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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘sad song’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This post is 501st post by Sadanand Ji. Due to a tagging error, we all missed the event of 500th post by him (his previous post).

In the early part of the golden era of Hindi film music, there were many films which were box office disasters. These films got released but vanished from the theatres quickly. These films also got ‘erased’ from the memories of the film audience of that time except those who had interest in Hindi film history. Some of such obscure films had the treasures of melodious songs.

If I confine myself to the first half of 1950, I get quite a good numbers such obscure films having melodious songs. Some of such films were ‘Adaa’ (1951, Madan Mohan), ‘Malati Madhav’ (1951, Sudhir Phadke), ‘Ghunghroo’ (1952, C Ramchandra), ‘Nirmohi’ (1952, Madan Mohan), ‘Raag Rang’ (1952, Roshan), ‘Baaghi’ (1953, Madan Mohan), ‘Fareb’ (1953, Anil Biswas), ‘Jhaanjhar’ (1953, C Ramchandra), ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954, Sardar Malik), ‘Naaz’ (1954, Anil Biswas), ‘Rishta’ (1954, K Datta), ‘Garam Coat’ (1955, Amarnath Chawla), ‘Madhur Milan’ (1955, Bulo C Rani) etc. The list is not exhaustive.

These obscure films of early 1950s had the adverse impact on the careers of some of the music directors for no faults of theirs. The then upcoming music directors like Madan Mohan and Roshan had to struggle hard to establish themselves in the film industry. Like-wise, the already established music directors like Anil Biswas and Bulo C Rani had difficulties in retaining their positions in the film industry.

‘Maan’ (1954) was one such film which had very melodious songs from the baton of Anil Biswas. The film was directed by Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri, a well-known lyricist, and screen play/dialogue writers of 1930s and 40s. This was his second and the last directorial venture, the first being ‘Bhook’ (1947). The star cast included Ajit, Chitra, Gajanan Jagirdar, Durga Khote, M Kumar, Achala Sachdev, Kamlesh Kumari, Yashodara Katju, Chandabai etc. The film belongs to the costume drama genre.

Dr.Safdar Aah Sitapuri was a Urdu laureate. He started his career in the Hindi film industry sometime in 1930s, probably with Mohan Pictures. He worked with Anil Biswas for the first time in ‘Comrades’ (1939) made under the banner of Sagar Movietone followed by ‘Alibaba’ (1940) and ‘Aurat’ (1940).

When Sagar Movietone was merged with General Films and renamed as National Studios in 1940, Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri and Anil Biswas shifted to this banner. Under National Studio Banner, Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri worked with Anil Biswas in films like ‘Aasra’ (1941), ‘Bahen’ (1941), ‘Nai Roshni’ (1941), ‘Roti’ (1942) etc. After Anil Biswas joined Bombay Talkies in 1942, he had to work with lyricists which were already in the pay roll with the banner. So he had no chance of working with Dr Safdar Sitapuri in Bombay Talkies but worked with lyricists Pt. Narendra Sharma and Kavi Pradeep among others.

After a gap of about 3 years, Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri got the opportunity to work with Anil Biswas for the film ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945) in which he wrote, among other songs, “Dil Jaltaa Hai To Jalne De” and Mukesh sang from his heart to make the song an iconic one. Thereafter Dr.Safdar Aah Sitapuri had worked with Anil Biswas in films like ‘Laadli’ (1949), ‘Laajawaab’ (1950), ‘Badi Bahu’ (1951), ‘Naaz’ (1954) and ‘Maan’ (1954) which was his last film as the director and I guess, it was also his last film as a lyricist.

The information on the internet indicates that Dr Safdar Aah Sitapuri returned to his teaching profession sometime in the later 50s though it appears that he was involved with writing screen-play and dialogues for ‘Son Of India’ (1962). Post-retirement from the film industry, Dr, Safdar Aah Sitapuri wrote books like ‘Amir Khusro Bhaisiyat Hindi Shaayar’, ‘Rubiyaat-e-Zamzama’, ‘Tulsidas Aur Ramcharitmanas’. I came to know through internet a few years back that he was also a guide for students doing Ph.d in Urdu literature.

