumari etc. Jal Merchant was a typical Parsi born on 15-1-1920 and brought up in the Parsi Colony area in Bombay. Though his family had a business, he did not join it as he was keen to make a career in films. Bombay being the centre of filmmaking he had plenty of chances. He did not have a masculine, wide chested body, but he compensated with his superb acting skills. He could also sing in his soft voice.

It was a colorful stellar team that Jal Merchant formed with Zubaida in the early talkies. But it was in mythological roles, and not romantic parts, that they first won the hearts of cinegoers. The first picture that made them a rage everywhere was Sagar’s “Veer Abhimanyu,” in which Jal played Abhimanyu to Zubaida’s Uttara. In the next one- Subhadra Haran-32, Jal was Arjun, Abhimanyu’s father, while Zubaida played Subhadra.

Like Zubaida, Jal Merchant joined films in the “silent days”. It was a change of medium for him, for he had been playing female roles on the Gujarati stage! His performance as the heroine of “Shankit Hriday,” a Gujarati play, proved a hit, and Nagendra Majumdar, who directed the play, induced him to switch over to screen acting. Jal joined the Imperial Film Company, and among his early films the most notable was “Vasant Bengali,” a social picture directed by R.S. Chowdhury. In those days, the screen hero generally had more brawn than brains, but the lead player of “Vasant Bengali” was called upon to show more intelligence than physical prowess. Jal did just that – and won instant fame.

After the advent of sound, Jal’s first four films for Sagar were mythologicals – “Veer Abhimanyu-1931,” Subhadra Haran-1932,” “Pandav Kaurav-1933” and “Mahabharat-1933”. For close-ups of these pictures, Jal used to wear trousers and only the upper part of his body was made up for his role. But in one close-up his pants were also visible! The shot was cut on the first day of screening in Bombay.

Gifted with a fine voice, he also delighted cinegoers with his singing. He sang 33 songs in 7 films-Meerabai-32, Pandav Kaurav-33, Mahabharat-33, Grihalaxmi-34, Aaj kal-34, Sone ka Shahar-35 and Toofan Express-1938.

In “Zarina,” written and directed by Ezra Mir, he was the tongawallah who falls in love with a dancing girl at a carnival. This poignant romantic tragedy won plaudits for both Jal and Zubaida. It was their last picture together for Sagar. Zubaida left Sagar and Sabita Devi took her place. Sabita and Kumar were the first stars imported from Calcutta. Sabita co-starred with Jal in “Phantom of the Hills,” directed by Ezra Mir, in which he played a dashing Pathan riding a white charger. In “Educated Wife” (Grihalaxmi), directed by Sarvottam Badami, he played a modern educated youth. In this role the versatile Jal revealed a genial personality. Sabita was again his co-star.

Jal and Zubaida played stellar roles together once again in “Aaj Kal,” directed by R.S. Chowdhury. This was the last important picture for both stars. Jal acted in about n15 Silent films and 29 Talkie films. His first Talkie film was Veer Abhimanyu-1931 and his last Talkie film was Armaan 1953.

Jal Merchant, who already had a family flourishing business, retired from the screen. Later, he started to live a quiet life in Bandra. Jal was an excellent shikari in his younger days. His screen associates also remember his soft voice, gentle manners and sensitive, handsome face. His pairing with Zubeida and Sabita Devi was very popular. He had all the gentle Parsee manners and was a popular co-star for the heroines.

I have read somewhere that Jal Merchant died in 1963 in Bombay. He was unmarried till the end, like many Parsis. ( information from an article by V.P.Sathe in Screen, ‘Screenplay’ by Isak Mujawar, HFGK, muVyz and my notes have been used in this post, with thanks.)

With today’s song by Rajkumari, film Chhote Sarkar-1938 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song- Sukh chain ke din sab beet gaye (Chhote Sarkaar)(1938) Singer- Rajkumari, Lyricist- Pandit Amar, MD- Shanti Kumar Desai

Lyrics

Sukh chain ke din
sab beet gaye
dukh rain andheri chhaayee hai
sukh chain ke din
sab beet gaye
dukh rain andheri chhaayee hai
koi sang na saathi saath sakhi
koi sang na saathi saath sakhi
sapna sa ?? mein aayi
sapna sa ?? mein aayi
Sukh chain ke din
sab beet gaye
dukh rain andheri chhaayee hai

jhoothha prem ye jhoothhi aashaa
jhoothha prem ye jhoothhi aashaa
jhoothhi kaaya
jhoothhi maaya
jhoothhi kaaya
jhoothhi maaya
jhoothhe jag mein
???
jhoothhe jag mein
???
jhoothhi preet lagaayi hai
jhoothhi preet lagaayi hai
Sukh chain ke din
sab beet gaye
dukh rain andheri chhaayee hai


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4943 Post No. : 16801

Today’s song is from the film Maharathi Karna-1944.

Karna is an interesting and a great character from Mahabharat. What most people know about Karna is that he was a ” Daan shoor ” or a great Donor. It is said that no one, who went to him to ask for anything, returned without getting it. There are many stories eulogizing his quality. But karna was much more than just this. He was a great Warrior. Though he was the king of Anga Desh (today’s Bihar/Bengal), he knew that he was indebted to the Kauravas for this honour.

Karna was aware that he was helping those who were in the wrong, but he was helpless in this case. He always felt that a lot of injustice was done to him by Destiny. He knew that he was the illegitimate child born to an unmarried Kunti. This made him the Eldest ” Pandava”, but he was denied his rights due to his birth – a matter which he had no control on! Embittered, he joined the opposition – the Kauravas, who gave him all the honours- only because he was a great Warrior and on their side.

Because of this, Karna had to keep quiet when a helpless Draupadi was being disrobed by his friend Duryodhan, before all the people. Not for anything else, but for this crime, he was killed when he became helpless due to breakage of his Chariot in the midst of the war, in spite of his cry that this was against the war rules- Adharm ! Lord Shrikrishna ensured that he got his punishment.

Those who have read Mahabharat, can you tell whyLord Shri Krishna had entered the Great War but did not fight himself ? Very few persons will know that Shri Krishna entered the great war not to ensure the victory of Pandavas. He had his own agenda. He wanted to ensure that some warriors got their punishment for their sins.

Duryodhana was killed because he disrobed a helpless woman, Jayadrath was killed because he was responsible for the death of Abhiumanyu in the Chakravyuh, Bhishma was kept on arrow-bed to see his kin getting killed before his eyes, for keeping quiet when Draupadi was disrobed, Dhritrashtra had to bear all his 100 sons killed because he never stopped them from doing sins. Not only Kauravas, but even Arjun, Yudhishthir, Balram etc got punished in other ways during the great war.

Film ” Maharathi Karna ” was also made in 1928 in the Silent era. The role of Karna was done by Balasaheb Yadav in that film. The film was directed by Damle and Fattelal, for Basburao Painter’s Maharashtra Film company. Bhalji Pendharkar was the assistant Director. This story of Karna fascinated him so much that at the first opportunity he remade this film, under his own Banner.

Besides the story, there was one more reason to make this film. When the silent film was being made in 1928, Bhalji first met Leela Chandragiri, his consort of many years. Ofcourse she was in her teens then, Later she got married and had children too before they came together again at a later time. In this film in 1944, Leela had an important role. One more actor – Indurao T Nimbalkar had acted in the Silent film of 1928. He was called again to do the same role in the 1944 film too.

