Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Post by Raja’ Category


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4400 Post No. : 15779

Less than a week ago, we were commemorating the death anniversary of Rafisaab on this blog. And here we are today to discuss another singing legend, this time on his birth anniversary. Of course, it’s none other than Kishore Kumar, another much-loved personality in the Hindi film industry.

As I said in my recent post on Rafisaab, I am a huge Rafisaab fan. But that doesn’t mean I’m not fond of Kishore Kumar.

I know some people have this “Rafi or Kishore” binary, but, thankfully for me, I don’t. I absolutely love both of them, and refuse to play one against the other. Why would one do that?

We’re extremely lucky to have had both singers in the industry. Why would we pick one, and exclude the other? Are our hearts so small? Is our love for music so narrow?

I, for one, thoroughly enjoy listening to both of them – and do listen a lot to both.

But today is Kishore da’s day, so the rest of this post is about him.

To call Kishore da a singing legend is absolutely true. But to call him only a singing legend doesn’t do justice to him at all.

Kishore da was an all-rounder par excellence – actor, director, producer, composer, writer, in addition to being a singing legend. So in a way, if I might very loosely use a cricketing analogy, he was Sir Garry Sobers to Rafisaab’s Bradman. 🙂 Bradman is considered the greatest batsman ever, whereas Sobers is considered the greatest all-rounder ever.

As with Rafisaab, I’ve written several posts here on Kishore da too. For me, he was an essential part of my pre-teen, and teen years, when he absolutely reigned. And from then, right till his death in 1987, he was the numero uno male singer in terms of popularity.

Much of my early musical experiences invariably had Kishore Kumar in them. It’s not like one had much of a choice in the 1970s – if you were listening to current songs, or watching current movies, you almost HAD to listen to Kishore songs. 🙂

I grew up in that atmosphere, and knew most Kishore songs of that era by heart. All three stanzas, if there were three.

Many of the hit movies at that time were Rajesh Khanna’s, but Kishore Kumar songs were big hits even in non-Rajesh films. Songs like “teri duniya se”, “dekha na haaye re”, “musafir hoon yaaron”, “ye jeevan hai”, “meri bheegi bheegi si”, “geet gaata hoon main” and many more. As I said, he just ruled at that time, so the actor in the film didn’t even matter.

Almost every one of my classmates in school was a Kishore fan, with the exception of one, who was a KL Saigal fan. In fact I first heard of KL Saigal only from him.

I too joined the bandwagon – and in the lunch break, we’d have a quick lunch and sing songs. Mostly Kishore, of course.

In those days, I had this habit of having ONE favourite song which I’d sing non-stop for a few days. It could be for 3-4 days, or a week or even 2 weeks. But I’d sing it non-stop, probably to the annoyance of others around me. 🙂

Again they were mostly Kishore songs.

I distinctly remember “jaane jaa, dhoondhta phir raha”, “chala jaata hoon”, “o mere dil ke chain”, “aadmi jo kehta hai” and “tere bina zindagi se koi”, though there were many more.

So now, when I have SO many fond musical memories of Kishore Kumar of those days, how can I POSSIBLY turn my back on him, just because I also became a Rafisaab fan later? Sorry, can’t do that.

At that time, I didn’t know too many Kishore songs from the 1950s. But as and when I got to listen to them, I’d just fall in love with them. How can you not fall in love with “piya piya piya”, or “o nigaahen mastaana”, or his songs of Funtoosh (1955) or Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi (1958)?

I feel, in the 1980s, he lost a little bit of that softness in his voice that he had in earlier decades. But some of that could also be to do with the type of songs he was called upon to sing. After all, even in that decade, he did sing songs like “lehron ki tarah yaadein”, “manzilein apni jagah” and “o yaara”.

And, if he hadn’t passed away in 1987, he could have easily continued to sing for many more years.
Even “o yaara” was from the 1987 film, Kaash.

But this is only one aspect of Kishore da.

He is also well-known as an actor, mostly in comedy lead roles of the 1950s and 1960s. I’ve seen many of those films – and I really like them.

The thing is, Kishore had no hang-ups, and could do the most crazy scenes on screen. Dances, songs, impersonations, anything.

I don’t know anyone else who was so versatile – the closest is possibly IS Johar or Mehmood.

But look at “kuen mein kood ke mar jaana” from Parivar (1956). That’s sheer Kishore genius.

And of course, “aake seedhi lagi” from Half-Ticket (1962) where he sings both in a male voice (for Pran) and female voice (for himself, disguised as a woman).

There are many more Kishore songs picturised on himself, that are pure fun – “main Bangali chhokra”, “CAT Cat”, “paanch rupaiya barah aana”, “meri pyaari bindu”, “is duniya mein pyaare, do kaam karna” , “guni jano bhakt jano” immediately come to mind.

Having said that, to assume that Kishore never took anything seriously wouldn’t be entirely true. Yes, most of his roles were comedy roles. And in real life too, his co-artistes often said he would enliven proceedings with his jokes and pranks. And yet, he could make meaningful cinema too.

Two films I like a lot are both produced and directed by Kishore Kumar. Door Gagan Ki Chhaon Mein (1964) and Door Ka Raahi (1971). Not only are the songs (composed by Kishore himself) excellent, but the storyline makes you think too. Especially Door Ka Raahi, which is unconventional in how it explores various facets of life, through the eyes of a traveler.

What more can I say about Kishore Kumar?

If the film industry is primarily about entertainment, Kishore Kumar was the ultimate entertainer. Even his live concerts were highly entertaining because he could connect very easily with his audience. No wonder he was loved so much.

There’s a lot more one can say about Kishore Kumar, but I will move on to the song for today.

This is from the film Harjaee (1981). In 2017, I posted a song on Kishore’s death anniversary from this film. Today I’m posting a song from this film on his birth anniversary.

I’m quite fond of both these songs, because they are vintage Kishore-Pancham (RD Burman) for me.

Kishore and Pancham had a long and extremely fruitful association. They were very close friends too, since Kishore, being very close to SD Burman, knew Pancham right from his childhood.

This is what I wrote about the film Harjaee (1981) on that post.

I remember seeing this film at that time – haven’t seen it since. Contrary to the typical multi-starrer, masala films of the time, this film, starring Randhir Kapoor and Tina Munim, was a proper tear-jerker. From what I remember, Randhir Kapoor is a carefree, prankster type of guy who pretends to have cancer, just to get Tina Munim to fall for him. His parents too believes his story and get Tina to be sympathetic towards him. Then tragedy strikes. Randhir Kapoor gets really diagnosed with cancer. The rest of the story is how he copes with it, how Tina copes with it, how their respective families cope with it.
The film has some good songs – like many Randhir Kapoor films do. Whether his films did well or not, there used to invariably be at least one hit song (often more) in each of his films. I remember during my schooldays, I personally didn’t mind Randhir Kapoor films at all – though I was clearly much in the minority at the time.

While watching this song “ye rut hai haseen” it struck me that this is yet ANOTHER song where the hero sings a song at a party, and makes the heroine cry or feel very uncomfortable. Off the top of my head, I remember songs in similar situations in Do Badan, Teesri Manzil, Ek Mahal Ho Sapnon Ka and Brahmachari . Maybe Atul should have a separate category for this. 🙂

Wish Kishore da a very happy birthday though he is not here with us anymore. He is probably up there singing to Pancham’s tunes, songs of Anand Bakshi’s lyrics, picturised on Rajesh Khanna. 🙂

And, for old times’ sake, singing to SD Burman’s tunes, songs of Majrooh, picturised on Dev Anand. 🙂

Kishore da, you will always remain in our hearts.

Thanks for all the entertainment, and for enriching our lives.


Song-Ye rut hai haseen dard bhi hai jawaan (Harjaayee)(1981) Singer-Kishore Kumar, Lyrics-Vitthalbhai Patel, MD-R D Burman

Lyrics

ye rut hai haseen
dard bhi hai jawaan
harjaee nahin hum
na tum bewafaa

milna tha hum mil hi gaye
phool pyaar ke khil hi gaye
milna tha hum mil hi gaye
phool pyaar ke khil hi gaye
ho
dil se yehi doon main dua
milke na ho koi judaa
ye rut hai haseen
dard bhi hai jawaan
harjaee nahin hum
na tum bewafaa

sapne the sapne hi rahe
apne jab apne na rahe
sapne the sapne hi rahe
apne jab apne na rahe
ho
roothe ho tum kaun suney
koi pyaar ka shikhwa gilaa
ye rut hai haseen
dard bhi hai jawaan
harjaee nahin hum
na tum bewafaa

tan mann preet ke deep jaley
aaye seher na raat dhaley
tan mann preet ke deep jaley
aaye seher na raat dhaley
ho
socho zaraa
hogi bhalaa
phool se khusboo kaise judaa
ye rut hai haseen
dard bhi hai jawaan
harjaee nahin hum
na tum bewafaa
ye rut hai haseen
dard bhi hai jawaan


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4396 Post No. : 15767 Movie Count :

4346

Today is the 31st of July.
A date that has an immediate connect with most HFM lovers, for it signifies to them the passing away of one of Hindi film industry’s biggest legends.

Mohammad Rafi, or, as many (including myself) refer to him with the greatest respect, Rafisaab.

Today is his 40th death anniversary – and all of us here on the blog, and I’m sure millions around the world, remember him with great love, affection and respect.

That I’m a big Rafisaab fan is no secret.
This is also why, despite any other constraints I might have, I always try to write a post on 24th Dec (his birthday) and 31st July (death anniversary) for this blog.
It is my very small way of paying respect to someone who has given me so much joy in my life from just listening to his voice. I already feel blessed to be able to listen to him. To then be able to write about him is such a pleasure, and yet a humbling experience.

In many of my previous posts on Rafisaab, I’ve discussed him not just as a singer par excellence but also as a very special human being. For me, it’s difficult to separate the artiste from the person.
And in Rafisaab, I find myself lost in admiration on both counts – his mastery of his art, and his character as a human being.

In life one comes across, or reads about, all sorts of people.
There’s a lot to learn from others, their conduct and experiences in life.
The other day I’d written about Rajesh Khanna and how his life, inspite of all the mistakes he made, is a lesson for others.
The same applies to Rafisaab too – although not due to his mistakes, but due to his elevated thinking.
Much to learn from it.

The industry, for all its seeming “biraadari” and bhai-chaara, can be a nasty place. Stories of egos, back-stabbing, credit-grabbing, politics abound. Many artistes themselves say it’s a dog-eats-dog industry.

And yet, in such an industry, there was also a Rafisaab.

Throughout his career, from the late 40s till he passed away in 1980, there wasn’t a single blemish on his character. No story of ego, or back-stabbing or politics, or anything of that sort.
It’s quite remarkable – but that was Rafisaab.
Others in the industry might have tried to throw their weight around, even manipulate or belittle Rafisaab, but he never reciprocated with any anger or vengeance. He was on a different plane altogether – an elevated one.
This is why though there were incidents with legends like BR Chopra, OP Nayyar and Lata Mangeshkar, they always patched up with him.
Such was Rafisaab’s personality – you just could not but respect him, inspite of any difference of opinion you have.

Stories of Rafisaab’s humility abound.
Whenever he’d be praised for a song, he’d point upwards to suggest it was all God’s doing.
Such was his humility that he would ask a composer after singing “Was it ok?” And if the composer had even the slightest doubt, Rafisaab would sing it again.
This, even with composers of far less stature than Rafisaab.
No ego, just thorough professionalism, and the desire to give the best he could.

Stories of Rafisaab’s generosity abound. How he would take just a one-rupee token fee from struggling composers. How he would support various poor and underprivileged people, without the slightest fuss or publicity.

It’s hard to imagine a person like this in today’s world. Such a soft-spoken, gentle person, ever-smiling, and with so much kindness in his heart.

Yes, there’s a lot to learn from Rafisaab, the person.

I’m no singer (ok, am just a bathroom singer) but am sure professional singers would have a lot to learn from Rafisaab’s professionalism, and sheer dedication to his profession. He always tried to give the very best he could – because that is what the composer, and the public, deserved. So no half-hearted measures or shortcuts.

Mind you, for a large part of his career, he was a superstar singer, so he could have got away without so much effort. But he wouldn’t be Rafisaab then. Right till the end, whether it was his riyaaz at home, or his rehearsals, or recordings, the effort and dedication was a hundred percent.

Like most artistes, Rafisaab also had ups and downs in his career.
One fine day, from being the most popular male voice for at least two generations, he found himself overshadowed by Kishore Kumar as the most popular voice of a new generation. It obviously hit him hard – his self-confidence apparently took a bit of a beating.