Coming back to Anil Biswas, I personally feel that after Lata Mangeshkar started singing for him from ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) onwards, his song compositions attained a higher level of melody than what was earlier. For example, I find his song compositions in the film ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) in which Lata Mangeshkar sang for him for the first time, superior to those in ‘Veena’ (1948) in which Lata Mangeshkar had no songs. Incidentally, stories of both these films revolved around love triangles.

I recall reading few years back that when Sardul Kwatra, the music director was asked as to how his compositions are so beautiful. His reply was that he got inspiration from the singers themselves to compose the beautiful songs. I think, Anil Biswas could compose some of the best soulful songs for Lata Mangeshkar because of her voice and the faster pick up of nuances of song compositions. This quality of her could inspire anyone to compose the songs for her better than their best.

Today, I am presenting one of the soulful songs ‘Guzraa Hua Ulfat Ka Zamaana Yaad Karke Royenge’ from the film ‘Maan’ (1954). The song is rendered by Lata Mangeshkar on the words of Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri.


Song – Guzra Hua Ulfat Ka Zamaana (Maan) (1954) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Safdar ‘Aah’ Sitapuri, MD – Anil Biswas

Lyrics

guzraa hua ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
apni kahaani apna fasaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
guzraa huwa ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge

jab saawan ki mast ghataayen
dhoom machaati aayengi ee
jab saawan ki mast ghataayen
dhoom machaati aayengi  ee
jab koyal ki meethi taanen
kaanon mein bas jaayengi
ham ik bhoola hua taraana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge

kabhi kabhi jab tumko apne
dil kaa dard sunaate thhe
kabhi kabhi
kabhi kabhi jab tumko apne
dil kaa dard sunaate thhe
pyaar se dhaadas dekar saajan
hamko gale lagaate thhe
wahi pyaar se gale lagaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
guzraa hua ulfat kaa zamaana
yaad karke royenge
yaad karke royenge
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
अपनी कहानी अपना फसाना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

जब सावन की मस्त घटाएँ
धूम मचाती आएंगी
जब सावन की मस्त घटाएँ
धूम मचाती आएंगी
जब कोयल की मीठी तानें
कानों में बस जाएंगी
हम इक भुला हुआ तराना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

कभी कभी जब तुमको
अपने दिल का दर्द सुनाते थे
कभी कभी
कभी कभी जब तुमको
अपने दिल का दर्द सुनाते थे
प्यार से ढाढ़स दे कर साजन
हमको गले लगाते थे
वही प्यार से गले लगाना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे
गुज़रा हुआ उल्फ़त का ज़माना
याद करके रोएँगे
याद करके रोएँगे

 

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Before the partition in 1947, two of the well-known and successful Lahore-based producers-directors were Dalsukh M Pancholi of Pancholi Art Pictures and Roop K Shorey of Shorey Pictures. After the partition, both of them had to shift to Bombay (Mumbai), having lost their assets including the studios which were burnt down during the communal riots. It took some time for both of them to re-organise their film production companies in Bombay. Roop K Shorey released his first post-partition film, ‘Ek Thhi Ladki’ (1949) under a new banner, Shorey Films. Dalsukh M Pancholi took one more year to release his first post-partition film ‘Meena Baazar’ (1950) under a new banner, Pancholi Productions.

There was one more producer-director who was also affected by the partition woos. But his case was on a different footing. His filmy career started in Bombay and then ended in Bombay, traversing the Calcutta-Lahore-Calcutta route. His name was Raghubir Chand Talwar, better known as RC Talwar.

I was aware of his association with films like ‘Sangdil’ (1952), ‘Mem Sahib’ (1956) and ‘Ek Dil Sau Afsaane’ (1963) which he produced and directed. But it was only during the last 5-6 years, I became aware of the fact that RC Talwar also produced and directed some films in the 1940s and that he was one time the First Assistant to Director Kidar Sharma for the film ‘Aulad/Dil Hi To Hai’ (1939).

