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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Raja’ Category


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This article is the 200th writeup of Raja in the blog.

Blog Day : 3569 Post No. : 14303

It’s been exactly five weeks since my last post here – but somehow it feels much longer. I’m reminded of that famous dialogue from Aandhi (1975) – “waise to ammavas pandrah din ki hoti hai, lekin is baar bahut lambi thi.” 🙂 These five weeks felt like five months.

One possible reason for this is that this happens to be my 200th post on this blog. So I’ve been on 199 for 5 weeks. Even Mudassar Nazar would be proud of my achievement. 🙂 Since this is IPL season, it’s also safe to say that franchisees wouldn’t exactly be falling over each other, outbidding each other to try to buy me at an IPL auction. 🙂

Not that I haven’t been nudged or reminded about this.

When I sent in my previous post, Atul told me it was my 199th and nudged me to get the 200th soon.

Peevisie’s Mom called me a while ago and reminded me of this.

One of Atul’s recent posts also nudged me (hint, hint!) to run that quick single.

And our Atulite whatsapp group also decided that it was high time.

And so I too decided today – yes, it is high time. This is unacceptable, even by Mudassar standards.

So here is the post – with due apology to everyone for this 5-week delay. And thanks to all who nudged me along the way. I needed it.

Actually, I had planned this 200th much earlier. Since I usually pick anniversaries for my posts, my first idea was Farooque Sheikh’s anniversary. That didn’t happen. Then, I’d planned for Jeetendra’s birthday. On both occasions I’d finalized the song – but, for a variety of reasons that I will not get into right now, I never got around to writing the post. No excuses though – if Atul can write up and post songs every single day, I just cannot have an excuse for taking five weeks for one post. 🙂

I see that these songs aren’t posted yet, so I can still write them up – no need for a specific occasion. In fact, the Jeetu song would be quite suitable for this post too – but I’m going with this particular one because it happens to have Moushumi Chatterjee in it too – and it is Moushumi’s birthday today. The Jeetu song can wait.

The song I’ve picked for today is an iconic song for a particular occasion – the baaraat in a wedding.

When I was very young, the song “meri pyari beheniya banegi dulhaniya” became very popular. Thanks to my name, I used to be constantly teased “bhaiya raja bajaayega baaja”.

This was in addition to another “baaraat” song for which I used to be teased – the famous “raja ki aayegi baaraat” from Aah (1953).

These were both regulars at any baaraat.

And then there was “ghodi pe hoke savaar”, today’s song.

It also became a very popular song for baaraat occasions – especially if the bridegroom was on a horse. The words suit the occasion perfectly, so it was only natural this song would play on the occasion.

“Ghodi pe hoke savaar” was not only popular then – I suspect, it’s still popular. Which is why I was very surprised to discover that it had not yet been posted on this blog. I know Atul has a category along the lines of “how come this song is not yet posted yet”. This song is the mother of all songs in that category, considering it’s almost ten years for this blog now. 🙂

In fact, this film “Ghulam Begum Baadshah” (1973) has not made an entry yet on the blog. So this is a debut for this film here. There’s a 1956 film by the same name which has songs here but, for this film, this is the first.

For me, another category that this song slips into – but is not a recognized category here – is “this song is in THIS film?”.

I’d heard this song umpteen times in my life – but never really got to know the name of the film it was from.

And then, a few years ago, I saw a film “Ghulam Begum Baadshah” (1973) prompted to me on youtube. It piqued my interest – I’d never heard of this film before, it was a 1970s film, it had Moushumi in it (I quite like Moushumi) – so I decided to give it a go.

When the prelude to the song started, I thought it sounded very familiar. And then when the song started, I was totally in this “ye gaana IS film ka hai?” mode. It was a very pleasant surprise.

It wasn’t the only one.

I remember that even the film turned out to be a pleasant surprise. Ok, I had zero expectations from it (that’s usually how I avoid disappointment :-)), but even so, it held my interest to the very end.

I remember there were scenes of patriarchy that annoyed me but what I liked most about the film was Moushumi and her role. From what I remember of her role, it had a lot of spunk.

As we know, in many movies, especially in earlier eras, the women are shown as weaker than the men. They need to be protected, they are subservient, they often don’t even have a mind of their own. They’re subdued, they’re shy. They’re not often shown as smart, thinking women.

In this film, from what I remember of it (I don’t remember the details well), Moushumi is shown as anything but weak. She gives as good as she gets, refusing to cower down to bullying. And when she is in a difficult situation, she finds her own way to get out of it, instead of depending on the male characters to solve her problems for her.

This is what I liked most about the film. And there’s a nice twist at the end too.

The film has Kumud Chugani too – always nice to see her in a film as well.

So if you haven’t watched this film – and want to watch a 1970s film – you could give it a shot. But don’t shoot me if you don’t like it – apni apni pasand. And I don’t claim to have high standards. 🙂

The song itself is by Rafisaab – and considering it’s an early 70s song, it was during his “lean” period. But even during this period, he had popular songs like this one – and “teri galiyon mein na rakhenge kadam” and “aaj mausam bada be-imaan hai”.

I think he does full justice to the song – singing it with gusto, as you’d expect on the occasion of a baaraat. The way midway in the song he pronounces “ghodi” is deliberately upbeat.

The lyrics are by Rajinder Krishan, music by Kalyanji-Anandji.

I hope you enjoy listening to this song as much as I do.

Once again, a very happy birthday to Moushumi Chatterjee. I think I’ve written a full post on her earlier – she was one of my favourite heroines in the 70s.

Whew! Got that 200th out of the way. Relief! 🙂 And thanks for tolerating me for these 200 posts.


Song-Ghodi pe hoke sawaar (Ghulaam Begam Baadshah)(1973) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-Kalyanji Anandji
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

ghodi pe hoke savaar
chala hai dulha yaar
kamariyaa mein baandhe talwaar
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa
ghodi pe hoke savaar
chala hai dulha yaar
kamariyaa mein baandhe talwaar
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa

kal tak bechaara humsaa kunwaara
phirta thha gali gali maara maara
kal tak bechaara humsaa kunwaara
phirta thha gali gali maara maara
dekhi ik chhokri
phoolon ki tokri
bolaa dil thhaam ke main haara haara
bolaa dil thaam ke main haara haara
yaar ko mubaarak ho
mohabbat ki baazi
o yaar ko mubaarak ho
mohabbat ki baazi
miya biwi raazi
to kya karegaa kaazi
sadaa phoole phale donon ka pyaar
ghodi pe hoke savaar
chala hai dulha yaar
kamariyaa mein baandhe talwaar
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa

dulhan ki dhun hai
kaisa magan hai
hoga milan dekho abhi abhi
haan
dulhan ki dhun hai
kaisa magan hai
hoga milan dekho abhi abhi
shaadi ki masti
lagti hai sasti
padti hai mehengi bhi kabhi kabhi
haan haan padti hai mehengi bhi kabhi kabhi
ye baat mat bhoolna pyaar ki bahaarein
ye baat mat bhoolna pyaar ki bahaarein
nanhe munne bachchon ki lagaa dengi kataarein
tab utarega jaake khumaar
ghodi pe hoke savaar
chala hai dulha yaar
kamariyaa mein baandhe talwaar
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa
ghodi pe hoke savaar
chala hai dulha yaar
kamariyaa mein baandhe talwaar
akadta hai chhaila
mili hai aisi laila
ki jodi hai nehle pe dehlaa

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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3530 Post No. : 14178

First of all, let me wish all of you a Happy Ugadi and Happy Gudi Padwa today (18 march 2018). I hope those celebrating the occasion are enjoying themselves.

Today also happens to be the birthday of Shashi Kapoor (18 march 1938-4 december 2017), one of our best-known and most loved actors.

The thought is inescapable – and burdened with more than a tinge of sorrow. The thought that, had I written this post on just his previous birthday, I would have been talking of Shashi Kapoor in the present tense. I’d have been saying “is”, instead of “was”.

But that’s life – and death. And we have to accept it.

Ah, Shashi Kapoor!

Where do I start?

Let me start as usual with “my generation”, the 70s.

For me, and I am sure for many Hindi film lovers born in the early 60s, Shashi Kapoor would have been an integral part of their childhood film-watching experience. He was a very familiar face throughout the 70s – whether in solo roles or in multi-starrer films.

Those were the times when Rajesh Khanna (for the first half of the decade) and Amitabh Bachchan (for the second half) ruled. The 70s also saw a whole lot of new actors emerge. There were also some from the earlier decade who continued to enjoy success – Dharmendra, Manoj Kumar, Sanjeev Kumar, Jeetendra to name a few.

