Advertisements

Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1930s (1931 to 1940)’ Category


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3502 Post No. : 14069

“Miss Frontier Mail”(1936) was produced under the banner of Wadia Movietone and was directed by Homi Wadia. The star cast included Fearless Nadia, Sardar Mansur, John Cawas, Sayani Atish, Jaal Khambata. Gulshan,  Jaidev, Master Mohammed, Meenu Cooper, Bashir Qawwal, Munchi Thoothi etc.

Mr Sadanand Kamath, our beloved inhouse HFM researcher has given some interesting information about this movie. He informs that the movie was originally named “Frontier Mail”. Frontier mail which used to run between Bombay and Peshawar was the most prestigious train of BBCI Railways. The promotional posters of the movie carried the picture of a train crash. BBCI offcials took exception to that. In order not to displease the BBCI officials, The movie makers changed the name of the movie to “Miss Frontier Mail” and carried the disclaimer that the movie was about the adventures of a lady and had nothing to do with the train.

The story of the movie, as reconted by Mr Sadanand Kamath is as following:-

The Deputy Station Master at a railway station is murdered by a masked man. He escapes from the scene just before the Station Master Maganlal (Master Mohammed) arrives. Maganlal touches the knife which has been used by the masked man to kill the deputy. The police arrest Maganlal for the murder. His daughter Savita (Nadia) and son Jayant (Jaidev) is informed by their uncle, Shyamlal (Sayani Atish) about the news of their father’s arrest.

Savita is fond of hunting, playing tennis and racing fast cars while Jayant is an amateur film maker. Soon Jayant and his friend (Munchi Thoothi) get involved in the villain’s evil design and manage to film the mask man’s gang readying to blow up a bridge. The masked man dynamites the bridge as he has been contracted to do so by a man who wants to promote his airline business. However, Shyamlal tries to implicates Sunder (Sardar Mansur), son of a railway official, for the crime.

There is also a gangster’s moll, Gulab (Gulshan) who is romantically linked first with Shyamlal and then with Kishore (John Cawas), one of the gang members of the masked man. Both Gulab and Kishore are reformed and they side with Savita and her brother, Jayant in hunting down the masked man.

Sunder has a soft corner for  Savita and rushes to help her in dealing with rail gangs and murders. He and Savita are involved in several chases culminating in a fight scene on top of a speeding train where Savita fights the gang alongside Sundar on her bare hands successfully. At last, the identity of the masked man is revealed. He is none other other than Savita’s uncle Shyamlal. Ultimately, Shyamlal is killed by the police while he is trying to escape in a plane.

This movie had four songs in it. Three of these songs have been covered in the blog in the past. Here are their details:-

Song Title

Post No.

Post Date

Gaawo gaawo ae mere saadhu 6147 29-Jun-12
Bhar bhar ke jaam pila de 10977 26-Mar-15
Karega har ek qadr jaani tumhaari 13032 12-Mar-17

Here is the fourth and final song from the movie to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Meenu Cooper, credited as Meenu the mystic. Lyricist is not known. Music is composed by Master Mohammad.

All the four songs in the movie, including the one under discussion were picturised on the same set. The song is a light hearted song where the artist talks about his experiences of betting on horses in the race course.

I have failed to get many words right in the lyrics. I request our readers with keener ears to help fill in the blanks/ suggest corrections as applicable.

With this song, “Miss Frontier Mail”(1936) joins the list of movies that have all their songs covered in the blog.


Song-Favourite main ghode khela (Miss Frontier Mail)(1936) Singer-Meenu the Mystic, MD-Master Mohammad
Chorus

Lyrics

Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
?? pe jocky jaawe
?? pe jocky ??
Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
hahahaha

seep mein moti bhi
meri kismat se niklega koi ??
seep mein moti bhi hai ??
meri kismat se niklega koi ??
sab ko ??? lagaao
??? hi lagaao

arre ?? tak main pahunch jaaunga
?? tak main pahunch jaaunga
joda badal ke
joda badal ke
Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
Favourite main ghode khela
arabi weller sab purzor
first class se first class tak
ghoda aaya shor
arre ?? se first class tak ghoda aaya shor
jocky ne jab side dabaayi
jocky ne jab side dabaayi
nikla number four
jocky ne jo side dabaayi
nikla number four
jab ?? pe jaa ke dekha
ye kismat ka andher
jab ?? pe jaa ke dekha
ye kismat ka andhera
ghoda mera thha nowhere

Advertisements

This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3502 Post No. : 14068

I became aware of a Hindi film ‘called Virginia’ (1940) nearly 2 years back. My first impression was that the film may be based on some Hollywood movie. Google search for details of this film did not yield much as most of the results pertained to a few Hollywood films of the same name in or around that name. The film did not find mention in ‘Filmindia’ magazine pertaining to the years 1939-41. Later on, I did get some details about the film in ‘list of Bollywood movies of 1940’ on Wikipedia which described the film as an ‘action’ film directed by K M Multani with a star cast of Manjula, W M Khan, Rajkumari, Pratap and David. Khan Mastana was the music director.

A couple of days back, I came across a High Court Judgement dated March 25, 1942 concerning K M Multani vs. Paramount Talkies of India. Being a law student myself once upon a time, I am interested in reading the court judgements, especially of the court cases pertaining to per-independence days. In the judgement, I got to know some more details about the film ‘Virginia’ (1940) and some interesting twist.

‘Virginia’ (1940) was made under the banner of A E M Multani Productions. The star cast mentioned in the judgement included Manjula, Pratap, W M Khan, David, Jamila and thousands of others. The film story idea was conceived by K M Multani sometime towards the end of 1939. Shooting of the film commenced in April 1940 at Bharatiya Studio. On May 16, 1940, the title of the film ‘Virginia’ was registered with Sub-Registrar in Bombay (Mumbai). The film was completed in August 1940 and advertisement of the film commenced in a limited way in September 1940. Censor Certificate was obtained for the film in November 1940. The film was released in Bombay on March 16, 1941 in Minerva theatre. The film ran for two weeks. The film was to be released elsewhere in India.

K M Multani, the producer-director had decided to produce this film on a grand scale just to prove a point that Indian film industry can also make spectacular films on the scale of Hollywood. The idea was to get ‘ high-brow westernised Indians who patronised the foreign films exclusively, to see in Indian films something which they would not find in Hollywood films even’. The story revolved around an imaginary war between Greeks and Romans about 4000 BC. In the film, Virginia was the name of the heroine.

It so happened that Paramount Pictures also conceived a film with a similar title ‘Virginia’ (1941) in 1939 and in December 1939, the title of the film was registered in the USA. The shooting of the film commenced more or less at the same time in the USA as that of ‘Virginia’ (1940). The film was released in USA in February 1941 and in Calcutta and Mumbai in May 1941. It was a family drama set against the background of an estate in Virginia, one of the States in the USA. The theme of the film was contemporary.

When the Paramount Pictures’ film was released in Calcutta and Bombay in May 1941, K M Multani filed a suit in a Bombay court to restrain the exhibition of Paramount film ‘Virginia’ (1941) with the same name on the ground that it would result in misleading a section of the cinegoers. He also claimed the damages for loss of box office collections of his film due to ‘passing off’ ‘Virginia’ (1941) as ‘Virginia’ (1940).

The lower court dismissed the suit on the grounds that no one can claim the sole monopoly of the title ‘Virginia’ as it is a geographical name. There was no reason to believe that Paramount’s film could mislead the cinegoers as the film is in English and the Multani’s film is in Hindustani. Also the story of the both the films are quite different. Even the advertisements of both the films make it very clear that both these films are different in terms of the language, the star cast and the themes of the films. The other point was that both the films were conceptualised, shot and released almost contemporaneously without the knowledge of each other. So there was no mala fide intention.

K M Multani filed an appeal in Bombay High Court against the judgement of the lower court. The High Court upheld the judgment of the lower court and dismissed the appeal with costs. Those interested in reading the detailed judgements, both of the lower court and the High Court can read here.

I am not sure whether K M Multani got ‘Virginia’ (1940) released at other places in India. The fact that the film ran only for two weeks in one theatre in Bombay would indicate that the film was a box office failure. I find that, later K M Multani re-joined Minerva Movietone to direct ‘Vasiyat’ (1940) and there after ‘Ujaala’ (1942). His filmy career almost came to an end with his home production ‘Umang’ (1944). I came to know from the former ‘Filmfare’ editor, B K Karanjia’s book ‘Counting My Blessings’ that K M Multani became the founding editor of trade journal ‘ Film Age’ and retired from film industry to become an estate agent.

‘Virginia’ (1940) had 8 songs written by Ehsaan Rizvi which were set to music by Khan Mastana. None of the songs has yet been represented on the Blog. Today, I present the first song from the film ‘diwaani tu kyaa jaane’ to appear on the Blog. The name of the playback singer is not mentioned. There are two other songs in the film which were identified to be that of Miss Iqbal (or Iqbal Bibi) who has a high-pitched voice. As against this, the voice in the song under discussion is a soft one.

Since Manjula (Manju Diwan, wife of Karan Diwan) is in the cast of the film, I checked her voices in the songs from the films ‘Gaali’ (1944) and ‘Chaand’ (1944). I am convinced that the voice in the song under discussion is that of Manjula (Manju). At the time of making of the film, Manjula was 16 years old and the voice sounds like that of a teenager.

A feature of this song is that there is a long prelude music (0:33) followed by a long interlude (0:42) and the end music (0:20). As a result, the lyrics of the song has space in the disc for about 2:00 minutes.