A few days back, I came across an interview of RC Talwar, taken sometime in 1949 at the time of commencement of the shooting of ‘Khilaadi’ (1950), his first film in Bombay as producer-director after the partition. I was amazed by his fighting spirit to come out successfully each time he faced problems due to extraneous factors during his film career from 1937-1965. The interview was published in August 1949 issue of SOUND magazine. I am thankful to Prof. Surjit Singh ji for making available some old issues of filmy magazines on his website which have some invaluable information and rare images of the films of the second half of 1940s.

RC Talwar was born on 21/10/1910 at Talagang, near Rawalpindi (now in Pakistan) in an affluent family. After completing his school in Rawalpindi, Talwar graduated from Dayal Singh College, Lahore. The father had observed that his son was interested in pursuing a filmy career. In order to specialise in some branches of film production, Talwar was enrolled in The Institute of Photography and RCA Institute of Sound Engineering, both in New York. After completing the two years courses in these institutions, Talwar was awarded Diplomas in the respective subjects.

Having gone to USA, Talwar spent 6 months in Hollywood but was disappointed as he could not get to meet any film technicians. While returning to India, he took break at London to study the working of film studios. In London, with the help of Diwan Sharar who was his father’s friend and a well-known person in the Fleet Street film circle, Talwar got opportunity to visits film studios in London and met some technicians.

Armed with the technical knowledge about the film productions, Talwar returned to India and landed in Bombay sometime in the middle of 1937. On his very first day in Bombay, he was employed by Bombay Talkies as a Technical Assistant in its laboratory. He worked in Bombay Talkies for one year after which he joined Film Corporation of India (FCI), a film production company based in Calcutta as the Head of Laboratory, a higher post with a higher salary.

Having worked in two full-fledged film production companies, Talwar’s ambition was to become a film director, a commanding position in the film industry at that time. When FCI roped in Kidar Sharma as director for their film ‘Aulad/Dil Hi To Hai’ (1939) and ‘Chitralekha’ (1941), Talwar got chance to work as his First Assistant. When ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) was in the making, FCI’s financial position worsened with debtors going to court for the liquidation of the company. Before ‘Chitralekha’ (1941) was released, the company went into liquidation. For the first time, Talwar faced the impending unemployment.

Instead of looking for work elsewhere, Talwar decided to form his own film production company called Talwar Productions by taking some of the displaced staff of FCI and getting an office space in FCI’s studio at Tollygunj. After producing and directing two Punjabi films, Talwar decided to produce and direct his first Hindi film ‘Khamoshi’ (1942). The film was an average success at the box office.

When Talwar was planning his next ambitious film on a big scale, he faced his second tragedy. The Japanese air force bombed some part of Calcutta in December 1942. In the circumstances, he decided to close down his production office in Calcutta and shifted to Lahore along with his staff who were willing to join him in Lahore. He reorganised his film production unit and started the shooting of his next film ‘Manchali’ (1943), followed by ‘Shikaayat’ (1944) in one of Lahore studios. Both these films were box office hits and celebrated jubilees.

Talwar’s next film was ‘Albeli’ (1945) followed by ‘Raazdaar’ and ‘Toote Sapne’. While ‘Albeli’ (1945) was released, the other two films could not be released due to the tense situations in Lahore following the announcement of partition. The situation in Lahore became worse, turning into communal riots. Following the partition in 1947, Talwar faced his third tragedy. He had to leave everything in Lahore except the negative of his completed film ‘Toote Sapne’ which he carried with him when he decided to shift to India after partition.

While Pancholis and Shoreys decided to shift to Bombay, Talwar decided to shift once again to Calcutta where he was more familiar with the film industry than in Bombay. To his surprise, the conditions in Calcutta had so much changed in the post-partition period that Talwar could not even make a new start. Sometime in 1949, he shifted to Bombay and started reorganising his film production unit. He got an office space in Bombay Talkies and in June 1949, he launched his first Hindi film in post-partition period. The name of the film was ‘Khilaadi’ (1950) starring Ashok Kumar and Suraiya in lead roles. The film was a box office success.

