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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1954’ Category


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3947 Post No. : 15022

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Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 14
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A dream within a dream. . .

In the growing up years, there is a whole generation I am sure, or actually, multiple generations, that have grown up learning about the American society and the lifestyle from the books of the author Harold Robbins. I remember, in my school years, his books were a taboo, generally carried around and exchanged, their cover pages obscured by plain paper or even newspaper wrappers. And yet, very avidly devoured by the young minds oh so keen to learn about the American way of life. But of course, the clandestine attraction was the common perception that his novels contained explicitly “hot” passages. And hence all the hush-hush and the covert operations to read his novels surreptitiously on the bus, while traveling back from school in the afternoons (of course, the morning trip traveling TO the school, one was always busy preparing for this test or that, or even completing homework assignments 😀 😀 ), or very late in the night, using various mechanisms to illuminate the pages in an otherwise darkened room. 🙂

The reason I bring up this author here – is that he wrote a trilogy on Hollywood and the American film industry – the three books spread over a period of 20 years (publication dates – 1949, 1961 and 1969), with the events covered spanning almost a century, or maybe about eight decades to be precise. The first novel tells about the rise of the cinema based powerful entertainment industry, from its initial baby steps, through the age of silent films, ending at the advent of the talkie era when sound entered the heretofore silent imagery. The second novel in this series tells the stories of the heydays of studio system in Hollywood, the big stars, the big directors and the mega budget productions – and the decadence that permeates the glitz of the tinsel town. The third part of this trilogy covers the period in Hollywood history that saw the decline of the studio system and the arrival of television as the more powerful younger sibling of the entertainment industry.

The first book in this trilogy – oh so appropriately titled – ‘The Dream Merchants’.
[The second book is titled ‘The Carpetbaggers’ and the third is ‘The Inheritors’.]

And life – what about life? What is it? Thinkers and philosophers over the ages, have contemplated on this existence – from the mundane tasks of bread and survival to the exotic astronomy of stars and black holes. And have pondered over this question.

One of the answers that has echoed through the centuries – life too, is a dream, a dream too. . . a concept that has been an important ingredient of the philosophies that have tried to explain life, over centuries and ages, in all the civilizations around this planet. Start with the ancient traditions of our land, and then examine the length and breadth of this planet, including the historical depth of time, we encounter this concept in the far eastern beliefs, the Persian mystique, the abounding Greek wisdom, and in the troika of traditions centered in the lands around the southern and eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea, extending to the Arabian Peninsula – the Judaic traditions, the Christian philosophies, and the Islamic cultures.

Parvati is the Hindu goddess of dreams, and also of births and everything related to the creation, suggesting that the Hindu tradition gives to dreams a creative ability and the power to produce something that did not previously exist in the material world. There are passages in our scriptures that describe this universe, this creation, as a dream dreamt by the Supreme Himself.

Our other philosophies also conjecture – that there is an alternate existence for each one of us in an alternate universe. At a certain juncture in that existence, we fall asleep, and are simultaneously born into this world – to exist as a dream of that primordial self in sleep. The dream continues, and at another juncture it comes to a close. And we are erased from existence in this world. What we term as death in this world, is actually awakening and end of a dream in that parallel existence.

One of the most important works of Persian and Arabic culture is ‘A Thousand and One Nights’, in many of whose stories comes the subject of dreams – mirrors reflecting reality around us, and preventing us from seeing it. The clearest example is the tale ‘The Sleeper and the Waker’, in which a king and a beggar swap roles and the latter ends up believing everything has been a dream.
[Ah, so that is the origin of the storyline for books and films like ‘The Prince And The Pauper’, ‘Raja Aur Runk’, and . . . goodness, I just googled ‘films on role switching’ – the list is too long to be added here. 🙂 ]

The Greek philosopher Plato, in his work titled ‘The Allegory of The Cave’, explains his theory of the existence of two worlds — Sense and Ideas — and metaphorically describes the situation in which the human is related by them: life goes into a kind of reverie, ignorant and ruled by the senses, of which you can wake up only through the reason, to attain true knowledge.

The Spanish writer Calderon de la Barca, in his work ‘Life is a Dream’, poses a dichotomy between earthly life and the heavenly life in which the first is similar to a dream that will finish only at death. Therefore, the real is death and life is associated with the unreality of the dream, so that the terms of our everyday perception are reversed: life is death and death is life.

The old bard has written about this in more than one ways. In ‘The Tempest’, his words say –
“We are such stuff as dreams are made of and our little life is rounded with a sleep’.

In ‘Hamlet’, he says,
“To die, to sleep;
To sleep, perchance to dream — ay, there’s the rub:
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil. . .”

And our own poet protagonists put it so simply. As songwriter Yogesh has said – “Jeevan Hai Ik Sapna, Madhur Suhaana Sapna”, the Asha-Kishore duet in the 1973 film ‘Honeymoon’.

In all the perspectives to life that have been conjectured, one is that it is a dream. And inside this dream, we have another level of existence, which is once again a dream – a dream that is manufactured by some, for the consumption of another some, to help forget, albeit temporarily, the vagaries of the so called reality, which in itself is conjectured to be a dream – of alternate self in an alternate existence.

Harold Robbins called these ‘manufacturers’ as ‘The Dream Merchants’ – the creators of these dreams, and who trade these dreams for a consideration.

It is this dream world, the dream factory that fascinates us all. And by ‘us’ I mean this bandwagon, all the regular riders, and all the other lovers of Hindi films and Hindi film music who are all connected by the singular passion for this art form. We all love this musical dreamboat. The ‘dream merchants’ keep dishing out new concoctions, spinning and re-spinning the tales that have been told often and again. They keep creating and re-inventing the jewel embellishments to adorn these tales, and to keep us all hooked – ah yes, hooked – so bad that we do not have any other place to go in this life. 🙂

Fifteen thousand songs – each post being an original work. As I am writing this piece, my mind made an attempt to estimate the amount of human effort that has gone into the building of this (now) legendary edifice. But my mind boggled at the endeavor. There may be some rough estimations we can draw upon for the amount spent in adding to and maintaining the data on this blog. But there is very little hope we can estimate the time spent on creating the original songs that are the basis on which this blog is built.

We could separate out these two calculations and make an attempt. In my mind, I would put an average of between 5 to 6 hours spent on each post. [I request Atul ji to please comment on this basic estimate.] I include the time spent by the author of the post to search and select the song, the time to note down and verify the lyrics, the time to write the article to go along with the song, the time spent to edit the entire post including lyrics review and color coding etc., the time for admin tasks related to finalizing and publishing the post, ah yes, must also include time to upload the song if not available, and then the follow up admin work to maintain and update the data pages and our own data files to keep them up to date.

Let me take the median number as 5.5 hours per post. Having come to the 15K milestone, by this estimate, the team has spent ~ 82,500 person hours on posting and publication on this blog.

Let me now put in perspective this rough estimate. A standard person working day is defined to be eight hours. Give or take some, a person works for an average of 22 days per month. That is 176 person hours per month. A simple calculation tells us that we are at a collective total of 469 person months invested in all activities of this blog. Translating this to years, we get a number ~ 39 years.

Imagine. The amount of effort that has been spent on this enterprise is equivalent almost to an entire working career of a person, who, mind you, has not taken any vacation or other time off, other than the 8 or 9 non working days per month.

Mind boggling, isn’t it. Every which way that we try to understand what this blog is, it turns out to be mind boggling. I wouldn’t even try to go to the next step of apportioning the percentage of this number to our fearless leader. I am sure you all are all too familiar with that by now.

What a fantastic enterprise this is turning out to be. The English phrase that appropriately applies to such an endeavor is – “dream run”. Be that an effort in athletics or sports, be that a string of successes in any particular field, be that the tenure of a successful enterprise, be that the number of weeks / months of a film showing at a single theatre – the word used is “dream run”.

And the expression brings us back to the theme I am attempting to connect with – a dream within a dream. I am reminded of a song that completes 40 years this year. A quick search tells me that the film ‘Golmaal’ was certified on 6th April 1979. Today we are a little over 40 years and one month since this song was released – “Sapne Mein Dekha Sapna”. So much food for thought it generates. Are we living? Are we inside a dream? Where do we go when we go to sleep? Is sleep another parallel existence? Sometimes we bring back snatches of memories of visions seen during our sleep tenure. What are these visions? What are these memories? Are these real experiences in another dimension? Would it be possible to experience sleep within a dream? And then, consequently, would it be possible to have memories of dream that was dreamt inside a dream? Yes, so much wholesome and appetizing food for thought.

But then yes, if we step back and ruminate over the philosophical conjectures, is this existence itself a dream. And the dreams we remember from our sleeping hours in here – is that a dream inside a dream? Interesting, very interesting discussions.

Let me introduce the song for today, for this post. A very interesting take on what this world of cinema is, in the words of the people who compose the work force of this industry – and the verdict is –

jaali, jaali, jaali
(its all unreal, unreal, unreal)

Yes, that is what the words in this song convey. The film is ‘Haar Jeet’ from 1954. The film is produced by GA Thakur under the banner of Film Kraft and is directed by Jaggi Thakur. The star cast of the film is listed as Shyama, Suresh, Manorama, Sundar, Heera Lal, Madan Puri, Shyam Lal, Amar, Baij Sharma, Ramesh Thakur, Ratan Sharma, and Peggy. I have not seen the film. As I tried to search for more information, I am able to locate a review of the film posted on the Cineplot blog. The review also summarizes the story of the film.

FilmCraft’s “Haar Jeet”, produced by G.A. Thakur and directed by Jaggi Rampal, which was premiered in Bombay at the Swastik and other cinemas on June 11th, 1954, had a good theme, with potential enough to make an absorbing picture. But poor characterization, naive and amateurish direction and artificial treatment have combined to defeat the proper development of that theme. The result is that “Haar Jeet” is more “Haar” (loss) than “Jeet” (gain) and that goes as much for the audience as it does for the production itself.

The atmosphere is never established, not in the degree it should be to make the characters. their actions and behavior understandable in a drama so dependent as this is upon the psychology of three of its principal characters, one of whom, Dr. Behari, is a physician and a hypnotist.