Bhalji Perndharkar had initial training in Baburao Painter’s Maharashtra Film Company and later in Shantaram’s Prabhat Film company. So his basics were well founded. Shri BHALJI PENDHARKAR ( 03 May 1897 – 26 November 1994 ), was Film Director, Writer, Producer & Actor, of Marathi and Hindi films. Bhal ji Pendharkar (Bhalchandra Gopal Pendharkar) was the son of Dr.Gopal Pendharkar, the Royal Physician of Shahu Maharaj of Kolhapur state and his partner Radhabai. Dr. Gopal was already married to another lady. This couple gave birth to Bhalji and Baburao Pendharkar. Their mother Radhabai left Dr. Gopal Pendharkar and married Damodar Karnataki. They had two sons- Master Vinayak (father of Baby Nanda), famous actor, director, producer and a studio owner and his brother Vasudev- who became a Cameraman. Kamalabai, the younger sister of Radhabai married Rajaram Vankudre and they had 2 sons- V.Shantaram, famous actor, director,producer and a studio owner and his brother V. Awadhoot- equally famous Cinematographer.

Prabhat Film company shifted to Poona, but actress Leela Chandragiri chose to stay back in Kolhapur and decided to work with Bhalji Pendharkar. They became attracted to each other and got married. Leela had a son (Jaysingh) and a daughter(Madhavi- who married Marathi author Ranjit Desai. She also wrote one book.) already, but Bhalji adopted both children and gave them father’s love. Even Bhalji had one son from his first marriage-Prabhakar. Later, when they built their own studio, it was given the name Jayprabha. It combined his two sons’ names, JAYsingh and PRABHAkar.

During the riots in 1948, arising after Gandhi’s death, their Jayprabha studio was burnt, because Bhalji was a Brahmin. However, within few years he built it again. After Bhalji’s death the studio was purchased by Lata Mangeshkar.

Bhalji started his career in the era of silent films. He was associated with Prabhat Film Company’s earliest talkies, and also worked with other studios in hometown of Kolhapur. Later he acquired his own studio in the form of Jayprabha Studio and became a film producer and director. He also wrote lyrics for some film songs in Marathi. His more famous films are: Netaji Palkar, Thoratanchi Kamala, Chhatrapati Shivaji, Mohityanchi Manjula, Maratha Tituka Melvava, Sadhi Manse, Tambdi Maati. Hindi: Maharathi Karna, Valmiki, Chhatrapati Shivaji, Ganimi Kawa. He directed 9 Hindi films from 1932 to 1952.

A few years before his death, Bhalji was awarded the Dadasaheb Phalke Award by the Indian Government in 1991.

Bhalji had two wives. One of whom, Leela Chandragiri, acted and sang in Hindi and Marathi films in 1930s and 40s, under the name Miss Leela. Bhalji’s son Prabhakar Pendharkar (1933 – 2010) was associated with making of Do Aankhen Barah Haath in 1950s, wrote the book रारंगढांग, and was author-director of noteworthy documentaries. Bhalji’s daughter Madhavi (? – 2013) author of ‘Naach Ga Ghuma’, was wife of renowned Marathi author Ranjeet Desai.

The cast of film Maharathi Karna-1944 was Prithviraj, Durga Khote, Leela, Nimbalkar, Shahu Modak, K N Singh, Swarnalata, Vasantrao pehelwan etc etc. Let us know more about this Nimbalkar. I.T.Nimbalkar aka Indurao T. Nimbalkar ( he was always credited as only ‘ Nimbalkar ‘ in all films) was born on 6-12-1893, in Kolhapur state. This was the time Kolhapur was slowly developing as Kalapur (hub of arts) and the seeds of film making were being planted there. Baburao Painter, one of the original film makers had started his ” Maharashtra Film Company” on 1-12 1917.

Baburao, Damle, Fattelal etc were taught painting By Anandrao painter, who was an extraordinary painter of those times. All these people, along with V Shantaram, Keshavrao Dhaiber and few more also joined Baburao painter’s Maharashtra Film company. True that, film making had started even earlier in Maharashtra, but Baburao painter is credited with making films a form of art and spreading it on a larger canvas of India.

Indurao Nimbalkar grew up in this atmosphere in Kolhapur. He passed his Matriculation exam and also did a diploma in Printing. Nimbalkar was six feet tall and had a good physique. He was expert in riding, swimming and wrestling. He did 1000 sit-ups every day. Shahu Maharaj, the king of Kolhapur encouraged all arts as well as development of lower castes. Arya Samaj had a ‘ Gurukul’ in Kolhapur. Impressed with Nimbalkar’s education and body, Shahu ji appointed him as Editor of the weekly ‘ Arya’ and secretary of Gurukul.

One day Baburao Painter, along with assistant V Shantaram visited his press and offered Nimbalkar a role in his proposed film Sairandhri. Shahu Maharaj also permitted and encouraged him ,so Nimbalkar joined the film line. He was already famous due to his fiery editorials and now people came to see his shootings too. However, due to money shortage, the film did not complete. ( It was later made in 1919, but with different cast. V Shantaram made coloured Sairandhri in 1933 with Nimbalkar again).

Nimbalkar acted in many silent films like Baji Deshpande, Khazanchi (directed by Moti gidwani- England returned), Lanka, Kismet (directed by Baburao Patel) etc etc. After the closure of Maharashtra F. Co., Nimbalkar was invited by V Shantaram to do Vishvamitra’s role in its first Talkie film ” Ayodhya ka Raja” -1932, in Hindi and Marathi. After this, he did Jalti Nishani-32, Sairandhri-33, Maya Machhindra-32, Sinhagadh-23 etc.

After this, Nimbalkar went to Calcutta on invitation and worked in films made by Radha Films, Laxmi Studios, Devdatta films and New Theatres. From 1934 to 1938, he acted in 12 Hindi films. He was provided a Bungalow, car with driver, servants etc. His son studied in local school there. Returning to Bombay he worked as an assistant director to Keshavrao Dhaiber for film ‘Nandkumar’-38, made by his Jayashree Films. Next 2 years he shuttled between Calcutta and Bombay. He did King Dashrath’s role in Prakash films’ Bharat Milap-42 and Ramrajya-43 in this period.

He was invited by V Shantaram for acting in his first film under banner of Rajkamal- Shakuntala-43. Nimbalkar did the role of Kanva Muni in it. He later also acted in Jeevan yatra-46, Subah ka tara-54, Parchhain-52, Teen batti char rasta-53, Toofan aur Diya-56, Z Z Payal baje-55. Earlier he did Aapki sewa mein-47, Prarthana-44,Nal Damayanti-45, Seedha Rasta-41, Gokul-46, Apna Ghar-42, Maharathi karna-44, Seeta Swayamvar-48. He worked in Pyasa-57, Mera Naam Joker-70, Amar Prem-60 etc etc. From 1928 to 1970 he acted in over 250 films.

His wife Sushila was also educated and looked after his home and children. She never visited any sets in her life time. Nimbalkar died on 17-1-1973 at Kolhapur. (Thanks to an article in book Chandraat-चांदरात by Babu Moshoi, in addition to my notes, HFGK, muVyz, CRTWF, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema and Film India magazines).

There were only 6 songs in the film, composed by K.Datta aka Datta Korgaonkar. Today’s song is the 2nd song to feature here.