Song-Deewaani tu kya jaane (Virginia)(1940) Singer-Manju Dewan, Lyrics-Ehsaan Rizvi MD-Khan Mastana

Lyrics

deewaani tu kyaa jaane
kaun mere ghar aataa hai
deewaani tu kyaa jaane
kaun mere ghar aataa hai
prem sandesha laata hai
prem sandesha laata hai
mere mann wo bhaata hai
mere mann wo bhaata hai
murjhaa chuki hai jo sakhi
dil ki kali khilegi
murjhaa chuki hai jo sakhi
dil ki kali khilegi
deewaani tu kyaa jaane
kaun mere ghar aataa hai
deewaani tu kyaa jaane
kaun mere ghar aataa hai

main kahoongi apni baat
wo sunenge saari raat
main kahoongi apni baat
wo sunenge saari raat
ab kyun
dil shor machaata hai
ab kyun
dil shor machaata hai


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3501 Post No. : 14066

Todays song is from an old film of the 30s – ‘Sunehara Sansar- from 1936.

Songs from films made in the 30s are difficult to find.If you find a song of a film of your choice, you are a lucky person. Sometimes, as a fluke, such songs are encountered and your day is made. Luckily, there are collectors from India and Pakistan, who collect songs from various sources and upload them on You Tube for the benefit of music lovers and history students. Since no collector ever discloses his sources, it is difficult to know from where the song has been taken. Actually it hardly matters as long as it is not used for commercial purpose. Such 70-80 year old songs are no one’s personal property in any case, once they are on public domain. The uploaders are also aware of it.

We are thankful to many uploaders like Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji of Jodhpur, Shalin Bhat ji in the US, Javed Rsjs ji and many more such kind and helpful souls who serve the interest of Film music history, by making old rare songs available to music lovers and writers. Our own Sudhir ji, Atul ji and Sadanand ji too upload such rare songs. God Bless Them all. Today’s song is uploaded by Shalin Bhat ji.

The song is from a film made by East India Film Co. of Calcutta. In those days, the name Calcutta was synonymous with New Theatres, in the film world. New Theatres is a Golden Chapter in the Indian Film History. Established by BN Sircar in 1930, NT was not just a commercial entity, but an institution which strengthened the foundation of film making in India. Sircar established systems and discipline in film shootings. He was an engineer from London. Son of a very famous and rich Advocate General of Bengal, Sircar was a soft spoken but a firm personality. Being rich himself, he had no problem in building a well equipped company, without making a compromise on quality – both in in terms of machinery and people.

Most other studio owners like V Shantaram, Mehboob, Chandulal Shah, Sohrab Modi, SS Wassan, Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor etc. took over as company’s film director, but not Sircar. He had a strong line up of capable directors like PC Barua, Hem Chander, Debaki Bose, Nitin Bose, Premankur Attorthy, Phani Mujumdar etc. He never ever interfered with directors choices of actors or work. Remaining in the background, he ensured shootings as per schedule.

NT was like a family. It ran on systems. It became a way of life for people working in it. Since its establishment in 1930, competition increased consistently, in the number of film producing companies in Calcutta. By 1938, there were 18 Production houses in Calcutta alone. They were – Arora Film Co., Shri Bharat Laxmi Pictures, Chitramandir RBS Prodn, Dev-Dutt films, East India Film Co., Indua Movietone, Kali Films, Kamala Talkies, Maadan Theatres, New Popular Pictures, Moti Mahal Theatres, Murli Pictures, Quality Pictures, Radha Film Co., Sonoray Picture Syndicate, Sunrise Film Co., and Tollywood Studio. Interesting point is, Bombay film industry came to be known as Bollywood many decades after this Calcutta studio – Tollywood – which continues till today for Bangla Film industry.

After 1939, the second world war created problems for NT. On one hand raw film shortage and  severe competition and on the other hand ego clashes of the stalwarts and exodus from the company plagued NT. PC Barua was the first to leave,in 1940, to restart his own studio. One by one people started leaving. From 1942 to 1947, many important actors, directors and technicians left NT and went to Bombay. During its existence, NT created an all time record as a company. It had produced  177 films as against the nearest competitor – Ranjit Studios of Bombay, with 175 films (as per Cine Advance issue dated 5th Dec 1980).

During the Golden period of NT, Debaki Bose made a Bangla film ‘Sonar Sansaar’ in 1936. The same was also made in Hindi as ‘Sunehra Sansaar’. During the period 1934 to 1936, Debaki Bose worked for East India Film Co. His film, ‘Seeta’ (1934) won the Honorary Diploma in Venice Film Festival and his last film there was ‘Sunehra Sansaar’ (1936). After this Debaki Bose (who gave the name ‘Kumar’ to actor Syed Ali Hasan Zaidi of film ‘Puran Bhagat’ (1933) returned to NT for the period from 1937 to 1941. He then left NT to start his own production company.

The East India Film Company was based in Calcutta, Bengal Presidency, Bitish India. It was the first Indian film company to screen a movie at an international Film Festival. Started in 1932 in Calcutta, by RL Khemka, it went on to be a pioneer in producing films across several regional film industries, including Bengali, Hindi, Urdu, Telugu, and Tamil in the decade after its founding; till then, production companies were restricted regionally.

The company was formed in 1932 by RL Khemka, a local Marwari businessman in Bengal after acquiring the RCA Photophone studio, its location recording equipment, and its Mitchell cameras. In 1933, East India Film Company’s first Bengali film production, ‘Jamuna Puline’ was released. The director was Priyanath Ganguli, who had joined here after leaving Maadan Theatres. Riding on its success, the company became the first Bengali studio to venture into not just Hindi films, but also various films in South Indian languages. East India Film Company was soon producing a dozen movie releases per year, including several hits like ‘Savitri’ (Telugu) and ‘Ramayan’ (Tamil).

The East India Film Company’s ‘Seeta’, made by Debaki Bose, was the first talkie shown in an international film festival. It was shown in 1934 at the Venice Film Festival where it won an Honorary Diploma. Subsequently, Bose also made his noted film, ‘Sonar Sansaar’ (Hindi: ‘Sunhera Sansaar’) in 1936 under the East India Film Company banner.

Shot in Calcutta on a lavish budget of Rs.75,000, East India Film Company’s ‘Savitri’ in Telugu was a huge hit. Based on a popular stage play by Mylavaram Bala Bharathi Samajam, the film was directed by debutant C Pulliah and starred stage stalwarts Vemuri Gaggiah and Dasari Ramthilakam as Yama and Savitri, respectively. Like ‘Seeta’, this film was also shown in Venice Film Festival, where it too won an Honorary Diploma.

Film ‘Sunehra Sansaar’ had 21 songs, all written by its hero – Vijay Kumar, BA. [Author Notr: I have written about him in my post “Tan Prem Ki Raakh Lagaa Kar Ke“on 31-1-2018). The cast of the film was Vijay Kumar, Rampyari, Menaka Devi (her first film in Calcutta), Kamla Jharia, Azuri, Mazhar Khan, Gul Hamid, KN Singh (his debut film) and others.

Like several common feminine names in those days – Zebunnisa, Zubeida, Khursheed, Zohra, Amirbai, Gauhar, Radharani, Menaka, Noorjehan, Yasmin, Vimala etc, there were common male names too. One of them was Hamid. It was prefixed and suffixed by Gul, Ali, Syed etc. For example, actor Ajit’s real name was Hamid Ali and actor singer Shyam Kumar was Syed Gul Hamid Ali. I remember, once when I wrote about Shyam Kumar and his real name, our Sudhir ji had queried if he and the actor Gul Hamid were same. I had informed him that they were different.

Today we will know more about this actor Gul Hamid, who acted in many films in the 30s and died very young at 31 years only. He was a handsome young man from Peshawar. After starting his film career from Lahore, he moved to Calcutta where he worked in more than a dozen of silent films and talkies. Some of his films were made in Bombay too. He had many honors to his credit. He acted in Heer Ranjha, the first film produced in Punjabi and in Seeta, a talkie that won an Honorary Diploma in the 1934 Venice Film Festival. That was also the first Indian film shown at an International film festival. Hamid also wrote the script, acted in, and directed the film Khyber Pass (1936). 

Gul Hamid was born in 1905 in Pirpiai, a village near the Kabul River in the North West Frontier Province of British India (now in Pakistan). His father was Saif Ullah Khan. Gul Hamid Khan had three brothers named Abdul Hameed Khan, Gul Jamal Khan and Sayed Jamal Khan. Gul Hamid Khan was married to Patience Cooper (later Sabra Begum) from 1930–1936, one of the first early silent movie actresses.

He became an all-India celebrity when AR Kardar cast him in his hit movie. It is said that the movie industry never again saw an actor with Gul Hamid’s looks. He made his film debut with Sarfarosh alias Brave Hearts in 1930, which was a silent movie made in Lahore and directed by AR Kardar. In 1931, his films Aatishe Ishq and Wandering Dancer were released. Gul Hamid also had the honour of working in the first ever Punjabi feature film Heer Ranjha released in 1932. This film was made in Lahore and directed by AR Kardar. In 1933, his film Yahudi Ki Ladki was released based on Agha Hashar Kashmiri‘s stage play by the same name. His other films released in 1934 were ChandraguptMumtaz BegumSultana and Night Bird.

1935 was the richest year of Gul Hamid’s career as many of his films were released in it. In Bharat Ki Beti (1935), his heroine was Rattan Bai.  His other notable talkie films in 1935 were Sauteli BadruhiSaleema  and  MurdererYasmin was also released the same year in which his name was Behram. As per records, only three films were released in 1936 i.e. ‘Sunehra Sansaar’, Baghi Sipahi and Khyber Pass.  Khyber Pass was the film in which he not only acted but also wrote its script and directed it. He worked with his wife, Patience Cooper, in three films i.e., Baghi Sipahi, ‘Murderer’ (1935) and Khyber Pass. He died  in 1936 due to a throat ailment.(Hodgekin’s Disease).