Talwar’s other films in the post-partition period were ‘Sangdil’ (1952), ‘Saaqi’ (1952), ‘Ilzaam’ (1954), ‘Rukhsana’ (1955), ‘Mem Saheb’ (1956), ‘Ek Dil Sau Afsane’ (1963). His last film which he directed was ‘Naya Kaanoon’ (1965).
As mentioned earlier, ‘Khamoshi’ (1942) was RC Talwar’s first Hindi film he produced and directed under his own banner, Talwar Productions. The star cast included his favourite actress Ramola Devi paired with AS Gyani. Others actors included Sundar, Ram Dulari, Manorama, Leela Mishra, Shyam Sundar, Nand Kishore, Himmat Rai etc. It may be observed that some of the actors had worked in the films produced by Film Corporation of India before it became defunct.

The film had 11 songs written by Himmat Rai, the younger brother of Kidar Sharma. All the songs were set to music by GA Chishti. The interesting features of the songs are that all the 11 songs have been rendered by actors on themselves and Ram Dulari who was in the supporting role in the film has sung 10 out of 11 songs. Two songs have been covered in the blog.

I am presenting the third song from the film to appear in the blog, a rare one. This song was not available on YT until I uploaded the video a few months back. The song is ‘Mann Ko Kaise Behlaayen’ sung by Ram Dulari.


Song – Mann Ko Kaise Behlaayen (Khamoshi) (1942) Singer – Ram Dulari, Lyrics – Himmat Rai, MD – GA Chishti

Lyrics

mann ko kaise behlaayen
mann ko kaise behlaayen
ye bipda aa
ye bipda kise sunaayen 
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen

kisko o mann ki baat sunaayen
kisko o mann ki baat sunaayen
kaise mann ka meet bulaayen
kaise mann ka meet bulaayen
neer bhare pyaase nainon ki
neer bhare pyaase nainon ki
kyonkar pyaas bhujaayen
o o o o
kyonkar pyaas bhujaayen
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen

kit jaayen ab kaun hamaara
kit jaayen ab kaun hamaara
rooth gaya hamse jag saara
rooth gaya hamse jag saara
kaah karen ab kaun jatan se
kaah karen ab kaun jatan se
bigdi baat banaayen
o o o o o
bigdi baat banaayen
hum mann ko kaise behlaayen
———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–
मन को कैसे बहलाएं
मन को कैसे बहलाएं
ये बिपदा॰॰आ
ये बिपदा किसे सुनाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं

किसको मन की बात सुनाएँ
किसको मन की बात सुनाएँ
कैसे मन का मीत बुलाएँ
कैसे मन का मीत बुलाएँ
नीर भरे प्यासे नैनों की
नीर भरे प्यासे नैनों की
क्योंकर प्यास बुझाएँ
ओ ओ ओ
क्योंकर प्यास बुझाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं

कित जाएँ अब कौन हमारा
कित जाएँ अब कौन हमारा
रूठ गया हमसे जग सारा
रूठ गया हमसे जग सारा
काह करें अब कौन जतन से
काह करें अब कौन जतन से
बिगड़ी बात बनाएँ
ओ ओ ओ
बिगड़ी बात बनाएँ
हम मन को कैसे बहलाएं


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Nisbat”(1949) was directed by S Shamsuddin for Hindustan Art Productions, Bombay. This social movie had Yakoob, Munawwar Sultana, Mirza Musharraf, S Mazhar, Baby Zubeida, H Prakash, Sofia, Jillo etc in it.

The movie had eight songs in it that were penned by three lyricists.

One song from the movie was covered in the blog in 2013.

Here is the second song from “Nisbat”(1949) to appear in the blog. This rare song is sung by Zohrabai Ambalewaali. Behzad Lucknowi is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pt Govindram.

Zohrabai Ambalewaali had sung two solo songs in the movie whereas Shamshad Begam had sung five solos and one duet (with Rafi). I wonder how and on whom this Zohrabai Ambalewali song was picturised. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.