Song- Jaago Krishna muraari giridhaari(Maharathi Karna)(1944) Singers- Rajkumari ,unknown male voice, Lyricist- Pt. Shiv Kumar, MD- Datta Korgaonkar

Lyrics

Jaago o o o o
o o o o
o o o o
Jaago o o o o
o o o o
o o o o

jaago Krishn muraari
giridhaari
saanwariyaa
girdhaari
ee ee ee ee
ee ee ee ee
jaago krishn muraari
giridhaari
saanwariya
giridhaari
ee ee ee
ee ee ee
nar naari pashu panchhi jaage
nar naari pashu panchhi jaage
laage ?? dwaar
bachuwa bachhia tumhen pukaare
jaago hey nandlal
bachuwa bachhia tumhen pukaare
jaago hey nandlal
ab jaago
ab jaago kunjbihaari
giridhaari
saanwariya
giridhaari
ee ee ee
ee ee ee

ujhak jharokhe sooraj aaye
ujhak jharokhe sooraj aaye
kirnon ke naina lalchaaye
ae ae ae
ae ae ae
ae ae ae
bin darshan phulwa murjhaaye
ae
ae ae ae
bin darshan phulwa murjhaaye
darshan do banwaari
ab jaago
ab jaago kunjbihaari
girdhaari
saanwariyaa
girdhaari
ee ee ee
ee ee ee

main go ras duh kar laayi hoon
main go ras duh kar laayi hoon
prem bhaav bhar kar laayi hoon
prem bhaav bhar kar laayi hoon
naath jagaane ko aayi hoon
oon oon oon oon
naath jagaane ko aayi hoon
bhor huyi sukhkaari
ab jaago
ab jaago krishn muraari
giridhaari
saanwariyaa
giridhaari
ee ee ee
ee ee ee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4938 Post No. : 16788

Today’s song is from an early period costume film-His Highness-1937.

The film was made by Prakash Pictures, who were into making C grade stunt, action and Costume films, before they became famous for Religious and Mythological films in the early 40’s. There was nothing new in the film story, except that in addition to several villains, it had some animals opposing them along with good people. The film was directed by Balwant Bhatt, the elder brother of Nanubhai Bhatt-father of Mahesh Bhatt. The cast of the film was jayant, Sardar Akhtar, Shiriun bano, Umakant, Ismail, Radha, M.Zahoor and many others. There were 2 MDs. The usual MD of Prakash- Shankar Rao Vyas and Lalloobhai Naik. All the 12 songs of the film were written by Sampatlal Shrivastav ‘ Anuj’.

Today’s song is a Parody song. What is a Parody / ” Humorous imitation of a serious composition” is a simple definition. Like Comedy songs, Romantic songs, Childrens songs, Loris, etc, parody songs are also an important segment of poetry. Parody has a very long history. Actually one can say that a Parody is a type of comedy poem. In early Sanskrit Literature also we find Parody, which was called ” Vidamban Kavya” (विडंबन काव्य ).

When the Talkie films started, songs became an integral part of films. Once the set of film making became stable in initial 5-6 years, the films started having Parody songs in it. I remember, I had done a series on “Parody songs in Hindi films” from 16-3-2013 to 2-4-2013, on this Blog, featuring 10 Parody songs from films. In the first post of that series 9 years ago, I had given information on the first few Parody songs in Hindi films. I reproduce here a small relevant portion of that post, for the benefit of our new readers….

” The very FIRST Parody song in Hindi films came as early as 1936. It came from a film called ” Sunehra Sansaar”-1936. It was a Parody of a famous patriotic song by Dr.Iqbal-” Saare jahan se achha Hindosta hamara…” The parody song was ‘ Saare jahan se achha saabun bana hamara,hum kishtiyan hai iski…’

The lyricist was Vijay Kumar, B.A. and the Music Director was K C Dey. When the song was released, instead of becoming popular, it drew people’s ire for distorting a patriotic song. There was criticism and several protests.

Another Music Director Master Mohd. (who was well known for composing many patriotic songs in those days, in his films) decided to make a Parody of K C Dey’s famous song, ‘Jao jao aye mere sadhu…’ from Pooran Bhagat-1933.

He included this parody song in the same year in his film ‘ Miss Frontier Mail ‘-1936. The lyrics for this song were- gaao gaao aye mere aye mere sadhu…’.It was sung by Minu,the Mystique in the film. This Minu was actually Minoo Cooper, a regular singer in Bombay city Parsi circles. He used to sing in many Hotels in those days. He has also sung a few more songs in Hindi films later.

This retaliatory Parody song was well received by the audience and it became popular too.

So, parody songs entered Hindi films with an interesting History behind them ! ”

In addition to the above, there is an example of a famous Parody song which became popular in its time. The story is, when singer actor Surendra was discovered by Sagar Movietone, they decided to project him as Bombay’s answer to Calcutta’s K L Saigal. Impressed with Surendra’s singing capabilities, Sagar made him a hero in his first film ” Deccan Queen ”-1936. In this film Surendra was given a Parody song for saigal’s famous song ” Balam aaye baso mere mann mein” from film Devdas-1935. In this film the song was ” Birha ki aag lagi mere mann mein”.

Thus one finds that parody songs became instant hits in their first appearance in the initial years 1936-1937 itself. In the subsequent years many such Parody songs featured in films. The most important condition for a Parody song is that the Original song must be so popular that people will recognise it from the tune of the parody song itself. For presenting my series on parody songs, I had searched and collected about 250 parody film songs. A big list was available on the then popular group “Hamara Forum”, on the internet.

Coming to today’s parody song “Kabhi tum ko bhi hum se pyaar tha”, from film His Highness-37, it was a Parody of the famous Ghazal “wo jo hum mein tum mein qarar tha, tumhe yaad ho ke na ho” written by the famous Urdu poet Momin Khan Momin (1800-14-5-1852). he was also known as Hakeem Khan, due to his ancestral profession. He died from an accidental fall from his terrace.

The Hero of the film was Jayant. Jayant was born as Zakaria Khan,on 15-10-1912 at Alwar, Rajasthan. His father Syed Ahmed Khan was originally from Peshawar, but was working as a Sports Coach in the court of the Maharaja of Alwar,Rajasthan. Along with his elder brother Jahangir Khan, Jayant used to sell ‘Makka-Bhutta’ (Maize) on a roadside thela and thus earned his pocket money, with which he used to see films. When he grew up, he was taken by his father to the Maharaja, who recruited him as Second Lieutenant in his Army. Jayant soon got bored with this life, left the job and came to Bombay in search of a job in films. When he met Vijay Bhatt of Prakash pictures, this 6’1″ tall,handsome and young man was liked by him. Jayant also knew Horse riding and swimming. He was named JAYANT by Vijay Bhatt and offered a role in their film Nayi Duniya-1934. Rajkumari Banaraswali also debuted in this film.

Excellent Urdu delivery and handsome personality earned Jayant Hero’s roles in Bambai ki Sethani,Bombay Mail, Lal chithi, Shamsheer-e-Arab, Azadveer, Passing show, Snehlata, Top ka gola, Challenge, His Highness, Khwab ki duniya, Mr.X, State Express, Hero no.1, Sardar and Mala. By now his salary was 3700 per month. He was more at ease in Costume and stunt films than social flicks.

Khwaab ki Duniya-37 was based on the story of Invisible Man and this was the first film as a Director for Vijay Bhatt. Babubhai Mistry from Surat used Trick photography in this film,by using Black Thread on black background.

Jayant was married to 13 year old Kamarbano Sultan. His first son,Imtiaz khan was born on 15-10-42 and second son was born on 21-10-43. He was Amjad Khan (Gabbar singh of Sholay). As a child, Amjad khan was very frail and weak till his second year. Later in his youth, of course he expanded out of proportion. Jayant’s elder brother Jahangir Khan died suddenly in an accident. Jayant was very much attached to him. To forget the sorrow, Jayant started smoking and drinking. After he was out of Prakash Pictures, he was taken by Minerva for Sikander’s role. When Sohrab Modi saw him smoking and drinking on sets, he was summarily thrown out and the role went to Prithwiraj Kapoor, for whom it was a Milestone in his career.