The story of film Sunehara Sansar-36, as outlined in Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, is as follows,

This is a parable about human suffering and capitalist enterprise. The village headman has the bandits attack house of Ramesh to settle an old dispute. His wife Roma is kidnapped and infant son is abandoned in a forest. Years later, Roma works as a nurse to a kind millionaire and her son Raghunath lives with other unemployed youths, in a nearby house. They all dream about starting a Soap Factory. The father has become a beggar in that town only. No one is aware about others. Changed circumstances bring the family together and the kind millionaire helps to set up the Soap Factory.

Today’s song is composed by KC Dey, but the singer is not known. I presume it is Vijay kumar only. So, here is a song from an 80+ year old film. Surprisingly, the song is clear.

[Auhtor’s Note: Acknowledgements and thanks to Indian Cinematograph Year Book – 1938, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, Muvyz, HFGK, Wikipedia, IPFS.com, Pakfilms.com, book by Ambarish Mishra and my notes.]


Song – Sukh Anand Aur Prem Ki Khaatir (Sunehra Sansaar) (1936) Singer – [Unattributed], Lyrics – Vijay Kumar BA, Music – KC Dey

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
bana ye soney ka sansaar
bana ye soney ka sansaar
is mein dhan dualat joban hai
hai. . .
is mein dhan dualat joban hai
jeevan saathi hai pyaari naar
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
bana ye soney ka sansaar
bana ye soney ka sansaar

putra hai aankhon ka taara
jis se chamke jagmag parivar
aish ke jhoole jhoolo nis din
prem se looto mauj bahaar
putra hai aankhon ka taara
jis se chamke jagmag parivar
aish ke jhoole jhoolo nis din
prem se looto mauj bahaar
saathi ishwar gun gaawo
saathi ishwar gun gaawo
saathi ishwar gun gaawo
jis ne racha sunder sansaar

sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
bana ye soney ka sansaar
bana ye soney ka sansaar
is mein dhan dualat joban hai
hai. . .
is mein dhan dualat joban hai
jeevan saathi hai pyaari naar
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
sukh anand aur prem ki khaatir
bana ye soney ka sansaar
bana ye soney ka sansaar

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
बना ये सोने का संसार
बना ये सोने का संसार
इस में धन दौलत जोबन है
है॰ ॰ ॰
इस में धन दौलत जोबन है
जीवन साथी है प्यारी नार
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
बना ये सोने का संसार
बना ये सोने का संसार

पुत्र है आँखों का तारा
जिससे चमके जगमग परिवार
ऐश के झूले झूलो निस दिन
प्रेम से लूटो मौज बहार
पुत्र है आँखों का तारा
जिससे चमके जगमग परिवार
ऐश के झूले झूलो निस दिन
प्रेम से लूटो मौज बहार
साथी इशवर गुण गावो
साथी इशवर गुण गावो
साथी इशवर गुण गावो
जिसने रचा सुंदर संसार

सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
बना ये सोने का संसार
बना ये सोने का संसार
इस में धन दौलत जोबन है
है॰ ॰ ॰
इस में धन दौलत जोबन है
जीवन साथी है प्यारी नार
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
सुख आनंद और प्रेम की खातिर
बना ये सोने का संसार
बना ये सोने का संसार


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3491 Post No. : 14023

There was a time when the films made in Hindi could be classified easily as A grade, B grade and C grade films. A grade films were those made by big and famous banners with top class actors and leading music directors. B grade films were those made with second rung of actors, director and music directors. C grade films were those films which were made by not so famous banners, almost unknown actors directors and composers. Usually C grade films used to be action/stunt films, made on shoestring budgets, having a fixed story line resembling Tarzan, Hercules or Hollywood action films of Robin Hood, with the background of a jungle, tribe people, king-queen-wicked wazir and similar stories.

C grade films were always quickies, made on  shoe-string budgets. During the late 1930s and 40s, Master Bhagwan action films used to be completed in about Rs. 50,000 only – including studio rent, sets, artist fees and other expenses. C grade films had a captive audience comprising of factory workers, daily wagers, low income earners and students. However, such films used to rake in big profits to the film makers. Therefore, even top class banners sometimes made C grade films, to make up their losses in big film flops.

There were certain production houses which specialized and thrived on such films – like Paramount Films, Jagriti Films, Mohan Pictures, Wadia Movietone etc. Since studio system was in vogue, the film studios usually had fixed actors and directors in their employment. Music directors were of no consequence, so anybody would do. Well known composers like C Ramchandra used to take another name while composing music for C grade action films. Music assistants of famous composers used to give music to such films. Well known composers fallen on bad days also gave music to such films. C grade films rarely released commercial gramophone records for their film songs, so such songs are a real rarity even with big collectors.

Some common and regular names one finds in such grade C action/stunt films are Nadia, Boman Irani, Sayani, Bilimoria brothers, Cooper sisters, Zohra Khatoon, Ameena Khatoon, Khatoon Bai, Prakash, Adjania, Noorjehan (sr.), Moosa Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Baburao Pehelwan, Marutirao Pehelwan, Azim Bhai, Basheer, Ali, Bachha, Chandra Rao, Harishchandra Rao, Shankar Rao, Master Bhagwan, Mirajkar, Jamshed, John Cawas, Lalita Pawar, Navin Chandra. . . and many more such names.

Barring a few names like Lalita Pawar, Bhagwan, Nadia etc, all the other action film actors remained relatively less known. No one knows anything about them. Actors like Baburao Pehelwan, Marutirao Pehelwan (he was the hero in the first Gujarati talkie film ‘Narsi Mehta’), Chandra Rao, Sayani etc. were quite famous in their times, but except their Filmography (thanks to HFGK), nothing more is known about them. All of them ended only with mere names !

Today, I am writing about one such action film hero of 7 silent and 12 talkie films of the 1930s and 40s, whom I stumbled upon recently. His name is so obscure and unknown that even I was stunned, but he has acted with heroines like Rajkumari (Dubey), Sarojini, Vatsala Kumthekar, Gauhar Karnataki and had acted in films made by well known production houses like Paramount and Mohan Pictures.

On 2nd January 2015, I got a message on my Facebook page from an unknown person called ‘Tejas Vazare’. Since I try to avoid unknown people as my Fb friends, I ignored that message. Three years later, this January, I saw the message again. This time it attracted my attention by what he wrote. He mentioned that his grandfather was a Hindi film hero of the 1930s and 40s. Out of curiosity, I wrote to him asking him to sent information about himself and his grandfather. He informed me that Master Shankar Rao Vazare was a hero in few films in 1930s and 40s. This was a name new to me. He also sent me film posters, photos, newspaper articles etc. about him. On reading all this, I strongly felt that here was a man who needs to be brought before today’s world. We exchanged lot many mails. I checked all film names with my books and prepared a list of films having evidence.

Tejas and me have planned to meet in March, in Bombay. May be his father (son of Shankar Rao) and aunt (daughter of Shankar Rao) will accompany him. That time I will complete my interview with them and prepare a detailed article with photos, posters etc for publishing on line. But till then, I wish to present his short biography on this blog first. This blog has the right to have such things first here before anywhere else. I owe it this much. So, here we go.

Master Shankar Rao Vazare was born on 1-1-1916 in the Bhabhanagar area of Nashik (Maharashtra), in a peasant family. His father Trimbak Rao Vazare was the Patil of Nashik. (Patil used to be the overall head of the village / town) and his uncle was the chairman of the Municipality. Shankar Rao was very keen on films. Dadasaheb Phalke was also from Nashik. Taking inspiration from him, Shankar Rao developed attraction for films. He used to see English films in the tent theatre of Nashik.

He reached Bombay. He was very handsome, tall and had a good physique. He got roles in the silent films made by Mahavir Photoplays. From 1929 to 1931, he worked in 7 silent films. There could be more also, but initially he was uncredited. Problem with the silent films was that they generally had 2 or 3 titles and alias names. Additionally as per the local language the title used to change also. So, it is very difficult to trace silent films by titles in the various lists published.

The list of his silent films that has been identified so far is –  ‘Father’s Love’ (1929), ‘Ideal Woman’ (1930), ‘Prince Of The People’ (1930), ‘Avarice’ (1930), ‘Niradhar Niru’ (1931), ‘Jungle Ka Jawan’ (1931) and ‘Saroj Kumari’ (1931).

His first talkie film was ‘Toofani Tamancha’ aka ‘Hands Up’ (1935), made by Paramount Film company. In this film, his heroine was Gul Bano. He acted in 7 films made by Paramount Film Co., 3 by India Liberty Co., and 1 each made by Mohan Pictures and Allied Films. Here is the list of his talkie films,

 

Film Title Year Production Company Director

Heroine / Co worker

1. Toofani Tamancha
aka Hands Up
1935 Paramount RN Vaidya Gul Bano / Miss Pukhraj
2. Farz e Adaa
aka Loyalty
1936 Indian Liberty AM Khan Shehzadi (sister of Zubeida (of Alam Aara)) / Vidya
3. Bansari Balaa
aka Fairy Of The Flute
1936 Paramount AM Khan Gauhar Karnataki / Kamla
4. Burkhawali
aka Bombay Mail
1936 Indian Liberty (Unknown) Gauhar Karnataki / Miss Pearl
5. Madhraat Ka Mehmaan
aka Midnight Man
1938 Indian Liberty Kikubhai Desai Miss Moti / Miss Pokhraj
6. Jungle Ka Jawan 1938 Mohan Pictures Chunilal Parekh Rajkumari / Kamla
7. Madhu Bansari 1939 Paramount Nanubhai Vakil Sarojini (sister of Indurani, mother of Azra, wife of Nanubhai Vakil) / Vatsala Kumthekar
8 Son of Alladin
aka Alladin ka Beta
1939 Paramount Nanubhai Vakil Sarojini / Ranibala
9. Reshami Saari 1939 Paramount GP Pawar (husband of Lalita Pawar) Kanta Kumari / Miss Moti
10. Aflatoon Aurat
aka Veerangana
aka Amazon
1940 Paramount Kikubhai Desai Miss Moti / Kanta Kumari
11. Mere Raja 1941 Paramount TS Mani Miss Moti / Kanta Kumari
12. Jungle Ki Pukar
aka Call Of The Jungle
1946 Allied Films Ramji Arya Ameena Khatoon / Usha

After 1941, he found it difficult to get films. He returned to his hometown Nashik to look after his family, farming and also started a business dealing in cucles. In 1946, he got his last film and after that, he again returned to Nashik. Master Shankar Rao Vazare died on 21-1-1949, at a very young age of only 33 years.