I have not been able to get a few words right in the lyrics. I request our readers with keener ears to help fill in the blanks/ suggest corrections bin the lyrics as applicable.


Song-Ye phoolon ka mausam ye thhandi hawaayen(Nisbat)(1949) Singer-Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Lyrics-Behzad Lucknowi, MD-Pt Govindram

Lyrics

ye phoolon ka mausam
ye thhandi hawaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam
ye thhandi hawaayen
kisi ko hasaayen
kisi ko rulaayen
kisi ko hasaayen
kisi ko rulaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam
ye thhandi hawaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam

yahi ab to ham
maangte hain duaayen
maangte duaayen
yahi ab to ham
maangte hain duaayen
maangte duaayen
jo yaad aa raha hai
usey bhool jaayen
jo yaad aa raha hai
usey bhool jaayen
yahaan kya raha hai
yahaan kya raha hai
jo ham muskuraayen
ye phoolon ka mausam
ye thhandi hawaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam

jise apna samjhaa aa
usi ne diya gham
jise apna samjhaa aa
usi ne diya gham
na poochho na poochho
mere dil ka aalam
mere dil ka aalam
na poochho
na poochho
mere dil ka aalam
mere dil ka aalam
mohabbat jo ki hai
to paayin sazaayen
mohabbat jo ki hai
to paayin sazaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam
ye thhandi hawaayen
ye phoolon ka mausam

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

ये फूलों का मौसम
ये ठंडी हवाएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम
ये ठंडी हवाएँ
किसी को हसाएँ
किसी को रुलाएँ’
किसी को हसाएँ
किसी को रुलाएँ’
ये फूलों का मौसम
ये ठंडी हवाएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम

यही तो अब हम
मांगते हैं दुआएं
मांगते दुआएं
यही तो अब हम
मांगते हैं दुआएं
मांगते दुआएं
जो याद आ रहा है
उसे भूल जाएँ
जो याद आ रहा है
उसे भूल जाएँ
यहाँ क्या रहा है
यहाँ क्या रहा है
जो हम मुकुराएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम
ये ठंडी हवाएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम

जिसे अपना समझा
उसी ने दिया ग़म
जिसे अपना समझा
उसी ने दिया ग़म
ना पूछो ना पूछो
मेरे दिल का आलम
मेरे दिल का आलम
मोहब्बत जो की है
तो पाईं सजाएँ
मोहब्बत जो की है
तो पाईं सजाएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम
ये ठंडी हवाएँ
ये फूलों का मौसम


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The first time I saw this film, it was on Doordarshan, and the only song that I could appreciate (given my age) was “Bibi Mendaki Ri Tu To Paani Mein Ki Raani”. Rest of the film, its emotional and familial nuances were all lost on me. Those were the days, when watching television was a privilege bestowed upon oneself by a friendly neighbor. One would go to watch television at a neighbor’s home, or hang on to the windows, if entry was not permitted. And so, the opportunity that one gets to watch a movie was in itself a treat, and an accomplishment. And one always wanted to make the most of such opportunities. Getting bored was not only not an option, but it was a thought furthest from the mind. I have this placement in front of a TV screen, and I will watch it for as long as I am allowed, whatever may be the content. The serious stuff was mostly OHT (Overhead Transmission), and the mind would remember and register the fun parts like Balraj Sahni having poori and lassi at a halwai shop in the morning before reaching his office, or singing this above mentioned song with his children on the Sunday when he is at home. But as far as watching time is concerned, it was to be religiously spent, to watch the entire film, whether I could make out more of it or not.

In later years, small memories of the films, snatches of screen shots, would replay randomly in the mind – Jayant taking Rashid Khan to task very onerously, or Balraj Sahni with a bundle of mail in his hand, standing in front of the sorting dockets, trying to quickly put the mail items into the correct dockets, Balraj Sahni admiring a new coat hanging in the display window of a tailor’s shop. Mind you, the names of the characters and the words to describe the scene are all being currently generated. In the mind’s eye, it is just the images themselves that are very familiar, without any labels, without any words.