And there was Shashi Kapoor.

One thing most people will agree about Shashi Kapoor – he was very handsome. He had this boyishly cute face, bright eyes, and a smile that got accentuated by crooked teeth and a deep dimple. No wonder you often heard of the term “chocolatey good looks” when people talked of Shashi. 🙂

I think girls found Shashi particularly handsome – he was easily my sisters’ favourite. I was very young then in the late 60s, but I still remember that when the one weekly film in our club happened to be a Shashi film, they’d be thrilled. 🙂 Thus I have fond memories of watching at a very young age, in that club, Shashi films like Haseena Maan Jaayegi, Aamne Saamne, Suhana Safar, Ek Shriman Ek Shrimati, Pyar Ka Mausam, Raja Saab, Rootha Na Karo, Jahaan Pyaar Mile and many more. Whether the film was good or not, was secondary. Shashi was a good enough reason to enjoy it. I remember for days after seeing Pyar Ka Mausam, they’d be singing “ni sultana re”. 🙂 And they loved Aamne Saamne’s “nain milaakar chain churaana kiska hai ye kaam”.

Even when we went on holiday to Bombay for the first time in the early 70s, and we decided to watch a movie, the unanimous choice was Sharmeelee, playing at that time. I think my sisters were even hoping to catch sight of Shashi Kapoor somewhere on the streets of Bombay. 🙂 Not even one in a million chance – but one lives on hope. I remember, for days after watching Sharmeelee, the song “khilte hain gul yahaan” was on their lips. 🙂

Back in our village, when we had to travel 25 km to see a film in a cinema hall, they managed to persuade my dad to take them for Jaanwar Aur Insaan (1972). My dad wasn’t into films at all – it’s possible they told him it was a film about animals (jaanwar). Whereas it’s more likely they were interested in the insaan (Shashi). 🙂

Ah, these childhood memories. 🙂

I was fond of Shashi too – from those late 60s films, while my sisters would sing Shashi’s “tum bin jaoon kahaan” in Antakshari, I’d sing “aaye baithe khaaye piye khiske”. A little more matter-of-fact. 🙂

Today, as I am writing this post, with all these memories coming to the fore, it strikes me that even in an era with Rajesh Khanna as superstar (and Amitabh Bachchan later), Shashi had his own following. Like my sisters. 🙂

Sharmeelee (1971) with superhit songs, Jaanwar Aur Insaan (1972), Aa Gale Lag Ja (1973) with superhit songs, Chor Machaye Shor (1974) with the famous “le jaayenge, le jaayenge, dilwaale dulhaniya le jaayenge”, Chori Mera Kaam and Salaakhen (1975), Fakira (1976) with hit songs.

All solo films for Shashi, all successful. Am not counting the multi-starrers, Roti Kapda Aur Makaan (1974), Deewaar (1975) and Kabhie Kabhie (1976).

As the decade progressed, and multi-starrers became more common, Shashi Kapoor was very much part of them, often to be seen opposite reigning superstar Amitabh Bachchan in films like Trishul (1977) and Suhaag (1979).

Yet, he could carry his own in a solo – as was to be seen in Satyam Shivam Sundaram (1978), a film made by his brother, Raj Kapoor.

So Shashi Kapoor was largely a “safe” actor in the 70s – both for viewers and producers. Of course not every film worked (there are many aspect to a film’s success), but, by and large, audiences liked watching him on screen.

Towards the end of the decade, Shashi got into film production too. He produced some well-known films – Junoon (1979), Kalyug (1981), 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981), Vijeta (1982), Utsav (1984).

But in 1984, disaster struck – his dear wife Jennifer passed away, due to cancer. I think after that Shashi was not the same again.

I’ve talked a lot about his films of the 70s, mainly because that’s the decade I have most memories of. Of course his career started much earlier. As a child artiste (a young Raj Kapoor in Aag and Awara), with his first film as an adult being BR Chopra’s controversial Dharamputra (1961). In that film, he had a negative role.

Although he came from the Kapoor khandaan, it was made clear to Shashi that he had to come up on merit. He had his share of struggles early on – and though he managed the odd hit (like in the multi-starrer Waqt), he really had his first mega solo hit only with Jab Jab Phool Khile (1965).

His co-star in that film was, as usual, Nanda. I say “as usual”, because Nanda was his co-star in many films during the 60s. She was a much bigger star than he was – but was happy to be paired opposite him. Shashi later said he was hugely grateful to Nanda for this. Nanda herself said that Shashi was her favourite co-star.

One thing that struck me in obituaries about Shashi Kapoor last December was that almost everyone spoke a lot about Prithvi Theatre. And rightly so.

While there’s no doubt that Shashi Kapoor gained a lot of popularity from cinema, I think in his heart his love was Prithvi Theatre. After all, he had met his wife Jennifer also through theatre in the 1950s. So one of the most satisfying moments for him and for Jennifer must have been to set up Prithvi Theatre in 1978 and fulfil his father Prithviraj Kapoor’s dream of having a permanent location for his Prithvi Theatres (it had been a travelling troupe during Prithviraj’s time).

Many of the obits talked about how dedicated Shashi Kapoor (and Jennifer, when she was alive) was to Prithvi Theatre. Even when he was in very poor health in his final years, he would want to visit and even watch performances.

So no mention of Shashi Kapoor is complete without a mention of Prithvi Theatre.

I’ve not talked about his acting in English-language films or his partnership with Merchant-Ivory. I’ve myself just watched only one of these films – Bombay Talkie (1970), directed by James Ivory. It also starred Jennifer.

I’ve also not mentioned that Shashi Kapoor was considered to be a true gentleman actor. Many of his co-stars, from Sharmila Tagore to Hema Malini to Zeenat Aman, have said this. He was also supposed to have had a good sense of humour, always keeping the set lively.

All in all, Shashi Kapoor was a much-loved person during his lifetime. And for good reason. And you cannot really ask for more than that.

Now for the song for today.

It is from the film “Suhaana Safar” (1970). A film that I remember seeing as a very young boy, but sadly have only very faint memories of. I seem to vaguely remember a bus in which Shashi and Sharmila travel. That’s all I can remember now. 🙂 A good excuse to watch it again. 🙂

The song is the title song. Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar hai, sung by Rafisaab. The lyrics of this song are by Anand Bakshi, music by Laxmikant Pyarelal.

The picturisation is of Shashi Kapoor in a jeep, generally giving out positive vibes, talking about travel, hawa, manzil etc. He finds himself behind a bus, and this infectious positive mood catches on with the travelers in the bus too. They join him in the song. Towards the end of the song, Sharmila Tagore (one of the travelers) looks out of the bus, Shashi waves to her – and it looks like he loses control of his jeep. (Am pretty sure it’s nothing serious :-)).

While watching the video and listening to the lyrics, I could not help thinking that this could be a metaphor for the suhaana safar of Shashi Kapoor’s life itself. And the suhaana safar that we have had following his films for decades. Indeed, it has been a wonderful journey – and we are thankful to him for letting us be part of it.

Interestingly, while I was having these thoughts, I got a message from Avinashji. As usual, when I thought of writing a post for Shashi Kapoor today, he had promptly messaged me, and offered to help me with providing the lyrics. Now, while sending me the lyrics, he echoed the exact same thoughts I had! About the suhana safar of Shashi Kapoor and what we have had with Shashi Kapoor. Serendipity. 🙂

I’ll now leave you with this positive song – and with remembering our suhaana safar with Shashi Kapoor.

There are two versions of this song – one by Rafisaab, the other by Suman Kalyanpur.

Rafi version (Audio)

Rafi version (Video)

Suman Kalyanpur Version (Audio)

Song-Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar (Suhaana Safar)(1970) Singer-Rafi/ Suman Kalyanpur, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal
Female chorus
All chorus

——————————————————-
Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
——————————————————-
O o
o o o
Aa aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa

Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o o
Hawaayein jhoom rahi hain
Gulon ko choom rahi hain
Hoye
Hawaayein jhoom rahi hain
Rokoon dil ko main kaise
Aise udaa jaaye jaise
maang liye ho kisi panchhi se parr
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

O o o
Musaafir chaltaa hi jaaye
Kabhi bhi manzil naa aaye
Musaafir chaltaa hi jaaye
Dheere dheere haule haule
Mujhse ye dil boley
Kat jaaye raste mein
Saari umar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Patli kamar mori
Naazuk bainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya
Chhainyya
Chhup chhup chhainyya

Ho o o
Mujhe ye raah naa bhulaa de
Kahin ye aur naa pahunchaa de
Mujhe ye raah naa bhulaa de
Kaisi hain ye matwaali
Lambi lambi kaali kaali
Zulf kisi ki hai
Ya ye dagar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Hoye
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar
Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar
Aha aha aa ye suhaana safar

—————————————-
(Female version)
—————————————–
Hmm hmm
O o o
o o
o o o

Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o o

Ho o o
Nigaahein jhoom rahi hain
Kisi ko dhoondh rahi hain
Ho
Nigaahein jhoom rahi hain
Koyee mulaakaatee miley
Aisa koyee saathi miley
Jo ban jaaye mera hamsafar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o
Abhi to door hai manzil
Dhadakne lagaa abhi se dil
Abhi to door hai manzil
Taubaa taubaa
Haaye haaye
Dil pe kyaa guzar jaaye
Saamne wo aa jaaye agar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

Ho o o o
Mere dil bhool na jaana
Ki hain ye rastaa anjaana
Mere dil bhool na jaana
Aise naa machal jaana
Aagey naa nikal jaana
Chhod ke peechhe sanam ka ghar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho o
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Rukti nahin hai nazaaron pe nazar
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar
Ho
Aha aha
aa ye suhaana safar

———————————————
Devnagri script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————
Male version
———————————————


ओ ओ ओ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ ओ
हवाएं झूम रही हैं
गुलों को चूम रही हैं
होए
हवाएं झूम रही हैं
रोकूँ दिल को मैं कैसे
ऐसे उड़ा जाए जैसे
बाँध लिए हो किसी पंछी से पर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

ओ ओ ओ
मुसाफिर चलता ही जाए
कभी भी मंजिल ना आये
मुसाफिर चलता ही जाए
धीरे धीरे हौले हौले
मुझसे ये दिल बोले
कट जाए रस्ते में
सारी उम्र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

छुप छुप छैंया
छैंया
छुप छुप छैंया
पतली कमर मोरी
नाज़ुक बैंया
छुप छुप छैंया
छैंया
छुप छुप छैंया

हो ओ ओ
मुझे ये राह ना भुला दे
कहीं ये और ना पहुंचा दे
मुझे ये राह ना भुला दे
कैसी हैं ये मतवाली
लम्बी लम्बी काली काली
ज़ुल्फ़ किसी की हैं
या ये डगर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
होए
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

————————————
Female version
————————————
हम्म
हम्म
ओ ओ ओ ओ ओ
ओ ओ

आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो

हो ओ ओ
निगाहें झूम रही हैं
किसीको ढूंढ रही हैं
हो
निगाहें झूम रही हैं
कोई मुलाकाती मिले
ऐसा कोई साथी मिले
जो बन जाए मेरा हमसफ़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ
अभी तो दूर है मंजिल
धड़कने लगा अभी से दिल
अभी तो दूर है मंजिल
तौबा तौबा
हाए हाए
दिल पे क्या गुज़र जाए
सामने वो आ जाये अगर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र

हो ओ ओ ओ
मेरे दिल भूल न जाना
कि है ये रास्ता अनजाना
मेरे दिल भूल न जाना
ऐसे न मचल जाना
आगे ना निकल जाना
छोड़ के पीछे सनम का घर
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो ओ
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
रूकती नहीं है नजारों पे नज़र
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र
हो
आहा आहा
आ ये सुहाना सफ़र


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3520 Post No. : 14136

There are many artists for whom I’ve written posts here, remembering them on their birth or death anniversaries. But there are two artists who have featured more than others in this regard. I remember them every day anyway – so on their anniversary it is only a matter of a different intensity. I am grateful to them every single day for their legacy, the treasure trove they have left us behind with. They are long gone now from this world – coincidentally they went within a few months of each other – but they remain, and will always remain, in my heart. And not just my heart, but millions of hearts. Such is the love we have for them, such is the hold they have over us.

I am of course talking about two giants of the industry – Rafi Saab and Sahir Ludhianvi.

Today happens to be the 97th birth anniversary of Sahir – and here I am, writing yet another post in his memory. I have already written many posts on him, so I expect this will be a short one. At least, by my standards. 🙂

From all accounts, Rafi Saab and Sahir were like chalk and cheese. Rafi Saab is reported always having a smile on his lips, a total lack of ego, easy to work with, a generally non-controversial nature – and was one of the most-loved artistes in the industry.

In contrast, Sahir was seen as egoist, not the easiest person to work with. He was seen as often being bitter and rebellious. He had his fair share of controversies – and differences with other artistes. It’s also fair to say that while everyone acknowledged his genius as a poet and lyricist, he didn’t exactly endear himself to one and all.

And yet both of them have a special place in my heart. They were masters of their craft, and when they executed it, whether through the written word (Sahir) or through his voice (Rafi Saab), the words went straight to my heart.

Since this is a post for Sahir’s anniversary, I will keep it to Sahir from here on.

Sahir needs no introduction to anyone here. And if he does, there are far better sources to discuss him than this post, so I would recommend checking out any of them. Here I will only talk briefly about why I love Sahir so much. It goes without saying that Sahir’s poetry (which often found its way in his lyrics) was in a class of its own. In fact, he often dumbed down (simplified) his poetry to make it more understandable for film-going audiences.

Much of Sahir’s poetry is understandably in Urdu – and his lyrics for film songs too have a strong Urdu slant to them. As a big fan of Urdu, I thoroughly enjoy listening to Sahir’s poetry and lyrics, even if I don’t always understand them. 🙂 But if it were only Urdu that attracted me to him, that would be at one level only. After all, I have a great regard for Shakeel Badayuni too – his lyrics were also often Urdu-based, and second to none.

No, it is more than just Urdu that attracts me. It is the poet himself – Sahir, the person.

To the world, his bitterness (‘talkhi‘), his moodiness, his ego, his sharp tongue might have made him intolerable. To me, I think it is these very qualities that helped him write the poetry he did. You cannot be dispassionate, you cannot be without fire in your belly – and write rousing poetry. It just doesn’t work. An actor might be able to completely keep his persona behind and immerse himself in a role the moment the director screams “Action”. After all, he is an actor – his job is to be somebody he isn’t in real life.

On the contrary, for a poet, his writing is nothing but an expression of himself and his creativity. And that creativity is a function of his mind, heart and soul. So it is only natural that how he thinks or feels will get reflected in his writing. It is possible to of course separate the two – and seasoned poets do – but when the poetry is in sync with the mood, it probably flows much more naturally. I’m guessing this – I’m no poet. 🙂

So Sahir throwing his feelings into his poetry is something I totally approve of. Now, to the content itself.

In his inimitable style, he wrote on a variety of topics. But he is most identified with having a strong opinion on social issues of the day – and never hesitating to express his opinion. He often used his poetry as a medium to convey a strong message. Sometimes showing a mirror to society, sometimes questioning the government of the day. Sometimes exposing hypocrisy, sometimes calling for revolution. Whatever it was, he was not just another poet content to write some lyrics and get paid for them. He was socially sensitive – and clearly the ills in society bothered him deeply. And this is one of the main reasons I SO love Sahir. How I wish we had more poets like him today, with so much awareness and concern for the plight of the common man!

He has written about injustice in society (“Samaaj Ko Badal Daalo”), about the need for unity in a fractured society (“Tu Hindu Banega Na Musalmaan Banega“), about women’s plight in India (“Aurat Ne Janam Diya Mardon Ko”), about hope (“Na Munh Chhupa Ke Jiyo”, “Ponchh Kar Ashq Apni Aankhon Se“, “Wo Subah Kabhi To Aayegi”) and despair (“Ye Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaaye To Kya Hai“, “Jinhen Naaz Hai Hind Par Wo Kahaan Hain“, “. . .Rehne Ko Ghar Nahin Hai, Sara Jahaan Hamaara“).

For someone who had a grounding in Urdu, he could write beautiful bhajans like “Tora Mann Darpan Kehlaaye“, “Prabhu Tero Naam“, “Allah Tero Naam“, “Meri Sun Le Araj Banwaari“,  and the immortal “Aan Milo Aan Milo Shyam Saanwre“.

Then there is the philosophical Sahir too, exemplified in songs like “Aage Bhi Jaane Na Tu“.

A recurring theme in his writing is the mother-child relationship, maybe based on his own experiences in life. It is well-known that he was particularly close to his mother – and chose her above his much more affluent father when he had to make a choice. So we see beautiful lyrics on mother-child in ‘Dhool Ka Phool’ (“Tu Mere Pyaar Ka Phool Hai“), ‘Mujhe Jeene Do’ (“Tere Bachpan Ko“), ‘Trishul’ (“Tu Mere Saath Rahega Munne“)  – and I am sure some other films too.

Then there is the qawwaali Sahir. He excelled in them, with the qawwaalis of ‘Barsaat Ki Raat’, ‘Dharamputra’ and ‘Taj Mahal’ showcasing just some of his work.

And then there is the romantic Sahir. Yes, while he wrote about all other aspects of life, he did not come up short on what was bread-and-butter for most poets – romantic poetry. He could write the most romantic lines – the romantic songs of ‘Gumraah’ and ‘Hamraaz’, for example, just take your breath away. And not just these films – think of songs like “Parbaton Ke Pedon Par” from ‘Shagoon’, and on the same ‘parbat’ theme, “Ye Parbaton Ke Daayare” from ‘Vaasna’.

I can go on and on, discussing his songs, but I think I need to now come to the song for today. It is also a romantic song, but this time from very late in his career. It is no secret that in the 1970s, Sahir was disillusioned with the quality of lyrics on offer in Hindi cinema. Urdu, which offered so much richness to lyrics, was being phased out and replaced with more ‘chaalu‘ lyrics. In general, films (and music too, I might add) had become more loud and less, for want of a better word, classy.

He himself withdrew for a bit – and while he continued to work for the BR Chopra/Yash Chopra banners, he wasn’t as prolific as in the 60s. His disillusionment is probably best expressed in one of his most memorable songs of the decade – “Main Pal Do Pal Ka Shaayar Hoon“.

It is in this context one needs to see the song for today. It is from the 1980 film ‘Chehre Pe Chehra’, a film that makes its debut on the blog today. I remember this film being released – and being a flop. I haven’t seen the film – my understanding is, it’s based on the famous ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ story. Sanjeev Kumar plays the dual role. The song is a romantic song – and pleasant enough, even if it doesn’t quite scale to the level of his heady songs of the 1960s. Even so, in comparison to the fare around at the time, I’d say its lyrics are better than most other songs of the time. Of course this is just my personal opinion.

Let’s now listen to the song, sung by Sulakshana Pandit and Rafi Saab. Music is by N Datta, one of his most famous pairings. I leave it to you to judge for yourself what you make of this song. I quite like it.

Lyrics were provided to me by the ever-helpful and reliable Avinash ji. A big thanks to him. He makes it so much easier for me to just focus on the write-up itself.

Video (Partial)

Audio (Complete)

Song – Aaj Socha Hai Khayaalon Mein Bula Kar Tum Ko (Chehre Pe Chehra) (1980) Singer – Sulakshana Pandit, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – Sahir Ludhianvi, MD – N Datta
Sulakshana Pandit + Mohammed Rafi

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

aaj socha hai. . .
aaj socha hai
khayaalon mein bulaa kar tum ko
pyaar ke naam pe thodi si shikaayat kar len
aaj socha hai

aaj socha hai
khayaalon mein bulaa kar tum ko
pyaar ke naam pe thodi si shikaayat kar len
aaj socha hai

aise bichhade ho ke jaise kabhi milna hi nahin
aise bhoole ho ki jaise  kabhi jaana hi na thha
ajnabhi ban ke agar yoon hi sitam dhaana thha
paas aana hi na thha  paas bulaana hi na thha
aao toote huye
aao toote huye
khwaabon ki jiyaarat kar len
aaj socha hai ae

ranjishen bhi wahin palti hain
jahaan pyaar paley
pyaar hi jis se nahin
us se gilaa kya hoga
meri ummeed hai tu
teri tammanna main hoon
aur chaahat ki duaaon ka sila kya hoga
ranjishen bhool ke
ranjishen bhool ke
khwaabon ko haqeeqat kar len
aaj socha hai

kya kahoon main tumhen
kya samjha hai kya maana hai
meri chaahat ne tumhen
apna khudaa maana hai
apna hissa hi tumhe maine sadaa maana hai
jaan ko kis ne bhalaa tan se judaa maana hai
jaan aur tan se
jaan aur tan se naya ahd-e-mohabbat kar len
aaj socha hai
aaj socha hai
khayaalon mein bulaakar tumko
pyaar ke naam pe thodisi shikaa …

hmm hmm hmm hmmmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

aaj socha hai. . .
———————————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————————————
आज सोचा है॰॰॰
आज सोचा है
खयालों में बुला कर तुमको
प्यार के नाम पे थोडी सी शिकायत कर लें
आज सोचा है

आज सोचा है
खयालों में बुला कर तुमको
प्यार के नाम पे थोडी सी शिकायत कर ले ए ए
आज सोचा है

ऐसे बिछड़े हो के जैसे कभी मिलना ही नहीं
ऐसे भूले हो कि जैसे कभी जाना ही नहीं था
अजनबी बन के अगर यूंही सितम ढाना था
पास आना ही न था पास बुलाना ही न था
आओ टूटे हुए
आओ टूटे हुए
ख़्वाबों कि ज़ियारत कर लें
आज सोचा है ए

रंजिशें भी वहीँ पलती हैं
जहाँ प्यार पले
प्यार ही जिससे नहीं
उस से गिला क्या होगा
मेरी उम्मीद है तू
तेरी तमन्ना मैं हूँ
और चाहत की दुआओं का सिला क्या होगा
रंजिशें भूल के
रंजिशें भूल के
ख़्वाबों कों हकीकत कर लें
आज सोचा है

क्या कहूँ मैं तुम्हे
क्या समझा है क्या माना है
मेरी चाहत ने तुम्हें
अपना खुदा माना है
अपना हिस्सा हि तुम्हे मैंने सदा माना है
जान को किसने भला तन से जुदा माना है
जान और तन से
जान और तन से नया अहद-ए-मोहब्बत कर लें
आज सोचा है

आज सोचा है
खयालों में बुला कर तुमको
प्यार के नाम पे थोडी सी शिका…

हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्मम्म
हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म
हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म
हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म हम्म

आज सोचा है॰॰॰


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3510 Post No. : 14101

It’s not easy writing this. I’ve written many posts here on the death anniversaries of various artistes – but in all those cases, I’ve had the benefit of distance of time from the event. Even if it is the first death anniversary, at least 365 days have passed since. That does make a difference. Today’s post isn’t a death anniversary post. It’s a tribute post, of course, but the artiste in question has just left us a few hours ago! And we are still in mourning. Which is why I write this post now with a lot of sadness in my heart.

This morning, when I woke up, I got the news that was like a bolt from the blue – that Sridevi, one of the most famous and popular actresses of our times, was no more. When I checked my whatsapp messages today, a regular morning routine, there was a message from one of my nieces – “This Sridevi news has left me so disturbed. She was my all-time favourite”.

I immediately checked Twitter, which is my usual go-to source for latest news. And sure enough – it was real, not a fake news item. Twitter is notorious for fake news being spread – but this time, unfortunately, there was nothing fake about this. Tributes were pouring in on Twitter.

I took a deep breath. It all seemed so unbelievable, it took me a while to digest the news. Sridevi  had died a few hours earlier of a cardiac arrest in Dubai. She had gone to attend a family wedding – it turned out to be her last day on this earth. There were pictures of her from just a few hours earlier – she looked just fine. In fact, she looked more than fine, she looked gorgeous – like she’d always looked. I was not aware of any health complaints of any sort. So then how did this suddenly happen?

There are theories floating around, some to do with her diet, pills etc. I do not want to discuss any of this here – it is all in the realm of speculation anyway, and I am sure we will get to hear more about it in the days to come.  Right now, all I know is that my thoughts have been with her all day today. I can see Sridevi’s face right in front of my eyes –superbly expressive, that twinkle in her eye, that smile. I can see her dancing, whether as a Naagin, or doing a break-dance in Michael Jackson style – completely at ease with both.

I can see her portraying a docile, innocent Anju one minute, and a chaalu Chaalbaaz Manju the very next. That is / was Sridevi. She could do both sadness and madness to such perfection within minutes – and you wouldn’t be able to say she was acting. No wonder she won many millions of fans all over the world. And not just Hindi film fans. Sure, she reigned as superstar for almost a decade in the Hindi film industry but her career in the South Indian film industry was not just longer, it was also probably far richer.

There will be many obituary and tribute pieces written for Sridevi in the days to come. As is common, her entire life will be detailed – from her early days to her final ones. Her career will be discussed in great detail, as will her personal life. I choose not to add to the repetitive element of these. I am no expert on Sridevi anyway – and anyone who wants a lot of facts on her is better advised to seek out one of those other sources. As is my wont, I will discuss Sridevi here from a personal perspective.

Hmm, where do I start? When did I first hear of Sridevi? I must admit that I first heard of Sridevi only in the late 1970s, though she had already become a popular name in South Indian cinema for some years by then. I lived in Eastern India at that time, where the exposure to South Indian cinema was very limited – and I’d heard of very few actors and actresses of the South.  Of course I’d heard of the legends (Sivaji Ganesan, MGR, Gemini Ganesan, Savitri, KR Vijaya etc.) but of the then-current lot, I’d not heard of many. Yes, I’d heard of Kamalahasan and Rajinikanth, though I’d not seen any of their films. As for heroines, I got to hear names like Sripriya, Srividya, Sujatha. And Sridevi. To me, the name Sridevi was just one of these names at that time.

Around that time, South Indian producers once again began to show interest in making Hindi films. Of course earlier too they had made a lot of films but the pace had slackened in the 1970s. It suddenly began picking up towards the end of the decade. Understandably these producers wanted to work with actors they were familiar with. So, just like Jamuna and KR Vijaya in an earlier generation, we got to see new South Indian faces entering the Hindi film industry.

Thus, in 1979, we got news that two big-name South Indian actresses would be seen in Hindi films. Jayaprada would be seen in a film called ‘Sargam’ (1979), and Sridevi would be seen in a film called ‘Solvaan Saawan’ (1978). ‘Sargam’ became a huge hit – and set Jayaprada on her way to success in the Hindi film industry. ‘Solvaan Saawan’, on the other hand, just came and went – and with that seemed to sink Sridevi’s future too in Hindi films. She simply seemed to have disappeared from the Hindi film scene.

For a while, I forgot about the existence of Sridevi, even as she was becoming a progressively more popular and successful star in the South. As it is, Hindi films rolled merrily on – with established heroines like Zeenat Aman, Hema, Parveen and Reena Roy, and a new set of heroines like Poonam Dhillon, Rati Agnihotri, Padmini Kolhapure, Anita Raaj and Deepti Naval.

By then, I was getting increasingly busy with my studies and was not able to keep pace with Hindi movies.

Then came 1983 and ‘Himmatwaala’ happened.  Sridevi returned with a bang. This film, in which she starred opposite Jeetendra, turned out to be a smash hit, with the songs becoming super-duper hits. Ironically for me, these songs only hastened my distaste for songs of that period, a distaste that had been formed with songs like “Angrezi Mein Kehte Hain”, “. . .Chaaye Pe Bulaaya Hai” becoming big hits. From then on, I almost completely shut myself off from Hindi films for a while.

‘Himmatwaala’ was one in a string of films from South India, many of which were commercially successful during the 1980s. Many of them starred Sridevi, Jeetendra and Jayaprada. Some starred Rajesh Khanna. But I had got a mental block about these films. So while Sridevi and Jayaprada were becoming big stars in Hindi cinema, I refused to watch their films. Years later, around 2007, I did watch ‘Himmatwaala’ on TV, keeping my expectations very low. Must admit it wasn’t all THAT bad!

Despite this mental block, I did watch the odd Sridevi film. The first one I remember watching was ‘Sadma’ (1983). I remember thinking “Oh, so THIS is Sridevi!”.  I liked her in the film. Then I watched ‘Tohfa’ (1984). Only because it was being screened in our local club and my friends persuaded me to watch it. I went in with very low expectations – and was therefore not very disappointed. Again, I liked Sridevi in the film. But then I’m not a particularly big fan of Jayaprada. So in comparison, I’d any day prefer to watch a Sridevi film. And then I watched ‘Moondram Pirai’ (1982), the Tamil classic – of which ‘Sadma’ is a remake. Apart from these three films, I didn’t watch a single Sridevi film in the 80s.

Thankfully her career wasn’t dependent on my taste at the time 🙂 otherwise it would not have taken off at all. She kept going from strength to strength. By 1986, when she would be seen in ‘Sultanat’, ‘Aakhri Raasta’, ‘Jaanbaaz’, ‘Karma’ and ‘Nagina’ – all big movies, I realized that whether I was watching her movies or not, the whole of India seemed to be watching them. And loving her.

I realized that though there were other heroines like Meenakshi Seshadri and Dimple Kapadia who had the odd hit film, and Jayaprada was still very much in the mix, Sridevi had gone ahead of them all. She was now probably the No.1 heroine of the time. (Rekha, by then, was in a league of her own).

Then in 1987, Shekhar Kapur’s ‘Mr. India’ hit the screens – and that probably sealed it. Anyone who had any doubts about Sridevi’s rank in the industry was effectively shut up by this film. Her “Hawa Hawaii” song was a rage all over India. And then there was “Kaate Nahin Kat’te Ye Din Ye Raat”, which was Sridevi all the way.

Around this time, it was not inconceivable that a film would run on Sridevi’s name alone. She had earned that superstar status. On the male front, Amitabh Bachchan in the mid to late 1980s wasn’t having a good run. And none of the other male stars were quite superstar material yet. Sridevi was.

Yet she continued to act in a remarkable number of poor-to-average films – such was the quality of films in the 1980s! You can hardly blame the actor for that. You were lucky if there was one memorable film in ten. Most films could be forgotten the moment you stepped out of the hall.

Of her other well-known films, two from 1989 come to mind – ‘Chaandni’ and ‘Chaalbaaz’. I remember ‘Chaandni’ becoming a superhit. I’m not so sure about ‘Chaalbaaz’ – though it is one of my favourite Sridevi films. She plays a double role – and how. The film, a remake of ‘Seeta Aur Geeta’ (1972), is a hilarious comedy, completely owned by Sridevi.

1991 saw ‘Lamhe’ – another landmark film in her career. Once again, Sridevi was seen in a double role. Mother and daughter. A very different sort of film. I think ‘Lamhe’ failed at the box-office – it was a storyline that the audience found difficult to accept. But that does not take away from Sridevi’s performance.

1992 saw ‘Khuda Gawaah’, again a double role for Sridevi. Mother and daughter again. I wonder if any heroine has done more double roles than Sridevi. Fabulous scenes of Afghanistan, fabulous acting by Sridevi.

1993 had the resounding and expensive flop, ‘Roop Ki Rani Choron Ka Raja’. After this, her career took a dip – and after ‘Judaai’ (1997), she was next to be seen in a lead role, goodness, 15 years later, in ‘English Vinglish’ (2012). And what a performance! It was SUCH a pleasure to see her in this film, putting up such a mature performance, that I was left wondering what might’ve been in the preceding 15 years.

Oh, one thing. I saw each one of the films I’ve mentioned above only after 1995. Yes, even her 1980s hits. Like I said before, I studiously stayed away from 1980s films at the time they were released. Not just Sridevi films, but all 1980s films. In the process, I might have missed some good ones too. I caught up with many of them later. After 1995.

And as I watched Sridevi, I could understand why she had become such a superstar. Beyond her looks and her amazing dancing ability, there was a fine actor. Not everyone realizes this – but her ability to take a scene to a different level altogether, just with her facial expressions, a roll of the eyes, a smile from the side of her mouth, all of this added to producing a memorable performance. And I daresay unlike the male superstars, her mannerisms didn’t come across as clichéd, even if she repeated them. She only endeared herself even more to the audience.

Yes, I could fully understand why Sridevi was a superstar. But ironically I realized this only after she had conceded the top spot to Madhuri Dixit, herself a deserving No.1. Many folks make a big deal of the Sridevi – Madhuri rivalry. I’ve never cared about it – each actor has his/her time and ups and downs. Both Sridevi and Madhuri were terrific actors and entertainers – and that is the main reason they were loved so much by the public. Anyway, the timing when the realization hit me, is irrelevant. What’s important is she is loved by millions of people. The outpouring of grief today is testimony to this. Whether you are a superstar or not, is secondary.

Let’s move on to the song for today.

I’ve picked this song from ‘Chaalbaaz’ (1989). It’s one of my favourite Sridevi films. I have watched it multiple times – and can still watch it. A ‘Seeta Aur Geeta’ (1972) remake, Sridevi here plays Anju (the docile one) and Manju (the chaalu one). The male leads are played by Sunny Deol and Rajinikanth. Though the film stars Anupam Kher, Rohini Hattangadi and Shakti Kapoor too, the film belongs to Sridevi. The dialogues are hilarious – check them out on youtube.

The song for today showcases, to some extent, why Sridevi was so popular. Just look at her bindaas dancing, just look at the expressions on her face. This is classic Sridevi. You cannot but love her in this song. Although it features Sunny Deol too, and a whole host of supporting dancers, Sridevi clearly steals the show. I’ve watched the song five times already today. It’s one way of remembering Sridevi. I am sure you will like the song too. Just observe Sridevi through the song – she is having so much fun, this song will just lift your spirits.

Lyrics have been provided by Avinashji. He was kind enough to offer to write them up, as soon as he got to know that I was planning to do this write-up. Thanks a lot, Avinashji.

Thank you for all the wonderful memories, Sridevi. You will always remain in our hearts.


Song – Na Jaane Kahaan Se Aayi Hai (Chaalbaaz) (1989) Singer – Amit Kumar, Kavita Krishnamurty, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal
Unidentified Male Voice
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub du u u u 

naa jaane kahaan se aayi hai
naa jaane kahaan ko jaayegi
deewaana kise banaayegi ye ladki

badi chhoti hai mulaaqaat
bade afsos ki hai baat

hu u  u u u yaa

kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u
kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u

naa jaane kahaan se aayi hai
naa jaane kahaan ko jaayegi
deewaana kise banaayegi ye ladki

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
ooh a

ye bheega huaa badan tera
is dil mein aag lagaa dega
ye bheega huaa badan tera
is dil mein aag lagaa dega
chhaayega baadal zulfon ka
to paagal tujhe banaa degaa aa
paagal tujhe banaa degaa aa
tu ru ru ru ru ru u u
tu ru ru ru ru ru u u

karega yaad mujhe din raat
bade afsos ki hai baat
hu u  u u u yaa
kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u
kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u

[undeciphered sound]

ye ladki bheegi bhaagi si
kya ghar se bhaag ke aayi hai
ye ladki bheegi bhaagi si
kya ghar se bhaag ke aayi hai
ye ladki nahin hai naagin hai
jo neend se jaag ke aayi hai
jo neend se jaag ke aayi hai

ru ru ru ru ru ru
ru ru ru ru ru ru

mere haathon mein de de haath
bade afsos ki hai baat
hu u u u u aa
kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u
kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u

[undeciphered sound]

ha ha ha ha ha ha hmm
aaraam se baitho paas mere
darne ki koyi baat nahin
aaraam se baitho paas mere
darne ki koyi baat nahin
main tumse pyaar karun mere
aise to bure haalaat nahin
aise to bure haalaat nahin

ru ru ru ru ru ru
ru ru ru ru ru ru

karegi yaad mujhe din raat
bade afsos ki hai baat
hu u u u u aa
tumhaare haath naa aayegaa
ye ladka
ru u u u
tumhaare haath naa aayegaa
ye ladka aa
ru u u u

naa jaane kahaan se aayi hai
naa jaane kahaan ko jaayegi
deewaana kise banaayegi ye ladki ee

badi chhoti hai mulaaqaat
bade afsos ki hai baat
hu u u u u aa

kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u

kisi ke haath naa aayegi ye ladki ee
ru u u u

dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub du u u u 
ru u u ru ru ru ru
ru ru ru ru ru ru ru u u
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub du u u u 
ru u u ru ru ru ru
ru ru ru ru ru ru ru u u
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub dub dub dub du ru ru ru
dub dub dub du u u u 
ru oo oo oo

———————————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————————————

डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु

ना जाने कहाँ से आयी है
ना जाने कहाँ को जायेगी
दीवाना किसे बनाएगी ये लड़की

बड़ी छोटी है मुलाक़ात
बड़े अफ़सोस कि है बात

हु उ उ उ उ या

किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ
ना जाने कहाँ से आयी है
ना जाने कहाँ को जायेगी
दीवाना किसे बनाएगी ये लड़की

हा हा हा हा हा हा हा
हा हा हा हा हा हा हा
उह अ

ये भीगा हुआ बदन तेरा
इस दिल में आग लगा देगा
ये भीगा हुआ बदन तेरा
इस दिल में आग लगा देगा
छाएगा बादल जुल्फों का
तो पागल तुझे बना देगा आ
पागल तुझे बना देगा आ

तू रु रु रु रु रु रु उ उ
तू रु रु रु रु रु रु उ उ

करेगा याद मुझे दिन रात
बड़े अफ़सोस कि है बात
हु उ उ उ उ या
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ

(असपष्ट शब्द )

ये लड़की भीगी भागी सी
क्या घर से भाग के आयी है

ये लड़की भीगी भागी सी
क्या घर से भाग के आयी है
ये लड़की नहीं है नागन है ‘
जो नींद से जाग के आयी है
जो नींद से जाग के आयी है

रु रु रु रु रु रु
रु रु रु रु रु रु

मेरे हाथों में दे दे हाथ
बड़े अफ़सोस कि है बात
हु उ उ उ उ या
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ

(असपष्ट शब्द )

हा हा हा हा हा हा हम्म

आराम से बैठो पास मेरे
डरने कि कोई बात नहीं
आराम से बैठो पास मेरे
डरने कि कोई बात नहीं
मैं तुमसे प्यार करूँ मेरे
ऐसे तो बुरे हालात नहीं
ऐसे तो बुरे हालात नहीं

रु रु रु रु रु रु
रु रु रु रु रु रु

करेगी याद मुझे दिन रात
बड़े अफ़सोस कि है बात
हु उ उ उ उ या
तुम्हारे हाथ ना आयेगा
ये लड़का
रु उ उ उ
तुम्हारे हाथ ना आयेगा
ये लड़का
रु उ उ उ

ना जाने कहाँ से आयी है
ना जाने कहाँ को जायेगी
दीवाना किसे बनाएगी ये लड़की

बड़ी छोटी है मुलाक़ात
बड़े अफ़सोस कि है बात

हु उ उ उ उ या
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई
रु उ उ उ
किसी के हाथ ना आएगी ये लड़की ई

रु उ उ उ

डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
रु उ उ रु रु रु रु
रु रु रु रु रु रु रु उ उ

डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
रु उ उ रु रु रु रु
रु रु रु रु रु रु रु उ उ

डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
डुब डुब डुब डू रु रु रु
रु ऊ ऊ ऊ

 


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Just five days ago, I’d written a post here paying tribute to one of the most loved legends of the Hindi film industry, Mohammad Rafi, on his birth anniversary. Referred to by many (including me) as Rafisaab, he was a giant in his field. Yet  he remained humble to his last day, never letting success get to his head. He treated everyone with great respect and, in turn, earned the respect of everyone he interacted with.

Today we pay tribute to another legend of the industry on his birth anniversary. Also a superstar in his own right, albeit for a relatively short period of time, he was possibly the best antithesis of Rafisaab in terms of letting success get to his head, treating everyone with great respect, and in turn, earning respect of everyone he interacted with. Thus his career, and his life, turned out to be very different from Rafisaab’s. Everyone goes through ups and downs in his career – and both this person and Rafisaab are not exceptions to this phenomenon.

Yet, even in his “downs”, there were those who stood by Rafisaab. The goodwill he had earned earlier stood him in good stead. On the other hand though, this other legendary person was not so lucky. His airs and rather dismissive (to use the most charitable term I can think of) treatment of others during his heyday, came back to haunt him when he was on his way down.  He hadn’t built enough goodwill, his relationships were damaged – this only hastened his downfall. Although he made a somewhat modest recovery later, and even admitted to his earlier mistakes, his image as an arrogant, even mean and vindictive, person stayed till his last day.

This world can be so unforgiving.

By now, I’m sure everyone knows who I am talking about. The one-time superstar of Hindi cinema, the one who at one time could deliver a superhit even if the main character in his film was an elephant, the one whose mere smile and slight shake of the head had audiences in a swoon, the one who set off a rage of buttoned-up silk kurtas as a fashion trend – yes, I am talking about Rajesh Khanna.

He would have been 75 today if he’d been alive. But he didn’t live to even see 70 – he died in 2012, when still just 69. Although he’d been ailing for a while, news of his death still shocked me – I wrote a blogpost on the occasion on my blog, in tribute to him.

See, here’s the thing. I don’t, for one moment, defend Rajesh Khanna for all his wrongdoings, his arrogance, any charges that anyone might level against him. If true, he must rightly be called out for them.  So  if anyone is trying to troll me by pointing out his failings (this happens sometimes) and expecting me to defend Rajesh Khanna, it won’t work – I will probably wholeheartedly agree with them. I am not living in denial about his misdeeds.

Yet, I can also not deny that Rajesh Khanna’s films provided me with a lot of entertainment and fun in my childhood days, of which I still have very fond memories. It just so happened that his superstar days coincided almost exactly with the time that I was watching Hindi films as a young boy. I have a sort of attachment towards him that is hard to explain –  considering everything else. It of course need not have been so. Atul too is of my era – and he has no such attachment.  Fair enough. I happen to have it – and even now, I sometimes watch videos of Rajesh Khanna songs of that 1969-1973 period, and get transported to that period.

I distinctly remember watching him then in songs like “Gussa Itna Haseen Hai  To Pyar Kaisa Hoga” (‘Maryada’), “Yahaan Wahaan Saare Jahaan Mein Tera Raaj Hai” (‘Aan Milo Sajna’), “Ye Jo Mohabbat Hai”, “Ye Shaam Mastaani”, and “Pyaar Deewaana Hota Hai” (all three from ‘Kati Patang’ – one of my favourite films at the time),  “Rona Kabhi Nahin Rona” (‘Apna Desh’), “Vaada Tera Vaada” (‘Dushman’), “O Mere Dil Ke Chain” (‘Mere Jeevan Saathi’)  and many more songs – and enjoying these songs and his mannerisms a lot.

I was very young then – and initially thought he was singing these songs himself. 🙂 When I was told he was only the actor in front of the camera and that someone else (in this case, Kishore Kumar) was the singer, I remember being a bit disappointed. But that did not take away from the enjoyment of the songs, or his mannerisms, or the films. Later on, when his mannerisms became forced and began to jar, the long hair (which was a fashion at the time)  made him look less appealing to me, and the quality of films too began dropping, the charm wore off, not only for India’s masses, but also for me. (After all, I also belonged to those masses).

But for the memories of those few early years, I have always had a soft corner for Rajesh Khanna. That sideways tilt of the head, that dialogue delivery (check out the dialogue just before the song “Daanton Taley Dabaa Kar Honth” from ‘Doli’ – the video is available on YouTube – and you will know what I mean). These are the memories of him I always keep with me. I have not watched many of his later films – maybe because I want to keep his 1969-73 image in my mind and not  a 1985 one. Having said that, I’ve heard that some of his 1980s films are worth a watch – so I think I will give them a try.

So, to summarise, yes, Rajesh Khanna had a lot of faults – more than probably any other actor. But he also had a meteoric rise that no other actor had – and , while he need not have let success get to his head – he was also only human. Sometimes maybe you do need extremes to make a point.

Maybe it is examples like Rafisaab (or probably for a more modern generation, Rahul Dravid) and Rajesh Khanna that can be held up for youngsters. When you achieve success, make sure you don’t lose your head. Make sure you follow the Rafisaab (or Dravid) example, not the Rajesh Khanna one. I don’t think Rajesh Khanna himself would mind this. Much later in life, he did realize his mistakes – and warned other youngsters not to fall prey to their own success. A lesson learnt the hard way.

Coming to the song for today. As always with Rajesh Khanna songs, I prefer to roll back the years and  go back to the Rajesh Khanna of 1969-73. The film si ‘Joru Ka Ghulaam’ (1972) – one of the films I distinctly remember from my childhood days. It is not one of Rajesh’s biggest hits, but I remember quite liking the film when I saw it. One of its songs,  “Nainon Mein, Nindiya Hai”, was very popular in its time. But the other songs were also fairly well-known, as was not uncommon for songs from Rajesh Khanna films at the time.

The song is “Baras Gayi Re Taras Gayi Re”. I had marked this song for a write-up the last time I wrote about Rajesh Khanna, but at the last minute, I decided to go with “O Monalisa” from ‘Dil Daulat Duniya’. I was a bit surprised to find that this song was still available for posting – so here goes.

The lyrics have been provided by Avinashji, who, as everyone knows is a big Rajesh Khanna fan. Even bigger than I am. So when I decided to write this up, he immediately offered to provide the lyrics. I gladly accepted. Thank you, Avinashji.

Hope you enjoy this song. It is written by Anand Bakshi and composed by Kalyanji-Anandji.

 


Song – Baras Gayi Re Taras Gayi Re (Joru Ka Ghulam) (1972) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, MD – Kalyanji Anandji

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

hmm mm
arey oo oo oo
ho o o o 

baras gayi re taras gayi re

baras gayi re taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariya ho
tere daras ko najariya
baras gayi re taras gayi
o uparwaale
sun uparwaale ae
o uparwaale
ham niche waalon ki
kab tu lega
khabariyaa
khabariyaa
baras gayi re taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariya
ho o tere daras ko najariyaa
haan

hamne bahot ki hai teri sewa..aa
hamne bahot ki hai teri sewa
jaane milega ab kab hamko mewa
aasha niraasha mein tere bhagat ki..ee
aasha niraasha mein tere bhagat ki
beet na jaaye umariyaa
umariyaa
baras gayi re taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariyaa
ho o tere daras ko najariyaa
ho

tan bhi hai pyaasa
mann bhi hai bhookhaa
tan bhi hai pyaasa
mann bhi hai bhookhaa
neelkanth ka kanth bhi sookha
barsegaa saawan takraayegi kab 
barsegaa saawan takraayegi kab
parvat se ayike badariyaa
badariyaa
baras gayi re, taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariya
ho o tere daras ko najariyaa
haan

niche main jaagoon
upar tu soye
niche main jaagoon
upar tu soye
kaise milan tera mera hoye
bairi jagat raste mein padaa hai ae he
bairi jagat raste mein padaa hai
rok ke hamri dagariyaa
dagariyaa
baras gayi re taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariya
ho o tere daras ko najariyaa
o uparwaale
ham niche waalon ki
kab tu lega
khabariyaa
khabariyaa
baras gayi re taras gayi re
tere daras ko najariya
ho o tere daras ko najariyaa
haan
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————

हम्म म्म
अरे ओ  ओ ओ
हो ओ ओ ओ

बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे ए
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया आ
ओ उपरवाले
सुन उपरवाले ए
ओ उपरवाले
हम निचे वालों कि
कब तू लेगा
खबरिया
खबरिया
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो ओ तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हाँ आ

हमने बहोत की है तेरी सेवा आ
हमने बहोत की है तेरी सेवा आ
जाने मिलेगा अब कब हमको मेवा
आशा निराशा में तेरे भगत कि ई
आशा निराशा में तेरे भगत कि
बीत न जाए उमरिया
उमरिया
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो ओ तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो

तन भी है प्यासा
मन भी हैं भूखा
तन भी है प्यासा
मन भी हैं भूखा
नीलकंठ का कंठ भी सूखा
बरसेगा सावन टकराएगी कब अ ह
बरसेगा सावन टकराएगी कब
पर्वत से अईके बदरिया
बदरिया
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो ओ तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हाँ

निचे मैं जागूँ
ऊपर तू सोये ए
निचे मैं जागूँ
ऊपर तू सोये ए
कैसे मिलन तेरा मेरा होए
बैरी जगत रस्ते में पडा है ए हे
बैरी जगत रस्ते में पडा है
रोक के हमरी डगरिया
डगरिया
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो ओ तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
ओ उपरवाले
हम निचे वालों कि
कब तू लेगा
खबरिया
खबरिया
बरस गयी रे तरस गयी रे
तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हो ओ तेरे दरस को नज़रिया
हाँ


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today is a very special day for all HFM lovers. It is the birth anniversary of one of the most beloved of artistes, and one of the greatest and most respected. I am, of course, talking about the one and only Rafi Saab.

Had he been alive today, he would have completed 93 years. But as fate would have it, he left us in 1980 itself, when he was barely 55. One does not have control over these matters – one can only have fond memories of the person concerned, and enjoy the rich legacy that he or she has left behind.

And WHAT A LEGACY Rafisaab has left behind!

There’s not a single day that his songs are not aired on the Indian radio channels. And I am not talking about just the odd song – we are talking about the chance that every programme (not deliberately exclusionary) that has songs up to 1980 having at least one Rafisaab song. He was just so prolific and his songs just so popular.

There’s also not a single day that I do not sing (to myself only, of course 🙂 ) a Rafisaab song. I sing a lot sub-consciously, it is second nature to me (although it might be an irritant to others). And often the song is a Rafi Saab song. It could be a sad song or a happy song, a bhajan or a qawwali, one of his early songs (like “Yahaan Badla Wafaa Ka. . .”) or one of his 1970s songs (like “Main Tere Dar Pe Aaya Hoon”- one of my favourites from his later years).  But whatever it is, a Rafi Saab song always seems to be on my lips.

Just like Rafisaab is always in my heart.