Shankar Rao Vazare was the favourite hero of director Kikubhai Desai (father of Manmohan Desai) for silent and talkie films. Fearless Nadia, Ashok Kumar and Kishore Kumar were his fans. Ashok Kumar used to like seeing his films. In one interview, Kishore Kumar has said – “Despite being a hero, my brother Ashok Kumar never did a fight scene on the screen. I considered Master Shankar Vazare a better hero than him ! ”

His hometown Nashik was very proud of him. During the centenary celebrations of Nashik Municipality, they published his photo and a short Biography in their souvenir. There were articles and photos published in local newspapers. His wife expired about 4 years ago and his sons continue to live in Nashik. They are proud of him.

To get a song from his films was a great problem since nothing is available on YouTube. I sent out request letters to some famous record collectors and our own Sudhir ji. All collectors replied negatively, but only Sudhir ji had just one song from the film ‘Madhu Bansari’ (1939). He sent me the song promptly. Thank you Sudhir ji for your kind help. On finding this song, Tejas Vazare and his family were overjoyed and have thanked our Sudhir ji wholeheartedly.

This song is sung by Vatsala Kumthekar, under the baton of Damodar Sharma. The film was directed by Nanubhai Vakil. The cast of the film was Master Vazare, Sarojini (sister of actress Indurani, mother of actress Azra and wife of Nanubhai Vakil ), Vatsala Kumthekar, Ganpat, Basheer, Ali etc. There were 14 songs in the film.

Acknowledgements :

–  Inputs from Tejas Vazare (grandson of Master Shankar Rao Vazare)
–  Article in newspaper ‘Lokmat’
–  Centenary book of Nashik Municipality
–  Advertisements in Times of India and Film India magazine
–  HFGK compiled by Shri Harmandir Singh ‘Hamraaz’
–  ‘Silent Filmography’ by Dr RK Verma
–  Sudhir ji
–  And my notes 🙂


Song – Rang Rasiya Aao Re (Madhu Bansari) (1939) Singer – Vatsala Kumethkar, Lyrics – [Unattributed], Music – Damodar Sharma

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
jeevan ki
prem jyot ko jagaawo
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
jeevan ki
prem jyot ko jagaawo
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re

lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aa..aa..re
aaa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaa aaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaaaa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aa..aa..re..e..e
oo oo aa..aa..aa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaare
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aare..e..e
oo oo oo
aa aa aaaaaaa aaaaa
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaare
mann mein bas ke tum kahaan sidhaare
mann mein bas ke tum kahaan sidhaare
aawo
aawo preetam pyaare
aawo
aawo preetam pyaare

rang rasiya
rang rasiya aawo re
rang rasiya aawo re
jeevan ki prem jyot kojagaawo
rang rasiya. . .

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
जीवन की
प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
जीवन की
प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे

लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰रे
आss आss आssss आssss
आs आss आss आssss
आssssss आsssss आsss आsss
आsss आsss
आsssss आsssssssss
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
ओ ओ आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्यारे
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आरे॰॰ए॰॰ए
ओ ओ ओ
आ आ आssssss आssss
आs आs आsss आss आs
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्यारे
मन में बस के तुम कहाँ सिधारे
मन में बस के तुम कहाँ सिधारे
आवो
आवो प्रीतम प्यारे
आवो
आवो प्रीतम प्यारे

रंग रसिया
रंग रसिया आवो रे
रंग रसिया आवो रे
जीवन की प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰ ॰ ॰


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3488 Post No. : 14009

In the early 1970s in Mumbai, it was quite common to see Pathan moneylenders standing outside the gates of the factories, mills, railway workshops and even some of the Government offices. Pathan moneylenders used to lend money at high interest rates, mostly to workers and subordinate staff who were in perpetual need of money. I had frequently watched them standing outside the main gate of my office, normally in pair, during the first week of every month. Their operations were always discreet without inviting any attention from the passers-by except that their distinct dress and caps would identify them to be the Pathans.

I had got the first hand information on the modus operandi of the Pathan moneylenders from one of my subordinate staff who was perpetually indebted to them. On the salary day, they would be present at the gate at the start of the office, at lunch time and the office closing time. If a borrower is not able to pay the monthly interest/principal amount, he would try to avoid the Pathans by not going out of the office during lunch time, would leave the office well before the closing time or leave late. But the network of the Pathans was so large that they would eventually catch the defaulters and get at least the interest amount by their discreet strong arm methods.

Their other occupation, that I have seen during my early years in the office, was selling dry fruits on the footpath. The Pathan would generally come around lunch time to sell the dry fruits near the gates of the office. He would continuously give high pitch commentaries describing the  quality of dry fruits and revealing the benefits of consuming dry fruits. Some passers-by would stand and watch the proceedings. Amongst these bystanders I suspected that a few of Pathans’ cronies would have themselves bought few items of dry fruits to create an aura of the demand for his dry fruits.

When the things which I described above became common, the Hindi films took cognizance of such activities which normally culminate into fun songs. For example, note the second stanza of the immortal song Din Hai Suhaana Aaj Pahli Taarikh Hai in which lalaji (generally refers to money lending Pathans) is waiting for his client to repay his loan:

kis ne pukaara ruk gaya baabu
lalaji ki jaan aaj aaya hai kaabu
o paisa zara laana
laana laana
o paisa zara laana
aaj pahli taarikh hai
khush hai zamaana aaj pahli taarikh hai

Similarly, in the song Mera Naam Abdul Rehman, Pistaawala Main Hoon Pathan from ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956), the second stanza of the song has the following lines:

leo ji bhai saab hamaara pistaa bahut achhaa
leo ji mem saab hamaara pistaa nahi kachchaa
leo ji saab log khaayegaa aap ka baal bachchaa
khaa ke dekho very very good mera charoli baadaam pista

Very recently, I came across a similarly worded stanza in sales pitch song from the 1939 film ‘Hero No. 1’. The song is ‘Leu Ji Memsaab Hamaara Pista Bahut Achhaa’. The song is sung by actor-singer  Shyam Sundar (Sr.) on the words of Pandit Anuj, is set to music by Lallubhai Nayak. The actor-singer Shyam Sundar is not to be confused with the music director Shyam Sundar. As per his filmography, Shyam Sundar (Sr.) started his career as actor with ‘Sakhi Lutera’ (1934). He worked in over 30 films – overwhelmingly during 1930s and 40s. He has sung about 20 songs on himself in the films. It is apparent that his voice is feminist. Had I not seen his videos of the songs from ‘Hunterwali Ki Beti’ (1943), I would have assumed him to be a female singer.

So the inspiration for the second stanza of the song from ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956) referred to above was the song under discussion which came out 15 years earlier of ‘Bhai Bhai’ (1956). I guess, Pandit Anuj may have got the inspiration for the lyrics by actually observing a Pathan selling dry fruits with his sales pitch.

‘Hero No.1’ was produced by Vijay Bhatt under the banner of Prakash Pictures and was directed by Balwant Bhatt. This action film had the cast of Jayant, Gulab, Umakant, Shirin, Lallubhai Nayak, Faizi, Munshi Khanjar, Bholaram, Ranjit, Shyam Sundar etc. There were 7 songs in the film.

With this song, the film ‘Hero No.1 (1939) makes a debut in the Blog.

[Ed Note: ‘Charoli’ is also a dry fruit. It is known by other names as ‘chironji’ or ‘chirongi’. Its English name is almondette.]


Song – Leu Ji Memsaab Hamaara Pista Bahut Achha (Hero No. 1) (1939) Singer – Shyam Sundar (Sr), Lyrics – Pandit Anuj (aka Sampatlal Shrivastav Anuj), MD – Lallubhai Nayak
Unidentified Female Voice

Lyrics

leuji memsaab
hamaara pistaa bahut achhaa
leuji saab log
hamaara pistaa nahi kachchaa
leuji memsaab
khaayega aap ka baal bachchaa
kha ke dekho very very good
meraa charoli badaam pistaa
 
banaa chatpata aalishaan
boodha kha ke hoye jawaan
banaa chatpata aalishaan
boodha kha ke hoye jawaan
khaanewaale kaa gaal hota laal. . . fauran
khaanewaale kaa gaal hota laal. . . fauran
leuji memsaab
hamaara pistaa bahut achhaa
leuji saab log
hamaara pistaa nahi kachchaa
leuji memsaab
khhaayega aap kaa baal bachchaa
khaa ke dekho very very good
mera charoli badaam pistaa
 
majedaar meri kismiss
majedaar meri kismiss
boodhi khaa ke ho jaaye miss
boodhi khaa ke ho jaaye miss
chintayen hoti dismiss. . . fauran
chintayen hoti dismiss. . . fauran

ae chokra
jara uppar aao

aaya memsaab

leuji memsaab
hamaara pista bahut achhaa
leuji saab log
hamaara pista nahi kachchaa
leuji memsaab
khaayega aap kaa baal bachchaa
khaa ke dekho very very good
mera charoli badaam pistaa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
लेउ जी मेमसाब
हमारा पिस्ता बहॉत आच्छा
लेउ जी साब लोग
हमारा पिस्ता नाहीं काच्चा
लेउ जी मेमसाब
खाएगा आपका बाल बच्चा
खा के देखो वेरी वेरी गुड
मेरा चारोली बादाम पिस्ता