But, like they say, you can’t keep a good man down for long – and Rafisaab came back.
And how!
By 1976-77, with Laila Majnu, Amar Akbar Anthony and Hum Kisise Kam Nahin all featuring hit songs from him prominently, he was back with a bang.

From then on, till his death in 1980, he was very much back in business. That’s how you come back even when you seem to be down and out.

Yes, there’s a lot to learn from Rafisaab, the artiste.

No wonder I am such a big fan of Rafisaab.
And I know I’m in pretty good company.
Company of at least a few million others.

I haven’t talked about Rafisaab’s songs here – what can I say? Right from his very early days, with songs like “yahaan badla wafaa ka” and “ik dil ke tukde” to his last days, with songs like “tu is tarah”, Rafisaab’s voice was totally in a league of its own.
Divinity incarnate.

And add to this divine voice, his control over pitch, his intonations, the “thehraav” in his voice. No wonder he could sing “o duniya ke rakhwaale” and “meri duniya mein tum aayi”, two songs on two totally opposite ends of the spectrum, with equal aplomb. Such was his mastery that he could easily adapt his voice to blend with any mood or moment.
Happy, teasing or sad.
Ghazal, qawwali or bhajan.
One moment, the despair of “ye mehlon ye takhton”. The next, the fun and frolic of “sar jo tera chakraaye”. Listen to this, and you feel it IS Johnny Walker’s voice.

Yes, that was another Rafisaab skill. To seamlessly adapt his voice to the actor on screen.

The “thehraav” in Rafisaab’s voice is something that I can never get enough of. I’ve listened to the title song of “Mere Mehboob” so many times, just to marvel at the “thehraav”.

Listening to Rafisaab’s voice is therapeutic for me. Whatever be my frame of mind, I just have to close my eyes and listen to “pukaarta chala hoon main”, and I suddenly feel better. 🙂

I could go on and on, but let me now move on to the song for today.

A few days ago, I was on youtube listening to some Rafisaab songs. But this time, instead of listening to his popular songs, I thought I’d look for lesser-known ones. There’s a special joy in discovering songs you’ve never heard before. True of any singer, but for me, especially true of Rafisaab.

I came across a few, shared them with Avinashji too, because he’s an even bigger Rafisaab fan than I am. 🙂

It was an enriching experience, since there were some songs with a decent spattering of Urdu – always a delight for me. 🙂

Today’s song isn’t one in this category. But I loved it the first time I heard it a few days ago, so I decided it would be the song for today.

Actually, I’m somewhat surprised I hadn’t heard this song before. Surprised because it’s from a 1982 film, Raakh Aur Chingaari. Starring Vinod Mehra, Vidya Sinha and Anil Dhawan. 1982 was still within my “active consciousness” of films and songs, and these actors are prominent actors – but somehow this film and song seem to have passed me by.

I also noticed that this film doesn’t figure on the blog yet – another surprise. So it’s making its debut here today.

Then the lyricist & composer. Lyrics by Tajdar Taj, music by Ratandeep Hemraj. Both new names for me.

I see that this combo is already on the blog in Sudhirji’s post.

But what is surprising is that this was MY era, and yet these names are new to me. It’s a very humbling realization. 🙂

I like the lyrics and the music – and of course, Rafisaab’s voice.

This happens to be a multiple-version song. The female version is sung by Chandrani Mukherjee.

So here it is “ye anjaan raahen”. Hope you like the song too.

And Rafisaab, you will always remain in our hearts.
Always.
There’s a very special place for you in all our hearts.
Thank you for making life that much more worth living. 🙂

Mohammad Rafi

Chandrani Mukherjee

Song-Ye anjaan raahen ye manzil paraayi (Raakh aur Chingaari)(1982) Singers-Rafi/ Chandrani Mukherjee, Lyrics-Tajdar Taj, MD-Ratandeep Hemraj

——————————
Rafi version
——————————

Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Kismat ne wo thokar maari
Dil ka sheesha toot gaya
Pyaar ki mehfil raas na aayi
Yaar ka daaman chhoot gaya
Kismat ne wo thokar maari
Dil ka sheesha toot gaya
Pyaar ki mehfil raas na aayi
Yaar ka daaman chhoot gaya
Saaya bankar
Saath chalegi
Jeevan bhar
Ye tanhaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Jaane kis din tootegi ab
Saanson ki ye shehnaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

—————————-
Chandrani Mukherjee version
—————————-

Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen

Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Roothh gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Aaj meri majboor wafaa
Khud mere liye ilzaam hui
Rooth gaye hain geet milan ke
Dard mein doobi shaam hui
Jaane kis din tootegi ab
Saanson ki ye shehnaai
Ye anjaan raahen
Ye manzil paraayi
Mujhe zindagi tu
Kahaan leke aayi
Kahaan leke aayi
Ye anjaan raahen


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4383 Post No. : 15732

Today, the 18th of July, is the death anniversary of one of the Hindi film industry’s biggest superstars. Probably one of its most controversial too. And certainly one of its most polarizing.

No prizes for guessing who I’m talking about. Of course, I’m talking about the one-time heartthrob of millions of women, Rajesh Khanna.

It’s been 8 years now since that day in 2012. I still remember the morning I got to hear the news – I was stunned. I knew he was ailing, but even so I never expected it would be so soon.

Since then, I’ve been writing posts on his birth and death anniversaries regularly here. To be honest, I don’t think the posts themselves contain any new material as such. But I still write – this is my small way of paying tribute to him.

As I’m writing a tribute to Rajesh Khanna, I’d like to think what he would like me to write about.

It’s no secret that he’d like me to write about his glory days. The days when he just had to tilt his head, and women would swoon. Or smile in a way only he could, and women would sigh. Or utter one dialogue in that deliberate drawn-out style and women would want to tie the knot that minute with him, even if they were already married.

Yes, he’d probably want me to write about all of this. How, during THAT period, he delivered hit after hit with such regularity that nothing else in the film mattered as long as Rajesh Khanna was hero. So much so that even a film which was mostly about elephants, and which Rajesh Khanna was admittedly not too keen on being part of, ended up becoming a smashing superhit.

Yes, he’d probably want me to write about all of this. And probably not too much about what followed after THAT period.

And yet, every single time when I’ve written about Rajesh Khanna, I haven’t been able to limit myself to just “the good bits”. I don’t do hagiography – and this isn’t like a highlights video, where you see a rather distorted and very selective picture of events.

So everytime I’ve written about him, I’ve also presented the not-so-flattering side of his persona.

Perhaps one reason is that I’m not able to easily separate the art from the artist. Not just in his case, but in anyone’s case. I know a lot of people say one should – but it’s easier said than done. This is also the reason that most of my posts here on Sahir and Rafisaab (two personalities I’ve discussed the most here) are also a lot about their character and persona outside their specific field.

Staying with Rajesh, like I said at the very start, he was a polarizing personality. You either loved him, or hated him. And I think this was something that he bore right through, till his death.
Even on his death, while there were condolences being offered, there were plenty of people constantly reminding everyone of his misdeeds.

Anyway, that’s how the world is. I don’t know if Rajesh did any good deeds, but all the things he did wrong are constantly brought up in a discussion about him.

Am reminded of that famous Mark Antony speech from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him
The evil that men do lives after them
The good is oft interred with their bones
So let it be with Caesar”

So let’s accept the same for Rajesh Khanna too. I’m not here to defend his wrongdoings. And I don’t think he’d want me to either. In the latter part of his life, he himself realized the mistakes he had made. And was honest enough to admit them. Which is the best you can do. You cannot undo what’s already done, but you can acknowledge your mistakes and try to make amends.

And boy, did Rajesh Khanna make mistakes! He made a LOT of them. Success came to him too soon, and SO overwhelmingly that it completely went to his head. By his own admission, he didn’t know how to deal with it. It made him supremely arrogant. It made him treat others with disdain and contempt. It made him thoroughly unprofessional. It brought with it a lot of vices in his lifestyle. It also brought with it a number of sycophants who only told him what he wanted to hear. Even when his films were beginning to fail, they kept the bad news away from him.

No wonder he fell the way he did. If your echo chamber keeps you insulated from reality, you have no corrective feedback mechanism to correct yourself.

It took Rajesh Khanna many years to come to terms with reality. For a long while, he still lived in that bubble.

I don’t think many realize that in 1975, when his decline began getting visible, Rajesh was still just 32-33. By then he had seen SO much success, that it was all only downhill from then on. It’s extremely hard for a superstar to reconcile with the thought that you’ve lost your mojo by 33.

By contrast, Amitabh Bachchan, a couple of months older to Rajesh, had just started seeing success at 33. That too, after quite a struggle.

And that’s another point I want to make here.

Many say that Amitabh Bachchan was/is THE thorough professional. He was a director’s delight. Just as much as Rajesh Khanna was a director’s nightmare. Amitabh was always punctual – even embarrassingly so for his co-stars.
And even at the peak of his superstardom. Rajesh Khanna’s tantrums were often just tolerated by his directors, because he was a superstar. So naturally when he began flopping, he didn’t have too many wanting to pick him up.

My point therefore is, if Amitabh Bachchan is a role model for any aspiring young actor (or person in any profession), we can also say Rajesh Khanna is probably the antithesis of that role model.

So you actually learn from BOTH of them. From Amitabh on how to conduct yourself, even when you see success. And from Rajesh on how NOT to conduct yourself, ESPECIALLY when you see success.

An older Rajesh would probably say to a class of youngsters “Don’t make the mistakes I made”.

There’s a lot to learn from observing others.

I realize I haven’t talked at all about Rajesh Khanna’s films (except for a reference to Haathi Mere Saathi). But then, that’s a whole new post in itself – and this one has already become long enough.

I’ll move on to the song for today.

As is now routine, lyrics of this song have come to me, courtesy Avinashji. He sent me a number of songs to choose from – I went with this. The title song of “Aashiq Hoon Bahaaron Ka”. This is the only song of this film yet to be posted – so with this, the movie gets yippeeed.

It’s actually somewhat ironic that I picked this movie’s song for today. For it was this film that made me do a blackout of Rajesh films.

By the time AHBK was released in 1977, Rajesh was well and truly on his way down. Amitabh had established himself as the new star, well on his way to becoming superstar. Rajesh’s movies had been flopping one after another, for at least two years by then.

And yet, fans like myself, would not give up hope. We’d watch with dismay as his movies would come and go. I remember Chalta Purza (1977) lasting barely a week at our local cinema hall. This, while Amar Akbar Anthony ran for many weeks.

Anyway, so AHBK came along. It was a very expensive movie, with foreign locales and all – one of the most expensive at the time. And how it flopped! J Om Prakash, director, admitted later that he didn’t want to make the film, but did so only because of his friendship with Rajesh Khanna. Danny also realized it would flop and warned the director.

This is what imdb says

Danny Denzongpa realized the film was going to be a disaster and warned the director. When the schedule went to Switzerland, Danny’s fears came true and the shooting went haywire due to the script being written at the last minute and disorganization.

When I watched the film all those years ago, I couldn’t take it anymore. I’d been hoping against hope that Rajesh would come back – but if THIS was the type of film he was going to act in, I saw no hope.

So after this film, I imposed a black-out on myself to not watch any other Rajesh film. It was just too painful to watch his films of that time.

For more than 25 years thereafter, I didn’t watch any Rajesh Khanna film. Except for 2 films that both appeared on Doordarshan – Thodisi Bewafai (1980) and Avtaar (1983), and one film I watched in a film hall in Calcutta with friends (I wasn’t keen, but I tagged along) – Dharam Kanta (1982).

Much later, I did catch up on films that I had missed. And I must admit many of them weren’t too bad.

But for me, AHBK will always be the turning point in my Rajesh experience. 🙂

And here I am, posting a song from this film. 🙂

More details of the film can be found on this post by Avinashji himself.

I will move on to the title song, which was fairly popular in its time, especially considering the disaster that the film was. 🙂

But that should not take away from Rajesh Khanna. If the script is rubbish, you can’t blame the actors. Amitabh Bachchan himself said once about some of his late 1980s films that he acted in them, very reluctantly only to accommodate friends.

So, as I close this, I just want to say to Rajesh Khanna…

Kaka, we still remember you fondly. Well, some of us do. Speaking for me personally, I will always remember you, and thank you, for the fond memories of my childhood, whether it be “ye shaam mastaani”, “yahaan wahaan saare” or “rona kabhi nahin rona”.

I hope wherever you are today, you are in a good place, and having fun with friends Kishore da and Pancham. 🙂

Editor’s note:- With this song, all the songs of the movie have been covered. So, “Aashiq Hoon Bahaaron Ka” (1977) joins the list of movies that have been YIPPEED in the blog.