Which is why I am writing this hurried tribute to him on this occasion. It is hurried because I am already late on this and am writing this post on the day, instead of at least a day earlier, allowing Atul or Sudhirji some time to process it. I hope they are still able to post it on Rafi Saab’s anniversary. If not, a day later is ok too.

It is also hurried because I have suddenly a lot of family-related demands on my time. This has been the situation for more than a month now – there has been a wedding in the family, a lot of work to be done for it, a whole lot of visitors/family arriving to attend, some illnesses in the family, Christmas time (always busier than usual because of family visiting anyway), etc. Due to all this, I have been very limited in my social activities of late. I’ve hardly visited the blog (a lot of catching up to do!), hardly been on other social media either. Family has taken precedence over everything else.

In spite of all this, I was hoping to be able to come up with a Rafi Saab post in time. Whether I miss other occasions or not, I almost always try to write a post, however short, on Rafi Saab’s birth and death anniversaries. But even that has not happened. One big reason is that I’m going to bed very early nowadays. I sleep by 10.30 pm or so – earlier I would sleep after midnight! That extra hour or two in the night would be peaceful – it would give me time for social media, writing and catching up on posts. During the daytime, there’s little chance of being able to concentrate on anything, with lots of people around. 🙂

But I digress – this post isn’t about me, it’s about Rafi Saab. So back on topic. (I still haven’t lost the habit of digressing, have I? 🙂 ). So here I am – with this hurried post. It might not be 2000 words long (do I hear a sigh of relief?), but it is a tribute to Rafi Saab straight from the heart.

After all, Rafi Saab’s songs went straight to the heart, didn’t they? He sang every song, sad or happy, with such love and dedication that you could sense he gave it his best. Not all songs were successful commercially (and that’s natural when you’ve sung so many thousands) but you could rarely fault Rafi Saab for this. And his dedication was the same, whether he was singing for a big composer or a small composer. In that respect, Rafi Saab was a true professional, who did full justice to his art. In fact, Rafisaab worshipped it. It was his humility that always made him refer to his divine voice as a gift from above. He used to point upwards whenever someone complimented him on a song.

I’ve written often enough about how I became a Rafi Saab fan in an era when he was considered to be “down and out” – an era when Kishore Kumar reigned. The early 70s. I am a huge fan of Kishore Kumar too – there’s no contradiction here at all. When you truly love music, you just soak in all the great music that is out there, and be thankful for it.  At least I, for one, don’t like to pit one artiste against another. Once I became a Rafi Saab fan, I listened to his songs more intently – and realized how pure his voice is. Truly divine.

The other thing that makes Rafisaab very special for me is the PERSON he was. It is very easy for a person successful in his field to let this success get to his head. There are many examples of this. But to remain level-headed, and not just that, but also to be humble and big-hearted enough to help others to achieve success too, is a rare quality.

Rafi Saab is highly respected, not just in the industry, but by millions outside it, for this quality. Stories abound of how big-hearted he was. Even at the height of his success, he would sing for absolutely new composers – that too for a token amount. There are many such stories about him. His humility, no airs, always there to help anyone in need. He was far more than “just another great artist” in the industry.

How can you then NOT respect such a person, or hold him in special regard? So for me, Rafisaab is a very very very special person. As many say in interviews about him “Rafi Saab Khuda ke bande the”. God does not seem to make them like him anymore.

So, the 24th of December 1924, when he was born will always be a special day for me. And every year, the 24th of December is a date we should all remember and celebrate. Christmas is a day later, but for us HFM lovers, celebrations start a day earlier.

Now onto the song for today.

Despite time constraints, I spent a lot of time looking for a suitable Rafi Saab song last evening. I found a wonderful short and sweet, song which I was all set to post – but then realized it has already been posted. (A song from the film ‘Saaranga’ (1960) – I left a comment on the song on the blog). Anyway, during the search process, I happened to hear this song for the first time yesterday. I quite liked it – it’s a cheerful, positive song, and fit for a celebration.

The song is from the film ‘Wanted’ of 1961. I haven’t seen the film, but since it is directed by NA Ansari, it’s probably a fun film, worth watching. 🙂 . This song is picturised on Vijay Kumar (brother of Johnny Walker) and Saeeda Khan. (I remember Vijay Kumar from ‘Kaun Apna Kaun Paraya’ (1963), opposite Waheeda Rehman, lip-synching to the lovely “Zara Sun Haseena e Naazneen”.) I think I recognize Bela Bose amongst the other dancers. The lyricist-composer duo is Shakeel Badayuni and Ravi. It is a pleasant song that I took an instant liking to. I hope you like it too.


Song – Aayi Zindagi Ki Raat Chhodo Kal Pe Kal Ki Baat (Wanted) (1961) Singer – Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle, Lyrics – Shakeel Badayuni, MD – Ravi
Male Chorus
Female Chorus
All Chorus

Lyrics

aayi zindagi ki raat
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
aayi zindagi ki raat
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
aayi zindagi ki raat
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke

kadam kadam pe shokhiyaan
nazar nazar hijaab hai
nayi nayi umang hai
naya naya shabaab hai
hoo oo oo oo oo
kadam kadam pe shokhiyaan
nazar nazar hijaab hai
nayi nayi umang hai
naya naya shabaab hai
aaj husn ishq ka hai kya haseen saath
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke

aayi zindagi ki raat
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

naacho jhoom jhoom ke
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

aayi zindagi ki raat
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

naacho jhoom jhoom ke
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
(aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa)

ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho

adaa adaa mein mastiyaan
tarang ang ang mein
range hue hain dil sabhi
mohabbaton ke rang mein
aa aa aa aa aa
adaa adaa mein mastiyaan
tarang ang ang mein
range hue hain dil sabhi
mohabbaton ke rang mein
bekhudi ke haath mein hai zindagi ka haath
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke

aayi zindagi ki raat
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
aayi zindagi ki raat
chhodo kal pe kal ki baat
naacho jhoom jhoom ke
ho naacho jhoom jhoom ke
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

आई ज़िंदगी की रात
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के
आई ज़िंदगी की रात
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के
आई ज़िंदगी की रात
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के

कदम कदम पे शोखियाँ
नज़र नज़र हिजाब है
नई नई उमंग है
नया नया शबाब है
हो ओ ओ ओ ओ
कदम कदम पे शोखियाँ
नज़र नज़र हिजाब है
नई नई उमंग है
नया नया शबाब है
आज हुस्न इश्क़ है क्या हसीन साथ
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के

आई ज़िंदगी की रात
(आ आ आ आ आ)
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
(आ आ आ आ आ)
नाचो झूम झूम के
(आ आ आ आ आ)
हो नाचो झूम झूम के
(आ आ आ आ आ)

आई ज़िंदगी की रात
(आ आ आ आ आ)
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
(आ आ आ आ आ)
नाचो झूम झूम के
(आ आ आ आ आ)
हो नाचो झूम झूम के
(आ आ आ आ आ)

अदा अदा में मस्तियाँ
तरंग अंग अंग में
रंगे हुए हैं दिल सभी
मोहब्बतों के रंग में
आ आ आ आ आ
अदा अदा में मस्तियाँ
तरंग अंग अंग में
रंगे हुए हैं दिल सभी
मोहब्बतों के रंग में
बेखुदी के हाथ में है ज़िंदगी का हाथ
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के

आई ज़िंदगी की रात
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के
आई ज़िंदगी की रात
छोड़ो कल पे कल की बात
नाचो झूम झूम के
हो नाचो झूम झूम के


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The 25th of October is an important date for Hindi film music lovers. In fact, not just for them but for lovers of Urdu poetry too. For it is the anniversary of passing away of one of the industry’s foremost lyricists, Sahir Ludhianvi, who was highly regarded not just for lyrics but also for his poetry. In fact it was his poetry that brought him recognition early on – he just extended it to the film industry.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today(13 october 2017) is the 30th death anniversary of one of the greatest legends of the Hindi film industry, Kishore Kumar. On this day, the 13th of October 1987, he left this earthly world. He was just 58 then.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today we pay tribute here on the blog to Mahendra Kapoor, one of the well-known voices of the golden era of Hindi music, on the occasion of his 9th death anniversary. There are many ways to start this tribute but, instead of “getting my eye in”, let me, Sehwag-style, straightaway go for it. By “it”, I mean the elephant in the room.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

After a fairly long break, I’m writing a post for the blog today.

There’s no particular reason for this break – it is just one of those things. I go through these periods of high-frequency posting to nil-posting every now and then.
Read more on this topic…


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(© 2008 - 2018) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 14400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3600 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

14449

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1146
Total Number of movies covered =3938

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3500 days.

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