Jayant worked in Aladdin, Laila, Bulbul e Baghdad, Mere saajan, Zewar and Dawat. He even went to Lahore to act in “Poonji” and “Shirin Farhad”. When Shirin Farhad became a resounding flop, Jayant stopped getting roles, but he never went to anyone to ask for roles. P N Arora went to Jayant’s house to sign him for Doli. After Partition, his finances became critical and he had to sell even family jewelry for his drinks. He acted in character roles in Amar ,Insaniyat, Madhumati, Maya, Memdidi, Son of India, Kabli Khan, Hakikat, Leader, Himalay ki God mein, Sangharsh, Do Raaste, Heer Ranjha, Mera Gaon Mera Desh etc. He worked in 105 films. Can you imagine Jayant singing ? Yes, he had sung a song in the film State Express-1938, along with Sardar Akhtar.

Jayant was a family man. Till the end he had only one wife and he followed the rule to partake the dinner at home with all family members daily. He contracted Cancer, lost his voice in 1970. His last film was ‘Love and God’,which was released 11 years after his death.

Jayant died on 2-6-1975. ( Thanks to shri Harish Raghuvanshi ji, for Jayant’s profile in his Gujarati book ,Inhe na Bhulana ).

The story of film His Highness was…….

When the king of Rajnagar dies, the Queen (Gulab) discovers that he had bequeathed the throne not to her mad son Pratap (Umakant), but to their nephew, the young Prince Kirit (Madhav). This made the queen very angry.

Captain Dilip (Jayant), Kirit’s bodyguard, takes the boy and his animal pals, Tiger (Dog Tiger) and Bahadur (Horse Bahadur), on an outing along with servants Ram (Lekhraj) and Rahim (Chhotejan). A group of ruffians surround Dilip and Kirit and attack them, knocking Dilip unconscious, and kidnapping Kirit. Bahadur gallops away to inform Ram and Rahim while Tiger takes off after the goons. Meanwhile, back at the palace, the aged prime minister (Jal Writer), Princess Asha (Sardar Akhtar), and Asha’s maid Kala (Shirin), are told of the kidnapping. Kala then overhears the queen planning to place the blame on Dilip for the kidnapping, thus doing away with him. Kala finds and informs Dilip that it is safest if he stays away from the kingdom for the time being.

Tiger finds Kirit but is unable to free him. However, the dog is able to lead Dilip, on horseback, to the cabin where the prince is being held. Dilip, Tiger and Bahadur put up a good fight against the ruffians, but the crooked Jalim Singh has Dilip arrested. Jalim attempts to take off with Kirit, but Ram and Rahim are able to rescue him.

The queen learns that the prince has been saved by some unknown persons and arranges that the boy should be found and killed, and that the killer will be appointed Prime Minister. Her plan is foiled by a masked man and eventually Kirit is returned safely to the palace.

But with Dilip having vanished, the minister must find someone else to play bodyguard. The Queen suggests her loyal follower Captain Ajaya (M. Zahoor), but the minister disapproves of that choice. When the Queen starts to form another dastardly plan, the mysterious masked man makes an appearance and cautions her to take no actions against Kirit. But the Queen soon ignores the warning and arranges a plot to frame the minister for some crime, thus leaving Kirit with no protection. But she didn’t count on the involvement of Asha, Kala, Tiger, Bahadur and Tommy (Dog Tommy) in trying to save the life of the child prince. (Thanks to pedrotheapebomb.com) .

let us now enjoy the Parody song,a Triad, sung by Rajkumari, Lallobhai and Ismail.


Song- Kabhi tum ko hum se bhi pyaar thha (His Highness)(1937) Singers- Rajkumari Dubey, Lallubhai, E.Ismail, Lyricist- Sampatlal Shrivastav ‘Anuj’, MD- Not known

Lyrics

Kabhi tum ko hum se bhi pyaar thha
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
Kabhi tum ko hum se bhi pyaar thha
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
wo wafa ki kasmein jo khaayin thhin
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
wo wafa ki kasmein jo khaayin thhin
kabhi chaandni mein jo khol kar
maine zulfen shaanon pe daal deen
kabhi chaandni mein jo khol kar
maine zulfen shaanon pe daal deen
mujhe tum ne dil se laga liyaa
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
mujhe tum ne dil se laga liyaa
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho

kabhi ham bhi tum bhi thhe o sanam
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho

na taka thha aapki jeb mein
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho

wo anarkali ke baazaar mein
maine girvi rakkhi thhi chappalen
wo jo tumko lassi pilaayi thhi
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
tujhe yaad ho ke na yaad ho
na machine gun se na tope se
mujhe maara nakhron ke teer se
na machine gun se na tope se
mujhe maara nakhron ke teer se
main ?? ka jawaan thha
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho
tumhen yaad ho ke na yaad ho o o


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4879 Post No. : 16674

Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment – Lord Buddha

Thinking about the past events in the life and planning for the future is one of the common activities of human beings most of the time. This, at times, can become a stressful activity during which negative thoughts can creep in the mind. In this process, we tend to lose focus on the current activities. We try to neatly plan for the future based on the past experiences. But not all the parameters of the future plan run on the basis of what was determined at the time of planning. The reason is that there are many uncertainties on the way to attaining the goal. I will give the example of planning my Himalayan treks to elucidate the tyranny of uncertainties.

I have always made a well-charted plan for each of my Himalayan treks. But the uncertainty starts when the train or the flight which we have booked gets delayed by a few hours jeopardizing the connecting travels to the base town/village from where the trek is to start. The second uncertainty is through natural calamities. A landslide or a flooded water stream cutting across the road can block the vehicle movements for a considerable time. The third element of the uncertainty is the weather. A rain/snow storm during the trek can force one to stay inside the tent or in a shelter on the way for a considerably long time. Lastly, the last-minute health issues of a trekker can force him the abandon the trek mid-way. Ultimately, one is not sure whether the trekker’s goal to reach his destination would be achievable or not.

Because of these perceived uncertainties, for the next trek, we plan more meticulously than what is necessary. Things work out smoothly and at the end of the trek, though we are happy to complete the trek in time without hic-cups, we feel cheated by the nature. We are left with extra days which means additional expenses. In short, there is no fixed solution in the planning for the future.

Because of the futility of the past memories and the uncertainty of the future, a philosophical thought has emerged which is known as ‘live in the moment’. This philosophy reminds us that our presence is in the present only. We cannot live in the past as that timeframe is over. We cannot plan for the future as there are many uncertainties. When we think of our past, the thought process influences our future goals. There is no guarantee that our past experiences would lead to achieving the future goals successfully.

Perhaps, it was in this context, Lord Buddha advised his followers to forget about the past, not to dream about the future and devote full time for present moment. In other words, there is no need for Mungerilal ke haseen sapne as there is no guarantee – kal ho na ho. So, enjoy the present moment on which the human beings have some control. Just go with the flow of life as beautifully visualised by Sahir Ludhianv in the song, main zindagi ka saath nibhaata chala gaya.

There may be many among us who are following ‘living for the moment’ philosophy, albeit unknowingly. After reading about this philosophy, I have realised that I have unwittingly followed this philosophy covering the important social and financial events in my life. I had flown with then current situation as needed without bothering about the future – especially in regard to my education, employment, buying a residential house, financial planning for the future etc. I had not made any financial planning for my future as at that time, I felt that my provident fund balance and the gratuity amount would take care of my future financial requirements. As I see it today, I was not completely right about this thinking as interest earned on this amount would not have taken care of a good standard of living in my post-retired life. Fortunately, when my job became pensionable in 1997, it helped me to maintain a good standard of living after retirement.