Video

Audio

Song-Main aashiq hoon baharon ka (Aashiq Hoon Bahaaron Ka)(1977) Singer-Kishore Kumar, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

nahin dekhaa
kabhi pehle
kabhi pehle ae
nahin dekhaa
ye phool hai kin gulzaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa
nahin dekhaa
kabhi pehle
kabhi pehle ae
nahin dekhaa
ye phool hai kin gulzaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon bahaaron kaa aa
main aashiq hoon bahaaron kaa

mujhe jo pasand ho main
chhodtaa nahin
par daro mat phoolon ko main
todtaa nahin
mujhe jo pasand ho main
chhodtaa nahin ee
par daro mat phoolon ko main
todtaa nahin
mujhko khabar hai ke
tumsi naazuk kaliyaan
chhoone se sharmaa jaati hai
ye hai aadat meri binaa matlab ke
ye nazrein kisi chehre pe
yoon hi ruk jaati hain
yoon hi ruk jaati hain
nahin dil mein
kuchh mere
mujhe shauk hai sirf
nazaaron ka aa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa

tumse haseenon ki ho
khaaq qadar
ham log rang roop ko na
dekhen agar
tumse haseenon ki ho
khaaq qadar
ham log rang roop ko na
dekhen agar
jiski taraf koyi dekhtaa nahin
poochho us’se kitni taqleef hoti hai
jal jaataa hai wo dil hi dil mein
jab saamne unke auron ki taareef hoti hai ae
taareef hoti hai
to lat uljhhi
suljhaa doon
matlab hai ye mere ishaaron kaa aa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon bahaaron kaa
nahin dekhaa
kabhi pehle
kabhi pehle ae
nahin dekhaa
ye phool hai kin gulzaaron kaa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa aa
main aashiq hoon oon bahaaron kaa aa
main aashiq hoon oon oon bahaaron kaa aa

———————————————
Devnagri script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
——————————————–
नहीं देखा
कभी पहले
कभी पहले ए
नहीं देखा
ये फूल है किन गुलज़ारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊ बहारों का
नहीं देखा
कभी पहले
कभी पहले ए
नहीं देखा
ये फूल है किन गुलज़ारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ बहारों का आ
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ बहारों का

मुझे जो पसंद हो मैं
छोड़ता नहीं
पर डरो मत फूलों को मैं
तोड़ता नहीं
मुझे जो पसंद हो मैं
छोड़ता नहीं ई
पर डरो मत फूलों को मैं
तोड़ता नहीं
मुझको खबर है के
तुमसी नाज़ुक कलियाँ
छूने से शरमा जाती है
ये है आदत मेरी बिना मतलब के
ये नज़रें किसी चेहरे पे
यूं ही रुक जाती है
यूं ही रुक जाती है
नहीं दिल में
कुछ मेरे
मुझे शौक है सिर्फ
नजारों का आ
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का

तुमसे हसीनों की हो
खाक कदर
हम लोग रंग रूप को न
देखें अगर
तुमसे हसीनों की हो
खाक कदर
हम लोग रंग रूप को न
देखें अगर
जिसकी तरफ कोई देखता नहीं
पूछो उससे कितनी तकलीफ होती है
जल जाता है वो दिल ही दिल में
जब साने उनके औरों की तारीफ़ होती है ए
तारीफ़ होती है
तो लट उलझी
सुलझा दूं
मतलब है ये मेरे इशारों का आ
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ बहारों का

नहीं देखा
कभी पहले
कभी पहले ए
नहीं देखा
ये फूल है किन गुलज़ारों का
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का आ
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ बहारों का आ
मैं आशिक हूँ ऊँ ऊँ बहारों का आ


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4355 Post No. : 15674

Hello everyone,

So after what seems like ages, I’m back here with a post.
You can therefore assume it must be a special occasion.
A special anniversary, of an artiste or celebrity.

And it is.

Today is the birthday of the most important celebrity for this blog.
In fact, without this celebrity, the blog would not even have existed.
Yes, I’m talking about Atul himself.

Wish you a very very happy birthday, Atul.
Many happy returns of the day!

Now Atul might not consider himself a celebrity – but for us, he very much is.
I checked the dictionary definition of “celebrity” and there are two definitions
“a famous person, especially in entertainment or sport”
“the state of being well known”.

Atul satisfies BOTH conditions, in the context of this blog.
Ok, so he might not be a celeb in Bollywood yet, he might not make it to Page 3 or gossip columns (or maybe he does, I don’t know!). But if the dictionary definition is satisfied, I am too. 🙂

I don’t know where to start writing from, but I think a journey down memory lane might not be such a bad place to start. Those of you who have heard this before, kindly bear with me.

It all started in the first half of 2005. Probably around April or so.

In those days I was in Holland, and pretty crazy about cricket.
Not the right sport for that country, or the right country for that sport. 🙂
I got no TV coverage of cricket – and I was desperate to discuss cricket with like-minded cricket fans.

Luckily I had internet – so that was a life-saver in this context.

BBC in those days had a forum called BBC  TMS where one could discuss cricket. It was mostly Indians and Pakistanis, so you can imagine the level of discussion and amount of abuse. 🙂 Much of it was deliberately in Hindi, to avoid catching the eye of the forum moderators.

But after a while, they caught on to what was going on – and eventually the forum was shut down.

I then began hunting for other options.
I came across a Pakistani cricket forum which I joined.

It was there that I came across a person who went by the handle of “squarecut” (I think).

Now most of the discussion on the forum was obviously of modern/current cricket (Tendulkar, Wasim Akram etc) but this handle posted on topics of an earlier era – mostly the 1970s. And mostly talking about Indian cricketers of that era – like Vishwanath.

I could immediately relate to this. This was MY era, and I loved to discuss cricket of that era. So I immediately warmed to this person.

What was most remarkable was that his experiences were very similar to mine.
And his posts were also very interesting.

After a while, I got bored of that forum and continued my search for other options.

I came across a new forum, started by a few Indians in the wake of the BBC TMS shutdown.

I was initially a bit unsure of it, but then I saw a familiar handle.
The same “squarecut”.

So I joined that forum.
And for many years, Atul and I (and many other friends we made on that forum) spent many wonderful moments discussing cricket, and a lot of non-cricketing stuff, on that forum.

Anyway, long story – of How I Met Atul.
(Someone needs to make a Netflix series on this. :-))

Continuing (Season-2 of HIMA), the best thing about the forum was that though it was primarily a cricket forum, we could, and would, discuss anything under the sun.

Politics, movies, music, culture, anything.
And since there were people from around the world, it was quite interesting.

It didn’t take long for me to discover that Atul was keen on Hindi songs too.
Bas, phir kya tha?

We set up a section on the forum to discuss just this.
We called it Geetmala, where each person would pick up a topic (Atul picked up “trains” – anyone surprised?) and post 10 or so songs on it.

One day Atul announced that he had just started a blog.
He has always been someone who likes to experiment with things, so this was a sort of experiment for him too.
For nostalgia sake, I checked just now and found that blog still very much intact – it is on the blogroll of this blog.

One of the posts is http://squarecutsblog.blogspot.com/2008_06_01_archive.html .
Dated 1st June 2008.

Having now got some blogging experience, Atul decided to start a new blog where he would discuss one song a day.

And thus, on the 19th  of July 2008, a first post on this “one song a day” blog appeared.

And the rest, as they say, is history.

I’m sorry for this rather elaborate throwback to another era, but since it is Atul’s birthday today, I couldn’t help reminiscing how we first got to know each other.

And oh, we did manage to meet once too.

When Atul was posted in Nagpur, I made a trip to Nagpur to meet him and a common friend (from the cricket forum). My only trip to Nagpur ever.

It was wonderful meeting Atul, and having dinner with him.
We discussed cricket of the 70s, songs and of course this blog.

There are other memories too.
Atul and his special relationship with Bangladesh cricket, for example. 🙂

No mention of Atul would be complete without talking about Atulisms. 🙂

This is a term I coined to refer to Atul’s unique one-liners.

For example, on his first blog referred to above, in an August 2008 piece, he says “Knowing fully well that Indian authorities are not likely to exert themselves in such strenuous tasks like thinking, planning, etc, I have done all the hard work for them.” 🙂

I can go on and on, but I think readers might already be impatient about the length of this post.

So I’m going to go straight to the song now.

As usual, I owe this song to Avinashji. He was in fact the person who requested me to write a post for this occasion, and gave me a choice of a few songs to pick from.

I picked this one – Avinashji has provided the lyrics.

It is a multiple version song from the film ‘Jeevan Rekha’ (1974).

Some more details about the film, provided to me by Avinashji.

“Jeewan Rekhaa-1974” was directed by Nanabhai Bhatt for ‘Nanak Films, Bombay’. It has Pran, Farida Jalal, Tabrez, Jalal Agha, Keshto Mukherjee, Chandrashekhar, Asit Sen, Aparna Choudhari, Vikrant, Jagdish Raj, Ravish Dhillon, Shetty, K.N.Singh, Ajit, Raj Rani, Rajni Bala, Pravin Pal, Polson, Ramlal, Sudarshan Sharma, Kirti Kumar, Kamaldeep, Dev Sharma, Surendra Kohli, Thakur Chhabra, Vikas Bali, Ashok Seth, Prince Shakil, Sagar, Rashid Khan, Master Vijay and others. Manmohan and Fariyal make special appearance in this movie.

This movie has as many as seven songs (including one multiple version song being presented today).
Three lyricist Dev Kohli (four songs), Anjaan (two songs) and Kafil Azar (one song) wrote the lyrics for this movie.
Music was composed by two music directors Suman Raj – three songs and Jagdish J- four songs.

Asha Bhonsle, Mohd Rafi, Manna Dey, Mukesh and Chandrani Mukherjee had given their voices to the songs in this movie.

This movie was passed by Censor Board on 19.07.1974.

Male version of this song is sung by Manna Dey, the female version by Chandrani Mukherjee.

I vaguely seem to remember a film by this name, but I don’t recall hearing this song before.

When Avinashji sent me the video(s) and I listened to the song, I instantly fell in love with it.

It’s a cheerful and positive song – and I think quite fitting for this occasion – “Geet Hai Ye Zindagi, Gungunaate Aur Gaate Chale Chalo, Chale Chalo”.

Doesn’t this just describe what Atul has been doing with this blog? It seems just perfect for Atul on his birthday. 🙂

So once again, wish you a very happy birthday, Atul. I hope you like this choice of song.

Just want to mention that the composer Jagdish is a totally new name for me. If anyone knows more about him, kindly enlighten me.

And Atul, if I’ve got any facts wrong in this post (my memory isn’t very good) , please let me know. 🙂

Audio – Male Version

Audio – Female Version

Song – Geet Hai Ye Zindagi (Jeevan Rekha) (1974) Singer – Manna Dey, Chandrani Mukherjee, Lyrics – Dev Kohli, MD – Jagdish J

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Male Version

geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo o
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

ise bhi ham se pyaar hai
hamen bhi is’se pyaar hai
ise bhi ham se pyaar hai
hamen bhi is’se pyaar hai
badi madhur ye preet hai
ye preet ki pukaar hai
geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo o
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

ye zindagi ee umang hai
haseen is ka rang hai ae
ye zindagi ee umang hai
haseen is ka rang hai
ye maana is mein dukh bhi hai
khushi bhi is ke sang hai
geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo o
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

hazaar aayen ae mushqilen
jahaan se aagey ae ham chalen ae
hazaar aayen ae mushqilen
jahaan se aagey ae ham chalen ae
ye kah rahe hain raaste
bulaa rahi hain manzilen
geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

laal laa laa laa la laa
laa laa laa laa laa
laa laa laa laa laa
laa laa laa la laal aa

Female Version

geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo o
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

ise bhi ham se pyaar hai
hamen bhi is’se pyaar hai
ise bhi ham se pyaar hai
hamen bhi is’se pyaar hai
badi madhur ye preet hai
ye preet ki pukaar hai
geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo o
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

hazaar aayen ae mushqilen
jahaan se aagey ae ham chalen ae
hazaar aayen ae mushqilen
jahaan se aagey ae ham chalen ae
ye kah rahe hain raaste
bulaa rahi hain manzilen
geet hai ye zindagi
geet hai ye zindagi
gungunaate aur gaate
chaley chalo
chaley chalo
geet hai ye zindagi

laal laa laa laa la laa
laa laa laa laa laa
laa laa laa laa laa
laa laa laa la laal aa

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————

पुरुष स्वर

गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

इसे भी हम से प्यार है
हमें भी इससे प्यार है
इसे भी हम से प्यार है
हमें भी इससे प्यार है
बड़ी मधुर हए प्रीत है
ये प्रीत की पुकार है
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

ये ज़िन्दगी उमंग है
हसीं इसका रंग है ए
ये ज़िन्दगी उमंग है
हसीन इसका रंग है ए
ये माना इसमें दुःख भी है
ख़ुशी भी इसके संग है
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

हज़ार आयें ए मुश्किलें
जहां से आगे ए हम चलें ए
हज़ार आयें ए मुश्किलें
जहां से आगे ए हम चलें ए
ये कह रहें हैं रास्तें
बुला रही है मंजिलें
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

ला ला ला ला ल ला
ला ला ला ला ला
ला ला ला ला ला
ला ला ला ल ला आ

महिला स्वर

गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

इसे भी हम से प्यार है
हमें भी इससे प्यार है
इसे भी हम से प्यार है
हमें भी इससे प्यार है
बड़ी मधुर हए प्रीत है
ये प्रीत की पुकार है
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

हज़ार आयें ए मुश्किलें
जहां से आगे ए हम चलें ए
हज़ार आयें ए मुश्किलें
जहां से आगे ए हम चलें ए
ये कह रहें हैं रास्तें
बुला रही है मंजिलें
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी
गुनगुनाते और गाते
चले चलो ओ
चले चलो
गीत है ये ज़िन्दगी

ला ला ला ला ल ला
ला ला ला ला ला
ला ला ला ला ला
ला ला ला ल ला आ


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4270 Post No. : 15500 Movie Count :

4271

Ok, so Atul approached me a few days ago requesting me for a post for a special occasion.