Many years on, just on a memory recall, I started to search for this film. For quite a long time this film was not available. A friend once got a version of it, but that was just about an hour long. So one can imagine what would have remained after such merciless cutting. That version seemed to have gone around, and a rumor followed it – the songs of this film are lost forever. Then, when the Geet Kosh volume three was released, it also carried a footnote to this film which says that except for one song, all songs were deleted from this film, and the film was truncated to half its length, and renamed as ‘The Clerk & The Coat’. This further strengthened the fears of the lost songs and lost film.  However, in all probability, this was just a version created from the original, for consumption in the foreign markets, or for participation in foreign film festivals. Thankfully, none of these prophecies proved to be true eventually. Once the VCD binge started, and more and more films started landing in the market, the original of this film also finally appeared in a near complete state. And then, I got to see it once again.

‘Garam Coat’ is a very poignant film. It deals with the everyday problems in the lives of lower middle income strata of society in a newly independent and developing India. Balraj Sahni is a lowly paid postal clerk, with a monthly salary of one hundred rupees, and a family of five. In the hands of Rajendra Singh Bedi and performance lead Balraj Sahni, both stalwarts of the IPTA movement, the film has descended to the practical levels of realism, and to pragmatic heights of credibility. The home of this clerk is a bare bones home. The kitchen is frugally stocked. The children are not well dressed. The housewife is very simply presented. The protagonist himself wears an old and ragged coat throughout the entire film. The name of the banner is Cine Co-operative Ltd, Bombay. In all probability, this was yet another joint effort of social conscience of IPTA.

The clerk fancies a new coat. On his way to work, he always pauses outside a tailor’s shop, admiring a new coat on display. The owner of the shop, sees him daily, and one day invites him into the shop, enquiring whether he plans to buys some new clothes. Unable to defend himself, and knowing that he is unable to afford the price of a new coat, he sheepishly tells about the qualities and the warmth of the coat that he is wearing, and that, no, he does not plan to buy a new one.

Come pay day, and the clerk returns home, happy with the load of a solitary one hundred rupee note in his pocket. Life is spring, and all is happiness in the household. Next morning, it is going to be a shopping spree for the month, and all expectations are high. The morning begins with the fun song “Bibi Mendaki Ri. . .”, and off goes the clerk to the market, with a list of shopping and hundred rupees in his pocket.

His first stop is a toy shop. He browses, he selects something for his children, almost pays for the items pulling out the hundred rupee note; but then thinks better of it, and saying he will return shortly, stuffs the note back into his coat pocket. His next stop is a halwaai shop where he has poori and lassi. He is in high moods, joking with the shopkeeper and other customers. As gets up to leave and pushes his hands in his coat pocket to pay for the breakfast – all the agonies of hell descend upon him. The note is missing. An impressive portrayal of a person who has lost everything in life – Balraj Sahni is insulted and kicked out of the halwaai shop. He runs back to the toy shop, tries to convince the shopkeeper that he might have dropped his money at his shop. Once again, he is insulted and made to leave the premises. Now, he simply has no place to go.

The remaining part of the movie is about his trials and tribulations on trying to survive without his salary through at least one more month till the next pay day. The movie is full of scenarios of what such a person will do – he tries to borrow, he tries to get advance, he tries to take up a part time job as a tutor, he goes without lunch, he contemplates suicide, even tries it. But the agonies simply do not cease. How he shares this calamity with his wife, and how does his wife respond, are all classic scenes to be visited again. The wife goes to the pansaari (grocery shop owner) and tried to get groceries on account, she and children start to make paper bags out of newspapers in an effort to raise some money. There are friends at office like Jayant who try their best to help him within his limited means. And there are unfriendly colleagues like Rashid Khan, who are completely unmoved by the troubles of their co-worker. There are scenes and performances that move me to tears as I watch the helplessness of an honest good man, trying to keep his wits together and to keep his family alive. The saving grace of the film is that the lost money is located at the end. And it is a very interesting way that it turns up.

In this sad and poignant film, this song is probably the saddest and the most pain filled song. Having come to know of the calamity that has befallen her husband, and the manner in which he is trying to fight these problems, there comes a point when the wife’s hopes probably break and she calls for help. The entire scenario and the get up of the film is so deeply entrenched into the simple values of our social system. She has no help at hand, she has no one with whom she can share her pain. For a woman in our culture, her last hope is her maternal family. But she is too afraid to inform them or talk to them. So she tells the bird to take her message to her parents and family, and let them know that she just a cheerless bundle of tears these days.

Then after telling this to the crows, she starts to make amendments to her request. First, she prohibits the crow from telling her mother, she will break down and cry. Then, thinking some more she prohibits the crow from telling her father also, he will cry into the cloth of his pugree (head dress) and not know what to do. She tells the crow to tell everyone, but not these two.

Then in the next stanza she makes some more amendments. She tells the crow not to tell her sister either, for she may give up her own food. Then she says, do not even tell my bhaabhi (sister-in-law, brother’s wife), for the fear that she might spread this in her own maternal family and make fun of it. She tells the crow to tell everyone, but not these two.

The embattled lady then ends the verses with telling the crow, to go an tell this tale of woes to her brother only. He will surely come to her aid, riding the blue steed.

The agony and the poignancy contained in these verses is so emphatic. She wants this message to be told to everyone in her family, and then slowly, one by one she decides not to tell this or that person, and finally, in conclusion she is ready to tell it to her brother only. The words, the composition and the rendition, brings tears to my eyes, as many times as I have heard this play. And it also underscores the vitality of the brother-sister relationship in our culture. When all seems to be lost and the lady is totally helpless, it is her brother that she thinks of, to go and share. (You may have noticed, I have tagged this song as a ‘brother-sister song’).

This low key, less heard of film, is one of my favorites – in and about the art of telling a poignant story through cinema. Although Lata ji has herself selected “Jogiya Se Preet Kiye Dukh Hoye” from this film, as one of her most favorite songs, in my humble opinion, I would rate this song even higher than “Jogiya Se . . .”.

Wonderful memories of an era of very simple living, of traditions and culture, of values – a touch of India that is very dear to me.

Song – Kahiyo Roye Dukhia Re, Ja Re Panchhi Tu Ja Re (Garam Coat) (1955) Singer – Lata MangeshkarLyrics – Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD – Pt Amarnath

Lyrics

kahiyo roye dukhia re
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re

ek na kahiyo maa raani ko
royegi wo meri gudiyon ko dekh ke
ek na kahiyo maa raani ko
royegi wo meri gudiyon ko dekh ke
ek na kahiyo babul ji se
ek na kahiyo babul ji se
royenge pagdi ko munh se lapet ke
aur sab se kahiyo tu pyaare
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re

ek na kahiyo behna meri se
haathon ki roti gira degi ro ke
haathon ki roti gira degi ro ke
ek na kahiyo bhabhi meri se
maike mein jaa ke hansegi wo munh pe
maike mein jaa ke hansegi wo munh pe
aur sab se kahiyo tu pyaare

kahiyo re dukh mera bhaiyya se jaa ke
kahiyo re dukh mera bhaiyya se jaa ke
aayega wo neela ghoda uda ke
utrega mere duaare
jaa re panchhi tu jaa re. . .
kaaga des hamaare
udd jaa re
kahiyo roye dukhia re
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे

एक ना कहियो माँ रानी से
रोएगी वो मेरी गुड़ियों को देख के
एक ना कहियो माँ रानी से
रोएगी वो मेरी गुड़ियों को देख के
एक ना कहियो बाबुल जी से
एक ना कहियो बाबुल जी से
रोएँगे पगड़ी मुंह से लपेट के
और सब से कहियो तू प्यारे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे

एक ना कहियो बहना मेरी से
हाथों की रोटी गिरा देगी रो के
हाथों की रोटी गिरा देगी रो के
एक ना कहियो भाभी मेरी से
मायके में जाके हंसेगी वो मुंह पे
मायके में जाके हंसेगी वो मुंह पे
और सब से कहियो तू प्यारे