He lives in the house of his millionaire brother and is driven by an overpowering lust for wealth to thoughts of murder because of a growing pile of debts. One is never told how he comes to incur the debts.

The doctor is the central character round which the picture and story revolve. He is shown making use of his hypnotic power to get his brother’s daughter Nalini under his control so that he can get her married to a rascally confederate of his, whom he introduces into the family as Prince Balraj.

Under his spell Nalini actually goes through the betrothal ceremony with a show of pleasure, sharing in the gaiety of the occasion. On the other hand, she is also shown growing suspicious of her uncle in scenes that follow. She refuses to marry the phoney Prince, and when her father insists, she runs away to Bombay, where she finds shelter with a young woman friend.

Nalini accidentally encounters a young man named Rajan and his friend Balam. Rajan falls in love with her. There are glimpses of a phoney Academy for Acting, where the lovers meet. But how that academy comes into existence, how it is managed and how the hero gets into it as a teacher of dramatic art one doesn’t quite know. In some comically unreal scenes she is selected to play the heroine in a film and Rajan is cast opposite her as the hero, presumably to enable the romance to develop.

The romance is interrupted, however, by the wicked uncle who turns up at this point with his bogus Prince Balraj, in search of Nalini, hypnotizes her and takes her back home.

In the final sequence, the doctor, desperate to get his hands on the money and pressed by his confederate, takes to violence and almost succeeds in getting what he desires, when Rajan and Balam burst in with the police to defeat him. He meets a condign end by falling off the roof and is killed. The film ends there.

Poor motivation, perfunctory treatment and utterly naive direction rob the narrative of all conviction despite some good acting by the cast. Hiralal puts over quite a convincing portrayal of the villainous Dr. Behari. Shyamlal is good as the millionaire brother, and so is Madanpuri, despite occasional touches of artificiality, as the polished rogue Balraj. Sunder manages to have a few bright moments.

Manorama, who is quite a good actress, is wasted in another very poorly written and badly directed role. Suresh is disappointingly dull and tame in the romantic role of Rajan. Shyama, who looks quite attractive, does her best.

The sets are realistic. The photography is mediocre and seems to have suffered a lot from indifferent laboratory work. The editor has not been able to give the film the requisite consistency in narration.

The music is depressingly drab and the unpoetic lyrics set to dull melodies are poorly sung.

The film has seven songs, written by four songwriters – Saraswati Kumar Deepak, Shewan Rizvi, Kaif Irfani and Aziz Kashmiri. This song is penned by Shewan Rizvi. Music is by SD Batish. The main singing voice is SD Batish himself. There is another primary voice which is an unidentified female voice. Some lines in the song are sung solo by this voice. I request other knowledgeable readers and friends to help identify this voice.

The Cineplot review above censures the poetry and the music in the songs of this film. As I review the songs of this film already posted, I am not able to reconcile that observation. Anyway, the opinions and judgments are personal and subjective, and that is fine. The songs already posted from this film are

The readers are encouraged to listen to these earlier songs and make their own judgment.

Today’s song is simply a fun song. One image that I could locate (also on Cineplot) seems as if it is from this song only. The ambiance created in the audio is that of a dance performance, quite possibly a stage dance performance, and the visual that I have inserted with the upload, seems quite likely to be for this song. The song tells about the unreality of the reel world. A make believe construct manned by actors who are just role playing – they are not what they are. 🙂

There are interesting references in the verses of the song. There are names of actors and actresses in the song. There also are names of films – ‘Passing Show’, and ‘Hunterwaali’. As I check the Geet Kosh listings, I find films titled ‘Passing Show’ in the years 1936 and 1956. Since this song dates from 1954, the poet here is referring to the 1936 film. And the hero of that film is Jayant. And the film ‘Hunterwali’ being referred to is also from 1935. Of course the heroine of that film is Nadia. 🙂 [Actually, there is a film titled ‘Hunterwali Ki Beti’ from 1943 also; and in that film, the lead role is played by Nadia again.]

A fun song, and also, in a subtle manner, a song that projects reality. That the world of cinema is

jaali, jaali, jaali
(its all unreal, unreal, unreal)

And yet, it enthralls us, fascinates us, grips and enchants us no end. So much so that we spend an entire working career on building this wonderful blog – one song at a time. 😀 😀

Fifteen thousand songs – whew. . . wow. . . and CONGRATULATIONS. 🙂


Song – Filmi Duniya, Duniya Waalo (Haar Jeet) (1954) Singer – SD Batish, Unidentified Female Voice, Lyrics – Shewan Rizvi, MD – SD Batish
SD Batish + Chorus
Chorus

Lyrics

filmi duniya
duniya waalo
dekho dekho
filmi duniya

ye hai nargis
ye hai nimmi
ye hai geeta baali
ye hai geeta baali
main hoon hero
passing show ka
ye hai hunterwaali

hey..ey..ey

asli hum mein
koi nahin hai
sab ke sab hain jaali

asli
asli
asli
jaali
jaali
jaali

filmi duniya
duniya waalo
dekho dekho
filmi duniya

aaj nahin to
kal ya parson
aaj nahin to
kal ya parson
dee dee lallaa
kal ya parson
honge hum mash’hoor
mash’hoor
mash’hoor
bante bante
ban jaaunga
main bhi..ee..ee..ee
raaj kapoor..rr..rr
chalengi apni filmen
dilli aur kolkotta

opni baari jaabe
roshogolla khaabe

aur coimbatore
yendaaa
yendaaa
yendaaa da da da da daaaa
coimbatore
coimbatore
coimba..atore

filmi duniya
duniya waalo
dekho dekho
filmi duniya

hello

hello

hello madam paaro
hello madam paaro
seenon se
dil baahar niklen
jebon se
kuchh noten niklen
seenon se
dil baahar niklen
jebon se
kuchh noten niklen
aisa koi jhatka
arey jhatka
arey jhatka maaro
taali maaro
taali maaro..o..o..o
filmi duniya
duniya waalo
dekho dekho
filmi duniya

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
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फिल्मी दुनिया
दुनिया वालो
देखो देखो
फिल्मी दुनिया

ये है नर्गिस
ये है निम्मी
ये है गीता बाली
ये है गीता बाली
मैं हूँ हीरो
पासिंग शो का
ये है हंटरवाली

हे॰॰ए॰॰ए

असली हम में
कोई नहीं है
सबके सब हैं जाली

असली
असली
असली
जाली
जाली
जाली

फिल्मी दुनिया
दुनिया वालो
देखो देखो
फिल्मी दुनिया

आज नहीं तो
कल या परसों
आज नहीं तो
कल या परसों
डी डी लल्ला
कल या परसों
होंगे हम मशहूर
मशहूर
मशहूर
बनते बनते
बन जाऊंगा
मैं भी॰॰ई॰॰ई
राज कपूर॰॰र्र॰॰र्र
चलेंगी अपनी फिल्में
दिल्ली और कोलकोत्ता

औपनि बाड़ी जाबे
रोशोगोल्ला खाबे

और कोयम्बटूर
येण्डा॰॰
येण्डा॰॰
येण्डा॰॰ डा डा डा डा डा॰॰आ
कोयम्बटूर
कोयम्बटूर
कोयम्ब॰॰टूर

फिल्मी दुनिया
दुनिया वालो
देखो देखो
फिल्मी दुनिया

हैलो

हैलो

हैलो मैडम पारो
सीनों से
दिल बाहर निकलें
जेबों से
कुछ नोटें निकलें
सीनों से
दिल बाहर निकलें
जेबों से
कुछ नोटें निकलें
ऐसा कोई झटका
अरे झटका
अरे झटका मारो
ताली मारो’
ताली मारो॰॰ओ॰॰ओ॰॰ओ

फिल्मी दुनिया
दुनिया वालो
देखो देखो
फिल्मी दुनिया

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3909 Post No. : 14967

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Blog Ten Year Challenge (2009-2019)-Song number 25
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This is my First song post for ‘The 10 year Challenge’ series. Today, 10 years ago, on this day, 6 songs were posted. They were 1 song each for films ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954), ‘Marine Drive’ (1955), ‘Naag Devta’ (1962), ‘Bees Saal Baad’ (1962), ‘Prince’ (1969) and ‘Lootmaar’ (1980).

From the day it started, I was keen on participating, but everyday that I checked I found films either belonging to the 60s to 80s or films which were already Yippeee’d. I became helpless. Not that I can not or don’t want to write on songs of films of 70s and beyond, but they are not of my liking. Further I like to write only on songs or films, where I have something substantial to offer to our readers.

Finally, I found one film from 1st April 2009, which had some scope for me. The song is from film ‘Bahut Din Huye’. First, out of the 17 songs only 3 songs are posted on the blog and hence lot of choice to choose a song from remaining 14 songs, and secondly, the background of the film, the stars, the producer/director, the company etc were matters where I could elaborate to my will. So, I opted for this film’s song today.

The film is from the southern giant – Gemini Pictures. The film title sounds almost like a translation of ‘Once upon a time…’. It is a very apt title too, because the film is based on a folk tale of south. I like such films made in south and also their mythological films. When I see these films, the costumes of all the actors as well as their palaces etc remind me of similar pictures that used to appear in Chandamama magazines.

Chandamama (Chandoba in Marathi) magazines vied with my childhood craze of seeing films and reading books. Like many of my age group, our childhood had an important segment covered by Chandamama (in 13 Languages, including English and Sanskrit) readings. I strongly believe that  either the south film actors copied costumes from Chandamama pictures or the vice versa, but they resembled each others, for sure !