My posts have become very infrequent here – in fact, before my latest post on Sahir’s birth anniversary (8th March), my previous post was on his death anniversary last year (25th October). So a gap of more than 4 months.

But then, like often happens in Test cricket, you wait and wait for a wicket to fall – and when one falls, another quickly follows.

Same has happened here. Following quickly on the heels of the 8th March post, here is another one.

And on such an occasion that I just could not refuse. Let’s just call it the perfect yorker. 🙂

Friends, I am SO honoured here to present Rafisaab’s 3000th song on this blog.

Please allow me now to take a deep breath to let this sink in.

I don’t remember now when we got to Rafisaab’s 1000th and 2000th songs, but as we scale new heights, it feels like we’re entering rarified space.

3000 songs of one artiste on our blog is quite an astonishing achievement. Of course, we’ve already got there with Lata Mangeshkar (she’s going strong with 3500+ right now) but Rafisaab is only the second artiste to hit this milestone here.

Even as I write this post, I feel extremely humbled – and undeserving of this honour. This post is supposed to be a tribute not just to Rafisaab, but to this blog itself.

And there have been so many more here, starting with Atul himself, who deserve to write this. My contributions have dramatically reduced – while there are at least a dozen others (actually many more), who contribute much more, and far more regularly.

But since I am a big Rafisaab fan, I think Atul approached me for this. (In fact there are even bigger Rafisaab fans here – but let’s not start comparing. :-))

Having said all that, let’s talk a bit about Rafisaab here – and our love for him.
I say “our”, because I know I speak for everyone here when I say, we all love Rafisaab here. Only the degree might differ.

Speaking for me personally (and maybe for others too), it has never been about just Rafisaab’s voice.

Sure, for his voice alone, he would easily have had a special place in my heart. That divinity in his voice, his ability to transport me into a different realm altogether, the intonations, the “thehraav” – all of these put him on a level that’s stratospheric for me.

I have spent hours listening to Rafisaab, often intending to listen to just one song. 🙂 I’d listen to one, then get tempted to listen to another, then another, and so on. And before I’d realize it, the minutes would turn into hours. I’ve even spent all night listening to him (ok, that was a few years ago, when I coul stay awake all night). 🙂

It has been said many times before, and by many, but I will say it again – at least in HFM, I haven’t seen any singer with the versatility of Rafisaab. He could deliver every single song in exactly the mood and range required for it. Which is why he could do rock and pop singing just as comfortably as he could do bhajans and ghazals.

Rafisaab could totally get you into any mood the song demanded. He could just mesmerize you into it.

One moment he’s singing the breezy “pukaarta chala hoon main” or the sensuous “aaja re aa zaraa”, the next he’s singing the bhajan “sukh ke sab saathi”. 🙂

One moment, you’re imagining yourself as Shammi Kapoor with “aaja aaja main hoon pyaar tera”, the next you’re Bharat Bhushan lamenting “o duniya ke rakhwaale”. 🙂

They said of Rafisaab that he was an extremely shy and quiet person outside the recording room. You could barely hear his voice.

But once, in the room, recording?

He was a totally different person.

He would be so totally immersed in the song, giving it the very best he could, that you couldn’t believe it was the same person who, outside the room, hardly ever spoke.

In this sense, Rafisaab was a thorough professional. He always sought to give his very best, regardless of who the composer was.

In stature, he was often far higher than most of the composers he sang for. So it is only normal that composers might have hesitated to ask him for a retake, and could have just gone with whatever had been recorded, even if they were not fully satisfied.

But such was Rafisaab’s humility, such was his professionalism, such was his lack of ego, that he would ask the composer if it was ok – and if the composer had any suggestions for improvement, Rafisaab would redo it to the composer’s satisfaction.

That is truly the sign of greatness of an artiste.
And, considering how many successful artistes end up with ego too to match, Rafisaab stands out as an exception.

There are so many other things about Rafisaab that speak of the greatness of him as a human being.

There are other examples of Rafisaab’s nature that are also endearing.

For example, the fact that he sang for composers for a nominal fee, even just a token one rupee, because he knew they could not afford to pay him fees compatible with his stature.

Even in the royalty issue, which resulted in his fallout with Lata, his stand was typical. I don’t want to play judge here, and talk about whether his/Lata’s action was right or wrong, but it was typical of Rafisaab to feel that he had been adequately compensated for the work he had done, and shouldn’t ask for more.

Rafisaab’s generosity went beyond the industry. He provided financial support to people who did not even know who their benefactor was.

All of this, without the slightest arrogance. When someone would praise one of his songs, Rafisaab would just smile and point upwards , as if to say “sab ooparwaale ki kripa hai”.

There’s SO much one could learn from Rafisaab and his values. Ever-polite, ever-professional, ever-helpful, ever-smiling, ever-humble. And ever the family man too, because he always enjoyed spending time with his family.

I’ve written many times about him here – and much of what I’m saying here is repetitive (and possibly boring), but it always gives me great joy to write about Rafisaab, whatever the occasion.

I invariably then write about his character and not just his songs, because his character amazes me just as much as his amazing voice.

So the fact that we have now got 3000 songs of Rafisaab on this blog is a hugely satisfying achievement. My hearty congratulations to Atul, and to everyone else who has been part of this process.

Oh, and in all the discussion about Rafisaab and his 3000th song, I almost forgot.

There’s another milestone to celebrate today – today’s song also happens to be the 15500th song on the blog.

Yes, 15,500.

There was a time, in the early years of the blog, when every century was a major milestone. Then, as the centuries began getting clocked with regularity, the celebration around them decreased. We had entered the chiliad league, so our major milestones became 1000, 2000, 3000 and so on….now past 15000.
The 100s became minor milestones.
While this is understandable to some extent after 155 centuries, I still think every century deserves to be celebrated.

Let us NEVER forget that EVERY song involves a fair amount of effort, and though contributors (*cough*, *cough*) do their bit, every song still requires time & effort from Atul/Sudhirji. And they’ve put this effort 100 times, since 15400. So, I definitely think they deserve appreciation and a round of applause for this.

Now onto the song for today.

You can always trust Atul to unearth songs that have long faded from people’s memory. Or maybe they never got attention when they were released.

The same applies to films too. After all, the Hindi film industry is prolific, with hundreds of films being released every year, and thousands of songs.

As a result, many songs and films never get attention.

This blog has always tried to unearth such songs and films, and to give them their share in the limelight, even if it is several years after their release. After all, every song involves a lot of effort from many artistes. And for a film? The effort is several times more – involving so many more people, in various capacities, each one playing his/her role hoping to see the film succeed at the box-office.

I don’t know the success rate of films, but I’d say there are far more films that don’t click at the box-office, than those which do. Let’s not get into reasons here – I’m no pundit – but I do always like to acknowledge the effort that has gone into making a film anyway.

Why so much of a build-up in this post?

Because the song for today has as much to do with the film as with the song itself.

Prima facie, the song looks like a routine song. It’s a qawwali, with its usual nok-jhok, and, as isn’t uncommon in movies, with disguises. 🙂

Now I’m a sucker for qawwalis, so even though this probably isn’t in the same league as many more illustrious ones, I’m happy to just listen to it, and enjoy it.
Besides, this was 1982 – and by then, qawwalis were slowly on the decline. The times had changed, and naturally films had to reflect the changed times.
So I wouldn’t judge this qawwali, keeping other classics in mind. 🙂

When Atul sent me an e-mail requesting me for a write-up, he explained why he picked this song. It has to do with not just the song, but the film as well.

This is what he said:

The song that I have chosen for the occasion is a special song. It is a rare song. It is composed by an obscure music director called B T Singh. It is the only song of B T Singh with Rafi in his career. HFGK mentions that music was arranged and composed by Uttam Singh. He could be assistant to B T Singh.

The movie is an obscure movie called “Chambal Ke Daaku”(1982). This movie was Produced by R S Sandhu , written and directed by S Azhar for S L Cheema films, Bombay.
The USP of the movie was “Real dacoits pesented first time on screen.”
The movie had real dacoits viz Mohar Singh, Madho Singh, Fateh Singh, Lakhan Singh, Kalyan Singh and hundred of ex dacoits, and actors like Nazneen, Javed Khan, Madhumalini, Sulochana, Malti Joshi, Yasmeen, Birbal, Dushyant, Deep, Ashok, S S Khan, Nirmal Singh, Shamsher Singh, Jeewan Singh, Joginder Singh, Amreek Singh, Joginder Singh Laddhar, Mahendra Singh, Chandrakala, Ramesh Deo, Sohel Khan, Joga Singh, Sayyad Khan, Praveen Lakhad, Gajendra Gadge, Rajkumar, Baw Brar, Shabbir Khan, Guest apppearances by Padma Khanna, Hina Kausar, Mahendra, Raza Murad etc.”

Wow!
So now we have a film here where real-life dacoits just decided to act in a film. Maybe there are other examples too (what about “Jis Desh Mein Ganga Behti Hai”)?

In any case, it is a rather fascinating scenario. And of course, when I learnt about this, my mind began working overtime, imagining all sorts of things.

– Were they active dacoits, wanted by the police? If so, how did they get to act? Or had they served their sentence, and reformed? In which case, they shouldn’t be judged on their past, of course.
– How much were they paid?
– Was it maybe just a smart move for the producer to co-opt real-life dacoits so that not only does he have a USP, but he also has access to their expertise, and could film in locations he wouldn’t otherwise dare to?
– How did co-stars, and the rest of the crew feel? Imagine having chai with a real-life dacoit. You’d probably not want to upset him, or even crack a joke about him, for fear of him taking offence at it
– In the shooting scenes, was anyone worried that the dacoits might just get excited and take it all too literally?

Such thoughts, and more, came to my mind, because this was reel life and real life potentially getting mixed up. The key word here is “potentially”. 🙂

Chambal itself was a common film theme in those days – especially in the 70s and early 80s. Films mirror real-life events, and dacoity used to be in the news off and on in those days. There were plenty of dacoit films made in that time, the most famous being Sholay, of course. 🙂

I remember VP Singh, CM of UP (1980-82) came down hard on dacoity in his time, and even got a lot of praise for it. But soon after, there was a major dacoity, as if to spite him – and he offered to resign as CM.

I myself used to travel a lot by train from Orissa to Delhi in the early 80s, and go through Gwalior-Morena (I think Dholpur in Rajasthan also), which I think is the Chambal area. The landscape would be “interesting”, and would trigger my imagination. 🙂

Anyway, enough of digression.

Back to the song, it is sung by Rafisaab (of course), together with Asha Bhosle and Manna Dey. Rafisaab passed away in 1980, so it’s possible this is one of his last few songs – unless the film took a while to get released.

I must admit I couldn’t recognise many faces – but Ramesh Deo is, of course, unmistakeable.

Hope you enjoy the song, and imagine yourself singing it with real-life dacoits in Chambal Valley. 🙂

And once again, congratulations to the blog for clocking Rafisaab’s 3000th, and the blog’s 15500th.