Let me add a caveat to the ‘live in the moment’ philosophy. Each one of us follow a different life style. Some will thrive with their life to flow with the needs as and when arise without planning for the future. Some may like to have a perspective plan for their future life, may be with some flexibilities. There is also the third possibility – a sort of mix of both where one partially plans and also partially swims with the flow.

I found a rare song from the film ‘Dukh Sukh’ (1942) which depicts, more or less, the ‘live in the moment’ philosophy, probably for a drunkard in a tavern. The song is ‘hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa, majhe se pee aur majhe se khaa’ which is rendered by Rajkumari Dubey. The words are of Wali Sahab which are set to music by Khemchand Prakash.

Audio Clip:

Song-Hai aaj kal ki fikar hi kya (Dukh Sukh)(1942) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Wahi Sahab, MD-Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa

ye aaj tere haath hai
ye aaj tere haath hai
kal ki kal ke saath hai
kal ki kal ke saath hai
kal kaa din jo aayega
kal kaa din jo aayega
to kal ko dekha jaayega
to kal ko dekha jaayega
hai kal ki tujhko fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai kal ki tujhko fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa

shabaab phir na aayega
ye abr phir na chhaayega
shabaab phir na aayega
ye abr phir na chhaayega
ye chaar din hain pyaar ke ae
ye chaar din hain pyaar ke ae
maz utha tu bahaar ke
maze utha tu bahaar ke
bahaar ke tu maze uthha
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
bahaar ke tu maze uthha
maze se pee aur maze se khaa
hai aaj kal ki fiqar hi kyaa
maze se pee aur maze se khaa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4796 Post No. : 16557 Movie Count :

4508

‘Aawaaz’ (1942) was produced by Dadasaheb Torne under his banner, Saraswati Cinetone and was directed by Rafique Razvi. The star cast included Maya Bannerji, Wasti, Swarnlata, Danve, Kailash, Shantabai, Baby Anwari etc. Dadasaheb Torne set up Saraswati Cinetone in 1931 after the sound films came into being. His maiden sound film, ‘Shyamsundar’ (1932) completed silver jubilee run in Mumbai. ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) was the last film of Dadasaheb Torne.

I became aware of Dadasaheb Torne when his name had propped up prominently in many newspapers and magazines around the time of closing of the centenary celebrations of Indian films in May 3, 2013. The day was exactly 100 years after Dadasaheb Phalke’s first Indian film. ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was released. Vijay and Anil Torne, the sons of Dadasaheb Torne claimed that it was their father, Dadashaeb Torne who produced India’s first film ‘Shree Pundalik’ (1912) which was released in the Coronation theatre in central Mumbai on May 18, 1912.

A petition signed by many citizens including the family members of Dadasaheb Torne and Vikas Patil, the producer and the then Chairman of IMPPA was submitted to the then President, Pranab Mukherjee and others seeking the status to Dadasaheb Torne as the producer of the first Indian film ‘Shree Pundalik’ (1912). A Public Interest Litigation (PIL) was also filed in Bombay High Court seeking the honour to Dadasaheb Torne for producing the first Indian film. Both the petition as well as PIL have cited the advertisement of the film which appeared in the Times of India dated May 25, 1912 and its screening in the Coronation Theatre. The film ran for two weeks.

I could not get to know whether any decision on the petition or the judgement on PIL came out. But judging by the intense debate in the print media those days on this issue, I do not think that the Government of India gave any final response to the petition.

There were many articles which appeared on this issue in various newspapers of that time such as the Times of India, Indian Express, DNA, Mid-Day etc. Based on the articles in these newspapers, I have summarised the points of arguments for and arguments against declaring ‘Shree Pundalik’ to be the first Indian film produced by Dadasaheb Torne which are as under:

Arguments in favour of ‘Shree Pundalik’ as the first Indian film

1. ‘Shree Pundalik’ was shot on a movie camera with a cameraman. The shooting script was written by Dadasaheb Torne and his friends, Ramrao Kirtikar and Nanasaheb Chitre.

2, Dadasaheb Torne directed ‘Shree Pundalik’ beside acting. Tipnis and Joshi also acted along with other actors. The shooting was done at the junction of the then Girgaon Road and Lamington Road. So, it was a location shooting.

3. The length of the film was 4000 feet, So, it was a feature-length film as per the standard of films those days.

4. Dadasaheb Torne was continuously associated with Indian films as a producer, director, editor, sound recordist and film distributors since 1912.

Arguments against ‘Shree Pundalik’ as the first Indian film.

1. ‘Shree Pundalik’ was a recording of a drama of the same name with a camera fixed on the stage. In other words, there were no camera movements, no close-ups and multiple angle shots. As against this, ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was filmed using the cinematic techniques. It was shot with a movie camera with multiple angles and in parts. All the parts were later joined together to make a full film (editing functions).

2. It is claimed that ‘Shree Pundalik’ was 1500 feet in length with a runtime of 22 minutes whereas the length of ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was 3700 feet with a runtime of 40 minutes.

3. For ‘Shree Pundalik’, the camera was operated by a Britisher, Johnson who took the raw film to London for processing. The negatives of the film is not available in India. The film’s positive print along with other related documents was lost during the Panshet dam flooding in Pune in 1961. ‘Raja Harishchandra’ was processed in India. In the words of Dadasheb Phalke, it was a complete swadeshi film.

4. Raja Harishchandra’ was made with a shooting script. Actors were specially selected for the film. Elaborate sets were designed both for indoor and outdoor shootings. Special costumes were designed for the actors. There were shooting schedules of about 4 weeks. In other words, all the important aspects of a film making – direction, camera movements, a couple of trick scenes, art work, costumes, lighting, editing etc were handled while making ‘Raja Harishchandra’.

Government of India continues to recognise ‘Raja Harishchandra’ as the first feature film made in India and Dadasaheb Phalke as the pioneer of Indian films.

A biographical book on Dadasaheb Torne was written in Marathi by Shashikant Kinikar, a film journalist which was published in 2007. After failing to get the book though I got some material from the preview of the book. I came across an article written by Kumar Kadam in Marathi in Maharashtra Times, dated April 23, 2012 giving a short biography of Dadasaheb Torne.

Ramchandra Gopal (Dadasaheb) Torne (13/04/1890 – 19/01/1960) was born in Sukalwad village, near Malwan in Sindhudurg district. At the age of 3, his father passed away plunging the family into poverty. As a result, Dadasaheb Torne did not complete his primary schooling.

Because of poverty, the family shifted to Mumbai. Soon, the young Dadasaheb went to Karachi with a friend and worked there in a shop learning job of an electrician. After about 6 months, he came back to Mumbai and joined Greaves Cotton in their Electric Department.

In Mumbai, once he attended the premier of the Marathi drama ‘Shree Pundalik’ staged by an amateur drama company. Soon, he became attracted to Marathi drama and joined Advocate Kirtikar’s Shripad Natak Mandali. Because of his multiple talents, he became one of the important members of the drama company.

At that time, the silent films from Hollywood were getting released in Mumbai which had become popular. Dadasaheb Torne’s mind was working on the conversion of Marathi drama, ‘Shree Pundalik’ into a silent film. He was in contact with his Hollywood friend to get the knowledge of making a film and the approximate cost thereof. His friend, Advocate Nanasaheb Chitre arranged for a movie camera and a British cameraman, Johnson. Thus, India’s first silent film ‘Shree Pundalik’ was produced and directed by Dadasaheb Torne which was released in Coronation Theatre on May 18, 1912. It ran for 2 weeks.