As expected, ‘Bahut Din Huye’ was a remake of Gemini’s own block buster ‘Bala Nagamma’ from 1942. Gemini Studios was the best known Madras studio in the 1940s for redefining the concept of mass entertainment with ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), the first Madras film to break successfully into the Hindi cinema circuit. SS Vasan started Gemini as a distribution agency, the Gemini Pictures Circuit, distributing and partly financing films by K Subramanyam’s Motion Picture Producers Combine. When the Combine went bankrupt, Vasan bought the studio in 1939 at public auction for a mere Rs 86,427-11 (annas)-9 (paise) (according to Randor Guy). The studio’s début feature was probably Balkrishna Narayan Rao’s ‘Madanakamarajan’ (1941), but it only took off when cameraman-scenarist K Ramnoth joined it along with his Vauhini partner, art-director AK Sekhar. This team made most of Gemini’s early features: ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943), ‘Kannamma En Kadhali’ (1945) and ‘Miss Malini’ (1947) before the ‘Chandralekha’ blitz catapulted it on to the national stage.

In the early days, the most important event in the studio was Uday Shankar’s dance extravaganza ‘Kalpana’ (released 1948) which also provided training for most of Gemini’s technicians as well as providing the model for an Orientalist dance idiom later associated with influential Tamil choreographers like Hiralal and Chopra Master. A few minor hits followed ‘Chandralekha’ before the studio’s second major onslaught on the national box office with ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’ (1949), a trilingual that established the studio’s dominance in the genre of the costumed adventure movie. Although its Hindi version ‘Nishan’ was not a major success, Vasan continued making Hindi films, often signing up major stars of Hindi films himself: e.g. the Dilip Kumar and Dev Anand film ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955), Vyjayanthimala’s ‘Raj Tilak’ (1958) and ‘Paigham (1959) starring Dilip Kumar, Raaj Kumar and Vyjayanthimala. They also made the mega-budget Tamil classic ‘Avvaiyyar’ (1953). An important later production was ‘Motor Sundaram Pillai’ (1966), Sivaji Ganesan’s only film at this studio. In 1958 the studio expanded into the Gemini Colour lab, licensed by Eastman color Kodak film. After Vasan’s death, his son SS Balasubramanyam produced the unsuccessful ‘Ellorum Nallavare’ (1975). Gemini’s productions declined in the 70s, although it remained successful as a studio and equipment rental business now taken over by the Anand Cine Services.

The unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ into all India market, Subramaniam Srinivasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He  established the popular Tamil magazine ‘Anand Vikatan’, and owned Gemini studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film. In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a  success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’ (1950). Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. ‘Mangala’ was remade in Sinhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955 and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao (later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh), and Jamuna.

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu Version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ in 1950 followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ in 1951. They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 1960s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to novels of writers like Chetan Bhagat. And thanks to modernization.

‘Bahut Din Huye’ had a cast consisting of Madhubala, Ratan Kumar, Agha, Kailash, Savitri (debut film in Hindi), Lalita Pawar, Pushpvalli (mother of Rekha), Kanhaiya Lal etc. Ratan Kumar had a big role in this film. Another film of 1954, ‘Jagriti’ also had a pivotal role for Ratan Kumar.

Ratan Kumar’s real name was Syed Nazar Ali (born 21-8-42 at Ajmer, passed away 12-12-2016 at California, USA). He started working as a child star when he was just 4 year old. His first film was Baburao Patel’s ‘Gwaalan’ (1946). He did 25 film roles before he acted in film ‘Jagriti’. He worked in many famous films like ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Malhaar’ (1951), ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Boot Polish’ (1953) etc. After doing film ‘Jalwa’ in 1955, he migrated to Pakistan in 1956, with his family, and remade ‘Jagriti’ in Pakistan, as ‘Bedaari(1957) – Urdu translation of the Hindi word Jagriti. This film used the same old tune for a film song in Pakistan, aimed at igniting a similar emotion and patriotic zeal, among the listeners. – “Aao Bachcho Tumhe Dikhayen Jhaanki Hindustan Ki… (come children let us show you glimpses of India), is a popular Hindi film song of the 1950s. “Aao Bachcho Sair Karaayen Tumko Pakistan Ki… (children, let us take you on a tour of Pakistan) is an equally hit song of the same period in Pakistan. The movie ‘Bedaari’ (1957) was produced by his elder brother Wazir Ali Rizvi.

He played a young boy’s role in many Pakistani films later. ‘Naagin (1959) was the first Pakistani film he played a lead actor opposite Neelo as the lead actress. Ratan Kumar’s success, as a lead actor, could not last long because his later films did not do well at the box-office and he eventually faded away.

In 1977, his 4 years old daughter died in an accident in Lahore, Pakistan. He was so emotionally upset after that accident that he decided to quit the Pakistani film industry. In 1979, Ratan Kumar left Pakistan never to return again. In the late 1960s, Ratan Kumar also got into the business of selling oriental carpets and had started travelling back and forth from Pakistan to Europe for this business. Eventually he ended up settling down permanently in the United States after 1979.

Ratan Kumar was living in California, in his old age, and was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia 10 days before his death on 12 Dec 2016. He had a long history of illness, though. In 1996, his lungs had collapsed twice in the same year. When they collapsed the third time in 2000, he was left paralyzed and went into a coma for eight days. Then he recovered in four to five months and became somewhat normal again. His survivors include 2 sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren .

Music for film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ is by a pair of BS Kalla and E Sankar Sastry. Many south Indian composers had tried their hand at giving music to Hindi films in the 50s decade. MDs like Ghantasala, BS Kalla, SD Parthasarathi, E Shankar, B Laxman, Vishwanathan, R Sudarshanam, SV Venkataramana, TR Ramanathan and TG Lingappa are few of the lesser known music directors from south, who composed music for Hindi films. They gave melodious music, but somehow they did not succeed here. One reason could be their use of southern singers, for whom acceptability was a problem here for Hindi songs. Names like Ramesh Naidu, Adi Narayana Rao and the pair of Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy were at least known names here. Their films like ‘Piya Milan’ (1955, MD – Ramesh Naidu), ‘Suvarna Sundari’ (1958, MD – Adi Narayana Rao) and ‘Naya Aadmi’ (1956, MD – Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy) had many popular songs.

The film had 17 songs, 7 of these were sung by Lata Mangeshkar and the remaining were either by chorus or unnamed male/female singers. The lyrics were by Pt. Indra. Let us now hear today’s chorus song and enjoy the song and dance video.

[Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Rajadhyaksha, HFGK, MuVyz, The Hindu, Wiki and my notes.]

Song – Swaagat Raajkumar Tumhaara, Swaagat Raajkumar  (Bahut Din Huye) (1954) Singer – Chorus, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – BS Kalla

Lyrics

aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aa aa aa aaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaa aaaaa

swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar
swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar

aaaa aaaa aaaa
ye akhiyan matwaali kab se
rahi hain baat nihaar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa

aao baitho ratan hindole
aaaa aaaa aaaa
ratan hindole
pawan veg se jhulo
tum pyaare mehmaan hamaare..ae..ae
aao sab kuchh bhulo
jhoola jhulo

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmmm mmmmm mmmm

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आ आ आ आssss
आ आ आ आ
आ आss आssss आssss
आsss आssss

स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार
स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार

आ आ आ
ये अखियाँ मतवाली कब से
रही हैं बाट निहार
आsss आsss आsssss आsss
आsss आsss आsss
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ

आओ बैठो रतन हिंडोले
आsss आsss आsss
रतन हिंडोले
पावन वेग से झूलो
तुम प्यारे मेहमान हमारे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आओ सब कुछ भूलो
झूला झूलो

आsss आsss आsss आsss
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3874 Post No. : 14894

The New Theatres Ltd.(NT) has given some outstanding and famous directors to the Hindi film industry who got fame on an all-India level. A couple of them got recognition in the international level also. I list below a few of them:

Debaki Bose was known for his films like ‘Chandidas’ (Bengali, 1932), ‘Puran Bhagat’ (1933), ‘Seeta’ (1934), ‘Vidyapati’ (1937). ‘Nartaki’ (1940) etc. Kidar Sharma called him the ‘Dronacharya of film making’. He was the first director who used background music. Probably, he was also the first Indian film director who was honoured with a Certificate of Merit for his direction of the film ‘Seeta’ (1933) at Cannes Film Festival.

Nitin Bose was known for the use of his magical camera angle in the films he directed. His camera angles spoke more than the dialogues. Some of the notable films he directed was ‘Chandidas’ (Hindi, 1934), ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’ (1935), ‘President’ (1937), ‘Dharti Mata’ (1938), ‘Milan’ (1946), ‘Deedar’ (1951), ‘Waaris’ (1954), ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961) etc. He was the first to experiment with playback singing in his film ‘Dhoop Chhaaon’ (1935). He got the idea when he saw Pankaj Mullick singing in tandem with a song which he was playing on his gramophone record player.

P C Barua, though not originally from NT, got name and fame when he joined NT and directed ‘Devdas’ (1935). He directed some other films like ‘Manzil’ (1936), ‘Mukti’ (1937), ‘Zindagi’ (1940), ‘Jawaab’ (1942), ‘Subah-Shaam’ (1944) etc. He was the first director who used ‘flash back’ technique in ‘Roop Lekha’ (1934).

Bimal Roy started his filmy career as Assistant to P C Barua in cinematography, editing and direction. He was the Cinematographer for films like ‘Devdas’ (1935), Mukti’ (1937), ‘Haar Jeet’ (1940), ‘Meenakshi’ (1942) etc. He got his first assignment as director in NT when he directed ‘Hamraahi’ (1945). Other well-known films which he directed include ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Devdas’ (1955), ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Sujata’ (1959), “Bandini’ (1963). ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953)’ was critically acclaimed and won a prize at Cannes Film Festival. ‘Madhumati’ (1958) got a total of 9 ‘Filmfare’ awards.

Name of a well-known director from NT is missing from the above list. I have chosen him in this article for his detailed profile. And he is Phani Majumdar.

Phani Majumdar (28/12/1911-16/05/1994) was born in Faridkot in Bengal Presidency (now in Bangla Desh). After his graduation in 1930, Phani Majumdar worked as a typist in a company. His connection with films started when he joined as Stenographer to P C Barua in Barua Studio sometime in 1932. Later he became his Assistant Director in ‘Devdas’ (1935) and ‘Mukti’ (1937). He was a script-writer for ‘Abhagin’ (1938).