Audio

Video


Song-Uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil (Chambal Ke Daaku)(1982) Singers-Rafi, Asha Bhonsle, Manna Dey, Lyrics-Gauhar Kanpuri, MD-B T Singh
Male chorus
Female chorus

Lyrics

banaayenge bhanwar mein raasta
aur lahron pe saahil
bhanwar kehte hain uljhan ko o
lahar ka naam hai ae ae mushqil

uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
mil ke rahegi yahin apni manzil
mil ke rahegi yahin apni manzil
kehta hai aaj yehi mera dil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

kahaan se aaye ho
bolo ji kya iraada hai

Ji kya iraada hai
hamaari baat hai
ya doosron se waada hai

ye dil ka raaz hai
dil mein hi rehne do dilbar
haan rehne do dilbar
banega baat ka afsaana honthon pe aa kar
dilon ke raaz ko
o o o o o o
dilon ke raaz ko
nazron se ham to
kehte hain
kehte hain
kehte hain
ham si haseenon ko samjho na gaafil
gaafil
ham si haseenon ko samjho na gaafil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

haaye
haseen adaaon ka rangeen nazaara dekhenge
nazaara dekhenge
ham apni aankh se kismat ka taara dekhenge
haaye ae ae ae
ae ae ae
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
nazar nawaaz
nazaaron mein jee nahin lagta
haaye ae ae
haseen chaand sitaaron mein aen
jee nahin lagta
sa ni ma dha pa ni
dhi ma pa ni sa
sa ni sa dha ni
pa dha
ma pa
ma ga ma
ga re ga sa re
sa re ga ma pa
nigaah e naaz ka hamko ishaara mil jaaye

ishaara mil jaaye
hamen bhi jeene ka
koi sahaara mil jaaye

isharaa paaoge ae ae ae
isharaa paaoge
jhaanko hamaari aankhon mein
aankhon mein
aankhon mein
chaand se chehre pe
taaron ki jhilmil
jhilmil

chaand se chehre pe taaron ki jhilmil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil

samajh gaya hoon main
dil aur nazar ke afsaane

nazar ke afsaane
anaar ek hai
aur uske do hain deewaane

deewaana kaun hai
duniya ko ye bataana hai
yahi bataana hai
nazar ke teer se taqdeer aazmaana hai
jo hoshiyaar hai
ae ae ae ae ae
jo hoshiyaar hai
duniya usi ke kaabil hai
kaabil hai
kaabil hai
mehfil se baahar bhi hai ek mehfil
mehfil

mehfil se baahar bhi hai ek mehfil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
uljhan ho chaahe koi aa jaaye mushqil
kahin uljhan hai
kahin mushqil hai

kahin mehfil kahin manzil
ye lo mera fasaana
ye kissa hai puraana
oho
hamaara dil na todo
oho
ye dil ki bat chhodo
oho
mere nazdeek aao
oho
qayaamat na uthhaao
oho
tumhaara dil hai patthar
aha
magar tum ho sitamgar
oho
mujhe tarpaaya tumne
oho
mujhe uljhaaya tumne
oho
tujhe hamne pooja
oho
mere dil mein hai dooja

oho
kahaan hai wo kidhar hai
oho
idhar hai ye udhar hai


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4251 Post No. : 15471

Back here on the blog after a fairly long break.
I daresay it would’ve been even longer if it were not a very special occasion today.

From today, we start the centenary celebrations of Sahir Ludhianvi’s birth.
Since he was born on 8th March 1921, today happens to be his 99th birth anniversary.

So yes, it is a very special occasion for Urdu poetry and classic HFM lovers. As a massive Sahir fan, I thought I owed it to him to write a post for the occasion. I’ve written so often about him here, on practically every birth and death anniversary, and have nothing new to say anymore – and yet it feels like a betrayal of sorts to let this day go by, without paying tribute to him.

So when Avinashji, an even bigger Sahir fan than myself, requested me to write a post for Sahir on this occasion, I could not, but agree. 🙂

But I must also admit that for the first time I told Avinashji that I don’t think I’d be in the right mental frame to be able to do this. For me, writing a post here is an investment of emotion – and right now, to be honest, I feel quite empty within. If it were not for Sahir, I don’t think I’d be able to pull myself together for this post.

To Avinashji’s credit, as always, he provided me with a list of songs and lyrics that I could choose from. And left it to me to see whether I could come up with a post. I owe this post to him too.

Ok, enough about myself and my “mental frame” – this post is about Sahir, not about me. 🙂

What can I say about Sahir that I haven’t said before?
Actually nothing.

But since it’s Sahir, whatever I’ve said before can hopefully be repeated, without sounding boring. 🙂
Just like whatever Sahir wrote as social messages, not once but repeatedly in different ways, was never boring, and only meant as a reminder to society, to show people a mirror.

For me, as for many others, Sahir was much more than just a poet or lyricist. Yes, he was a lyricist par excellence. But I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have had this level of regard for him if he’d limited himself to just writing lyrics or poetry on mundane matters, however beautifully worded.

Sahir’s greatness, in my mind, has a lot to do with the topics he chose to express his views on. And the manner of such expression.

Sure, he could write about romance – “abhi na jao chhod kar” will always be one of my all-time favourite romantic songs.

Sure, he could write about heartbreak too – “jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”, another favourite.

Sure, he could write about love in its multitude of shades – is there a more exquisite ode to love than “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq”?

Sure, he could write bhajans with consummate ease – “tora mann darpan kehlaaye” and “aan milo aan milo shyam saanwre” are just two examples.

Sure, he could write light-hearted, fun songs too – the first song that comes to mind in this category is an all-time favourite “sar jo tera chakraaye”.

Sure, he could write, and wrote quite often, on a mother’s love for her child – “tu mere pyar ka phool hai”, “tere bachpan ko jawaani ki dua deti hoon” and “tu mere saath rahega munne” come to mind.

And yet, Sahir rises, no, TOWERS, above all others when it comes to writing on social issues.

No one, NO ONE, showed a mirror to society as earnestly as Sahir. It was as if he truly came into his own on these occasions.

Whether he was writing about injustice towards the oppressed, society’s shocking treatment of women, casteism, communalism, labor exploitation, or the futility of war, Sahir’s words were like cries of anguish, straight from the heart. You could feel the raw sincerity in them, even if they were often laced with cynicism, sarcasm or anger. Or, occasionally, even hope.

So many songs come to mind.

“Tu Hindu banega na musalmaan banega” – where Sahir calls out communalism in all its ugliness
“Cheen-o-arab hamara” – where Sahir sarcastically exposes India’s hypocrisy over wealth disparity
“Jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain” – Sahir at his cynical best, showing society a mirror of its ugly reality
“Khuda-e-bartar teri zameen par” – where Sahir busts the myth about the glory of war, pointing out that there are no winners in war, only bloodshed
“Ponchh kar ashq” – where Sahir exhorts the oppressed to rise and demand their rights from the oppressor, pointing out that colour, religion, caste, race can never be above humanity
“Aurat ne janam diya mardon ko” – Sahir’s famous lament about society’s treatment of women
“Wo subah kabhi to aayegi”– where Sahir, in one of his less frequent refrains, chooses hope over despair

and many more.

Every single time asking questions of society, pointing out its flaws, exhorting it to reform.

That each of his songs is STILL relevant more than 50 years after he wrote them, is truly sad, and a reflection of Indian society – but no one can ever fault Sahir for not doing his utmost to put his writing ability to good use. If society is still languishing in darkness, it certainly isn’t Sahir’s fault.

And it is for this particular trait of Sahir’s that he has a very special place in my heart.

Yes, he’d have had his own place in my heart anyway for lyrics like “wo afsaana jise anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, use ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

But his attempt at social awareness, and his speaking truth to power, takes my regard for him to a different level altogether.

If I may say so, and no disrespect meant to any lyricists who have come since, but no one comes close to Sahir’s intensity in this one matter.

Or maybe times have changed too.

Now, coming to the song for today.

Avinashji gave me a few options – of the lot, I picked the title song of “Samaj Ko Badal Daalo” (1970). Lyrics have been provided by Avinashji, of course. 🙂

It’s a lament, not uncharacteristic of Sahir, where he lets loose on society itself, blaming it for its own ills. That it tolerates corruption and crime is the biggest reason society suffers these, in the first place. Reform cannot start unless society decides to step up, and adopt a zero tolerance policy towards these. Hence “samaj ko badal daalo”.

I honestly don’t think it’s a bad assessment of why we are the way we are.

Without coming across as too preachy, let me share a few thoughts quickly.

We Indians love to blame our politicians for everything. We blame them for corruption, for the poor state of our roads, education and healthcare, for dividing society along communal lines – basically everything.

And yes, since they are our leaders, and have power, it’s not unfair to place responsibility and accountability on them.

And yet, where do these politicians come from?

They don’t fall from the skies, they come from amongst US.

So if we’re complaining about corruption and bigotry in our politicians, we first need to acknowledge that we, as a society, are ourselves guilty of these very shortcomings in our character. We carry a lot of baggage historically, and don’t have a particularly high moral compass ourselves. Our politicians then just exploit our weaknesses.

For example, politicians pander to our base instincts, dividing us based on identity, or other group characteristic. And we fall for it. Every single time.

Then again, when it comes to governance, they manage to get away with promises because we don’t make a serious enough effort to hold them accountable anyway. We behave like slaves – and get treated as such. So our leaders end up with power, but no accountability.

This is OUR fault. If we didn’t allow them to exploit us like this, if we raised the bar and held them accountable to us, things would be very different.

So when Sahir writes “samaj ko badal daalo”, it does resonate a lot with me. And hopefully with others too.

End of “preaching”. 🙂

The song itself is sung by Rafisaab, at the start of the film, as credits roll. I remember seeing this film as a young boy – what I remember most about it from that time is that the hero (Parikshat Sahni, who was then still Ajay Sahni) gets stabbed midway in the film and dies. I’d never seen a film till then where the hero dies midway :-), so I couldn’t reconcile easily to this at all.

A few years ago, I watched this film again, just out of curiosity. I wouldn’t call it a bad film as such (I’ve seen worse), but the last 30 minutes or so, are very dark and depressing. After watching this film, it might linger in your mind – and you’re likely to feel sad for a while.

Considering people usually look towards cinema for escapist fare, and don’t want to be reminded of daily miseries of life, this film is definitely not one you should watch if you want a feel-good feeling from the film. Don’t get misled by the fun “tum apni saheli ko” song, picturised on Prem Chopra.

But none of this takes away from Sahir, who is the reason for this post. Rafisaab singing Sahir’s lines are always a joy for me – even if it’s a sad song.

I hope you will also listen to it – and possibly agree that what we need most is for society itself to reform, otherwise we will continue bad practice of the past, and only regress.

In my opinion, the greatest danger to a society is not economic bankruptcy (which, however hard, CAN be corrected through appropriate economic policy), but moral bankruptcy (which eats away at the very fabric of society, and is therefore far more difficult to correct).

Thank you for reading.

Audio
(audio) (lyrics noted are as per this link)
Video

Song-Samaaj ko badal daalo (Samaaj Ko Badal Daalo)(1970) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhianvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

(Ye ek katha jo laakhon logon ke ae
Jeevan ka darpan hai
Desh pita ke charnon mein
Ham sab ki ore se arpan hai)

***

Samaaj ko badal daalo o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo o o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ae tan-badan hai jinme zindagi ee nahin
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo o
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o

Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley
Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley ae
Oonch neech se bharaa
Nizaam kyun chale ae
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo o
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————-

समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो

कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने ए तन-बदन है जिनमे ज़िन्दगी ई नहीं
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो ओ
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ

सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले
सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले ए
उंच नीच से भरा
निजाम क्यूँ चले ए
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो ओ
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day : 4116 Post No. : 15269

Here is that date again.

The 25th of October is a date that many Hindi film lovers, and lovers of shaayari, remember with some pain. For it was on the 25th of October 1980 that one of the tallest figures of the industry, and certainly of the world of poetry, bade farewell to us.

Sahir Ludhianvi.

I’m usually careful with my choice of adjectives, especially when using them in the superlative. But in the case of Sahir, I don’t have the slightest hesitation in saying “one of the tallest”. For he comfortably satisfies this criterion.

There have been more famous figures in the industry.

And there have certainly been more popular and liked figures in the industry. If anything, Sahir, with his uncompromising nature, and and ego and mood to match, wasn’t the easiest person to get along with.

And yet, when it comes to stature, that too in his particular field, Sahir was truly a giant.
Without belittling any of the others who also produced outstanding work in the form of lyrics, Sahir always seemed to be in a league of his own.