Soon after the release of ‘Shree Pundalik’, Greaves Cotton transferred Dadasaheb Torne to their Karachi office where he became friendly with Baburao Pai (He was the same Baburao Pai who became one of the partners of Prabhat Film Company and introduced Dev Anand in ‘Hum Ek Hain’, 1946). Both of them started the business of importing silent films from Hollywood for distribution in Karachi.

After a couple of years in Karachi, Dadasaheb Torne returned to Mumbai and spent 3-4 years in Kolhapur probably to learn the nuances of film making. During the first World War period, he came back to Mumbai and started a company dealing in cine equipment like camera, films and other accessories which were required for making films. His business boomed as many had started making silent films. In 1929, Dadasaheb Torne in partnership with Baburao Pai floated ‘Super Pictures’, a film distribution firm which made a lot of profit during the boom period of silent films.

In around 1927, sound films had made their presence in Hollywood. Dadasaheb foresaw the opportunity in doing business in sound equipment. With his American associates, he learnt the use of sound technology in films. When Ardeshir Irani was planning to make India’s first sound film, ‘Alam Ara’ (1931), Dadasaheb Torne provided him Bell & Havel movie camera and the sound equipment. He himself supervised the sound recording of ‘Alam Ara’ (1931) sitting with the Sound Recordist.

In 1932, Dadasaheb floated his own film production company, Saraswati Cinetone with a studio in Pune and produced its maiden sound film, ‘Shyam Sundar’ (1932). Under this banner, Dadasaheb made 20 films in Marathi and Hindi up to 1942.

The financial constraints forced Dadasaheb Torne to rent out his studio premises in Pune to one of his close associates (W Z Ahmed?). In 1947 in the wake of the partition, his associate mortgaged the premises to a bank by forging the signature of Dadasaheb Torne. Thereafter, he ran away to Pakistan with the money he raised and along with the expensive camera and other equipment. A shocked Dadasaheb got his first heart attack after which he decided to completely retire from the films. He stayed with his family in his bungalow in Shivaji Nagar, Pune until his death in January 19, 1960.

I feel very sorry for Dadasaheb Torne as he came so close to becoming the pioneer of Indian films, but lost the honour on technical points. He was a visionary man who foresaw the advent of silent and sound films well in advance and kept himself ready in learning the techniques of film making. His efforts need to be lauded as he came from a very poor family without even completing his primary education.

It is not known whether Dadasaheb Phalke had occasion to see ‘Shree Pundalik’. But he may be aware of the short comings of the film which could have facilitated him to improve upon while planning ‘Raja Harishchandra’. I feel that Dadashaeb Torne’s contributions to Indian cinema need to be recognised some way or the other – say by instituting an award for some film related activities. A road in Pune is named after him.

Coming back to the last film produced by Dadasaheb Torne, ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) had 10 songs written by Ramesh Gupta and Kaabil Amritsari. However, accreditation of lyricist of each song is not available. There were two music directors for the film – K C Verma and Sadashiv Neverekar. Again, accreditation for each song is not available. Sadashiv Narvekar was associated with Marathi films as a music director who composed Lata Mangeshkar’s first ever recorded song in a Marathi film, ‘Kiti Hasaal’ (1942).

I am presenting the first song ‘naach naach re man pankhi’ from ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) to appear on the Blog. The melodious song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey. An almost similar sounding tune was used in the mukhada of the song, nain dwaar se man mein wo aake in ‘Saawan’ (1959). But I guess that this has more to do with the same raag-based songs than getting inspired from the tune of the song under discussion.

With this song, ‘Aawaaz’ (1942) makes its debut on the Blog.
Audio Clip:

Song-Naach naach re man pankhi tere saajan aayenge(Aawaaz)(1942) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyricist-Kabil Amritsari/Ramesh Gupta, MD-K C Verma/ Sadashiv Nevrekar

Lyrics

naach naach re
naach naach re man pankhi
tere saajan aayenge
naach naach re man pankhi
tere saajan aayenge
phoolon ka chaadar sajaa le
phoolon ka chaadar sajaa le
aasha ke ae ae ae ae
aasha ke man deep jalaa le
aasha ke man deep jalaa le
(??) ko dhoond rahi hain ankhiyaan
(??)ko dhoond rahi hai ankhiyaan
kab saajan aayenge.. ae ae
kab saajan aayenge
naach naach re mann pankhi
tere saajan aayenge

jeewan ki ee ee ee
ho…. o
o o o o
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa
jeewan ki ?? lehraaye
?? ankhiyan basaayen
manwa meethhe gaane aaye
gaane gaaye
gaane gaaye
manwa meethhe gaane aaye
kyaa
tere saajan aayenge
haan
aayenge
naach naach re mann pankhi
tere saajan aayenge


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4793 Post No. : 16553 Movie Count :

4507

Leela Desai was one of the top actresses during 1937-47 both in Kolkata and Mumbai. There was a curiosity in me as to why she suddenly disappeared from the film industry after 1947 when her career was at the peak. Thereafter, she lived in almost obscurity. What is surprising about Leela Desai is that information about her date/year of birth, her marital status, what she did after she left the film industry and when she passed away are unknown or sketchy.

Leela Desai was the 4th of the 5 children born to Dr Umedram Desai from Gujarat and Satybala Devi, daughter of a Bengali landlord settled in Bihar. It was a second marriage for both of them as Satyabala Devi lost her husband during the childhood while Dr Umedram Desai got married to his first wife in his childhood through whom he had two sons. Later, Dr Umedram Desai married Gunobati Mitter, a Bengali Christian, for the third time with whom he had 6 children. Before her marriage, Gunobati Mitter worked as a tutor for the children of Dr Umedram Desai and Satyabala Devi in Rampur. So apart from her own 4 siblings, Leela Desai had 8 step brothers/sisters.

Leela Desai was born in Newark when her parents were in the USA for a 3-year stint. She was brought up in Rampur as her father, Dr Umedram Desai became the State Surgeon for the State of Rampur and the personal Physician to the Nawab of Rampur. At the age of six, Leela Desai was sent to Kolkata for her primary schooling and to Kurseong near Darjeeling from where she completed her Matric and Junior College. Thereafter, Leela Desai returned to Lucknow by which time her father had passed away in Mumbai. In Lucknow, she enrolled to learn Kathak from Shambu Maharaj. During her training, she gave a lot of charity dance performances and made a good name as a dancer.

Hemchandra Chunder, one of the film directors in New Theatres who was on a visit to Lucknow, attended one of Leela Desai’s dance performances. He was impressed by her dance performance with her expressive eyes. He offered her a role of a younger sister of Kamlesh Kumari in New Theatre’s ‘President’ (1937) in which she had also a dance performance. At first, she did not show much interest to work in the film. However, after few days when she watched New Theatres’ Krorepati’ (1936), she felt that she could act in the film. She wrote to Hemchandra Chunder about her willingness to work in the film. The fact that Hemchandra along with Nitin Bose rushed to Lucknow with a contract showed their eagerness to take Leela Desai for the film without the screen test.

‘President’ (1937) became a hit on the box office and Leela Desai’s performance in the film was appreciated so much that overnight she became the star. Under New Theatres’ banner, apart from ‘President’ (1937), she worked in ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Dushman’ (1938), Kapal Kundala’ (1939) and ‘Nartaki’ (1940). Except ‘Kaapal Kundala’, she also acted in Bangla versions of the films and had also dance performances in these films.