बना चटपटा आलीशान
बूढ़ा खा के होए जवान
बना चटपटा आलीशान
बूढ़ा खा के होए जवान
खानेवाले के गाल होता लाल॰॰॰ फौरन
खानेवाले के गाल होता लाल॰॰॰ फौरन
लेउ जी मेमसाब
हमारा पिस्ता बहॉत आच्छा
लेउ जी साब लोग
हमारा पिस्ता नाहीं काच्चा
लेउ जी मेमसाब
खाएगा आपका बाल बच्चा
खा के देखो वेरी वेरी गुड
मेरा चारोली बादाम पिस्ता

मजेदार मेरा किस्समिस्स
मजेदार मेरा किस्समिस्स
बूढ़ी खा के हो जाये मिस्स
बूढ़ी खा के हो जाये मिस्स
चिंताएँ होतीं डिस्समिस्स॰॰॰ फौरन
चिंताएँ होतीं डिस्समिस्स॰॰॰ फौरन

ए छोकरा
जरा ऊपर आओ

आया मेमसाब

लेउ जी मेमसाब
हमारा पिस्ता बहॉत आच्छा
लेउ जी साब लोग
हमारा पिस्ता नाहीं काच्चा
लेउ जी मेमसाब
खाएगा आपका बाल बच्चा
खा के देखो वेरी वेरी गुड
मेरा चारोली बादाम पिस्ता


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3484 Post No. : 13994

Today’s song is from film Azaadi-35.

It is always a pleasure for me to write on films and songs of the 1930s and the 1940s. It is a different world altogether and traversing on the path of these decades is easy, for there is no crowd here. Not many writers are interested in discussing songs from the 1930s in details.

There are several reasons for this. First and foremost is lack of information. Considering what our love for recording history of old films and the artistes is, one has to be lucky to a great extent to have enough material to write about, in the first place. Secondly, most artistes of the 1930s and early 1940s were the lot carried forward or brought forward from the Silent Era. By the end of the first 10 years, most of these brought forward artistes went into oblivion and new force of artistes entered the film industry.

Most artistes of 1930s seem to be faceless, with only names to go by. No details, no biographies and no other informations are available for them. A select few, however, were well known with their details available, as they continued deep into the 1940s and some even into the 1950s. No information is available for most leading artistes and character artistes of 1930s. For example, artistes like, S.M.Hadi, Miss Khatoon, Miss Ameena, Kashinath, Tara, Armelin, Nayampally, Rampyari, Master Mohd., Shanta kumari, Shantarin, Vimla, Shareefa, Prabha shankar, Zebunnisa, Sultana, Shehzadi, Zillobai, Mushtari,Khalil, Jamshed ji, Chandrarao, Iqbal, Miss Kamla, Sorabji kerawala, Laxmi, Anwari, Shankarrao Bhosle, Shankarrao Vazare, Nimbalkar, Miss Leela, Madhav Kale, Jal Merchant, Sayani, Keki Adjania, Bhagwandas, Panna, Alaknanda, Hafiz, Sunalini,Sushila, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Marutirao Pehelwan, Zohra, M.Ismail…….the list is too long.

There are hundreds of such names about whom absolutely no information is available. This makes writing on old films/artistes a huge problem for students of film history ,like me. We have to be constantly on our toes to look for such information. Sometimes, Lady Luck blesses us and we come across heaps of information about an obscure name and our joy knows no bounds.

Something like this happened with me sometime back. I stumbled on an article in ” The Tribune” dated 26-5-2001, titled ” The Himachali who shone in Bollywood “, written by Ms. Anjali Mahajan. As soon as I started reading it, I realised that I was onto a discovery ! The article was based on an interview of Ms. Bimla, daughter of yesteryear actor-Hero Vijay kumar Pandit-whose song we are going to discuss today. I was not only overjoyed, but also I thanked my good luck. So, here is the information I gathered from this article as well as some other sources and HFGK of course.

As we all know, our Hindi film industry is full of Same Name Confusions. I know at least two more Vijay Kumars who acted in Hindi films. One of them was Johnny Walker’s brother, who was Hero in few films like Wanted-61 etc.

Vijay Kumar Pandit was born on 10-3-1905 in Shageen village in Shimla. His father, Kanshiram, was a rich and prominent person in the village. Brilliant Vijay Kumar matriculated from Shimla and did F.A. from Mahindra College, Patiala. While in school and college he was doing stage dramas. He did a role in Agha Hashra Kashmiri’s play “Asir-E-Hind”. He graduated from S.D.College, Lahore in 1930 and passed his M.A. M.O.L. from Lahore only in 1932.

Handsome Vijay Kumar joined as A.D.C. to Maharaja of Patiala. His love for acting continued and in one drama, even the Music Director/Singer S.D.Batish acted with him. Based on his recommendation, Vijay Kumar got Hero’s role in Premier Film Co.’s silent film,”Dukhtar-E-Zamana”. At Patiala, Vijay Kumar got married to Miss Tara, who was the sister-in-law (saali) of the maharaja of Patiala.

Then he moved to Bombay to enter films. His first film was Shakti Cinetone’s “Sajeev Moorti”-35, in which he was paired with Ashalata ( Mehrunnisa Bhagat-first wife of Anil Biswas). His wife Tara also acted in this film for the only time in her life. Then came film ‘Azaadi-35’ from same company. In this film he not only acted, he also wrote the script and gave Music. His next film was Mohan Bhavnani’s comedy film, “Shaadi ki Raat”-35, in which he was paired with actress Shareefa.

After this he moved to Calcutta, on the invitation of East India Film Co. for their film, “Sunehra Sansar”-36. Along with him Rampyari, Kamla Jharia and Menaka also acted i it. For this film, he wrote all its Lyrics also. Impressed with his performance, New Theatres called him for film, “Abhagin”-38, opposite Molina Devi and menaka.

Vijay Kumar returned to Bombay and acted in his last film,”Asha”-38, made by Film corporation of India. His Heroine was Kamlesh Kumari. After this film, he got intimation from Shimla about the illness of his father and he returned to Shimla to look after him. After doing 6 films as a Hero, due to the protracted illness of his father, Vijay Kumar could not return to Films ever. His father died in 1947 and all the responsibility of ancestral property fell on him.

All India Radio, Shimla invited him to work for them. He wrote and directed several dramas for Radio. Same time he acted in stage dramas in Gaiety Theatre of Shimla. According to his daughter, Raj Kapoor had invited him to work in the film Jaagte Raho, but he could not go. He stayed at Shimla till his death in 1977.

I was lucky to get information on this unknown hero, but there are hundreds of artistes without any face or information- only names.

Somehow,I seem to be lucky that some people from faraway countries contacted me and I got clues to get in touch with relatives of yesteryear actors, like Bhudo Advani, Indurani, Parshuram, Latika, Mirza Musharraf and few more. Recently, a gentleman from Dubai contacted me saying that he was the grandson of an obscure hero of over 20 films of 1930s and 1940s. I am in the process of meeting the son of that actor soon. So hopefully, we will know about yet one more old time actor and his career, sometime in coming months.

Today’s song is sung by Vijay Kumar. HFGK does not mention names of singers, Lyricist or the Composer of this film. However, this is one of the 6 songs Vijay Kumar sang for his films, since there was no Playback system in force that time. He sang a song even in New Theatre’s film Abhagin-38.

The uploader of this song on You Tube claims that the music is given by Mushtaq Hussain, HFGK thinks the composer may be Master Chhaila and the daughter of Vijay Kumar claims that HE was the Music Director for this film. Only Time will tell the truth.

Let us enjoy the song. With this song film Azaadi – 1935 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Tan prem ki raakh laga kar ke (Aazaadi)(1935) Singer-Vijay Kumar Pandit

Lyrics

tan prem ki raakh lagaa kar ke
tan prem ki raakh lagaa kar ke
sukh prem ki dhooni ramaayenge
phir prem ki maala phira kar ke
phir prem ki maala phira kar ke
mukh prem ka ??? chadhaayenge
prem hi saadhan
prem hi poojan
prem hi saadhan
prem

prem hi saadhan
prem hi poojan
prem se hi hai safal ye jeewan
prem mein hai (?) jagat mein
prem ki bansi bajaayenge
prem ki bansi bajaayenge

prem pujaari prem mandir mein
prem pujaari prem mandir mein
prem pujaari prem mandir mein
prem ke pushp chadhaayenge
prem ke pushp chadhaayenge
prem hi prem hai saare jagat mein
prem hi prem hai saare jagat mein
prem hi prem hi prem
prem hi prem hi prem


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3477 Post No. : 13968

The year 1940 can be regarded as a benchmark year for Hindi film industry to assess its progress in the talkie era as it marked about a decade since talkies came into being. Although studio systems (in which artists were on the payrolls of the studios) continued, slowly the star system was evolving in which the star actor commanded the salary acccording to his success rate in box office collections. During this period, actors with star values emerged. They commanded good salary from their respective studios to ward off poaching by the competing film production companies. Films with K L Saigal, Prithviraj Kapoor, Chandramohan, Surendra, Motilal, Ashok Kumar, Durga Khote, Madhuri, Sabita Devi, Kanan Devi, Shobhana Samarth, Leela Chitnis, Naseem Bano etc were expected to be box office hits.

If one goes by the estimates done by ‘Filmindia’ magazine of prominent stars’ salaries in the early 40s, most of these stars were getting a monthly salary ranging from Rs.3000-5000/- from their respective studios. (If we relate it to the cost of indexing to 2013, the amount is equivalent to about Rs.48000-80000/- per month). With the World War-II, the cost of production of films had shot up. There was an acute shortage of raw films. Many film production companies had reported to have bought raw films in the black market.