They say that an actor is not real – after all, it is his job to act. He is only putting on a show. Which is one reason Kishore Kumar preferred singing to acting. He felt a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, whereas an actor’s job is to pretend.

A lyricist goes a step further than even a singer.

While a singer can put his heart and soul into a song, he does not create it. He only renders it.

The text comes from the lyricist.

And therefore the lyricist has the best chance of putting his heart and soul into his creation. He talks to his audience through his lines. He can use his poetry as an outlet for his thoughts, his feelings, his joys and his frustrations.

And I feel no one did this better than Sahir.

With Sahir, what you saw was what you got.

Sahir was pretty much an open book in terms of his preferences, his likes and dislikes. Nothing duplicitous or fake about him. He had strong views on certain topics, and he had absolutely no qualms about expressing them.

He even got into trouble early in his life with the Government of Pakistan for this reason – and fled Lahore (and thus, Pakistan) to come to India in 1949.

Imagine if this had not happened. Imagine what might have been lost to us.

Whatever issues Indians might have with the Government of Pakistan, I thank the Pakistan Government, on behalf of all Indians, for creating an “enabling” environment for Sahir to move to India. 🙂

And Sahir never looked back.

From “thandi hawayen” (Naujawan-1951), the song that got him noticed, to “pal do pal ka saath hamaara” (The Burning Train-1980), one of the last films for which he wrote lyrics, Sahir was one of the most highly regarded lyricists of his time.

I remember saying this before. When Sahir passed away, I only knew his name as a lyricist. In those days, still a teenager, I had limited knowledge of song details. I’d know the song, and the singer. Yes, some chance I’d know the composer, but unless I’d listened carefully to the lyricist’s name while listening to it on radio, not much chance I’d know the lyricist. In those days, to be honest, I enjoyed songs without knowing whether it was a Majrooh or Sahir or Shailendra or Hasrat Jaipuri song.

With this limited knowledge, I read the obituary on Sahir in the Illustrated Weekly of India in 1980. It was a fairly long obituary, and naturally many of his songs were mentioned.

That was when it hit me.

Oh, “aage bhi jaane na tu” was Sahir’s?

And “ye raat ye chaandni phir kahaan”?

Oh, and “udey jab jab zulfen teri” also?

And “abhi na jao chhod kar”?

And “zindagi bhar nahin bhoolegi wo barsaat ki raat?”

And “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”?

Oh, and “jeevan ke safar mein raahi” also?

And “tadbeer se bigdi hui taqdeer bana le”?

There were many more – and each one was a song I knew, a classic. Yet, such was my pathetic knowledge at the time of who the lyricist was, that I never realized these were all Sahir.

At that time, if you’d asked me to mention a few Sahir songs, I’d have come up with Pyaasa and Kabhie Kabhie songs. These I always knew as Sahir songs. But I am ashamed now to think of how ignorant I otherwise was.

It was only at that moment I realized what a legend Sahir had been. And what the world had lost.

After that, I paid a lot more attention to the lyricist, while listening to songs.

And often it was Sahir.

Much later in life, I read that it was only on Sahir’s insistence that All India Radio itself started mentioning the name of the lyricist also, in its radio programmes.

It was not only the name of the lyricist, but also the lyrics themselves, that I started paying attention to.

And that is when I realized that Sahir’s lyrics were different.

They were deep, they conveyed an emotion that came from the heart – and often a strong emotion at that. They were not the “baith ja, baith gayi, khadi ho ja, khadi ho gayi” types.

If today lyrics are a very big, in fact the biggest, part of my love for a song, it is entirely due to Sahir. I listen to lyrics carefully today – no appreciation of a song is complete for me, without appreciating the lyrics.

Whether Sahir was writing romantic poetry (“abhi na jao chhod kar”) or mocking the government for its failures (“cheen-o-Arab hamaara”), whether he was lamenting the state of society (“jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain”), or trying to uplift those seemingly with no hope (“wo subah kabhi to aayegi”), whether he was exhorting the oppressed to fight for their rights (“ponchh kar ashq” , “na munh chhupa ke jiyo”), or showing a mirror to society about its treatment of women (“aurat ne janam diya mardon ko”), whether he was trying to promote communal harmony (“tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega”), or talking about the futility of war (“khuda-e-bartar”), every single time Sahir’s lyrics tugged at your heart strings.

Not just because the poetry was beautiful and the lyrics powerful (which they absolutely were), but because you could feel that every word was written with heart and soul. No wonder it went straight from Sahir’s heart to our hearts.

You could feel Sahir’s anguish and despair when he says “ye duniya agar mil bhi jaaye to kya hai”. Or his cynicism when he says “aasmaan pe hai khuda aur zameen pe hum, aajkal wo is taraf dekhta hai kam”.

At the same time, you could feel the romance in the air, with “tum agar saath dene ka waada karo” and “parbaton ke pedon par”. Just listen to poetry like “thehre thehre paani mein, geet sarsaraate hain….bheege bheege jhonkon mein, khushbuon ka deraa hai”. Waah!
And “abhi na jao chhod kar”, one of my alltime favourites, and surely one of the most perfect songs ever in every respect.

Sahir’s poetry for the hurt felt by the jilted lover was no less powerful. “Jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”. Or lines like “laut rahi hain meri sadaayen, deewaaron se sar takra ke….haath pakad kar chalne waale, ho gaye rukhsat haath chhuda ke (sad version of in hawaon mein)”. And of course, “chalo ek baar phir se ajnabi ban jaayen hum dono” with lines like “wo afsaana jisey anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, usey ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

Then you have the Barsaat Ki Raat qawwalis. Roshan’s masterpiece “na to karwaan ki talaash hai” merging into “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq” is one of the greatest ever compositions in Hindi cinema, with Sahir’s contribution in lyrics being no less significant. With lines like “jo dawaa ke naam pe zeher do, us chaaraagar ki talaash hai”.

I can go on and on. Dharamputra, Taj Mahal, Aaj Aur Kal, Mujhe Jeene Do, Chitralekha, Kaajal, Waqt, Neel Kamal, Humraaz, Bahu Begum, Aadmi Aur Insaan. Each one with memorable lyrics. One of my favourites is “poochhe koi ki dard-e-wafaa kaun de gaya, raaton ko jaagne ki sazaa kaun de gaya…kehne se ho malaal, to hum kya jawaab dein….duniya kare sawaal, to hum kya jawaab dein”.

Although Sahir was less productive in the 70s, he still came up with poetry that reminded us of Sahir of yore. The 70s was a decade where poetry began steadily losing ground to more “chaalu” lyrics. Urdu also began losing ground in the process.

This was a development that Sahir could not prevent, but did leave him disillusioned. His “main pal do pal ka shaayar hoon” very correctly represents his then state of mind. He continued to write though, but mostly for the Chopra family’s films, for films like Karm, Trishul, Insaaf Ka Tarazu, Kaala Patthar and The Burning Train.

Since Sahir started as a poet, and moved into film song lyrics, the sense of poetry comes across strongly in his lyrics. Much like with Kaifi Azmi.

So much for Sahir’s poetry. No one can do justice to it in one article. I’ve barely scraped the surface.

But what really makes me put Sahir on a different pedestal altogether is not the QUALITY of his poetry, but the CONTENT of his poetry.

Clearly Sahir was a rebel, a non-conformist.

And his poetry often reflected this, since he wrote straight from the heart.

But importantly, he never shied away from expressing his views. He never tried to be politically correct. He showed society a mirror, whether society liked it or not. For example, his line “kaho ji tum kya kya khareedoge, yahaan to har cheez bikti hai” is a much underrated, but powerful, line, in my opinion.

Yes, he railed and ranted – whether it made a difference or not. “Samaj ko badal daalo” he wrote.

Today, 39 years after his death, we are still languishing with most of the ills that existed in Sahir’s time, and which he spoke against.

It is a sad commentary of our times that many of his laments feel just as relevant today as they felt then. Yes, “aurat ne janam diya mardon ko, mardon ne usey bazaar diya” and “tu Hindu banega na Musalmaan banega, insaan ki aulad hai insaan banega” are just as relevant in 2019, as they were in 1958-59.

If Sahir were alive today, he’d probably be writing just as strongly today as he wrote then. The issues haven’t gone, sadly only Sahir has.

That’s a sobering thought.

Now, let’s move on to the song for today.

It’s from the 1969 film, Paisa Ya Pyaar.

As has now become customary :-), the lyrics for this song have been sent to me by Avinashji.

I remember seeing this film as a young boy, but I don’t remember the story now. It was a remake of a Tamil film Panama Paasama, starring Gemini Ganesan and Saroja Devi, which was a pretty big hit at the time. In fact, the name Panama Paasama, translates in Hindi to Paisa Ya Pyaar.

I remember the song “Ber lo, ber lo” was a lift from the very popular “yelantha pazham yelantha pazham” song of Panama Paasama. 🙂

But today’s song is different. It is a typical Sahir song – Insaan ne paise ke liye.

Here, Sahir’s lament is about how money destroys relationships. He talks about how people lose everything, even their own self-respect, for money. He concludes by saying that love is the biggest wealth there is.

The song is sung by Hemant Kumar, music composed by Ravi.

Please do listen.

I’d like to end by saying that Sahir was wrong in one respect.

He wrote

“kal koi mujh ko yaad kare
kyon koi mujhko yaad kare
masroof zamaana mere liye
kyon waqt apna barbaad kare”

Sahir saab, I can only say you grossly underestimated our love and respect for you.

jo aapse mila hai, wo itna hai anmol
roz sunte hain, aap hi ke hum bol
aap ko bhool jaayen, ye mumkin nahin
aap ki yaad na aaye, aisa koi din nahin

Thank you SO MUCH for what you’ve given us, Sahir saab.

And, very importantly, for just being you.

Video

Audio

Song-Insaanon ne paise ke liye aapas ka pyaar mita daala (Paisa Ya Pyaar)(1969) Singer-Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhainvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics (based on audio link) (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa
Hanste baste ghar phoonk diye
Dharti ko narak banaa daalaa

Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Mitti se nikaala sone ko
Sone se banaaye mahal magar
Jazbaat ke naazuk rishton ko
Mitti ke taley dafnaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Deen aur dharam ko haar diya
Neki ko badi par waar diyaa
Mandir Masjid aur Girjon ko
Bankon ki bhent chadhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Daulat ki hawas mein logon ne
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Kya kya na kiya is duniya mein
Chaahat izzat mehnat gairat
Sabkaa neelaam uthhaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi insaan ne
Pyaar apne jagah khud daulat hai
Ye baat na samjhi ee insaan ne
Kudrat ke banaayi daulat ka
Sikkon mein mol lagaa daalaa
Insaanon ne ae
Paise ke liye
Aapas ka pyaar mitaa daalaa

————————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————–
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला
हँसते बसते घर फूँक दिए
धरती को नरक बना डाला

मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
मिटटी से निकाला सोने को
सोने से बनाए महल मगर
जज़्बात के नाज़ुक रिश्तों को
मिटटी के तले दफना डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
दीन और धरम को हार दिया
नेकी को बदी पर वार दिया
मंदिर मस्जिद और गिरिजों को
बैंकों की भेंट चढ़ा डाला
इंसानों ने
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

दौलत की हवस में लोगों ने
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
क्या क्या न किया इस दुनिया में
चाहत इज्ज़त मेहनत गैरत
सबका नीलाम उठा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला

प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी इंसान ने
प्यार अपने जहाँ खुद दौलत है
ये बात न समझी ई इंसान ने
कुदरत के बनायी दौलत का
सिक्कों में मोल लगा डाला
इंसानों ने ए
पैसे के लिए
आपस का प्यार मिटा डाला


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4104 Post No. : 15254 Movie Count :

4191

First of all, my apologies for my infrequent appearances here. Even calling it a cameo is unfair to a cameo, because, to be honest, it is not even that. It is more like, a “blink and you miss” situation.

Anyway, here I am today, back with a post. The occasion is the Remembrance Day of someone very special to the Hindi film industry, and also to me. He has millions of fans around the world and is easily one of the legends of the industry.

I am talking about Kishore Kumar, of course.

I’ve written about Kishore Kumar many times in the past. And yet, when Avinash ji requested me to write a post for this occasion, I immediately agreed. Such is my love for Kishore Kumar that even if I repeat myself and bore my readers in the process 🙂 , I could not bring myself to say no.  🙂

The problem then was to get the required writing mood back. What they say about writing is very true. If you don’t write for an extended period of time, you gradually lose the ability to do so. That is why many writers practise their writing everyday, by writing at least a minimum number of words.