After ‘Nartaki’ (1940), Leela Desai left New Theatres and took a year-long all-India tour with her dance troupe which became very successful both in terms of recognition as a dancer as well as in monetary terms. After accepting the attractive offer from Chimanlal Trivedi of Laxmi Productions, she landed in Mumbai to act in their maiden film ‘Tamanna’ (1942). In Mumbai, though Leela Desai worked as a free-lance actor, she was associated with Laxmi Productions for ‘Inkaar’ (1943), ‘Sharaafat’ (1943), ‘Miss Devi’ (1944), ‘Kamala’ (1946), and ‘Maharani Milandevi’ (1946). She also worked with her New Theatres’ colleagues and directors in Mumbai such as Nitin Bose in ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Mujrim’ (1944), with Debaki Bose in ‘Meghdoot’ (1945) and with Kidar Sharma in ‘Kaliyaan’ (1944). In addition, she worked with veterans directors like Vishram Bedekar in ‘Nagad Narayan’ (1943), R S Chaudhary in ‘Magadraj’(1946) and with Ramchandra Thakur in ‘Geet Govind’ (1947).

During her short filmy career between 1937-47, Leela Desai worked in 22 films. After 1947, Leela Desai seems to have taken a ‘voluntary retirement’ from the film industry. Her only connection to filmy industry after 1947 was that her name appeared on the credit titles of Bimal Roy’s film, ‘Kabuliwala’ (1961) as Associate Producer. It is said that Leela Desai bought the rights of ‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961, Bangla) from Tapan Sinha with an intention to make the film in Hindi. However, later she sold the rights to Bimal Roy.

Leela Desai’s elder sister, Shanti Desai was married to Bratindranath Tagore, a nephew of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. Her younger sister, Monica Desai was also an actress in Bangla and Hindi films who got married to film director, Phani Majumdar in 1947.

As I said earlier, not much information about Leela Desai was available after she left the films. One of the commentators has mentioned on the facebook page that Leela Desai remained unmarried for rearing the children of her elder sister, Shanti who passed away at a young age. If it is true, it is a sacrificial act by her to leave the film industry and remain unmarried to take care of her elder sister’s children.

Another reference I got about Leela Desai after her leaving films was from an obituary of Sumita Sanyal written in 2017 by Shoma A Chatterji, a film scholar and a free-lance journalist. In this article, she has mentioned that Leela Desai was staying in Mumbai at her apartment in Worli Sea Face where she used to conduct acting classes for the prospective actors coming from Kolkata. One of such actors to whom she gave acting training was Sumita Sanyal. It is possible that Leela Desai may have recommended Sumita Sanyal to Hrishikesh Mukherjee for the film ‘Ashirwaad’ (1968).

As per the comment on Upperstall, written by Shoma A Chatterji in the context of yester year stars who passed away in oblivion, it was stated that Leela Desai passed away in Mumbai. But her date/year of death was not mentioned. She further stated that none of the newspapers and film magazines carried the news of her death.

Leela Desai who started her filmy career with her maiden film “president’ (1937) under the direction of Nitin Bose, got the opportunity to work under his direction in ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Mujrim’ (1944), later film being also produced by Nitin Bose under the banner of Vishnu Cinetone. The star cast included Motilal, Leela Desai, Jagdish Sethi, Yakub, Veena Kumari, Sunalini Devi, Cuckoo etc.

From a very short synopsis available on-line, the film was a ‘musical crime-thrilling family drama’. Motilal is a kind hearted person who meets Leela Desai and fall in love with her. Both of them want to marry each other but a villain, Yakub comes in the way as Leela Desai would inherit a lot of wealth if she gets married. So, Motilal is framed under a false murder case by Yakub. How the real culprit is traced and Motilal and Leela Desai get united, becomes the part of the thrilling end.

The film had 6 songs written by Kailash Matwala (4) and Rammurti Chaturvedi (2). The songs were set to music by Padmabhushan Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh, one of the greatest Tabla and Harmonium players.

I am presenting the first song ‘mori dukaniya aana baabu’ from ‘Mujrim’ (1944) to appear on the Blog. The song is rendered by Rajkumari Dubey on the words of Rammurti Chaturvedi. It is very melodious song with unusual orchestration. There is also some influence of Rabindra Sangeet in the musical composition of the song.

With this song, ‘Mujrim’ makes a debut on the Blog.

Note: Leela Desai’s early life sketch is based on an article which appeared in July 1942 issue of ‘Filmindia’ magazine after the release of ‘Tamanna’ (1942), her maiden film in Mumbai. Some personal information about Desai family is supplemented from a Blog of Adeel Desai.

Audio Clip:

Song-Mori dukaniya aana baabu (Mujrim)(1944) Singer-Rajkumari, Lyrics-Rammurty Chaturvedi, MD-Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh

Lyrics

mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana
haan aan aan
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa

jeth maheena aa aa
raat ki raani ee ee
jeth maheena raat ki raani
phoolen aadhi ratiyaan aan aan
jeth maheena raat ki raani
phoolen aadhi ratiyaan aan aan
bahey paseena jee ghabraaye
saajan karen na batiyaan
karen na batiyaan
karen na batiyaan
aan aan aan aan aan aan
phool ka haar pahan ke sajni
saajan ko lalchaana aa aa
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa

aaya maas ashaadh
chameli phooli kyaari kyaari
aaya maas ashaadh
chameli phooli kyaari kyaari
kali kaliyon mein se khushboo nikli pyaari pyaari
chilla chilla kar baabu mere roothhi naar manaana
chilla chilla kar baabu mere roothhi naar manaana
baabu roothhi naar manaana
mori dukaniya aana baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa
bhaant bhaant ke phool rangeele
des lekar jaana
baabu
mori dukaniya aana aa aa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4751 Post No. : 16486 Movie Count :

4479

Today’s song is from the film Maharani Minal Devi-1946. This film was made by Lakshmi Productions, Bombay, owned by the Director Chimanlal Trivedi. This film was made on a remarkable historical personality from Gujarat.

Bombay film industry has made more than 12000 films so far, on various Genres, but it’s score on making films on Historical Indian personalities is very pathetic. While films on Mughal Kings, Queens and other personalities were made in all decades since the films started talking, not much focus was given on Indian historyHero and Heroines. Not that no films were made at all on them, but if you see its number, there can not be a justification for the large gap.

In the history of India, there were hundreds of such worthy sons and daughters who fought for the country, brought social reforms, did extraordinary work for the people and generally did things for which the country remembers them proudly. Actually,in every state of India, there are Heroes and Heroines who did a lot of good work for the people, in the past few hundred years. Sadly, Hindi films are very poor on this count.

However, I find that regional cinemas are way ahead of Hindi cinema in this matter. Particularly I would quote Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Bangla films in the first list. The second list is of Marathi and Oriya films. Mind you, I am not talking about films on religious personalities and saints like Kabir, Tulsida etc. Even in this category, very few are the subject matter of Hindi films.

People like Rana Pratap, Ishwarchandra Vidyasagar, Rabindranath Tagore, Dhondo Keshav Karve, Rani Chennamma etc etc deserved Hindi films. The entire focus was on Mughals and those who came from outside.The regional films at least did some justice by making films on their Heroes/heroines. Tamil and Bangla films are leaders in this. The strong Regional Pride was the causal factor essentially but honouring heroes is a matter of appreciation. Films on Babar, Humayun, Shahjehan, Bahadurshah Zafar and the likes of them are made in plenty, for obvious reasons, but how many films were made on Savarkar, Shivaji, Rana Pratap, Ashoka the great, Jhansi ki Rani etc ? Leave the older ones. Are there films on Indira Gandhi, Nehru, Gandhi ? A British person had to come here to make a film on Gandhi !