कहियो रे दुख मेरा भैया से जाके
कहियो रे दुख मेरा भैया से जाके
आएगा वो नीला घोडा उड़ा के
उतरेगा मेरे द्वारे
जा रे पंछी तू जा रे॰॰॰
कागा देस हमारे
उड़ जा रे
कहियो रोये दुखिया रे


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mohammed Rafi – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 35
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

“शम्मा बुझने को चली

Of the many colors of Rafi Sb’s voice, probably the most touching, and the most impressive is his interpretation of the emotions of sadness. Maybe, it be so that the “. . . sweetest songs are the ones that tell of the saddest thoughts” (from the poetry of Percy Shelley, that inspired the iconic song of ‘Patita’ (1953) – “Hain Sab Se Madhur Wo Geet Jinhen Hum Dard Ke Sur Mein Gaate Hain”). And maybe, that the genuineness and honesty of expressions that go together with the unfeigned and substantive voice of Rafi Sb, it simply makes us feel the true depth of this ‘sweetness’ – a sweetness that touches a very familiar, a very dear chord within.
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

As soon as he discovers that I have uploaded a new post, Arvinder ji (I should say, Dear Arvinder ji) is immediately on my case – “where are the songs that I have requested”. And so it transpires this time also. As soon as he became aware of my previous post (of Tuesday early morning), I have been getting calls and messages of all types reminding me of his list of requests for songs that are very dear, but are not easily available at this time. We had a small get together of our group yesterday afternoon. Arvinder ji was also present. And I don’t need to add much more to say how he urged me to post the songs he has requested.
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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

It’s been a while since my last post here.  And to be absolutely honest, I haven’t even been active on the blog recently.

This is for a variety of reasons, none of which is, thankfully, any cause of worry. I go into this shell from time to time. I hope Atul, and my other friends here, know me long enough now to not mind my absence. It is nothing to do with the blog or with them, it is just me and my bizarre-ness. Anyway, it doesn’t matter – what matters is that I’m back here today.

But why today? What’s so special about today? Well, today is special, not just for one, but for two reasons. Firstly, the 8th of March is celebrated worldwide as International Women’s Day. Secondly, it also happens to be the birthday of Sahir Ludhianvi, one of our most celebrated poets and lyricists.  And most people who know me on this blog know what a special place Sahir has in my heart.  I have often posted his songs here, especially on his birth and death anniversaries. I feel that’s the least I can do for him.
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This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Saalgirah”(1946) was directed by K S Daryani for Krishn movietone, Bombay. This movie had Snehprabha Pradhan, Jairaj, Bibbo, Gope, Majid, Tarabai, Chandrakala, Kumar, Pramila etc. in it.
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The byline in one of the news programs on the 6th evening was – “फिल्मों का एक युग, मिनटों में सिमट गया” (“filmon ka ek yug, minton mein simat gaya”) (an entire era of (Hindi) filmdom, faded away in a matter of minutes). A completely unexpected departure happened earlier in the day. Very much in the saddle, and very much in the busy prime of his career, Om Puri passed away suddenly. The amount of intensity he packed into his characters, and in his dialogue delivery, it seemed he was going to last forever on the screen. Sixty six years they say. Goodness, it just seems like yesterday that Bhikhu picked up that axe used to cut wood at a cremation ground, and brutally attacked his own sister.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The runaway success of musical films like ‘Khazaanchi’ (1941), ‘Basant’ (1942), ‘Kismet’ (1943), ‘Tansen’ (1943) and ‘Rattan’ (1944) seem to have attracted, many new music directors to join the Hindi film industry in the 1940s. But only a few of them could climb the ladder of success to reach among the top music directors and elongate their successful musical carrier in the 1950s and beyond. Most of new music directors vanished into thin air after composing songs for very few films.
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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where "new" songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than eight years. This blog has over 13300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3200 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Movies with all their songs covered =1012
Total Number of movies covered =3703

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008 Active for 3000 days.
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