When I wrote to Avinash ji saying “Mere thoughts gather nahin ho rahe. I have lost the ability to write”, he replied “Aap Kishore Kumar ke gaane suniye aur din bhar sunte rahiye. Thoughts will come, I am sure.” 🙂

So I did listen to a few songs – predictably songs of ‘my’ era. “Khizaan Ke Phool”, “Jeevan Se Bhari Teri Aankhen”, “Teri Duniya Se”, “Hum Bewafa Hargiz Na The”, “O Mere Dil Ke Chain”, “Ye Shaam Mastaani” and a few others.

I think that might have helped a bit, because here I am.

Anyway, coming to Kishore Kumar.

The years just roll by – it is already 32 years since he left us.

He was just 58 at the time – far too young to go.

But like they say, it is not the years in your life that count, it is the life in your years.

And Kishore Kumar had plenty of life in his years.

No one will dispute that Kishore Kumar was the No.1 all-rounder in the industry. There have been a few others who have had multiple skills. Manoj Kumar was actor, writer, director, producer. Mehmood was also quite an all-rounder.

But Kishore was in a league of his own, because in each of his roles, he left a mark. Of course he is best-known as a singer, but even today many remember his acting, especially in comedy roles like in ‘Dilli Ka Thug’, ‘Chalti Ka Naam Gaadi’, ‘Half Ticket’ and many other films.

But there was so much more to Kishore Kumar than just comedy. And probably to prove this point, he produced and directed films like ‘Door Gagan Ki Chhaon Mein’ (1964) and ‘Door Ka Raahi’ (1971). I was stunned when I saw both these films – they have tremendous depth and philosophy, uncommon for the times.

His versatility was not limited to singing, acting, producing and directing though. Kishore Kumar also composed music, for some of his films.  Like the two films mentioned above, whose songs are quite popular to this day. As are the songs of  ‘Jhumroo’ (1961).

This is why I call Kishore Kumar the Gary Sobers of the Hindi film industry. 🙂 He could take on any role, and make a success of it.

But beyond even his multifarious talents, there was Kishore the person. And even as a person, he is quite an inspiration for me. His attitude towards life is something I can only admire.

Those who worked with Kishore Kumar, especially Lata Mangeshkar and Asha Bhosle, vouch  for his ability to enliven a recording session with his sense of humour, his cracking a joke or pulling someone’s leg. Some people are like this – never a dull moment with them around.

It is not as if Kishore didn’t have low moments, or tough times. Everyone has these – Kishore was no exception. But he never let this affect his professionalism. He was very clear about himself, his philosophy towards life – and he never allowed others to define it for him.

Like he said “Duniya samajhti hai main paagal hoon….main samajhta hoon duniya paagal hai”.

I think, whatever his conflicts with the world might have been, especially later in his life, he was at peace with himself. And that is most important for a human being. Like he told Lata Mangeshkar in an interview in the fag end of his career “I am quite happy”. He expressed a desire to run away from it all, and go to a place which was calling out to him.

Today, on his Remembrance Day, I feel Kishore Kumar found that place and left us in order to go there.

And left us with SUCH a treasure of songs and memories that we are indebted to him for life.

So thank you, thank you, thank you, Kishore Kumar for what you have given us. Speaking purely for myself, as someone who has been part of my life from my very early years, when I listened repeatedly to songs like “Mere Sapnon Ki Raani” and “Ye Shaam Mastaani” on the radio, your impact on my life cannot be described.

Now onto the song for today.

It is a totally new song for me. In fact I have never even heard of the film. Details, including lyrics of the song, have been sent to me by Avinash ji.

This is what he says :

“Zindagi Jeene Ke Liye-1984’ was directed by K.S. Sethumadhavan for ‘Tirupati Chitra Mandir, Bombay’. It was produced by Hastimal.

It had Rakhi Gulzar, Suresh Oberoi, Vijay Arora, Manmohan Krishan, CS Dubey, Krishan Dhawan, Shobhha Khote, Birbal Raj, Raj Kishore, Rakesh Roshan, Tina Munim, Master Rinku, Shah Chaturvedi, Raghvaiyya, Santosh Kumar, Lata Kashmiri, Dolphin and others. Deepa and Ramu make a guest appearance in this movie.

This movie was passed by Censor Board on 06.06.1984. However, the movie was re-certified by Censor on 15.12.1987 with a UA certificate (as mentioned in HFGK).

The movie has total seven songs, including the three-part song being presented today (as per HFGK Vol-VI 1981-1985) composed by Rajesh Roshan. HFGK mentions Rajesh Roshan as the lyricist for this movie and the same is mentioned on the vinyl cover of this movie available on online sources, which I guess is correct. (myswar.co also mentions the same). Asha Bhonsle, Kishore Kumar, Pankaj Udhas and Yesudas had given their voices to the songs in this movie.”

This film, ‘Zindagi Jeene Ke Liye’ (1984), makes its debut entry on this blog today.

The song itself is amazing. I’d never heard it before, but when I heard it for the first time a few days ago, it touched my heart. It also suits this occasion, as it talks of a person who feels he is ready to move on.

Please do listen to this wonderful song. Quite a gem, it is, especially in Kishore Kumar’s voice. Thanks for the song, Avinash ji.

Audio, All Parts

Video, Partial

Song – Udte Udte Pyaase Panchhi (Zindagi Jeene Ke Liye) (1984) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Indeevar, MD – Rajesh Roshan

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Part 1

hmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm
hmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm mmmm

udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye
armaan pyaase chhaayi udaasi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye

ek nadi thhi pyaar ki
saari duniya byopaar ki
ek nadi thhi pyaar ki
saari duniya byopaar ki ee
raah roke apni khadi thhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye

zindagi ke ae baaki thhe kuchh lamhe
shaayad ke ho milna phir hamen
zindagi ke ae baaki thhe kuchh lamhe
shaayad ke ho milna phir hamen
maar daalegi ye bebasi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye
armaan pyaase chhaayi udaasi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye

Part 2

door jaa rahe hain
ke nainaa ro rahe hain
door jaa rahe hain
ke nainaa ro rahe hain
saanson ki na toote ladi ee
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye

Part 3

haathon ne hamesha waar kiya
kabhi naa kisiko pyaar kiya
haathon ne hamesha waar kiya
kabhi naa kisiko pyaar kiya
nas nas basi buzdili thhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae
udte udte pyaase panchhi
pyaase panchhi thhak gaye ae

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————

भाग १

हम्मम मम्मम मम्मम मम्मम मम्मम
हम्मम मम्मम मम्मम मम्मम मम्मम

उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए
अरमां प्यासे छायी उदासी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए

एक नदी थी प्यार कि
सारी दुनिया ब्योपार कि
एक नदी थी प्यार कि
सारी दुनिया ब्योपार कि ई
राह रोके अपनी खड़ी थी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए

ज़िन्दगी के ए बाकी थे कुछ लम्हे
शायद के हो मिलना फिर हमें
ज़िन्दगी के ए बाकी थे कुछ लम्हे
शायद के हो मिलना फिर हमें
मार डालेगी ये बेबसी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए
अरमां प्यासे छायी उदासी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए

भाग २

दूर जा रहे हैं
के नैना रो रहे हैं
दूर जा रहे हैं
के नैना रो रहे हैं
साँसों की ना टूटे लड़ी ई
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए

भाग ३

हाथों ने हमेशा वार किया
कभी ना किसीको प्यार किया
हाथों ने हमेशा वार किया
कभी ना किसीको प्यार किया
नस नस में बसी बुज़दिली थी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए
उड़ते उड़ते प्यासे पंछी
प्यासे पंछी थक गए ए


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4046 Post No. : 15175

Am writing this post with a heavy heart.
I never expected that I’d be writing a post on this occasion so soon.
But if we’ve learnt anything about life in all our lives, it is that life is unpredictable.
For all the wonderful advancements that science has made, we still don’t know who will live how long. All we know is that everyone has to go some day.

As it turned out, Independence Day 2019 was the day that Vidya Sinha, well-known heroine of (mainly) the 1970s, had to leave us and go.

When I came across the news on Twitter this (15th August) afternoon, I felt immensely sad. She had passed away in the morning.

A few days earlier I had got the news that she was on ventilator, with lung problems. That news shocked me because I had no idea that she was unwell at all. I had not heard about her for years – and then suddenly, boom, you get news like this.

So today, when I read the news of her death, it was not entirely unexpected. But that doesn’t mean it made me any less sad.

Vidya Sinha was part of my childhood, part of my schooldays.

I’ve often said I am a 1970s boy – which means my school life spanned that decade.

It is also the decade that I have most nostalgic memories of – especially with regard to films and music. In the 1980s, I was busy with higher studies, career, moving places etc – life changed quite a bit. And of course, thereafter, other priorities took over.

So it is the 1970s, and my experiences of that decade, the films I watched, the songs I listened to, that have particularly fond memories for me.

And Vidya Sinha was certainly very much part of those fond memories. As it turned out, the main part of her career was totally in that decade. Though she acted in the 80s too (and even later), I will always associate her with the 1970s.

I will not discuss her personal life – to be honest, I don’t know much about it. I am sure there are many other sources that can, and will, provide this. I will myself learn about it only from them.

This post, written so soon after her passing away, is just to pay her my own personal tribute.

Many who have remarked on her death, have referred to her as having the “girl next door” image in her films. And that’s not entirely off the mark. In many of her films, this was the type of role she played. Both her best-known films, Rajnigandha (1974) and Chhoti Si Baat (1976) portrayed her as a woman who you could easily run into in Bombay at a bus stop, waiting for a BEST bus. Or working in an office. She had that unassuming, down-to-earth image about her.

And it was this image that endeared her to many at that time.

That was the time when Hema Malini was the reigning female superstar. Zeenat Aman, Neetu Singh and Raakhee were also popular. Rekha , though not yet the star she was to become, had her fair share of films. Parveen Babi and Reena Roy were beginning to make their mark. Then there were others, like Yogeeta Bali, Moushumi Chatterjee and Sulakshana Pandit, who had their fans too.

Many of these heroines comfortably fitted the requirement of the typical mid-1970s masala film. Stories often had a plot around smuggling, or (if village-based) dacoits. There’d be song-and-dance, a car (or horse) chase, “disguises” – the usual masala stuff. Music was often loud, costumes even louder.

Then you also had the “art” films of the mid-70s. Dominated by Shabana Azmi and Smita Patil.

But there was also room for simple, wholesome entertainment – without the above-mentioned elements. Films of Hrishikesh Mukherjee and Basu Chatterjee specialized in this.

And this is where Vidya Sinha fitted in very comfortably.

She didn’t have a very prolific, or long, career – certainly not by standards of other heroines. She also didn’t have a very wide variety of roles, unlike many other heroines.

But one thing for sure. In almost every film she did, she had a role that you felt was just tailormade for her. Ok, she wasn’t a star like Hema Malini, but the roles themselves needed an understated, non-star type, actor. And no one did that better than Vidya. (In later years, Deepti Naval would do similar roles).

Vidya doesn’t quite get credit for her acting – but I think it could also be because I always felt she didn’t “act”. She just seemed to be natural for her role – you didn’t even notice her “acting”.

In those days, when I was in school, Hema, being the reigning superstar, was the favourite for many of my friends. In trying to be “hatke” :-), I preferred Vidya, Moushumi, Leena C, even Sulakshana. Their films usually had better storylines, I felt.

I’ve seen most of Vidya’s films of the time – she didn’t act in too many.
The ones that I remember are Rajnigandha (1974), Chhoti Si Baat (1976), Karm (1977), Mukti (1977), Inkaar (1977), Pati Patni Aur Woh (1978), Tumhaare Liye (1978) and Atithee (1978).

I have very fond memories of those times, and of her – which is why it hit harder to hear about her illness, and her death.

She might not be physically around anymore, but her films will remain with us. And memories of her films. I thank her for these at least.

Moving on the song for today, it is from a film Mera Jeevan (1976).

Now this is a film I do not recall seeing. But when I checked the songs, all of them seemed familiar. That’s possibly because at that time, I used to get to listen to a lot of songs, without having any clue about the film. I’d get to hear the song on radio, or through my classmates in school. Or I might even have seen the film at that time, but have no recall of it.

There are 4 songs in this film – of which 3 are already posted. The title song sung by Kishore Kumar “mera jeevan kuchh kaam na aaya” is quite well-known, as is “tera jogi aaya” by Rafisaab. The other song posted already is “Koi mere haathon mein mehendi lagaa de”, sung by Asha Bhosle. I’ve heard this song too in my schooldays.

The song that remains to be posted is “ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare”, sung by Asha Bhosle. From the clip it appears that Vidya Sinha is a teacher at a school, and singing this song to her students.