Phani Majumdar got his opportunity to debut as director in ‘Street Singer’ (1938) with K L Saigal and Kanan Devi in lead roles. This film is regarded as classical musical melodrama like ‘Devdas’ (1935). His debut film was highly successful at the box office. With this film, K L Saigal and Kanan Devi reached the pinnacle of their filmy career as actor-singer.

After successfully directing ‘Kapal Kundala’ (1939) for NT, Phani Majumdar shifted his base to Bombay (Mumbai) sometime in 1941. But working as a free-lance director was not a cakewalk for him especially at a time when there was scarcity of raw films, getting actors for the films who were mostly studio attached and the studio time for shooting. But due to his fame as a director of ‘Street Singer’ (1938) and also his friendly nature, he could overcome the initial obstacles.

Luck favoured Phani Majumdar. Chimanlal Trivedi had closed down his film production company, CIRCO Productions and had set up a new banner, Laxmi Productions. He engaged Phani Majumdar for directing his first film ‘Tamanna’ (1942) under the new banner. From the cast and crew of the film, it would appear that Phani Majumdar had a free hand in selecting them. Apart from actors for the film like Leela Desai, Jagdish Sethi, K C Dey who were earlier attached to NT, he had engaged 7 technicians from Bengal for the film. This was the first film in Mumbai for Leela Desai.

‘Filmindia’, in its review of ‘Tamanna’ (1942) while lauding the performances of Jairaj, Leela Desai, Jagdish Sethi and K C Dey, was critical of the direction by Phani Majumdar. However, some of the film producers seemed to have a different views. The result was that Phani Majumdar was flooded with new assignments as director for ‘Mohabbat’ (1943), ‘Rajkumar’ (1944) and ‘Meena’ (1944). Thereafter, he produced and directed ‘Devdasi’ (1945), Insaaf’ (1946) and ‘Door Chalen’ (1946). He also directed an off-beat film ‘Hum Bhi Insaan Hain’ (1948) starring Dev Anand and Ramola.

In the early 1950s, Phani Majumdar directed ‘Andolan’ (1951) which was virtually a documentary type film depicting the history of the Indian National Congress since its inception in 1885 until 1947 and India’s freedom struggle. Thereafter, he directed Bombay Talkies’ ‘Tamasha’ (1952) and ‘Baadbaan’ (1954), the latter being actually produced by the Bombay Talkies Workers Cooperatives. Both these films were critically acclaimed though they were not successful in terms of box office receipts. Shakti Samanta assisted Phani Majumdar in both these films in direction as also in dialogues/script writing.

During 1955-59, Phani Majumdar joined Shaws’ Malay Films Productions, Singapore. During this period, he directed 11 films in Malay, Chinese and English languages. He directed the first Eastman Colour film in Malay language, ‘Hang Tuah’ (1956). The film won awards in the Asian Film Festival held in Hong Kong in 1957 and was nominated for the Golden Berlin Bear in Berlin International Film Festival, 1957. The prominent Malaysian film maker, Jamir Sulong assisted Phani Majumdar in his 6 out of 8 films he directed in Singapore.

After returning to India in 1959, he directed successful films like ‘Aarti’ (1962), ‘Oonche Log’ (1965) and ‘Aakashdeep’ (1965). In all, he directed 26 feature films in Hindi during 1938-1989. He wrote the scripts for most of his films which he directed. In addition, he also directed a few Children’s films and films in other languages like Bengali, Punjabi, Magadhi, Maithili, Malay, Chinese, English etc. Towards the end of his filmy career, he directed a few TV serials in Kolkata.

Phani Majumdar left for heavenly abode on May 16, 1994 at the age of 83. He was married to actress Monica Desai, the younger sister of actress Leela Desai.

Phani Majumdar mostly directed films which were acclaimed as creator of social consciousness. One of such films he directed was ‘‘Dhobi Doctor’ (1954). The film was produced under the banner of Ranjit Movietone. The star cast included Kishore Kumar and Usha Kiran in the lead role supported by Kanhaiyalal, Gautam, Krishnakant, Nazira Begum, Shivraj, Usha Rani, Master Jagdeep, Baby Asha Parekh etc

The gist of the story of the film based on the film’s review in January 24, 1954 issue of ‘Filmfare’ and the song book of the film is as under:

Ramu (childhood roe played by Jagdeep) is the son of a poor Dhobi, Mahadeo. Ramu is smart and intelligent. His elder sister, Lakshmi is very proud of her younger brother. Every evening, Lakshmi walks through the fields to pick him up from the school for back home.

One day, Lakshmi falls ill. Mahadeo has no money to bring doctor to the village. Having ranked top in his class in the school examination, Ramu has to attend to a prize distribution ceremony. But Lakshmi cannot accompany him as she is ill. After the prize distribution ceremony, Ramu returns home quickly to show his Didi the books he received as the prize. He finds that his Didi is dead. Choked with grief, he asks his father as to why Didi died. Mahadeo has no answer except that he was so poor that he could not afford to call a doctor. The broken-hearted Ramu vows that he would become a doctor and treat free the poor in the village.

Mahadeo works hard to earn more money for the fulfillment of Ramu’s dream. In the school, Ramu is taunted by some of his rich classmates for a dream of a poor Ramu of becoming a doctor but he is indifferent to the taunts. Ramu’s hard work and his father’s struggle bring fruits. He finishes his school with good performance and gets admitted to the medical college.

Ramu’s aptitude for medical studies attracts attention of the Vice- Principal, Professor Tripathi. He takes a greater interest in Ramu’s studies. Ramu becomes a doctor. Professor Tripathi helps him further in his practice by placing his laboratory at Ramu’s disposal. He also allows Ramu to study in his residence since his house in the village is far-off. Professor Tripathi has a young daughter, Uma (Usha Kiran) who plays pranks with Ramu. Gradually, Uma falls in love with Ramu. However, he is shy to reciprocate the love. Moreover, he is aware that he is the son of a poor Dhobi and Uma is the daughter of a rich father. There is struggle between his heart and realities of the situation. However, at the end, they unite after overcoming the stumbling block of the society.

‘Dhobi Doctor’ (1954) had 7 songs of which one song has been covered in the Blog. Interestingly, out of the 7 songs as many as 6 songs are solo songs of Asha Bhonsle. The remaining one song is sung by Kishore Kumar. All the songs were written jointly by Ali Sardar Jafri and Majrooh Sutanpuri and were composed by Khayyam.

I am presenting one of the remaining six songs from the film which is a rare one. The song is ‘taaron se akhiyaan milaaun main’ sung by Asha Bhonsle. When I first heard this song, I was surprised to note that the composition as well as the orchestrations of the song sounded like that of O P Nayyar. The fact is that when Khayyam composed the music for this song, O P Nayyar had not established himself as the music director of repute to copy his style of music. He came into prominence only after a runaway success of ‘Aar Paar’ (1954) and its songs. But the film ‘Dhobi Doctor’ (1954) was released on January 19, 1954, about 4 months before the release of ‘Aar Paar’ (1954).

Enjoy this song of Khayyam in the style of O P Nayyar.

Note: The information on Phani Majumdar is mainly from indiancine.ma, ‘Filmindia’ magazines, ‘Film Pictorial’- April 1945 issue and inputs from newspapers.

Audio Clip :

Song-Taaron se ankhiyaan milaaun main (Dhobi Doctor)(1954) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Majrooh Sultanpuri, MD-Khayyam

Lyrics

hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
taaron se
taaron se ankhiyaan milaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se
taaron se ankhiyaan milaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se

shaam ki bahaaron mein
jhoomte nazaaron mein
naachoongi titliyaan ban ke
shaam ki bahaaron mein
jhoomte nazaaron mein
nachoongi titliyaan ban ke
chaandni ki chhaanv mein
dolti hawaaon mein
gaaungi koyaliyaa ban ke
dil na kisi se lagaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se
taaron se ankhiyaan milaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se

ankhiyon ko mal ke gaaungi machal ke
birha ke geet jhoothh moothh ke
ankhiyon ko mal ke gaaungi machal ke
birha ke geet jhoothh moothh ke
kahin bhi na jaaungi
abhi roothh jaaungi
aa ke man jaaungi roothh ke
dil na kisi se lagaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se
taaron se ankhiyaan milaaun main
chanda ko sajna banaaun main
taaron se
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3872 Post No. : 14890

Today’s song is from the film Toote Khilaune-54. It is produced by N.Mehta, directed by Nanabhai Bhatt and the music Director is my favourite – Chitragupt. The cast of the film was Shekhar, Purnima, Gulab, Ranjeet Kumari, Master Romi, Babu Raje, a dog called Ginger and Guest artiste Asha Mathur.

This was a typical family film, involving a too much interfering Mother in law, a foster son and a loving step mother. The decade of the 50s was a period when the film makers were trying their best to give something to everyone. Films of almost all Genres were made in this decade. This decade was a Bridge Period between the old style music and the film making and the New Age films and the Music.

Sadly, the melody in Music had died a slow death, along with the phased exit of composers of the 40s and the 50s. Though emergence of New Age music makers kept the country on par with the changing world tastes, the Music, in particular, suffered the demise of melody and sweetness in film music. Earlier too,songs were inspired by foreign tunes, but the new age music based on foreign tunes was more noisy and instrument dominant, rather than the melody of tunes and singing styles. The 1959 film ‘ Dil deke dekho’ heralded loudly the coming of new age music from then on.

One can not blame the music makers alone, because not only the tastes of audience were changing, but also a whole new generation of producers, directors, actors, singers and composers was replacing the older one step by step. No change takes place overnight. One always gets the warning signals well in advance. Change is inevitable. Either accept change or perish !

Music composers from the 40s and 50s did survive in the 60’s decade, but they were relegated to B and C grade films. Very few composers remained A grade even in 60 or the early 70s. Ultimately, they had to give way to new music. This change was seen as the ” end of the Golden Period” of film music.

Cases like that of Chitragupta and others of his ilk were different. They operated long time but never became A grade. However, it was to their credit that even then, they composed melodious songs which delighted lovers of good music. That is why I like Chitragupt songs. Pick them up from any film and you will not be disappointed as far as melody and good tunes are concerned.

Songs of Toote Khilaune-54 are no exception. Songs were very sweet. There were 8 songs (this was another change that took place in the 50s onwards. Now films had songs less than 10 on average- unlike 10 to 15 songs in 40s and 15 to 20 songs in the 30s). 3 songs are already discussed here. Today’s song is 4th song. This is a duet sung by Chitragupt and Shamshad Begum.

From the cast, I have written about Shekhar and Purnima in my earlier posts. The 3 odd names appearing in the cast are Gulab, Ranjeet kumari and Asha Mathur. Ranjeet kumari’s name was Ranjit kaur. She was a sikh from Punjab. She acted in only 8 films, from Matwali Meera-40 to her last film Toote Khilaune-54. She got married to actor Ramsingh and moved with him to his village in U.P. to become and remain a housewife till her last day.

One of the few educated actresses of her times, Asha Mathur (Sohan Singh in real life) studied up to B.A. Both Asha Mathur and Bina Roy were introduced by Kishore Sahu in Kali Ghata (1951). While Bina Roy was relatively more successful among the two and did some memorable movies including Anarkali (1953) and Taj Mahal (1963), Asha Mathur was relegated to obscure mythical and costume films including Alif Laila (1953), Rajyogi Bharthari (1954), Malka-E-Alam Noorjehan (1954), Amar Kirtan (1954) etc because of her lackluster performances. Her most memorable role was in Poonam (1952), as a suffering wife of Ashok Kumar. She married famous director of her times Mohan Sehgal and left films. She acted only in 18 films. Her last film was Taqdeer-58.

Asha Mathur is a forgotten name today except for the few popular songs picturized on her – Humsai na poocho koi pyra kiya hai (Kali Ghata, 1951) and Baanki adayein dekh na ji dekh na(Amanat, 1955).

One of the beauties of old films was Gulab. The First actress form Kashmir to work as a Heroine in Hindi films was GULAB. Her real name was Saraswati Devi. She was born on 10-6-1908 at Jammu. She joined Krishna Film Company in 1924. Her first silent film’Krishna kumar’ came in 1925. She worked in 60 silent films. Her last silent film was ‘Dagabaz Dushman’-32, made by east India Film co.Bombay.

Her first Talkie film was Suryakumari-33, made by Vishnu Cinetone. It was directed by Dhirubhai Desai. She sang one song ‘more preetam jab ghar aaye’ composed bu Kikubhai Yagnik. Then came Baburao Patel’s ‘Bala Joban’-34, Sewa Sadan-34 and Nai Duniya-34 ( Debut film of Rajkumari and Jayant). In this film Gulab sang 2 songs.

Gulab was very beautiful and quite popular in film industry. Some of her films were Bambai ki sethani-35, Challenge-37, Bharosa-40, Pyas-41, Ek Raat-42, Station master-42, Gaali-44, Rattan-44, Mann ki jeet-44, Mirza Sahibaan-47, Lahore-49, Badi Behan-49, stage-51, Post Box 999-58, Chhabili-60 etc etc. She acted in 160 films. Her last film seems to be Haqeeqat-64. She also sang 22 songs in 11 films.

The story of film Toote Khilaune-54 , as found on Cineplot, is…..Pragati Pictures’ “Toote Khilone,” premiered at the Roxy Theatre on March 19th, 1954 is pro­duced by N. Mehta and directed by Nanabhai Bhatt and it is a very good film based on a story-idea whose truth and simplicity invest it with an irresistible appeal.
The deeply moving and very human story, sensitively enacted by Shekhar, Purnima, Asha Mathur and little Romi, tells of a little child and his bewildered sorrow in the midst of do­mestic troubles.

Written by Akhtar Mirza, the story centers on a young married couple and their little son who dotes on his mother’s cousin, Sheela. When the mother dies of cancer, Sheela stays on to look after the little boy and eventually marries his father.

Trouble arrives in the shape of Sheela’s mother who moves into the happy household and builds up in her daughter a resentment against the child. The poisonous insinuations of the older woman turn Sheela into a confused and bitter foster-mother, but kindness and love triumph when the heart-broken child runs away. The film reaches a cleverly presented climax in which Sheela and her husband find the child safe and all three happily return home.

Playing his role with restraint and sym­pathy is Shekhar who puts over a fine perform­ance as the boy’s father. His portrayal of a man who marries a second time so that his child may have a mother is quite flawless.

As the young wife, Purnima is superb. Hers is a natural and convincing performance, done with a fine understanding of the role.

A superb performance comes from Romi, as the little boy caught up in a web of circumst­ances he cannot understand. He is utterly lov­able and, together with the wonderful canine star, Ginger, he walks away with the picture’s honors.

Gulab turns in another one of her brilliant cameos as the interfering mother-in-law, and Asha Mathur gives an appealing and warm in­terpretation of the tragic role of Shekhar’s wife.

The fine supporting cast is headed by Ranjit Kumari and Babu Raje who provide the comedy relief as the kind, devoted servants.

Gay and appealing dances punctuate the story, and the songs, with the music composed by Chitragupta, are melodious.

“Toote Khilone” is a charming film, well directed and acted, with polished production values and excellent sets, decor and photogra­phy.

Let us now enjoy the melodious duet of Chitragupt and Shamshad Begum from film Toote Khilaune-54.

( Thanks to Cineplot, directory of Films-1948 and my notes)


Song- Tere pyar mein huye badnaam hum, lote ki kasam, thali ki kasam (Toote Khilaune)(1954) Singers- Chitragupta, Shamshad Begum, Lyricist- Raja Mehdi Ali Khan, MD- Chitragupta
Both

Lyrics

Tere pyaar mein huye badnam hum
lote ki kasam, thaali ki kasam
lote ki kasam, thaali ki kasam
bhoole ghar ke sab kaam hum
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam

Tere pyaar mein huye badnaam hum
lote ki kasam, thaali ki kasam
bhoole ghar ke sab kaam hum
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam

din raat muhabbat mein teri
choolhe ki tarah hum jalte rahe
haaye jalte rahe
din raat muhabbat mein teri
choolhe ki tarah hum jalte rahe
haaye jalte rahe
hum dil ki kadhaahi mein baalam
tere pyaar ke bhajiye talte rahe
hum dil ki kadhaahi mein baalam
tere pyaar ke bhajiye talte rahe

choolhe ki tarah hum jalte rahe
jalte rahe subaho shaam hum
koyle ki kasam lakdi ki kasam
koyle ki kasam lakdi ki kasam
tere pyaar mein huye badnaam hum
lote ki kasam thhaali ki kasam

bhoole ghar ke sab kaam hum
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam

nainon ki rakaabi mein rakh ke
hum pyaar ki barfi laa na sake
haaye laa na sake
nainon ki rakaabi mein rakh ke
hum pyaar ki barfi laa na sake
haaye laa na sake

tera jalwa meethha halwa hai
jee bhar ke ise hum khaa na sake
o tera jalwa meethha halwa hai
jee bhar ke ise hum khaa na sake
jee bhar ke ise hum khaa na sake
tum piste aur baadaam hum
pede ki kasam barfi ki kasam
pede ki kasam barfi ki kasam

Tere pyaar mein huye badnam hum
lote ki kasam, thaali ki kasam
lote ki kasam, thaali ki kasam
bhoole ghar ke sab kaam hum
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam
aaloo ki kasam gobhi ki kasam


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3796 Post No. : 14784

Today’s song is from the film Mahatma Kabir-54.

India has been attacked and ruled by outsiders for centuries. Religions other than Hinduism ruled this country and at times it was feared if our religion will become extinct. Perhaps, from this feeling Bhakti Movement started in India in one part and over the years it engulfed the entire Bharatvarsha. During this period, many saints, teachers and holy figures came up and helped the country to be strong once again in matters of religion.

The Bhakti movement refers to the theistic devotional trend that emerged in medieval Hinduism and later revolutionised in Sikhism. It originated in eighth-century south India (now Tamil Nadu and Kerala), and spread northwards. It swept over east and north India from the 15th century onwards, reaching its zenith between the 15th and 17th century.

The Bhakti movement regionally developed around different gods and goddesses, and some sub-religions were Vaishnavism (Vishnu), Shaivism (Shiva), Shaktism (Shakti goddesses), and Smartism. The movement was inspired by many poet-saints, who championed a wide range of philosophical positions ranging from theistic dualism of Dvaita to absolute monism of Advaita Vedanta.

The movement has traditionally been considered as an influential social reformation in Hinduism, and provided an individual-focused alternative path to spirituality regardless of one’s caste of birth or gender. Postmodern scholars question this traditional view and whether the Bhakti movement ever was a reform or rebellion of any kind.

India is a Multi racial, multi language and Multi religions country. It is not only one of the largest Democracies in the world, but also the largest Secular state in the world, where people from different faiths have been living together since centuries.

Many saints and religious leaders have played a significant role in keeping the mixed population of India as One Unit, when it was needed the most. A majority of Hindus, ruled by Muslim Mughals was a natural cause for social divisions, but Saints like Kabir, Surdas, Tulsidas, Ramdas, Tukaram, Ramanand, Narsi Mehta, Purandar das,Namdev, Guru Nanak Dev, Eknath, Bhakta Pundarikar, Rohidas, Mrutyunjaya and many such noble souls, did an excellent job of maintaining harmony amongst peoples of different faiths.

Kabirdas ji is one saint who is revered equally by Hindus and Muslims as well as Sikhs. He belonged, in fact, to all Indian masses.

Kabir was born near Kashi (Varanasi) to a Bramhin widow, who deserted him, for fear of social boycott. He was found and brought up by a Muslim weaver couple-Niru and Naima. Vaishnava Saint Ramanand accepted him as his disciple. Unlike some other saints, Kabir did not become a Sadhu or a Fakir, but he married and led a normal life earning from his Loom works. He had 1 son and 1 daughter also.

Kabir campaigned against social discrimination and economic exploitation. He vehemently opposed dogmas in Hinduism and Islam. His language was straight from the heart, using common vernacular words, which appealed to the masses. He was against Moorti-puja and believed in Bhakti and Sufi ideas. He was an illiterate person. His poems and Dohas were heard ,noted and written by his followers. His works are included in the Guru Granth Sahib of the Sikhs also. His dohas were in Awadhi, Brij and Bhojpuri languages. Through his philosophies, he spread the message of unity during his times. For him Ram and Rahim were the same.

While the authentic period of kabir is 1440 to 1518, there are popular legends about him living for 120 years and after death, his body turning into Flowers.

More than anything else, Mahatma Kabir is remembered for the courage of his convictions. He was a religious reformer who slashed down the orthodox bigotism of Hindus and Muslims alike. He denounced with a touch of satire, the whole apparatus of piety of the temple and the mosque, the idol and the holy water scriptures and the priests, labelling them as cults that vainly tried to replace Reality with Ritual. And thus it was that while courting bitterness from the accepted monopolists of Faith, he tried to eliminate the bitterness that then existed between Hindu and Muslims of that day. The life story of Kabir saheb is surrounded by numerous contradictory legends, on many of which reliance cannot be placed. It is therefore not to be expected that any one version of his life could satisfy all such sections of people who claim to know anything about him.

Mahatma Kabir-54 was made by New premier Films, Bombay and it was directed by Gajanan Jahagirdar. The music was by Anil Biswas and the cast included Surendra, Sulochana, Jahagirdar, Randhir, Lalita Pawar and others. The story of the film is…

The story of Mahatma Kabir begins with the unfolding of a lotus as divine light penetrates through its petals. The infant that lay within, stretched out its chubby arms to Nooru and Naima, a weaver couple of Benares, who brought him up as Kabir, their foster son. But Kabir grew into a strange boy, dreamy and listless, curious of matters spiritual, until one day he saw in Swami Ramananda his destine teacher. Eager to meet his Guru alone, he lay upon the steps of the Ganges, where Ramananda was accustomed to bath. The master trod upon his body unexpectedly and exclaimed “Ram Ram”. Accepting this as a token of the mantra of initiation, and with inspiring words of the Guru, Kabir stepped forth in pursuit of his mystic mission.

As a youth, he found his opposition from the orthodox groups increasing in the threatening proportions. His family was ostracised socially and economically, a calamity to which his foster father Nooru succumbed. All legends agree that Kabir a simple unlettered weaver relied in work as a means of living independently of any charity and earned his livelihood from the loom. The work of his hands helped him rather than hindered the impassioned meditation of his heart from the depths of which he sang the rapturous lyrics of divine love.

Kabir Saheb was constantly harassed by the Mahajan for the repayment of his foster father’s debt which on account of his economic boycott he was not able to repay. He was involved in a theft charge and presented before the Ruler of Kashi who ordered him to be whipped. The sentence was executed but Kabir smiled at the foolishness of those trying to punish him for the offence he had not committed, while the real offender on whom the lashes were actually falling cried in pain. The repentant Kashi Naresh honoured and feted Kabir and the entire ensemble shouted Kabirji ki jai. Returning home Kabir found his ancestral home attached by his Mahajan. People offered to pay off the debt but Kabir declined their offer. He thought that Ram was taking him closer to Himself by removing slowly the barriers of worldly possessions.

With the ancestral house gone, Kabir walked away to the ruins in the outskirts of the Kashi with his foster mother Naima and wife Loi. From there, this apostle of Universal Love, travelled through the length and breadth of the land and the countries beyond, spreading his gospel far and wide while his foster-mother and wife Loi suffered the privations of life. After many years he returned to Benares, where his ailing mother held her breath only to see him for the last time. Now Kabir was an old man, but much revered and still more opposed. This opposition culminated in his being presented before Sikander Lodi on a charge that he was not only an enemy of Islam but also a traitor to the throne of Delhi. Sikander referred the matters to the Kazi of Benares, who ordered him to be thrown into the Ganges tied hand and foot. The cruel sentenced was carried out, while a vast multitude, thronging the Benares Ghats looked on with throbbing hearts and streaming eyes.

As expected Kabir survives and the Kazi and Sikander bow their heads in respect. Finally when Kabir dies, his body turns into flowers and Hindus and Muslims share it for their respective last rites.

The music for this film was given by Anil Biswas. C.H.Atma, who unsuccessfully tried to become a singing star in films like Bhai sahab-54 and Bilwamangal-54, had sung a Bhajan ” Ram Ras Barse re manwa ” in this film as a playback-in Saigal style. Anil Biswas and Saigal were good friends. Whenever Saigal wanted to avoid any unwanted visitor to him, he would escape to Anilda’s home and take his afternoon siesta. Unfortunately, Saigal never sang for Anilda, though he had kept one tune ready for him. This was later used for a song by Mukesh in another film.

Not Saigal, but singers who liked Saigal, sang for Anil Biswas…like Mukeh in Pehli Nazar-45 (dil jalata hai to jalne de), Kishore kumar in film Fareb-53 ( husn bhi hai udas) and C.H.Atma in the film Mahatma Kabir-54 (Ram ras barse re Manwa).

The Hero of Mahatma Kabir was Surendra. At one time he was projected as Bombay’s answer to Calcutta’s Saigal, by Sagar Movietone. While working in Sagar and National, Anil Biswas had used Surendra’s voice in films like Jagirdar, Mahageet, Gramophone singer, Comrade, Aurat and Jawani. Sagar Movietone always tried to compete with New Theatres, Calcutta. When they made President-37, Sagar made Jagirdar-37 and when Street singer-38 was made, Sagar made Gramophone singer-38. Though Surendra was popular, he could never match Saigal. It is to the credit of Surendra, that personally he revered Saigal and never thought of competing with him.

It was Naushad, who first stopped Surendra’s singing and gave him playback of Ustad Amir khan in film Baiju Bawra-52. When he was sporadically heard in films Gharbar-53 and Gawaiya-53, Anil Biswas bloked his singing again and all songs for Surendra in film Mahatma kabir were sung by Manna Dey as playback. After this Surendra only sang in film Pati patni-66. It was rumoured that Surendra himself requested the producer to allow him to sing his last song. He did it free too !

Amirbai Karnataki , who sang in this film was also in her last phase of film singing and after Mahatma Kabir-54, she sang only one song each in 57,61,64 and 72. Thus ended her singing career.

HFGK mentions that today’s song is written by Kabir himself. However, I find that except the Mukhda ‘ Ram Rahima ‘(repeated several times till last), the antara words are from a famous song by Wajid Ali Shah- ‘ Babul mora ‘, which was used in films like The trapped-31, Nachwali-34, Street singer-38 and Shatranj ke khiladi-77.

The song by Manna Dey and Chorus is very good. As such Anil Biswas was an expert in composing chorus songs, in his films. You may find at least one or two chorus songs in most of his films.


Song-Ram Rahima Ram Rahim (Mahatma Kabir)(1954) Singer- Manna Dey, Lyrics- Kabir Das , MD- Anil Biswas
Chorus

Lyrics

ram rahimaa
ram rahim
ram rahimaa
ram rahim
ram rahimaa
ram rahim
ram rahimaa
ram rahim

baabul mora
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
naihar chhuta hi jaaye
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
baabul mora
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
naihar chhuto hi jaaye
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim

chaar kahaar mil ab doliya aa aa sajaawen
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
mora apna begaana aa aa chhuto jaaye
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
baabul mora aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
naihar chhuto hi jaaye
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
baabul mora aa baabul mora
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
baabul mora aa aa baabul mora aa aa
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)
baabul mora aa aa aa
(ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
ram rahimaa ram rahim
)


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3775 Post No. : 14753

“Africa” (1954) was produced by by C Chandrakant and directed by K Kant for Movie India, Bombay. The movie had Baburao pahalwan , Krishna Kumari, Habib, Alice, Ishwar, R S Pawar, Madan Kapoor, Shaikh, D N Devesh, Parmesh, Babu, Raghu, Gopal, Ahmad, Kaka, Nagendra, Kumar Sharma, R S Dewan (Gorilla) etc in it.

The movie had five songs in it. One song has been covered in the past.

Here is the second song from this obscure movie. The song is sung by Mubarak Begam. Lyricist is Kumar Sharma Vanvasi. Music is composed by Robin Chatterji.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the movie as well as on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Dil ki duniya pe chhaa gaya koi (Africa)(1954) Singer-Mubarak Begam, Lyrics-Kumar Sharma Vanwasi, MD-Robin Chatterji

Lyrics

dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi
dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi

maine ab tak na kuchh bhi seekha tha
pyar karna sikha gaya koi
sikha gaya koi
dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi

mast aankhon ke ek ishaare se
aag dil mein laga gaya koi
laga gaya koi
dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi

chain tab se hi ho gaya rukhsat
aankh jab se lada gaya koi
lada gaya koi
dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi

pyaar mein main to ho gayi paagal
mujhpe jaadu chala gaya koi
chala gaya koi
dil ki duniya pe chha gaya koi
mujhko apna bana gaya koi
bana gaya koi


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3756 Post No. : 14722

Today’s song is from a film called ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ (1956). This is a film in which singer Talat Mahmood acted as a hero opposite heroine Roopmala. Talat Mahmood (24-2-1924 to 9-5-1998) acted in 12 films from 1945 to 1958 and he also did a cameo role, singing a song-“Shukriya Ae Pyaar Tera Shukriya“, of  three and half minutes in film Aaram-1951. In his early career starting in Calcutta, he fell in love with a Bangla actress Latika Mullick. They got married on 20-2-1951. She was converted to Islam and was renamed Nasreen, who bore two children to Talat. As per a book by Manek Premchand, ‘Talat Mahmood – The Velvet Touch’, he sang 777 songs which included Hindi film songs, NFS and unreleased films etc. As per another source he sang 451 Hindi film songs from 259 Hindi films.

Two very good singers – and my favourites – spoiled their singing careers at the cost of fulfilling their misplaced hype of making it as a singing hero, when such times had died down after Saigal. Mukesh ( 22-7-1923 to 27-8-1976 ) acted in 8 films from 1941 to 1956 and sang 928 songs from 538 films, as per one source. I personally feel, the film bug did more damage to Talat than Mukesh. Of course a money-smart Talat made it up with innumerable foreign tours for concerts and singing jaunts with a party made up of musicians, singers and mimicry artistes.

Recently, I received a copy of Talat’s handwritten inland letter, sent to one of my friends in Gujarat, who wanted to arrange his show. As per what Talat wrote on 26-12-1977, his fees was Rs. 12,000/-, plus hotel accommodation for him and others. The troupe, he said, consisted of singers, dancers, musicians and mimicry artistes. One may feel that Rs. 12,000 was too low, but remember, this was 41 years ago, when petrol was less than two rupees per litre. In late 70s, I had rented a two bedroom, 1,000 sq ft flat in prime locality like Andheri in Bombay, for just Rs. 800 pm. Today the same size flat will command a rent of Rs. 40,000 + pm.

Like the values of money and values of life changed in all these years, almost everything has changed nowadays. These changes have not come overnight, but like slow poisoning, the changes took almost 50 to 60 years to show their effect. The second world war and the independence era were the beginning when quantity started overpowering quality. The film industry was also not an exception. How good the acting or the music was, became secondary and how many films, became the testing apparatus to judge the actor or the composer. Thus the simple but the talented artistes fell behind and those who pushed hard or had the right connections (and the luck) went much ahead.

In the field of Music Direction, at least two names come to the mind, who were talented but too simple to last in the neck to neck competition of the film line. One of them was Snehal Bhatkar (the other being, Bharat Bhai’s favourite- Jaidev). He was the MD for the film ‘Diwali Ki Raat’.

White full shirt, ironed white pyjama, spectacles with big powerful lenses and the trademark white Gandhi Topi – he could easily be mistaken for a ‘Pandharpur Warkari’ (a regular pilgrim to Pandharpur) or a member of a ‘Bhajani Mandali’ or simply a middle class ‘Marathi Manoos’. Such was the appearance of one of Hindi filmdom’s talented, yet not so famous, music maestro VASUDEV GANGARAM BHATKAR or Snehal Bhatkar, as we all know him.

In Hindi film music field there were some talented composers like Ghulam Mohd, Mohd. Shafi, Iqbal Qureshi, Daan singh, C Arjun, Ramlal, Sardar Malik, Ajit Merchant, Jamal Sen, Dattaram, Ganesh, etc. who could never reach the peaks of their careers. They really deserved success and fame, but luck did not favour them. Big banners never approached them and eventually the losers were the music lovers in India. These composers did not know, perhaps, how to sell their art. May be they never wanted to enslave music to gain name and fame, instead they preferred to settle for genuine service to music!

Snehal Bhatkar was one such composer. The maxim of simple living and high thinking never worked in this Mayanagari, but he had no regrets. Till the very end he was contented with whatever God gave him, and whatever name and success he achieved.

He was born into and grew up in a family that was surrounded by traditional devotional music all around. In the lower middle class, the people had their entertainments in singing bhajans and doing keertans in temples en masse.

Vasudev G. Bhatkar was born on 17-7-1919. He knew at least 100 bhajans by heart by the time he was in his 10th class. He was invited to sing in Ganesh Melas and other celebrations and soon became a well-known name in the locality. Because of his singing and skills in playing harmonium and other instruments, he got a job with HMV in Bombay. Here he used to give accompaniment on harmonium to big classical singers. At the same time, taking cognizance of his singing skills, many Marathi bhavgeets and bhajans were recorded by HMV. Some of them are popular in Maharashtra even today.

All this while, Bhatkar was looking for opportunity to compose in films. Sudhir Phadke who also served in HMV and recorded some songs from 1943 to 1945, joined hands with Bhatkar and made a pair – Vasudev-Sudhir. In 1946, they got a film of Baburao Painter – ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’ – for music direction. The problem was that due to his service in HMV, he could not openly work outside. Hence he only gave his name as Vasudev. After this film, the pair separated and Phadke went to give music to films like ‘Gokul’ (1946), ‘Aagey Badho’ (1947), etc. Due to financial constraints Bhatkar was unable to leave his job with HMV.

In 1941, Bhatkar had come to know Kidar Sharma while recording songs for his film ‘Chitralekha’, which he was making for Ranjit Studios. Sharma had just come from Calcutta to establish himself in Bombay. He had a knack of identifying talents. He first gave a chance to Bhatkar to sing some songs with Leela Sawant in his film ‘Kaliyan’ (1944). After ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’, Kidar Sharma gave him his first break as an independent composer in his film ‘Neelkamal’ (1947), where Kidar Sharma launched Raj Kapoor and Madhubala in adult roles as the leading pair. Here Bhatkar used the name B Vasudev. In the subsequent years Bhatkar used different names for different films like VG Bhatkar in ‘Sant Tukram’ (1948), ‘Sati Ahalya’ (1949) and ‘Pagle’ (1950), and Snehal in ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948) and ‘Thes’ (1949). After doing ‘The’s and ‘Sati Ahalya’, Bhatkar resigned from HMV.

Snehal Bhatkar and Kidar Sharma were very good friends. Kidar gave him ‘Neki Aur Badi’ in 1949. Meanwhile, Kidar Sharma met Roshan Lal Nagrath in some musical event. Sharma was terribly impressed with Roshan and wanted to give him a break in his film. At that point of time, Kidar had just started work on ‘Neki Aur Badi’. He had a heart to heart talk with Bhatkar and Bhatkar gladly left the film for Roshan. Thus Roshan got his break with ‘Neki aur Badi’. Roshan never forgot Bhatkar’s magnanimity in his life and always respected Bhatkar. In return Kidar Sharma gave ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950) to Bhatkar. As he was a free bird now, Bhatkar started using the name SNEHAL BHATKAR  from this film. Snehal was the short form of Snehalata, his daughter.

Snehal Bhatkar did many Marathi films and recorded many bhajans in Marathi, which are ever popular. He did 28 films in Hindi (including one unreleased film in the 1950s) and 12 films in Marathi. Out of 27 released Hindi films, 9 were made by Kidar Sharma.

The song which made Mubarak Begum and Bhatkar famous in India was ‘Kabhi Tanhayion Mein, Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ from the film ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961). (This film was was originally named ‘Jawaan Mohabbat’). Actually this song was to be done by Lata Mangeshkar. Lata had already recorded two songs for this film. Due to her extremely busy schedule she was unable to do this song, so she suggested the name of Asha Bhosle. But Kidar Sharma, already upset over Lata’s refusal, opted for Mubarak Begum and the rest, as they say, is history. She imbued a unique character to this song with her special voice.

After 1960, the musical scene in India was undergoing drastic changes and there was no space for composers like Bhatkar, who used minimum orchestra and dwelt upon melody. His films came in long intervals. Even Kidar Sharma left him after ‘Fariyaad’ (1964) only to return in ‘Pehla Qadam’ (1981). Finally Bhatkar did his last Hindi film ‘Sahme Hue Sitare’ (1994), which featured his son Ramesh Bhatkar, who was already a popular hero in Marathi film, stage and TV. This obscure film did nothing good to Bhatkar. After retirement Bhatkar devoted his time for children’s welfare and his original love – Bhajan Mandali singing.

Snehal or Vasudev Gangaram Bhatkar, together with cousin Devji Bhatkar and Panchambuwa Pandurang Shivalkar, was the founder member of ‘Vishwambhar Prasadik Bhajan Mandal’ in Dadar. It is still in operation after 50 years, with new set of singers. Bhatkar was very kind hearted. Every year, during Ganapati festival he used to visit his ancestral village ‘Bhate’ in Ratnagiri district and participate in singing bhajans.

Lata, Talat and Mukesh were his favourite singers. Although Talat has not sung many songs for him, his song “Zindagi Kis Mod Pe Laayee Hamein” from ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ was very popular. When rehearsals for this song were being done, Bhatkar had used only tabla and sitar for the practice session. The producer who chanced upon this rehearsal was so much impressed with this that he insisted recording the song only with minimum instruments. So, this song has only tabla, sitar and another instrument for accompaniment.

Though there were many melodious songs composed by Bhatkar like, Khusro’s “Lakhi Babul More Kaahe Ko Deenha Bides Re” sung soulfully by Mukesh in ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948); “Ro-oge Pachhtaoge” by Mukesh and Rajkumari in ‘Thes’ (1949); Lata’s “Chanda Tujhko Laaj Na Aayee” from ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951); Suman Kalyanpur’s “Haal-e-Dil Unko Sunana Tha“- Fariyaad (1964), no other big banner producer opted for Snehal Bhatkar, except Kidar Sharma . May be his compositions were not so simple for common man to hum or sing, although they were quality songs.

Despite several melodious songs Bhatkar was never counted among the first line composers. Kidar Sharma returned to him in 1980, but by that time Snehal Bhatkarwas already on a descending track.

SNEHAL BHATKAR, a talented but sadly not much applauded composer, died peacefully on 29-5-2007 at his Dadar home.

Today’s song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor. As far as I know, this is my first song of Mahendra Kapoor. Today’s song was his first solo song of his career. Mahendra Kapoor was among the premier playback singers of the Golden Age of Hindi musical cinema, with hits like “Chalo Ek Baar ” and “Neele Gagan Ke Taley” vaulting him to a level of celebrity rivaling the on-screen actors miming to his vocals. Born January 9, 1934, in Amritsar,  Kapoor spent the majority of his childhood in Mumbai, where he claimed top honors in the All-India Murphy-Metro Singing competition in 1957. His victory captured the attention of filmmaker Raja Nawathe, who used him in 1958’s ‘Sohni Mahiwal’. This also caused a controversy, because the contest was for new comers and Mahendra Kapoor had already sung  songs in several films like ‘Madmast’ (1953), ‘Madhur Milan’ (1955) ‘Lalkar’ (1956) and ‘Heer’ (1956) and also his first solo song in film ‘Diwali Ki Raat (1956). Later on he gave some lame excuse that he had not got any payment for that song etc. (beetehuedin.com has all the relevant details on this controversy and the court case etc, in MK’s interview article).

A year later, Kapoor launched into the top ranks of Bollywood singers when composer and musical director Ramchandra Chitalkar tapped him to perform the show stopping “Aadha Hai Chandrama Raat Aadhi” in the film ‘Navrang’ (1959). Kapoor quickly proved himself a versatile talent even by Bollywood standards, performing in a number of regional Indian languages beyond his native Hindi. Within the sub genre of Marathi language productions, he was renowned as the playback singer of choice for superstar Dada Kondke — and over time his repertoire expanded, becoming virtually synonymous with patriotic anthems when he delivered “Mere Desh Ki Dharthi. . .” in Manoj Kumar’s 1967 film ‘Upkaar’, a rendition that also earned him the Best Male Playback Singer honors from India’s National Film Awards voters.

Kapoor remained a respected and popular figure across his five-decade cinema career, notching additional hits via “Iktara Bole. . .” (from ‘Yaadgaar’, 1970), “Fakira Chal Chala Chal” (from ‘Fakira’, 1976) and “Ab Ke Baras” (from ‘Kranti’, 1981). While his filmography embraces dozens of directors, he enjoyed his most fruitful collaboration with filmmaker BR Chopra, a partnership that extends across productions like 1959’s ‘Dhool Ka Phool’, 1963’s ‘Gumrah’, 1965’s ‘Waqt’, 1969’s ‘Aadmi Aur Insaan’ and 1973’s ‘Dhund’. From 1980 onward Kapoor appeared largely in small, regional films in the Punjabi and Bhojpuri tongues, and with son Rohan he mounted a series of live tours spanning across India and overseas. His contributions to the Bollywood industry were later recognized via the Indian government’s Padmashri Award as well as the Madhya Pradesh government’s Lata Mangeshkar Award. Poor health plagued Kapoor during the final years of his life, and he suffered a fatal heart attack in his sleep on September 27, 2008.

Today’s song is the 7th song from this film, to be discussed here. There are 10 songs in the film as per HFGK, but one Talat song was removed from the film. For this film, Kersi Mistry and Prabhakar Naren were the assistants for Bhatkar. Mistry later claimed that the above song was composed by him.


Song – Tere Dar Ki Bhikmangi Hai Daata Duniya Saari (Diwaali Ki Raat) (1956) Singers – Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics – Madhukar Rajasthani, Music – Snehal Bhatkar

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

tere dar ki
bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

koi maange mahal do-mehle
koi kutiya chhoti
koi maange sona chaandi
koi sookhi roti
re roti
koi maange laal salona
koi maange laal salona
koi sundar naari
maange koi sundar naari
waah re duniya rachne waale
shaan hai teri nyaari
shaan hai teri nyaari
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

koi tujh par phool chadha kar
maalik tujh rijhaaye
koi tujh par phool chadha kar
maalik tujh rijhaaye
koi bechaara dukh ka maara
aansoo bhent chadhaaye
koi bechaara dukh ka maara
aansoo bhent chadhaaye
donon hi mohtaaj hain tere
donon hi mohtaaj hain tere
donon tere pujaari
donon tere pujaari
khel rahe ho khel anokhe
kya samjhe sansaari
kya samjhe sansaari
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

तेरे दर की
भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी

कोई मांगे महल दो-महले
कोई कुटिया छोटी
कोई मांगे सोना चाँदी
कोई सूखी रोटी
रे रोटी
कोई मांगे लाल सलोना
कोई मांगे लाल सलोना
कोई सुंदर नारी
मांगे कोई सुंदर नारी
वाह रे दुनिया रचने वाले
शान है तेरी न्यारी
शान है तेरी न्यारी
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी

कोई तुझ पर फूल चढ़ा कर
मालिक तुझे रिझाये
कोई तुझ पर फूल चढ़ा कर
मालिक तुझे रिझाये
कोई बेचारा दुख का मारा
आँसू भेंट चढ़ाये
कोई बेचारा दुख का मारा
आँसू भेंट चढ़ाये
दोनों ही मोहताज हैं तेरे
दोनों ही मोहताज हैं तेरे
दोनों तेरे पुजारी
दोनों तेरे पुजारी
खेल रहे हो खेल अनोखे
क्या समझे संसारी
क्या समझे संसारी
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3746 Post No. : 14708

“Majboori”(1954) also known as “Chhoti Bahan”(1954) was directed by Ram Daryani for Murli Movietone, Bombay. The movie had Balraj Sahani, Shyama, Gope, Kumar, Jeevan, Gulab, Pramila etc in it.

The movie had 8 songs in it which were penned by D N Madhok (7) and Pandit Gaafil (1).

Three songs have been covered in the past. Here is the fourth song from “Majboori”(1954) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Asha Bhonsle. The song is penned by D N Madhok. Music is composed by Robin Chatterji.

Only the audio of song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Aankhen ro ro haar gayin (Majboori)(1954) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-D N Madhok, MD-Robin Chatterji

Lyrics

aankhen ro ro haar gayin
aankhen ro ro haar gayin
armaan tadap kar choor huye
aise mein dil thhaam ke hum
haan kehne par majboor huye
aankhen ro ro haar gayin

rote armaanon aao
lag jaao kaleje se mere
rote armaanon aao
lag jaao kaleje se mere
jo tumne gharonde baandhe thhe
haaye wo gharonde choor huye
aankhen ro ro haar gayin
armaan tadap kar choor huye
aise mein dil thhaam ke hum
haan kehne par majboor huye
aankhen ro ro haar gayin

jis duniya mein humne laakhon
shauk se phool khilaaye thhe
jis duniya mein humne laakhon
shauk se phool khilaaye thhe
ek bujhe dil ko lekar
hum us duniya se door huye
aankhen ro ro haar gayin
armaan tadap kar choor huye
aise mein dil thhaam ke hum
haan kehne par majboor huye
aankhen ro ro haar gayin


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3735 Post No. : 14681

“Ameer”(1954) was produced and directed by Chandu for Chandu Studio Limited, Bombay. This “stunt” movie had Geeta Bali, Kamal Kapoor, Tiwari, Patanjali, Manju, Nagpal, Vasantrao Pahalwan, Babu Raje etc in it.

The movie had six songs in it. Three of these songs have been covered in the past. all these songs were discussed in 2011.

Now, after more than seven years, here is the next song from “Ameer”(1954) to appear in the blog. this song is sung by S Balbir and Asha Bhonsle. Udhhav Kumar is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pt Lachchiram.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.

With this song the blog now has 500 songs from movies relesed in 1954. With this song, 1954 joins 1949, 1950, 1959 and 1960 that have 500 songs each in the blog.


Song-Kahaan se aayi hai…ho tu bol saamne aake (Ameer)(1954) Singer-Balbir, Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Uddav Kumar, MD-Pt Lachchiram
Both

Lyrics

kahaan se aayi ee ee
kahaan se aayi hai
nazron mein laakhon teer chhupaa ke
kya laayi
kya le jaayegi
bol saamne aake
kya laayi
kya le jaayegi
bol samne aake
ho tu bol saamne aake

layi hoon main husn jawaani
ulfat ki rangeen kahaani
laayi hoon main husn jawaani
ulfat ki rangeen kahaani
le jaaungi pyaar chura ke

bol saamne aake
ho tu bol samne aake

ye husn hai faani
mast jawaani do din ki
ulfat ki rangeen kahaani do din ki
dekh le dil ki aankhon se
tu parda zara uthha ke
parda zara uthha ke
dekh le dil ki aankhon se
tu parda zara uthha ke
parda zara uthha ke
ho tu bol saamne aake

do din hai to hans loon gaa loon
dushman ko dildaar bana loon
do din hain to hans loon gaa loon
dushman ko dildar bana loon
naagan si zulfen bikhra ke

bol saamne aake
ho tu bol saamne aake

hansna gaana dil ka lagaana khel nahin
dard ki duniya mein muskaana khel nahin
jeena ho to jeene waale
jeena naam kamake
jeena naam kamaake
jeena ho to jeene waale
jeena naam kamaa ke
jeena naam kamaa ke

ho tu bol saamne aake
kya laayi
kya le jaayegi
bol saamne aake
ho tu bol saamne aake


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3720 Post No. : 14654

“Teen Tasweeren”(1954) was produced by Shree Gaglani and directed by S S Solanki for Ashok Studios, Bombay. This movie had Anil, Kishore, Devendra, Neena Makker, Sharda, Munshi Khanjar, Kumar etc in it.

The movie had at least seven songs in it, may be more.

The songs are as obscure as the movie. One song has been covered in the past.

Here is the second song from “Teen Tasweeren”(1954) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Kaumudi Munshi. Prem Dhawan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Ninu Majumdar.

Only the audio of this song is available. Kaumudi Munshi was the only female singer in this movie so it would seem that she sang for the leading lady in the movie who could be Neena Makkar. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this melancholic song.


Song-Kaajal kaali raat re (Teen Tasweeren)(1954) Singer-Kaumudi Munshi, Lyrics-Prem Dhawan, MD-Ninu Majumdar

Lyrics

Kaajal kaali raat re ae
Kaajal kaali raat re
koi samjhaaye
koi bataaye
koi samjhaaye
koi bataaye
kab hogi prabhaat re ae
Kaajal kaali raat hai
Kaajal kaali raat re

murjhaaye phoole pe haaye
koi bhanwra kab aata hai
murjhaaye phoole pe haaye
koi bhanwra kab aata hai
apne tan ka saaya bhi to
din dhalte chhup jaata hai
koi na dewe saath re ae
kaajal kaali raat re

aaj ye ooncha neela ambar
sulag raha hai angaaron mein aen aen aen
aaj ye ooncha neela ambar
sulag raha hai angaaron mein
yaa mere apne hi aansoo
chhalak rahe hain in taaron mein
bin saawan barsaat re
kaajal kaali raat re


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(© 2008 - 2019) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15100 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15120

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1172
Total Number of movies covered =4153

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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