On the one hand, the cost of film production went up, with less purchasing power at the hands of cinegoers due to World War-II, perhaps they became choosy in watching films. Those days, publicity of films was mostly by words of mouth of the cinegoers. As a result, many Hindi films with star actors failed at the box office. For example, a few films listed below with star value released in 1940 failed at the box office:

1 .Bharosa (1940) – Chandramohan, Sardar Akhtar, Mazhar Khan

2. Deepak (1940) – Prithviraj Kapoor

3. Geeta (1940) – Chandramohan, Durga Khote

4. Main Haari (1940) – Naseem Bano

5. Sajni (1940) – Prithviraj Kapoor, Sabita Devi

‘Haar Jeet’ (1940) produced under the banner of New Theatres was one such film which failed at the box office in spite of having star value and a reputed banner. The film was directed by Amar Mullick. The star cast included Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal, Nawab, Nemo, Nand Kishore, Meera Dutta, Pannalal etc. The film was based on a Bengali short story ‘Shubhojog’ written by Upendranath Ganguli.

The story of the film was as under:

It is the story of two theatrical companies competing with each other. Kamala (Kanan Devi) is the star actress of the Ruby Theatre. Narendra (Pahadi Sanyal) is the star actor of the Bina Theatre. Narendra leaves Bina Theatre and joins Ruby Theatre. Here he falls in love with Kamala. They get married in a rural setting among the peasantsand stay in the rural area. In keeping with the rural setting, Narendra forbids Kamala from acting in the theatres. However, she does not heed his advice and continues to acts in the plays of the Ruby Theatre. They are separated.

After staying among the peasants for some time, Narendra also re-joins Bina Theatre. While the Bina Theatre achieves success, Ruby Theatre goes bankrupt. This is regarded as the punishment for Kamala who has refused to be a dutiful housewife. At the end, Kamala and Narendra are united.[Based on the review of the film in ‘Filmindia’ magazine, November 1940 issue with some additional inputs from ‘Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinemas’].

The ‘Filmindia’ review has blamed inept direction and a weak story line for the failure of the film. I feel that the film’s ending is a reflection on the male dominated society of rural India in the early 20th century which one would often find in Hindi films of 1930s and 1940s.

‘Haar Jeet’ (1940) had 9 songs written by Arzoo Lucknowi and Kidar Sharma. However, individual accreditation to the song is not available. It may be noted that Kidar Sharma had left New Theatres in 1937 after the completion of the shooting of ‘Vidyapati’ (1937). So, I guess, his contribution as a lyricist, if any, may be only marginal and most of songs may have been written by Arzoo Lucknowi. Songs were set to music by R C Boral.

I am presenting the first song ‘mast pawan shaakhen lahraaye’ from the film ‘Haar Jeet’ (1940) which marks the debut for the film in the Blog. The song is sung by Kanan Devi and Pahari Sanyal. The main feature of the song is that it has a long musical prelude of 1:34 and thereafter there are no musical interludes. I guess, this song may have been the earliest one to have the longest duration of the musical prelude in any Hindi film song of that time. Perhaps this record was broken by this song which had a musical prelude of 1:50.


Song-Mast pawan shaankhen lahraayen (Haar Jeet)(1940) Singers-Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal, MD-R C Boral
Both

Lyrics

mast pawan shaakhen lahraayen
ban ban mor papeehe gaayen
ae ae mast pawan shaakhen lahraayen
ban ban mor papeehe gaayen
ae ae mast pawan shaakhen lahrayen
phool
phool
phool phool par bhanwre jaayen
jaa kar
preet ke
geet sunaayen
phool phool par bhanwre jaayen
jaa kar preet ke geet sunaayen
jo hriday mein geet hai vyaakul
tu bhi usey sunaa sunaa
jo hriday mein geet hai vyaakul
tu bhi usey sunaa sunaa
gaa sajanwaa gaa
sajanwaa
gaa sajanwaa gaa

mast pawan shaakhen lahraayen
ban ban mor papeehe gaayen
ae ae mast pawan shaakhen


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3474 Post No. : 13952

The name Keshavrao Dhaiber may not ring any bells for most readers of the Blog. He was not as famous as V Shantaram, one of his contemporaries and a colleague in Maharashtra Film Company and later in Prabhat Film Company. I became aware of his name only during the last 2-3 years when I was deep into the film songs of 1930s and 40s. But the name did not interest me much until recently when I came across a song from his film ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) which made me to study his filmy career.

Kolhapur born Keshavrao Dhaiber (1890-1978) who had done a short stint in the Army as Lancer, started his filmy career in Baburao Painter’s Maharashtra Film Company, Kolhapur as an actor and a technician in the early 1920s. Here, he came in contact with V Shantaram. Both of them made their debuts as directors for a silent film– Netaji Palkar (1927) which they co-directed. In 1929, due to differences with Baburao Painter, V Shantaram and Keshavrao Dhaiber left Maharashtra Film Company and formed Prabhat Film Company along with V G Damle, Fatehlal and Sitaram Kulkarni in Kolhapur. Under this banner, Keshavrao Dhaiber and V Shantaram co-directed 3 silent films – ‘Khooni Khanjar’ (1930), ‘Rani Saheeba’ (1930) and ‘Udaykaal’ (1931). He got his first film as an independent director in ‘Zuloom’ (1931), a silent film. [Source: Encyclopaedia of Indian Cinema – Ashish Rajadhyaksha].

I find from his filmography of talkie films that Keshavrao Dhaiber and V Shantaram combination worked as Cinematographer and Director, respectively for ‘Maya Machhindra’ (1932), ‘Ayodhya Ka Raja’ (1932), ‘Sinhagad’ ( Marathi,1933), ‘Sairandhri’ (1933), ‘Amritmanthan’ (1934) and ‘Chandrasena’ (1935). Dhaiber got the opportunity to independently direct his first Hindi talkie film ‘Rajput Ramani’(1936).

During the making of ‘Chandrasena (1935) and ‘Rajput Ramani’ (1936), Dhaiber got romantically involved with the films’ heroine, Nalini Tarkhad. As per the contract among the partners of Prabhat Film Company, partners were not allowed to be romantically linked with actresses who were in the payroll of the Company. Since this was a breach of contract, Dhaiber was forced to resign from the partnership of the Company. He later married Nalini Tarkhad.

It is said that the most vocal among the partners to force Dhaiber to resign from Prabhat was V Shantaram. Interestingly, in 1941, V Shantaram too got romantically linked with Jaishree Kamulkar, another actress in the payroll of Prabhat Film Company whom he married in October 1941. Soon, V Shantaram left Prabhat to form his own film company, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. While V Shantaram’s filmy career continued to flourish after he left Prabhat, same was not the case for Keshavrao Dhaiber.

After leaving Prabhat, Dhaiber formed his own film production company, Jaishree Pictures. Under this banner, he produced and directed ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) which was made in Marathi and Hindi. He roped in A V Meiyappan (AVM) as producer and Jayantilal Thakore (probably, financier/film distributor) for the Tamil version which was also directed by Dhaiber with a Tamil speaking Assistant Director, Krishnaswami. Unfortunately, all the three versions of the film did not fare well on the box office resulting in heavy losses for him and his newly set up banner. As a result, Dhaiber had to close down his film production company.

It is interesting to note that Prabhat’s ‘Gopalakrishna’ (1938) was released just a month ahead of Dhiaber’s ‘Nand Kumar; (1938). Both had, more or less, the same mythological story. Another interesting part of these two films was that while Ram Marathe played the role of Krishna in childhood in ‘Gopalakrishna’ (1938), the same role for ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) was played by his brother, Anant Marathe. ‘Gopalakrishna’ (1938) was the 3rd highest grosser at the box office for 1938 while ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) failed at the box office.

After directing a couple of Marathi films in 1939, he joined Minerva Movietone and directed ‘Ulti Ganga’ (1942) and ‘Bhakta Raidas’ (1943). However, these films too failed at the box office plunging his already downward filmy career further. Dhaiber re-joined Prabhat Film Company as Production Supervisor during 1943-46. Later, he was associated with Famous Studios. His last film as a director was the Marathi film ‘Sudamache Pohe’ (1958). He also made a few documentary films for Maharashtra and Gujarat Governments. He wrote his autobiography ‘Eka Zindagichi Patkatha’ (Screen-play of a Life) which was released in 1967. Unfortunately, I could not get this book either from the publisher nor could I locate it online.

Keshavrao Dhaiber left for the heavenly abode on May 11, 1978 at a ripe age of 88.

Today, ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) makes its debut in the Blog which was Keshavrao Dhaiber’s first Hindi film as producer-director under his own banner, Jaishree Pictures. The star cast included Durga Khote, Anant Marathe, Govindrao Tembe, Jaishree Kamulkar, Govind Kurvalikar etc. As mentioned earlier, the film was simultaneously produced in Marathi, Hindi and Tamil. While the star cast for the Marathi and Hindi versions were, more or less, the same, the Tamil version had different star cast which included T P Rajlakshmi (Yashoda), T R Mahaligam (Lord Krishna), C V V Panthulu (Nandgopan), Master Sethuraman (Krishna in childhood), T R Ramchandran etc.

The Tamil version of the film also did not do well at the box office. However, the film became the stepping stone for the debutant actors T R Mahalingam, the singer and T R Ramchandran, the comedian. Also, it was the debut film for music director S V Venkataraman. For the first time, the playback system in a Tamil film was used in this film with Lalitha Venkataraman lending her voice to the actress playing the role of Devki. [Source: The Hindu, October 12, 2007].