Lyrics are by MG Hashmat, probably best-known for “mera jeevan koraa kaagaz”. At least, that’s the first time I heard of him.

The song “ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare” is philosophical – talking primarily about life.

Which, given the context of this post, is most apt.

A few lines struck me as particularly poignant

Jeevan khilona hai
Kitna salona hai
Sukh dukh ke aansoo ka
Haar phirona hai
Isi khilone se
Khel rachaana hai
Kya leke aaye the
Kya leke jaana hai

So very true.

We come into this world with nothing, and with nothing we will one day return.

All we leave behind are a legacy, if at all, and memories.

Go well, Vidya Sinha.

Thank you for the memories.

May your soul rest in peace.

Om Shanti.

PS-With this philosophical song, all the songs of “Mera Jeewan”(1976) have been covered in the blog and this movie joins the list of movies that have been YIPPEED in the blog.


Song-Ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare(Mera Jeewan)(1976) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-M G Hashmat, MD-Sapan Jagmohan
Chorus

Lyrics

aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa
aa aa

ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare
bolo bolo
hamaare
nahin
uske
jisne hum sab ko banaaya hai
achcha
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare
sadiyon se ghoome hai
kisko ye dhoondhe hai
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare

nadiya ki dhaara ye
badle kinaara ye
thham nahin paaye kyun
behti hi jaaye kyun
kahaan se aati hai
kahaan ko jaati hai
kisne pukaara hai
kiska ishaara hai
ghoome zameen
aur aasmaan
manzil miley
jaane kahaan
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare
sadiyon se ghoome hai
kisko ye dhoondhe hai
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare

jeewan khilauna hai
kitna salona hai
sukh dukh ke aansu ka haar pirona hai
isi khilaune se
khel rachaana hai
kya leke aaye thhe
kya leke jaana hai
baadal kahe
jis ko jahaan
jalte dilon ka hai ye dhuaan
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo chalte hain kis ke sahaare
sadiyon se ghoome hai
kisko ye dhoondhe hai
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare
bolo
chalte hain kis ke sahaare
ye sooraj ye chanda ye taare

bolo
chalte hain kis ke sahaare


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4030 Post No. : 15147

It is that day of the year again.

The 31st of July.

A date that doesn’t need any reminder for lovers of HFM.

Of all the days in the calendar, a few stand out – and the 31st of July is one of them.

For it is the death anniversary of one of the most loved and respected figures of the Hindi film industry, Mohammad Rafi, respectfully referred to as Rafisaab.

Today on his 39th death anniversary, we on this blog, remember him with great fondness and respect.

I’ve written about Rafisaab many times here on this blog. In fact, there’s no one I have written about more than about Rafisaab.

To be honest, there really isn’t anything more for me to say that I haven’t already said before.

How I, growing up in a Kishore-dominated era, fell in love with Rafisaab’s voice.

How I’ve done all-nighters listening to Rafisaab songs, completely losing track of time.

How much I respect Rafisaab for being such a good human being, inspite of having the power to abuse his position, if he had wanted.

I’ve written about all this – and more. And I don’t want to bore readers here by repeating stuff.

Not that I get bored of writing about Rafisaab. Never. When I don’t ever get bored of listening to his voice, how can I possibly get bored of writing about him? It is such a pleasure, and an honour, to write about Rafisaab.

So whether I have any new material or not, I will write about Rafisaab – even if it is only a few lines. That is the very least I can do for someone who has given me so much joy in life. And on his Remembrance Day, I just have to write a few lines for him – to thank him for everything.

Different people make a mark in this world for different reasons. Not all leave a legacy of course, but I doubt even those who do, have any idea of the magnitude of the legacy they would leave behind. And its endurability.

I doubt Rafisaab thought about all this when he was alive. He was a simple man, happy to earn his living through the one profession that he loved, and knew he was loved for – singing. Even for that, he was humble enough to always point upwards, to God, to suggest He was to thank for everything.

Rafisaab was very soft-spoken. For all his animation while singing, he was an extremely shy person in conversation and avoided interviews. Which is also why there are very few interviews of him available out there. It is our loss, but then that was the person he was. At least we have his songs, and anecdotes of those who knew him with us.

Rafisaab was devoted to his profession – he would do riyaaz for hours. He enjoyed spending time with his family. And enjoyed playing badminton. And good food. A man who always had a smile on his lips, who never thought ill for others – on the contrary, he went out of his way to help others.

A simple man – but what a legacy!

One that he would never have imagined during his lifetime.

Even today, 39 years after he is gone, there isn’t a day when his songs are not playing on radio. There isn’t a day when HFM lovers from around the world are not listening to his songs on whatever device they have. Today, thanks to technology, we have access to music on demand.

Yes, Rafisaab has enriched the lives of millions by his sheer voice. And that, for decades. And, I am sure, will continue for decades too. Such is the love people have for Rafisaab. It transcends generations.

This is another aspect that makes me really happy for him. It is great to see young generations today, even teenagers, listen to Rafisaab’s songs. Of course, their music interests are current too – and they should be. But from what I’ve seen, many of them are still happy to listen to old HFM songs – and Rafisaab, of course. Which is why I say Rafisaab’s voice transcends generations.

In my own case, I know my next generation is also very fond of Rafisaab. My niece’s husband invariably plays Rafisaab songs in his car. Not just for me, but for himself too. Not that my niece complains. She is herself very fond of Rafisaab. 🙂 They like current songs too, but Rafisaab is a fixture in their car. Especially 1960s songs like “dil ke jharoke mein”, “pukaarta chala hoon main” and “deewana hua baadal”. I swear, I did nothing to influence them – it all happened by itself. 🙂 Actually, my niece’s father-in-law is also a Rafisaab fan, so maybe that played a role too.

Now my niece has a kid – he is not even 3, but I have a feeling he will also soon be listening to Rafisaab. 🙂

I will not be surprised if this is the story in many other families too. I hope it is – then Rafisaab’s legacy is in safe hands.

Rafisaab deserves nothing less. A person with such a divine voice, a person who had such a good heart, who did good for so many, deserves every little bit of love and respect he gets.

I always have a warm feeling, and feel energized, when I discuss, or write about, Rafisaab. His songs immediately come to my mind, THAT voice, those intonations in the rendering. I get lost, happily so, thinking about his songs.

I can keep going on and on, but then I will be repeating what I’ve written in the past. And will be boring the readers. 🙂

So I’ll just move on to the song for today.

This is from Jaani Dushman (1979). A decade right up my sleeve, given that I’m a 1970s boy. Avinashji, himself a huge Rafisaab fan, sent me the lyrics and requested me to do a write-up.

By the late 70s, Rafisaab had regained his place in public mindspace. The first half of the decade had been totally dominated by Kishore Kumar (inspite of a few Rafisaab hits). But by the mid-70s, Rafisaab began coming back. I remember Laila Majnu (1976) songs being a success. A year later, he had chartbuster hit songs in Amar Akbar Anthony (1977), Hum Kisise Kam Nahin (1977) and Apnapan (1977), to mention just three films.

And so he continued, with hits in Abdullah (1980) and Karz (1980), right until his untimely death.

Jaani Dushman (1979) was during his revival phase.

The film has the popular, foot-tapping Rafisaab-Asha Bhosle duet “tere haathon mein pehna ke chudiyaan”, but also the song of today “chalo re doli utthao kahaar” (which comes multiple times in the film, if I remember right), was popular too.

The film itself is a multi-starrer in keeping with the trend of the time. Those were the days of multi-starrers – many commercial films had two or more lead heroes and heroines. JD went a step further, and must be considered a mother of multi-starrers – it had at least 5 “heroes” – Jeetendra, Sanjeev Kumar, Vinod Mehra, Shatrughan Sinha and Sunil Dutt. And Rekha, Reena Roy, Bindiya Goswami, Neetu Singh and Sarika amongst the “heroines”. Other movies of that era that were multi-multi-starrers that come to mind are Naagin (1976) and the Burning Train (1980).

I remember seeing the film at the time, but given my pathetic memory, I don’t remember too much of it. I do remember that it was meant to be a horror film of sorts, where a monster is supposed to murder every newly-wed bride. Something like that.

The songs of the film were quite popular, and the film too did well I think.

“Chalo re doli utthao kahaar” is a background song, picturised during the bidaai of a daughter as she leaves her parents’ home. It is a typical Rafisaab song – he was very good at emotional, background songs of this type. With their ebbs and flows.

Talking of emotional, background songs, am reminded of Ravi, the composer of songs of Waqt (1965) saying he had insisted with the Chopras on Rafisaab singing “waqt se din aur raat”, though Mahendra Kapoor, and not Rafisaab, was generally their preferred singer. He had said that this song would suit Rafisaab more than anyone else.

Similarly Kalyanji Anandji picked Rafisaab to sing a couple of lines as background song in that death scene in Muqaddar Ka Sikandar (1978) – “zindagi to bewafa hai, ek din thukraayegi”. Anandji said in an interview that he was a bit embarrassed to ask Rafisaab to sing those lines, because he had no other song in the film, and it was only a couple of lines. But he wanted them to be in Rafisaab’s voice. Without the slightest ego, Rafisaab rendered those lines with his usual high standards.

L-P, ever loyal to Rafisaab, even during Kishore Kumar’s peak, used him to render the emotional background song “nafrat ki duniya ko chhod ke” of Haathi Mere Saathi (1971) even though Kishore Kumar sings the songs picturised on Rajesh Khanna.

This song for today is also an L-P composition. I request you to please listen to this song – and remember Rafisaab today.

Rafisaab, you will always be in our hearts. The years roll by, but the love and respect does not diminish one bit. For what you’ve given the world, millions are ever grateful to you.

Personally, I can’t thank you enough, hence this post as a humble tribute.

(As mentioned above, lyrics for today’s song have been provided to me by Avinashji. I thank him for providing me these lyrics).

Video

Audio

Song-Chalo re doli uthhaao kahaar piya milan ki rut aayi (Jaani Dushman)(1979) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Verma Malik, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)-Based on audio link

Hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

Ho o
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi ee
Hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

Ho o
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi ee
Pi ki nagri le jaao
Qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

Jin nainon ki ee tu hai jyoti
Un nainon se ae barse moti
Daawaa nahin hai
koi Zor nahin hai
Beti sadaa hi paraayi hoti
Jaldi naihar se le jaao
Qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi ee

Chhaayi hai dekho hariyaali ee ee
Aayi hai rut khushiyon waali ee
Har aasha parwaan chadhi ee ee ee
Din hai Dashehra
Raat deewaali ee
Galey daal baahon ka haar
Qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi

Tan maike man teri nagariyaa
Ud jaaun main Ban ke badariyaa
Chaand nagar ko Chali chakori ee ee
Pyaasi hoon milan ki sanwariyaa
Mere sapne sajaao
Qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi ee
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi

Sooni padi ee
Bhaiyya ki ee haveli
Vyaakul behnaa aa
Rah gayi akeli ee
Jin sang naachi
Jin sang kheli ee
Chhoot gayi wo o
Sakhi Saheli ee
Ab naa deri lagaao
Qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Chalo re doli uthhaao qahaar
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Piya milan ki rut aayi
Piya milan ki rut aayi ee

—————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
—————————————–
हं हं हं
हं हं हं हं ह
हं हं हं
हं हं हं
हं ह
हं हं हं

हो ओ
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई ई
हं हं हं
हं हं हं हं ह

हो ओ
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई ई
पि की नगरी ले जाओ
कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
हं हं हं
हं हं हं
हं हं ह

जिन नैनों की तू है ज्योति
उन नैनों से बरसे मोती
दावा नहीं है
कोई जोर नहीं है
बेटी सदा ही पराई होती
जल्दी नैहर से ले जाओ
कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई ई

छायी है देखो हरियाली ई ई
आई है रुत खुशियों वाली ई
हर आशा परवान चढ़ी ई ई ई
दिन है दशहरा
रात दिवाली ई
गले डाल बाहों का हार
कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई

तन मयके मन तेरी नगरिया
उड़ जाऊं मैं बन के बदरिया
चाँद नगर को चली चकोरी ई ई
प्यासी हूँ मिलन की सांवरिया
मेरे सपने सजाओ
कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई ई
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई

सूनी पड़ी ई
भैय्या की ई हवेली
व्याकुल बहना आ
रह गयी अकेली ई
जिन संग नाची
जिन संग खेली ई
छूट गयीं वो ओ
सखी सहेली ई
अब ना देरी लगाओ
कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
चलो रे डोली उठाओ कहार
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
पिया मिलन की रुत आई
पिया मिलन की रुत आई ई


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15916

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1221
Total Number of movies covered =4362

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