During the British rule – till 1947 – it was probably not possible, allowed or was risky, but since 1947 till date what was the problem ? I feel sad at this state of affairs in making films. Luckily, in the last few years, some enterprising filmmakers have dared to make films on Indian Heroes. I do hope that the situation will improve further and films on Indian heroes/Heroines (there are plenty of them) will be made.

Film maharani Minal devi-1946 is a film on a brave, intelligent, kind and Patriotic personality from Gujarat. I could not get any information on her, the story of the film or other details. Fortunately, I could find a site http://www.streeshakti.com, wherein I found a note on her. here it is to get an idea who she was and what she did….

“Minal Devi or Mayanalla, a famous queen of eleventh century Gujarat, is remembered as an able and just administrator. She was the daughter of Jayakeshin, a king of the Kadamba dynasty in Karnataka and was married to Karna I, a Chalukya king of Anahillapatanawada who met an early death, leaving his queen and young son Siddharaja Jayasimha. Minal Devi acted as regent for her son, who went on to become a legendary hero. An incident described in Rajashekhar Suri’s Prabandha Kosha testifies to the fact that she inspired him in many of his warlike exploits.
She also managed affairs of state, built several monuments and lakes and was responsible for the remission of the tax on pilgrims visiting the Somnath temple. Two lakes built in her period were Minalasar or Munsar near Viramgam and Malva at Dhavalakka or Dholka in Ahmedabad. According to legend, there was a house owned by a woman at the proposed site of the lake Malva, which needed to be demolished to give the lake a regular shape. The queen offered a big sum of money to the woman for her house, but she refused, saying, ‘I shall be famous with your lake,’ thus threatening to sacrifice her life if her house was touched. The queen did not coerce her, showing herself to be a just ruler. This event led to the Gujarati saying: ‘If you want to see justice, go to Dholka and have a look at Malva lake.’

Minal Devi is mentioned with high esteem in contemporary literature. A Sanskrit play entitled Mudritakumudachandra-prakarana depicts a learned dispute between the Digambaras and Svetambaras, the two major Jain sects. One topic in this dispute is whether a woman can achieve salvation. The Svetambaras here claim that women possessing sattwa (identity: an inner quality of goodness) could attain salvation and cite Sita from mythology and Minal Devi in the court of Siddharaja Jayasimha as examples.”

The film had 7 songs written by two lyricists, composed by Saraswati Devi-the music Director. The film was directed by Chimanlal Trivedi. The cast of the film was Prem Adeeb, Leela desai, Durga Khote, Jagdish bSethi, Agha, Sankatha prasad and many others. Director Chimanlal trivedi was a remarkable enterprising person.

Chimanlal Trivedi, was one of the major filmmakers of the 30s and the 40s decade. He was more a Producer businessman than a Director. While he directed hardly 7 films, he produced close to 50 films- all having A grade actors, directors and composers !

Born on 19-3-1909 at a village near Anand in Gujarat he was from a Brahmin family. He did his schooling in Ahmedabad and technical graduation from Baroda. Being an expert in weaving, he took up a job as a weaving Master in Calcutta. Fond of writing, he started writing Dramas, which were staged in Bengal and Gujarat. He was attracted towards Cinema and tried some work in New Theatres. Knowing that the real playing field is Bombay he reached there. He wrote stories for the film Chevrolet-36 and Danger Signal-37 for Mohan pictures.

He established his own production company CIRCO (Cine Industries Recording COmpany) in 1937. By 1943, he had made 12 films. He preferred not to direct his films, but appointed directors like Mohan Sinha for Laxmi-40, Anuradha-40 and Vanmala-41, Balwant Bhatt for Suhag-40 and Madhusudan-41, A R Kardar for Swami-41 and Nai Duniya-42 and Debki Bose for Apna Ghar-42.

He had the art of getting the most popular stars for his films like, Prithviraj kapoor, Chandramohan, Durga Khote,Mazhar khan, Bibbo,Surendra, Jairaj, Sitara, Jeevan, Yaqub, Shobhana Samarth, Prem Adeeb, Vishnupant Pagnis,Leela Desai, Pahadi Sanyal, Shanta Apte and many others. Even big directors like Debki Bose,Nitin Bose, Kardar,Mohan Sinha, Sarvottam Badami, Nandlal Jaswantlal,Profull Roy, Sudhir Sen, R S Chaudhary, Phani mujumdar, Balwant Bhatt etc. worked for him. From Prabhat he brought Shanta Apte for Rs.1000 pm, and also Chandramohan, Pagnis and Mazhar khan. His friend Chandulal Shah followed his way and brought K L Saigal from New Theatres !

C L Trivedi was an expert in gathering funds for his films. After CIRCO at Parel, he started Laxmi Productions at Andheri, in 1942. He made mera Gaon,Sharafat,Bhagya Laxmi,Kadambari,Tamanna,Inkaar,Mohabbat,Miss Devi etc. In 1951, it was Supreme Pictures, Trivedi Productions was in 1952, Kala Kendra in 1953 and with Chitra Bharati in 1954, he made 13 films upto 1961. Top Composers like Timir Baran,Ashok Ghosh,Rafiq Gaznavi,K C Dey,Saraswati Devi,Husnlal-Bhagatram and Naushad gave music to his films.

In the end, he turned to Stage and started Abhinay Bharati. He staged many dramas in Bombay and Gujarat. Chimanlal always went for big names. He had close relations with Nehru, Menon, Morarji Desai, and other National leaders. His wife Kantaben was a Leader herself. Chimanlal Trivedi died on 25-11-1973. His wife, 3 sons and a daughter settled in the USA.

It may be a coincidence, but Gujarati businessmen like Chimanlal Trivedi, Chimanlal Desai,Chimanlal Luhar, Chaturbhuj Doshi, Chimankant Desai, Chunibhai Desai and Chandulal Shah made sizable contribution to Hindi cinema in the first 20 years of the Talkie era. All names started with CH ( ? ) !

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari dubey. With this song the film makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song- Ae maina madhubaina tu kehna sajan se (Maharani Minal Devi)(1946) Singer- Rajkumari Dubey, Lyricist- Not known, MD- Saraswati Devi

Lyrics

Ae maina
madhubaina
tu kehna sajan se
sapnon mein aaye na
Ae maina
madhubaina
tu kehna sajan se
sapnon mein aaye na
chupke chupke
nindiya churaaye na
chupke chupke
nindiya churaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na

raat ko jab main sudh budh khowoon
nindiya ka main jhoola jhooloon
chanda ki kirnon mein chhupke
muskaata wo aaye
chanda ki kirnon mein chhupke
muskaata wo aaye
dheere dheere man mein samaaye
soye peer jagaaye
main man ki
main man ki us ko poochhoon
wo bhed na kuchh batlaayen
wo bhed na kuchh batlaayen
main pallaa uska pakdoon
main pallaa uska pakdoon
wo apna aap chhudaaye
wo apna aap chhudaaye
isi raar mein sapna toote
aankh meri khul jaaye ae ae
aankh meri khul jaaye

aankh khule to yaad mein unki
gaaun geet piya ke
gaaun geet piya ke
taaron ki aankhon mein chhupke
phir wo kare ishaare
phir wo kare ishaare

sun ree pyaari koyal kaali
sun ree pyaari koyal kaali
jaa ke sajan ko keh de aali ee ee ee
keh de aali
bhola sa man mera
bhola hai man
bhola sa man mera
bhola hai man
kisi ko tarsaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na
kisi ko tarsaaye na
sapnon mein aaye na


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over FOURTEEN years. This blog has over 17200 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 5000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2022) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1338
Total Number of movies covered=4642

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