The song I am presenting today is from the Hindi version of ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938). Durga Khote (in the role of Yashoda) sings this unique type of the song ‘rooth gaye kyon kunwar kanhaai’. The song with prelude and interlude of conversations is not an usual lullaby but a song to assure a crying child. The song is penned by Pandit Veer and it is set to music by G P Kapoor.


Song-Roothh gaye kyun kunwar kanhaai (Nand Kumar)(1938) Singer-Durga Khote, Lyrics-Pt Veer, MD-G P Kapoor

Lyrics

[haan haan haan
kyun rota hai
mera laal
mera pyaara
kyun kyun
maara mere bachche ko
kisne maara
haan haan haan
nahin
chup chup chup
mera bachha]

roothh gaye kyun kunwar kanhaai
roothh gaye kyon kunwar kanhaai
maiyya par bar bar bar jaai
maiyya par bar bar bar jaai
rooth gaye kyon kunwar kanhaai
rooth gaye

[kyun
kyun mere laal
maara
kisen maara mere bachche ko
mera pyaara
hmm hmm hmm
mera munna
mera lalla]

ro ro ansuwan jhari lagaayi
ro ro ansuwan jhari lagaayi
baadal dekh chakoran aayi
baadal dekh chakoran aayi
kyun chanda par badali chhaayi
kyon chanda par badali chhaayi
rooth gaye kyun kunwar kanhaai
rooth gaye kyun kunwar kanhaai


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3471 Post No. : 13935

Today is an important day, maybe one of the most important day in the annals of Hindi film music. Today, 18th January, is the day the legendary Saigal Sb completed his mortal journey and departed from this world. After so much that has been written about him, any more contributions would simply be repetitions. But then, no matter how much we may write about him and his singing, it will never ever be able to express the complete emotions about him, and his voice. For one cannot fathom in words and language, that which is a gift of divine.

Ah yes, we can add something to the celebrity eminence of this occasion and this celebration. Readers and regulars are aware that the erstwhile considered lost film ‘Kaarwaan e Hayaat’ of 1935 vintage, has been traced and is now available. Today, I bring one more gem of an unheard song, for the listening pleasure of the multitude fans and lovers of Saigal Sb’s voice.

This song is a duet that Saigal Sb sings in accompaniment with Rajkumari. It is important to highlight that this Rajkumari is not the singer Rajkumari that most music lovers are familiar with. This is the actress-singer Rajkumari, who is also known by the name Rajkumari Kalkatta. (राजकुमारी कलकत्ता). In this film, she plays the role of the Shahzaadi – the Princess of Vijaypore. And yes, she is singing for herself in this song. The playback singing had not yet been implemented, and all songs were recorded live in the voices of the actors themselves.

To set the context of this song, let me add a brief of the storyline of the film.

Parvez (role played by KL Saigal) is the prince and heir apparent to the throne in his kingdom. However, he is less interested in the throne and becoming a king. He fancies an independent life and is seeking love, which is not a feasible thing to accomplish within the constraints of the palace life. And then the Queen Mother (role played by Shyama Zutshi) announces his betrothal with the Princess of Vijaypore. Considering this to be a setback to his life and dreams, Parvez quietly leaves the palace and goes incognito. He dresses up as a ‘banjaara’, changes his name to Naaju, and joins a band of travelling gypsies, in an effort to escape a marriage and a king’s life that he is not interested in. This secret is known only to his closest friend and sidekick, Suhail (role played by Bikram Kapoor), who is the son of the state’s prime minister (role played by Hamid).

To project a picture of normalcy, the palace keeps this news under the folds, that the prince has disappeared. As part of the matchmaking process, the Princess is supposed to visit the palace. The Queen Mother is unable to postpone this occasion. Efforts are being made to trace the Prince, and the Princess is given a go ahead to visit the palace per the agreed upon schedule.

But there is mishap waiting to happen. The Emir of Tikkim, another neighboring state, also wants to marry the same Princess. He has the Princess kidnapped as she is traveling to the palace. However, the fate intervenes in an interesting manner. The Emir has planned to hide in a safe place, within a group of people where no one would suspect. As fate would have it, he brings the Princess to the same band of gypsies, where Parvez is also hiding, masquerading as Naaju.

This congruency of fate puts Naaju (alias Parvez) and the Princess in each other’s company, and they fall in love. However, the secret identity of Naaju is not revealed to the Princess (till the end of the film). She believes she is in love with a handsome gypsy who sings very well.

In this clip, the amorous overtures of this pair of love birds are continuing. They are at the gypsy camp. The Princess had heard the singing of Naaju. She falls in love with this voice, and calls for him to visit her. That is when this song happens.

This song is a set of four couplets of a ghazal. Both the Princess and Naaju, are expressing how the love for the other in their hearts is giving them sleepless nights and aches in the heart. The exchange progresses somewhat as follows,

ab kaise chhupaaun main dil ki baat
kaati tadap kar saari raat

Pray tell me how
I am not able to contain within
The matter of heart that so engage me
I am having sleepless nights
I spent time writhing with pain in my heart

ulfat mein teri kitna roya
bin saawan aayi barsaat

I am faring no better, o dear one
My eyes are weeping
Being separated from my love
It is as if the monsoon rains
Have descended into my eyes
When it is not even season for rain

kisi ke ek hi naghme ne ashkbaar kiya
sukoon e qalb liya gham se hum-kanaar kiya

It is just one song that I heard
That has made me shed tears (of longing)
My peace and tranquility has been removed
And am now connected with sorrows (of separation)

na taab e zabt hai mujhko na taaqat e fariyaad
khizaan ne gulshan e hasti ko be-bahaar kiya

My sense of restraint and my composure is lost
I have lost my power to even make an entreaty
The autumn has descended
Upon the garden of my being
And has made it bereft of spring

Let us listen to this rare treat of Saigal Sb’s voice. A song that has so far been considered lost, is now being shared for the pleasure of all music lovers.

[Ed Note: At the end of the clip, it appears as if the song is abruptly cut off, and possibly it is not complete. However, I have checked with the copy of the film booklet, which has so graciously been shared with me by Harmandir Singh ji ‘Hamraaz’. On referring to this booklet for checking the completeness of the lyrics, it is determined that this song is complete, with just a tiny blip at the end.]

 

Song – Ab Kaise Chhupaaun Main Dil Ki Baat  (Kaarwaan e Hayaat) (1935) Singer – Rajkumari, KL Saigal, Lyrics – [Unattributed], MD – Mihir Kiran Bhattacharya

Lyrics

ab kaise chhupaaun main dil ki baat
ab kaise chhupaaun main dil ki baat
kaati tadap kar saari raat
kaati tadap kar saari raat
ab kaise chhupaaun main

ulfat mein teri kitna roya
ulfat mein teri kitna roya
bin saawan aayi barsaat
aaa aaa aaa
bin saawan aayi barsaat
ab kaise chhupaaun main dil ki baat

kisi ke ek hi naghme ne ashkbaar kiya
kisi ke ek hi naghme ne ashkbaar kiya
sukoon e qalb liya gham se hum-kanaar kiya
sukoon e qalb liya gham se hum-kanaar kiya

na taab e zabt hai
mujhko na taaqat e fariyaad
na taab e zabt rahi
mujhko na taaqat e fariyaad
khizaan ne gulshan e hasti ko be-bahaar kiya
khizaan ne gulshan e hasti ko be-bahaar kiya

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

अब कैसे छुपाऊँ मैं दिल की बात
अब कैसे छुपाऊँ मैं दिल की बात
काटी तड़प कर सारी रात
काटी तड़प कर सारी रात
अब कैसे छुपाऊँ मैं

उल्फ़त में तेरी कितना रोया
उल्फ़त में तेरी कितना रोया
बिन सावन आई बरसात
आ आ आ
बिन सावन आई बरसात
अब कैसे छुपाऊँ मैं दिल की बात

किसी के एक ही नग़मे ने अश्कबार किया
किसी के एक ही नग़मे ने अश्कबार किया
सुकूने क़ल्ब लिया ग़म से हम-किनार किया
सुकूने क़ल्ब लिया ग़म से हम-किनार किया

ना ताब ए ज़ब्त रही मुझको
ना ताक़त ए फरियाद
ना ताब ए ज़ब्त रही मुझको
ना ताक़त ए फरियाद
ख़िज़ाँ ने गुलशन ए हस्ती को बे-बहार किया
ख़िज़ाँ ने गुलशन ए हस्ती को बे-बहार किया


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3462 Post No. : 13893

Going back happily to my favourite decade of the 30’s, here is a song from film ‘Dr. Madhurika’ (1935).

This film was made by Sagar Movietone. 1935 was a period of the early talkie films and the film business was slowly developing into an industry. In the 2-3 years, prior to the advent of sound, the news was already in the air about the silent films soon to start talking and singing on the screen.

This prompted enterprising entrepreneurs to jump onto the film making wagon and establish their set ups as film producing units. The start of Prabhat Film company in Kolhapur in 1929, the beginning of Ranjit Movietone in 1929 and Sagar Movietone in 1931 was a result of this. That way Kohinoor, Imperial, New Theatres, Maharashtra Film Co. and many others were already in this business. Bombay Talkies started in 1934.

All these production companies needed people. Actors, directors, cameramen, musicians, writers and other technicians were needed. In the initial stage of the Indian films,whether silent or talkie,it was difficult to get girls from good families and background. Slowly this picture changed. When talkies started, many tawaifs – singing girls and girls from such families joined films as they fulfilled the requirement of singing and looking good, in addition to their ease on Hindi/Urdu language. At this time slowly many educated and girls from high society as well as middle class families started joining films. So,to distinguish these women from each others, a system of nomenclature was followed. All the girls coming from ‘singing’ families and tawaif background added the suffix ‘Bai’ to their names, like Jaddanbai, Waheedan bai, Zohrabai, Amirbai etc. The Anglo-Indian and middle class girls took the prefix of ‘ Miss’ like, Miss Moti, Miss Rose, Miss Tara, Miss Ajmat, Miss Pearl etc.Those girls who were from high society were called Devi, like Sabita Devi, Padma Devi, Renuka Devi etc. All Marathi actresses used their full names like Shanta Apte, Minaxi Shirodkar, Leela Chitnis, Snehprabha Praadhan, Durga Khote etc.

The studios, on their part, tried to develop their own staff by recruiting talented artistes. Each studio had their own set of artistes. Sagar Movietone developed and promoted their actors like Motilal, NM Charlie, Kumar, Yaqub, Bhudo Advani, Sheikh Mukhtar, Surendra, VH Desai, Kanhaiyalal etc., actresses like Bibbo, Waheedan Bai, Jyoti, Nalini Jaywant, Maya Banerjee, Sabita Devi etc., directors like Ezra Mir, Mehboob, Sarvottam Badami, Zia Sarhadi, Ramchandra Thakur etc., and cinematographer – Faredoon Irani, music director – Anil Biswas. They were all referred to as ‘Jewels of Sagar’.

The film ‘Dr. Madhurika’ had Motilal and Sabita Devi as its lead pair and it was directed by Sarvottam Badami. A director of Hindi, Telugu and Tamil films, Sarvottam Badami was born in Channapatna, Karnataka. He was the son of a revenue officer in Mysore. As a young man, he worked as motor mechanic and handyman in a garage owned by Ambalal Patel. (Even Gulzar was a motor mechanic before entering films). Later he worked as a projector operator at Patel’s Select Pictures cinema in Bangalore.

When Patel partnered with Ardeshir Irani and Chimanlal Desai in launching Sagar Movietone (1930), Badami, as the only available South Indian in the Bombay studio, was allowed to finish ‘Harishchandra’ and ‘Galava Rishi’ and went on to direct the Telugu ‘Paduka Pattabhishekham’. He made several social films at Sagar, usually starring Sabita Devi, including some of novelist KM Munshi’s best-known scripts, e.g. ‘Dr. Madhurika’, ‘Vengeance is Mine’ (1935). He also adapted Hollywood films, e.g. ‘Aap Ki Marzi’ (1939), based on E. Buzzell’s ‘Paradise For Three’ (1938). He followed his mentor, Patel, to Sudama Pics. in 1939 when Sagar merged to become National Films. He worked in Famous Cine Labs (1946-48). He then moved to Films Divisiion (1948-52) as the Chief Producer (Newsreel), and made documentaries. He left Films Division in 1954 and became an industrialist based in Bangalore; and an adviser to the Kamani industrial group.

Filmography:
1932 – ‘Harishchandra’; ‘Galava Rishi’; ‘Paduka Pattabhishekham’; ‘Shakuntala’
1933 – ‘Chandrahasa’
1934 – ‘Grihalakshmi’
1935 – ‘Dr. Madhurika’; ‘Vengeance is Mine’;
1936 – ‘Jeevan Lata’; ‘Gram Kanya’;
1937 – ‘Kokila’; ‘Kulvadhu’;
1938 – ‘Three Hundred Days and After’;
1939 – ‘Aap Ki Marzi’; ‘Ladies Only’;
1940: – ‘Chingari’; ‘Sajani’;
1941 – ‘Holiday in Bombay’;
1942 – ‘Khilona’;
1943 – ‘Prarthana’;
1944 – ‘Bhagya Lakshmi’;
1945 – ‘Ramayani’;
1946 – ‘Uttara Abhimanyu’;
1947 – ‘Manmaani’;
1951 – ‘Vinoba Bhave’ (Doc);
1952 – ‘Roof Over The Head’

[Ed Note: The above bio-sketch is adapted from Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.]

Sagar Movietone produced many social films. These films had a soft message that morality is a commitment to society, but these films were disguised as ‘reformist’ films. ‘Dr. Madhurika’ was written as a script by Kanhaiyalal Maneklal Munshi (K.M.Munshi). It was one of his rare original scripts. Later it was adapted into a drama in 1936. Though the story was admired, it was criticised by some feminists of those days, who understood the disguise of reformation. The story of film Dr. Madurika is,

Dr. Madhurika (Sabita Devi) is a modern woman dedicated to her profession. She marries Narendra (Motilal) on conditions that 1. He forgets the idea of having children because she advocates birth control to limit population control of the country and 2. He does not interfere with her profession or her choice of friends and their meetings.

While following profession, she neglects her home and also provokes husband’s jealousy by being very friendly with a very smart colleague, Dr. Gaurish (Pesi Patel). Narendra is very jealous. By coincidence, he meets the wife of Dr. Gaurish and learns that she too is sad because of husband’s neglect and resents his friendship with Dr. Madhurika. Narendra starts meeting her often and they become friendly. Meanwhile Narendra also helps a poor and needy good looking girl Indu (Padma Shaligram), who reciprocates with gratitude and meets him often.

Dr. Madhurika is now jealous of Narendra’s attention to these two women. She realises that this is all due to her neglect towards Narendra. She decides to become a dutifully domesticated traditional housewife and all ends well. (647).

The film was yet another feather in the success of Sabita Devi. The real name of Sabita Devi was Irina Gasper. She was an Anglo-Indian, born in an affluent family of Calcutta, in 1914.

After completing education she wanted to join films, but her family objected. Without family’s knowledge, she sent her resume and photo to British Dominion Film Co., owned by Dhiren Ganguly in Calcutta. When they informed their consent the family resisted and kept her locked in the house. She fell ill and finally, the family conceded to her wishes.

Her first film was ‘Flames of Flesh’ (1930). Then came ‘Kanthahaar’, ‘A touch of Love’, ‘After the Death’, ‘Aparadhi’, ‘Money Makes What Not’ and ‘Bhagyalaxmi’ as silent films.

When the talkies came, she determinedly learnt Hindustani and Urdu and also music. She was a good piano and harmonium player. Her first talkie film was ‘Radha Krishna’ in 1933. In this film she sang 16 out of 23 songs in the film. In 1934, came ‘Shahar Ka Jaadu’, opposite to Motilal as a debut actor. The film was a hit. Later she and Motilal became a popular  pair.

Later she joined East India Co. and did many films with them. In later days i.e. 1943 onward, she stopped singing herself. Her last pictures were ‘Amrapali’ (1945) and ‘Manmaani’ (1947). In 1946, she got married and left for England. She returned to Calcutta in 1965, and passed away the same year.

A list of her films – ‘Radha Krishna’, ‘King For A Day’, ‘Shehar Ka Jaadu’, ‘Phantom Of The Hills’, ‘Grihlaxmi’, ‘Chandragupta’, ‘Vengence Is Mine’, ‘Silver King’, ‘Dr. Madhurika’, ‘Village Girl’, ‘Lagna Bandhan’, ‘Jeevan Lata’, ‘Kulvadhu’, ‘Kokila’, ‘300 Days And After’, ‘Ladies Only’, ‘Aap Ki Marzi’, ‘Sajni’, ‘Chingari’, ‘Holiday In Bombay’, ‘Prarthana’, ‘Fashion’, ‘Amrapali’ and ‘Manmaani’.

The film has 9 songs, all written by Prof. Waqif and tuned by music director Pransukh M Nayak. Nayak came to Sagar from Imperial. Starting with ‘Madhuri’ (1932), he composed music for almost 25 films. The songs of ‘Deccan Queen’ (1936) composed by him and sung by Surendra (debut film), were very popular and famous.

With this song, the film ‘Dr. Madhurika’ makes its debut on our blog. The film’s songs are not available on You Tube. I got this song from the collection of Shri Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji. It is hosted on Dr. Surjit Singh ji’s site. Thanks to them both.


Song – Mori Pyaari Pyaari Gaiya Aur Doodh Ki Tu Dilvaiya (Dr Madhurika) (1935) Singers – Sabita Devi, Lyrics – Prof Waqif, MD – Pransukh M Naayak

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

mori pyaari pyaari gaiya
mori pyaari pyaari gaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
dilvaiya
pyaari gaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
pyaari gaiya
mori pyaari pyaari gaiya

aa chal tujhko chai pilaaun
bhookhi ho to cake khilaaun
laadli aai meri gaiya
meri gaiya
pyaari gaiya
laadli aai meri gaiya
meri gaiya
pyaari gaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
dilvaiya
pyaari gaiya
mori pyaari pyaari gaiya

aa chal tujhko saadi (??) banwaaun
patli chonch ka boot dilaawun
tujh par bal bal jaiya
bal jaiya
pyaari gaiya
tujh par bal bal jaiya
bal jaiya
pyaari gaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
aur doodh ki tu dilvaiya
dilvaiya
pyaari gaiya
mori pyaari pyaari gaiya

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

मोरी प्यारी प्यारी गईय्या
मोरी प्यारी प्यारी गईय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
दिलवइय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
मोरी प्यारी प्यारी गईय्या

आ चल तुझको चाय पिलाऊँ
भूखी हो तो केक खिलाऊँ
लाड़ली आई मेरी गईय्या
मेरी गईय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
लाड़ली आई मेरी गईय्या
मेरी गईय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
दिलवइय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
मोरी प्यारी प्यारी गईय्या

आ चल तुझको सादी (??) बनावूँ
पतली चोंच का बूट दिलावूँ
तुझ पर बल बल जईय्या
बल जईय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
तुझ पर बल बल जईय्या
बल जईय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
और दूध की तू दिलवइय्या
दिलवइय्या
प्यारी गईय्या
मोरी प्यारी प्यारी गईय्या


Advertisements

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2018) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has exactly 14100 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3500 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

14100

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1087
Total Number of movies covered =3846

Total visits so far

  • 10,122,094 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,571 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Archives

Current Visitors

visitors whereabouts

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

blogadda

Stumble

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3500 days.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: