Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1952’ Category


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4452 Post No. : 15914

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 86
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This day ten years ago (viz on date 25 september 2020), six songs from six movies were covered in the blog. The first article was published at 6:50 AM whereas it was 8:59 when the sixth post of the day appeared in the blog.

Here are the details of these songs :-

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Banaane waale kyaa toone yahi duniyaa banaayi hai Jalpari-1952 06 songs posted
Aa jaa ab to aa jaa Anarkali-1953 All Songs covered
Ye rang bhare baadal Tu Nahin Aur Sahi-1960 All Songs covered
Jaani tum dole dagaa dai ke Dr Vidya-1962 All Songs covered
Chal mere dil lehraa ke chal Ishaaraa-1964 All Songs covered
Angrezi mein kahte hain ki I love you Khuddar-1982 03 songs posted

Four movies whose songs were discussed on 2 September 2020 have been YIPPEED by now. That leaves us with only two movies whose songs are eligible for todays blog Ten yaer challaenge.

“Jalpari”(19552) is one of the eligible movie for BTYC today. Six songs from this movie have been covered in the blog so far. Here are the details of these songs :

Song Posted On
Suno suno gagan ke taaron 22.07.2009
Banaane waale kyaa toone yahi duniyaa banaayi hai 25.09.2010
Barbaad huyi dil ki duniyaa 29.10.2010
Himmat se koi kaam le 21.12.2015
Tum nahin aaye mora jiya ghabraaye 23.12.2015
Khushi ke phool liye aa gaye bahaar ke din 21.01.2018

Here is the seventh song from the movie. This so9ng is sung by Lata and it is picturised on Nalini Jaiwant. Lyricist is not known. Music is composed by Pt Govindram.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

Video

Audio

Song-Kaari kaari andhiyaari raat mein (Jalpari)(1952) Singer-Lata, MD-Pt Govindram

Lyrics (Provided by avinash Scrapwala)

kaari kaari andhiyaari ee raat mein
kaare kaare baadarwaa chhaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye ae
kaari kaari andhiyaari raat mein
kaare kaare baadarwaa chhaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye ae

mere man mein chhaayi udaasi re
main piyaa milan ki pyaasi re ae
mere man mein chhaayi udaasi re
main piyaa milan ki pyaasi re
main kab se khadi hoon raah mein
nainon ke deep jalaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye
kaari kaari andhiyaari raat mein
kaare kaare baadarwaa chhaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye ae

bhar aayi ankhiyaan mori re
chandaa se door chakori re ae ae ae
bhar aayi ankhiyaan mori re
chandaa se door chakori re
main birhan baat takoon palchhin
hriday mein aas lagaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye
kaari kaari andhiyaari raat mein
kaare kaare baadarwaa chhaaye
aise mein kahin meraa chaand nikal aaye
to mazaa aaye

———————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————–

कारी कारी अंधियारी ई रात में
कारे कारे बादरवा छाए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए ए
कारी कारी अंधियारी ई रात में
कारे कारे बादरवा छाए ए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए ए

मेरे मन में छायी उदासी रे
मैं पिया मिलन की प्यासी रे ए
मेरे मन में छायी उदासी रे
मैं पिया मिलन की प्यासी रे
मैं कब से कड़ी हूँ राह में
नैनों के दीप जलाए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए ए
कारी कारी अंधियारी ई रात में
कारे कारे बादरवा छाए ए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए ए

भर आई अँखियाँ मोरी रे
चन्दा से दूर चकोरी रे ए ए ए
भर आई अँखियाँ मोरी रे
चन्दा से दूर चकोरी रे
मैं बिरहन बाँट टाकून पलछिन
ह्रदय में आस लगाए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए ए
कारी कारी अंधियारी ई रात में
कारे कारे बादरवा छाए
ऐसे में कहीं मेरा चाँद निकल आये तो
मज़ा आए


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4450 Post No. : 15909

Today’s song is a comedy song from a Costume/Action film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. The film was a production from Basant Pictures, owned by producer/Director Homi Wadia. In 1942, brothers JBH Wadia and Homi Wadia separated from each other on a very important point. The elder brother JBH Wadia was of the opinion that the life of the action-stunt films is a short one. He firmly believed that the market for action films will dry up within the next 10-15 years, hence the company should change over to Social films.

The younger brother Homi Wadia differed and wanted to continue with stunt films. He separated and established his own Basant Pictures. Most stunt actors joined his group – especially Fearless Nadia. Besides the Human artistes, Homi Wadia also replaced Animals used in stunt films. In Wadia films there was a Horse named ‘Punjab ka Beta’, a dog named ‘Tiger’, and a Motor car called ‘Rolls Royce ki Beti’. Basant Pictures brought a Horse named ‘Rajput’, dog called ‘Moti’, and a Motor Car called ‘Austin ki Bachhi’. In addition they also acquired a Motorcycle named ‘Runnio’.

The history of stunt action films is as old as the Silent film history. Silent films were essentially a Visual medium, as there was no sound. What could be achieved by dialogues had to be conveyed only with the visuals, hence there was not much scope for emotional films. In the initial stages of silent films, the audience was mainly of the middle and lower class of the society. Impressing and attracting them was easy with action films. That’s how the majority of silent films consisted of action or stunt scenes.

After the advent of Talkie films, the trend of stunt films continued and also became money spinners. Those days stunt films did not need any well known or famous actors or beautiful heroines. These films were made with minimum budgets. Master Bhagwan used to make a stunt film in just 60 to 70 thousand Rupees, covering all expenses. The Wadia, Mohan, Imperial or Ranjit action films cost a little more as they were more elaborate with some story and known actors.

There were specialist actors like Baburao Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Fearless Nadia, Prakash, Boman Shroff, Billimoria brothers, John Cawas and few others who were fixed stars of stunt films. In those days “SPL FX” techniques were not there and all the stunts were actually done by the actors themselves.

Veeru Devgan – yesteryear Fight Master, has written an article on “Stunts and Actions” in the “Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema”. He says in it,

“It was from film Aan-52 that professionals were employed for the first time. Azeembhai handled the Horses and Douglas took care of the fights and fencing….
“Evolution of action hero began with “Phool aur Pathar”-66, when Dharmendra bared his chest for the first time….
“Stunts in Hindi cinema started taking centre stage in the late 60s and early 70s…..
“What is creditable is that most of today’s actors are ready to do all the action scenes themselves “.

These days, no film is complete without “SPL FX”. What we miss now is the Human involvement in film stunts !

The cast of today’s film was Fearless Nadia, John Cawas, Goldstein, Dalpat, Leela kumari, Rajani, Shyamsundar, Raja Sandow etc. This film is remarkable for 2 reasons. First is – for its Music Director, Madholal Damodar Master, this was his last film as MD. He retired from films, but excelled in another field with International fame, after retirement. More of it later in this post.

Secondly, one of the names in the film cast today was Raja Sandow. He indeed was in the film and film credits, though he had died on 25-11-1943 only ! Surprised ? Not only this film, but a total of 5 Hindi films and over a dozen Tamil films featured Raja Sandow in their films till 1960 ! This is because this legend of stunt films was so popular that his film shots were used again in different films for over a decade as a member of film cast. This must be unique in the world.

Raja Sandow (born P. K. Nagalingam) was an Indian film actor, film director and producer. He began his career as an actor in silent films and later became a prominent actor and director in Tamil and Hindi films of the 1930s. He is considered to be one of the pioneers of early Indian cinema.

Raja Sandow was born in Pudukottai, Tamil Nadu. He was trained as a gymnast and started his film career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film Company at Bombay. He was given the name “Raja Sandow” because of his physique (after strongman Eugen Sandow). His first lead role was in Patankar’s Bhaktha Bhodhana (1922), for which he was paid Rs. 101 as salary. A passionate gymnast, he started his career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film (1922). Top star at Kohinoor and its associate LAxmi Pics. (1922-8) under Manilal Joshi (Mojili Mumbai), R.S. Choudhury and Homi Master. Achieved fame when he formed a trio with director Chandulal Shah and heroine Gohar starting Jagdish Film with them (1928) and its successor, Ranjit Film (1929-36). Sandow’s star image in reformist melodramas, playing complex psychological characters opposite Gohar, was launched with Gunsundari and extended in several classic ‘negative’ roles in Shah-Gohar sound films, e.g. Desh Dasi, Prabhu Ka Pyara and Barrister’s Wife. Other noted roles include Indira MA where he plays Kishore.

He became famous by starring in silent films like Veer Bhemsen (1923), The Telephone Girl (1926). After acting in a few silent films he also worked as a director in Ranjit Studios for a monthly salary. His first film as director was Sneh Jyoti (1928).
Returning to Tamil Nadu, he directed and acted in a number of silent films for R. Padmanaban’s Associate Film Company. Many of his silent films had reformist social themes like Peyum pennum (1930), Nandhanar (1930), Anadhai Penn (1931), Pride of Hindustan (1931) and sathi usha sundari (1931). After talking films were introduced with Alam Ara in 1931, he went back to Bombay and starred in many Hindi and Tamil talkies. He was often paired with the actresses Gohar and Sulochana (Ruby Myers). Between 1932–35, he acted in many socially themed Hindi films like Shyam sundar (1932), Devaki (1934) and Indira MA (1935). In 1935, he was commissioned to direct his first Tamil film Menaka and returned to Madras. He continued directing and acting in films till his death in 1943. Vasantha Sena(1936), Chalak Chor (1936), Chandrakanta (1936), Vishnuleela (1938), Thiruneelakantar (1939) and Choodamani (1941) were some of the films he directed and starred in during that period. The last film he worked in was Sivakavi (1943). Sandow suffered a heart attack and died at Coimbatore on 25 November 1943. He was survived by his wife Leelabai and one Son.

As far as films are concerned, he acted in 58 Silent films, 16 Hindi Talkie films and also directed 2 Hindi Talkie films.

Sandow was the first Tamil film director to adopt the practice of using names of actors in film titles. He was the first to introduce intimate kissing scenes and dancers in revealing costumes to the then conservative Tamil film industry. He was also the first director and producer to move Tamil cinema from remaking mythological stories and into making social themed films. He even advertised his films as “Don’t miss to see your own picture”. Sandow was also the first director to use Tamil literary works for film by directing Anadhai penn in 1931 based on Vai. Mu. Kothainayagi Ammal’s novel of the same name.

Writing about Sandow, film historian Theodore Baskaran says: “As a director, actor, scriptwriter and producer, his contribution to Tamil cinema is significant. Many of the stars of the Forties and Fifties have worked with him. He was very competent at coaching actors and maintained complete control over his films. He was a martinet on the sets and was often compared to a ringmaster in a circus. In his films, the emphasis shifted from songs to the spoken word.”

Film historian Randor Guy has also described him as a tough task master: “Raja Sandow was a tough and no-nonsense guy who would not hesitate to shout at and slap his crew and cast including women! Regretfully there are no such directors these days!.”

The Tamil Nadu Government has instituted an annual award in his name called Raja Sandow memorial Award, given for outstanding services to Tamil Cinema. A Postage stamp had been issued in recognition of his contributions to Indian cinema.

Filmography-Talkie films in Hindi…Pardesi preetam-33, Noor e imaan-33, Toofani Taruni-34, Partha Kumar-34, kashmeera-34, Indira M.A.-34, Gunsundari-34, Ratan Manjiri-35, Raat ki rani-35, Desh Dasi-35, College girl-35, Barrister’s wife-35, Prabhu ka pyara-36, Matlabi Duniya-36, Dil ka Daku-36 and Chalaak Chor-36. He directed Raat ki rani-35 and Chalaak Chor-36.

An extraordinary point. Raja Sandow was so popular during the Silent era and early Talkie period, that even after his death in 1943 at Coimbatore, his film shots and leftover films were used in 5 Hindi films till 1953-that is till 10 years after his death. Even his name appeared in the film cast and credits !. I feel this is an exclusive honour, which I have never heard in case of any other actor. The films using his shots in them were Dhoomketu-49, Alladin and Wonderful lamp-52, Jungle ka Jawahar-52, Nav Durga-53 and Husn ka chor-53. This information is given in The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.

(Thanks for information from wiki, The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, Atit ke sitare by Nand kishore, muVyz, HFGK and my notes).

The name Madholal Master must be unknown to the newer crop of Music lovers, because he retired from film music in 1952- much before most readers were even born. The story of Madhulal Master is as strange as his death. On the morning of 19th June 1990, The Times of India, Bombay flashed a news…” The old time Music Director and a Director of Indian Institute of Puppetry, shri Madholal Damodar Master is found murdered in his Shivaji Park home.”

Born on 21-6-1903, Madholal joined the film industry to become a Comedian, but he was first made a sound recordist assistant, then an assistant MD for two films and finally independent MD for Krishna Tone Film Company for their film, ‘ Navchetan’-32. In the next 21 years he gave music to 34 Hindi films, few Gujarati films and some documentaries, composing 267 Hindi songs. Unable to cope up with the changed pattern of Music and public taste, he retired from this profession after his last film- Jungle ka Jawahir-52. After this he pursued his hobby of Puppet making and soon developed a flourishing business. Internationally well known, he was the only Indian member honoured by the International Puppetiers’ Organization. Very few people know that it was his JOKER PUPPET which was used by Raj Kapoor in his ambitious film MERA NAAM JOKER-1970.

He was invited as a special guest for the release ceremony for the HFGK-Vol I, on 8-10-1988, after Harmandir ji meticulously made special efforts to locate him in Bombay. He was overwhelmed with this gesture. Madholal ji showed a Catalogue to Harmandir ji, in which Madholal ji had recorded information about all songs composed by him with details of every film that he did in his career. Harmandir ji was wonder struck with his systematic records. In the ceremony, senior artistes like Naushad, Sitara Devi, Rajkumari ji etc all touched his feet with respect. He regaled the audience with his humorous talk for an hour. He had spent 38 years before this in anonymity. It is very sad that his life ended in such a tragic way. ( His murderer was never found out, nor was the motive known and the case file was closed.)

Here is today’s duet from the film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. It is shot on Rajni and actor singer Shyamsundar. Enjoy….


Song- Pyaare Pappu Gore Gappu paas tu mere aa (Jungle Ka Jawaahar)(1952)Singers- Sulochana Kadam, Shyamsundar, Lyricist- Saraswati Kumar Deepak, MD- Madholal Damodar Master

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhallo
chhod de mujhko ja

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithhalli chhod mera palla
kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithalli chhod mera palla
main jungle ki sherni
tu shahar ka pilla
khaati gaajar mooli tu
main khaata rasgulla
main khata rasgulla
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubaab tera
are ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubab mera
mujhe jaan le,
nahin
kahaa maan le
nahin nahin
mujhe jaan le
kaha maan le
o tauba hai ??
mujhko nahi sata
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

pyare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapk jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4429 Post No. : 15855

“Betaab”(1952) was produced and directed by Harbans for Susheel Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Ashok Kumar, Naseem, Motilal, Kamal Kumar, Murad, Mirza Musharraf, Tiwari, Kamal, Nazeer Kashmiri, Agha Mirza, Afghan Sandow, S Kamal, Parvati devi, Meera Aarti etc.

“Betaab”(1952) had thirteen songs in it. Two songs have been covered so far.

Here is the third song from the movie. This song is sung by S D Batish. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by S D Batish.

Going by the mukhda “binti karat hoon main tori maa” and going by the fact that it is penned by Bharat Vyas, some people may belieb=ve that it is a bhajan. Not al all. This song is a comedy song where a person is requesting his mother to get him married as soon as possible. He has no demands, no bars, no qualifications in mind for the prospective bride. The most openminded bridegroom ever !

The hilarious lyrics contains words that are considered politically incorrect now a adys but they raised no eyebrows those days. In any case it is a comedy song and it should be treated as such.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this fun song.


Song-Binti karat hoon main tori maa (Betaab)(1952) Singer-S D Batish, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-S D Batish

Lyrics

binti suno o o o o
mori
maa
maa
binti karat hoon main tori maa
binti karat hoon
binti karat hoon
binti karat hoon main tori maa
tu shaadi kara de
shaadi kara de
shaadi kara de mori ma

agle phaagan tak jo mujhko
nahin milegi biwi
to saanch kahoon bhagwaan kasam
mujhe ho jaayegi t b
chaahe kaani ho
ya andhi ho
wo looli ho
ya langdi ho
chaahe goongi ho ya bahri ho
chaahe goongi ho ya bahri ho
wo kaali ho ya gori ma
tu shaadi kara de
shaadi kara de
shaadi kara de
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shadi shadi
mori shaadi shadi shadi
o mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
shaadi

jaat paat ki fikar na karna
jo kuchh bhi ho naam
des bides kahin ki bhi ho
humen byaah te kaam
punjaaban ho
bangaalan ho
gujaraatan ho
maarwaadan ho
madraasan ho
maaraathan ho
madraasan ho
maaraathan ho
wo kahin ki bhi ho chhori ma
tu shaadi kara de shaadi kara de
shaadi kara de
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shadi shadi
mori shaadi shadi shadi
o mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
mori shaadi shaadi shaadi
shaadi


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4428 Post No. : 15853

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 68
———————————————————————————–

The date ten years ago, viz 1 september 2010 saw as many as seven songs getting discussed in the blog. First post of the aday appeared at 5:45 AM and the seventh post at 9:01 AM ! Ten years from that day, I am surprised myself how I was able to cover seven songs in a matter of little over three hours !

Here are the details of these songs :-

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Koi nahin mera iss duniyaa mein Daag-1952 All songs covered
Dil matwaalaa laakh sambhaalaa Bewafaa-1952 05 songs posted
Chupke chupke rukte rukte Paying Guest-1957 All songs covered
Dil todna kisi ka ye zindagi nahin hai Pooja Ke Phool-1964 All songs covered
Ye dil hai muhabbat ka pyaasaa Dil Ne Phir Yaad Kiyaa-1966 All songs covered
Daanton taley dabaa kar honth Doli-1969 All songs covered
Tadap ye din raat ki Amrapaali-1966 All songs covered

As many as six out of the seven movies that figured ten years ago, have already been YIPPEED by now. “Bewafa”(1952) is the only movie that still has a few songs left to be covered and that makes this movie the only movie eligible for “Blog Ten Year Challenge” for today (1 september 2020).

“Bewafa”(1952) was produced by Nargis and directed by M L Anand. The movie had Ashok Kumar, Nargis, Raj Kapoor, Neelam, Siddiquie, Sybil, Advani, Nizam, Sheel, Ghosh etc in it. The movie had nine songs in it. The movie made its debut in the blog on this date ten years ago. Six songs from the movie have been covered in the blog so far. Here are the details:-

Song Posted On
Dil matwaalaa laakh sambhaalaa 01.09.2010
Badnaseebi ka gila ae dil ae naashaad na kar 06.07.2012
Tu aaye na aaye teri khushi 01.02.2013
Tumko fursat ho meri jaan 15.02.2013
Kaam haathon ka hai 01.08.2015

Here is the seventh song from “Bewafa”(1952). This song is sung by Lata. Sarshar Sailaani is the lyricist. Music is composed by A QR Qureshi.

The song is picturised on Nargis and Ashok Kumar.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Prakashchandra. BTYC details were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

Lyrics were sent by Prakashchandra.

It is interesting to note that the first song of the day today was from “Wafa”(1950) and the next song (this one) is from a movie called “Bewafa”(1952). 🙂

Audio link

Video link:

Song-Ek baar jhalak dikhlaa ke hamen…isi ka naam duniya hai (Bewafa)(1952) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Sarshar Sailaani, MD-A R Qureshi

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

Ek baar jhalak
dikhlaa ke hamein aen
qismat ka sitaraa aa aa doob gayaa
kashti to bechaari ee
kashti thi ee
paani mein kinaaraa doob gaya
aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa

issi ka naam duniyaa hai
issi ka naam duniyaa hai
to duniya dekh lee maine ae
issi ka naam duniyaa hai

kisi ki aarzoo ka
khoon kar ke
kya milaa mujhko o o o
kya milaa mujhko
kisi ki aarzoo ka
khoon kar ke
kya milaa mujhko o o o
kya milaa mujhko
ke apne dil ki duniya bhi
ujadte dekh lee maine
ke apne dil ki duniya bhi
ujadte dekh lee maine
isi ka naam duniyaa hai

meri aankhon ke aagey
lut rahaa thha
qaafilaa dil ka..aaa…aaa
qaafilaa dil ka
meri aankhon ke aagey
lut rahaa thha
qaafilaa dil ka..aaa…aaa aa
qaafilaa dil ka
qayamat hai ke jeete jee
qayamat dekh lee maine ae
qayamat hai ke jeete jee
qayamat dekh lee maine ae
issi ka naam duniyaa hai

meri andhi jawaani
ne mujhe barbaad kar daala aaa aaa aaa
barbaad kar daala
meri andhi jawaani
ne mujhe barbaad kar daalaa aaa aaa aaa
barbaad kar daala
kissi ki bewafayee par lutaa di zindagi maine
kissi ki bewaffayee par lutaa di zindagi maine
issi ka naam duniyaa hai
to duniya dekh lee maine
issi ka naam duniyaa hai


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4424 Post No. : 15841

While collecting information for writing articles on Hindi songs in Bangla films, I have often come across discussions and references about the beauty and the elegance of Suchitra Sen, Supriya Devi, Sandhya Roy and Sabitri Chatterjee in the golden period of Bangla film industry. In fact, during this period, all the four actresses ‘cornered’ a majority of Bangla films. In a way, they had partly contributed to the revival of Bangla film industry after a slump arising out of the partition of Bengal in 1947.

During this period, there was one more actress who was equally beautiful and had given outstanding performances in both Bangla and Hindi films who seems to have been almost forgotten now. The said actress is Sumitra Devi.

It is said that Sumitra Devi’s presence in the Calcutta (Kolkata) studios was so mesmersing that her co-stars Pradeep Kumar and Uttam Kumar used to visit the studios to watch her shootings even though they did not have their shooting schedule for those days. Shammi Kapoor who acted with her in ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954) had remarked that she was not only a beautiful actress but her etiquette and politeness brightened her beauty.

Today, August 28th is the 30th Remembrance Day of Sumitra Devi (22/07/1923 – 28/08/1990). She was born as Nileema (Lily) Chattopadhya in Shiuri (Bhirbum district), presently in West Bengal in a conservative brahmin family. Her father was a lawyer in Muzzafarpur in Bihar who was a nephew of Digambar Chatterjee, the then Chief Justice of the Calcutta High Court. After the Bihar earthquake, the family shifted to Kolkata where she completed her schooling with some interruptions in her education. In 1944, the family once again shifted out of Kolkata to Bankura due to the threat of Japanese bombing. After the end of World War II, the family shifted back to Kolkata.

During her school days, Sumitra Devi participated in dramas and also in amateur dramas after she finished her schooling. She was influenced by the acting of Kanan Devi and Chandrabati Devi. While watching a Bangla film ‘Samadhan’ (1943), she felt that she can act better than the lead actress in the film. She was so obsessed with working in the film that one day she gate-crashed into New Theatres Studio, met Debaki Bose and said that she would like to work in a film. Debaki Bose was surprised to see a young girl asking for a film role. But at the same time, he was so struck by her beauty that he immediately offered her the heroine’s role in his next Bangla film ‘Sandhi’ (1944). She was asked to come to the studio the next day after getting the permission from her father. However, her father would not give her permission to join films. It was through the intervention of New Theatre’s boss, B N Sircar whose father was known to Sumitra’s father that finally she got permission to join films.

Even though Sumitra Devi was taken for the Bangla film, ‘Sandhi’ (1944), she also got a role in ‘My Sister’ (1944) opposite K L Saigal. ‘Sandhi’ (1944) was released first followed by ‘My Sister’ (1944). Both films were instant hits making Sumitra Devi a star overnight. She won the best actress award from Bengal Film Journalists Association for her very first film. ‘Wasiyatnama’ (1945) was her second Hindi film.

However, Sumitra Devi’s becoming a star had an opposite effect on her domestic front. She had to face non-co-operation from the family of her first marriage at Bhagalpur which ended in divorce. Later on, she worked in successful Bangla films like ‘Pather Dabi’ (1947), Abhijog (1947) and ‘Joyjatra’ (1948). In all these films, she worked opposite Debi Mukherjee with whom she got married on 21/10/1946. A son was born to her on 01/12/1947. However, after 10 days, Debi Mukherjee died on December 11, 1947. It was speculated that he committed suicide.

Sumitra Devi took a sabbatical from films for a year. However, it was imperative that she kept herself busy with the work. With her parents looking after her son, she resumed shooting in 1949 and did ‘Swami’ (1949) and ‘Devi Chaudharani’ (1949) among others which became hits. In 1950, she shifted to Mumbai with her parents when she was offered a lead role in Bombay Talkies’ ‘Mashaal’ (1950) opposite Ashok Kumar. Her performance in the film was appreciated and she got more Hindi films such as ‘Ghunguroo (1952), ‘Deewaana’ (1952) and ‘Mamta’ (1952) in which she got the varied roles from dancer, queen and a single mother, respectively. She did the lead role opposite Kishore Sahu in ‘Mayurpankh’ (1954), in ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954) opposite Shammi Kapoor and a neglected wife in ‘Jaagte Raho’ (1956) and its Bangla version, ‘Ekdin Ratre’ (1956).

In between, Sumitra Devi continued to get Bangla films in the 1950s and 60s, the prominent films being ‘Dasyu Mohan’ (1955) in which Pradeep Kumar was her lead actor. and ‘Saheb Bibi Golam (1956), in which she played the role of the wife of the younger landlord (Uttam Kumar). Her role was subsequently done by Meena Kumari in the Hindi version, ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). In the national award-winning film ‘Andhare Alo’ (1957), she played the role of a courtesan. (Note:The above biography of Sumitra Devi is mainly based on ‘Sumitra Devi – Interview of 1952 in Cineplot and ‘Sumitra Devi’ by Jyoti Prakash Guha on IDMb).

From the second half of 1950s, most of Sumitra Devi’s films – both Hindi and Bangla did not fare well on the box office. In Mumbai, she started getting roles mostly in B grade films. In Kolkata, with the successful arrival of the new actresses like Suchitra Sen, Supriya Devi, Sandhya Roy etc, Sumitra Devi was relegated to the background. Her active years as an actress in Hindi and Bangla films virtually ended by the middle of 1960s. Her acting career comprised of 23 Hindi films and about 12 Bangla films.

It is said that in her later life, Sumitra Devi got married to a Mumbai-based businessman. She got some minor character roles to play in a few Hindi films in 1970s and 80s. Sumitra Devi died in Mumbai on August 28, 1990 at the age of 67.

‘Raja Harishchandra’ (1952) was one of Sumitra Devi’s early Hindi films which she had done in Mumbai. The film was produced by C M Trivedi and was directed by Raman B Desai. The star cast included Prem Adib and Sumitra Devi in the lead roles supported by Moni Chatterjee, Bipin Gupta, Lalita Pawar, Gope, Tiwari, Kammo etc. The film had 6 songs written by four lyricists – Bharat Vyas, Ramesh Gupta, Gulshan Jalalabadi and Qamar Jalalabadi. The songs were set to music by Husnlal-Bhagatram. Four songs have been covered in the Blog.

On the occasion of the 30th Remembrance Day of Sumitra Devi today, I present the 5th song from the film, ‘gori gori chaandni aur poonam ki raat re’. The song is sung by Lata Mangeshkar and picturised on Sumitra Devi in the role of Rani Taramati. This song is accredited to Bharat Vyas.

Video Clip (Longer)

Audio Clip:

Song-Gori gori chaandni ho aur poonam ki raat re (Raaja Harishchandra)(1952) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas MD-Husnlal Bhagatram

Lyrics(Based on video version)

gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

aaj ki hai raat hai
o o
aaj ki hai raat piya paas mere aayange
roothhoongi main unse
wo aa ke manaayenge
aa ke manaayenge
o o o
aa ke manaayenge
gaayenge khushi ke geet
gaayege khushi ke geet
hilmil saath re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

thandi thandi pawan saloni man bhaaye re….ae..ae ae ae
thandi thandi pawan saloni man bhaaye re…ae ae..ae ae ae
bindiya hamaari dekho gir gir jaaye re
gir gir jaaye re
bindiya hamaari dekho gir gir jaaye re
o o o
gir gir jaaye re
rimjhim rimjhim
rimjhim rimjhim
pade barsaat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re

kar ke singaar ho o o
kar ke singaar aaj unko rijhaaungi
odh ke chunariya sajan ghar jaaungi
sajan ghar jaaungi
o o o sajan ghar jaaungi
mehndi se laal laal
mehndi se laal laal
honge mere haath re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re
gori gori chaandni ho
gori gori chaandni
aur poonam ki raat re
meethi meethi
o meethi meethi saajna se
hogi man ki baat re
hogi man ki baat re


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4403 Post No. : 15787

‘Kaafila-1952’ was directed by Arvind Sen for Munshi Productions, Bombay.

It was produced by S.H. Munshi. It had Ashok Kumar, Nalini Jaywant, Motilal, Ranjan, Sunalini Devi, Nazeer Hussain, Amita, Bhagwan Ji, Mona, Krishnakant, Shakti, Mumtaz, D.S. Panchotiya, Samar Chatterjee, Parvatibai, Sachin Ghosh, A. Sharma, Munshi Khanzar, Anand Prabhu and others.

This movie was passed by Censor Board on 05.05.1952.

This movie had total eight songs written by Vrajendra Gaur (five songs), Kavi Pradeep (two songs) and Moti. B.A. (one song). Music for this film was composed by two music directors viz. Husnlal-Bhagatram (six songs) and Bhola Shreshtha (two songs-both songs penned by Kavi Pradeep).

The voices of Geeta Dutt, Kishore Kumar, Lata Mangeshkar, Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum, Talat Mahmood and Zohrabai Ambalewali were used in the songs of this movie.

So far, six songs from this movie have been posted on the blog as per following;

S.No. Song Title Posted on
01 Chori chori dil mein samaya… 14.11.2010
02 Lehron se poochh lo 19.06.2011
03 Wo meri taraf yoon chale aa rahe hain 13.10.2011
04 Aansoo ab tum kabhi na behna 12.12.2013
05 Khushiyon ki bahaaren laut gayin … 02.05.2018
06 Is duniya mein kaun bada hai 06.02.2020

Today (7 august 2020) is the 40th remembrance day of Vrajendra Gaur (7 August 1980). On this occasion, here is a song from “Kaafila”(1952). This song is sung by Zohrabai Ambalewaali. Vrajendra Gaur is the lyricist. Music is composed by Husnlal Bhagatram.

To know about Vrajendra Gaur, the best source is this indepth article on memsaabstory, written by the sons of Vrajendra Gaur.


Song-Ho chhoona jee mujhe sambhaal ke (Kaafila)(1952) Singer-Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Lyrics-Vrajendra Gaur, MD-Husnlal Bhagatram

Lyrics

Ho o o o ho o
Chhoona ji mohe sambhaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho o o o ho o
Chhoona ji mohe sambhaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya saanwre

Haan haan haan aan aan aan aan
Ye samaa aur ye mausam hai
Josh e ulfat hai ae ae
Ho o o o
Main to betaab hoon
Aur aapko bhi fursat hai
Ho o o o o o
Phir bhi majboor hoon
Anjaam se dard e shaq hai
Ae ae ae
Ho o o o
Is jawaani se husn apna
Bachaane ke liye ae ae ae
Ho o o o
Aayi hoon ghoonghat nikaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho o o o ho o
Chhoona ji mohe sambhaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya
Ho sainyya saanwre

Ho o o o o o
Aap kehte hain hamesha
Mujhe dil ki malika
Aa aa aa aa aa
Ho o o o o
Kab badal jaaye nazar
Kya hai bharosa aa kal ka
Ho o o o o
Yahi hai fikr
Jo in aankhon se aansu dhalkaa
Aa aa aa
Aa aa aa
Ishq mein aansu hansaate hain
Rulaane ke liye ae ae ae
Ho o o
Aashiq hain mere kamaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho o o o ho o
Chhoona ji mohe sambhaal ke
Ho sainyya saanwre
Ho sainyya
Ho sainyya saanwre


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4397 Post No. : 15773

In Memory of Meena Kumari :

Mehjabeen Bano, who gained name, fame and huge popularity as Meena Kumari, was born on 1st August 1932. Child artist, tragedy queen, poet and singer, are the various attributes to her name. Had she lived to see this day, she would have been 88 today i.e. the two fat ladies of housie. Really, she was just 40 when she left this world, her temporary abode.

Honestly, I have not seen many of her movies. Some of the earlier movies like “Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam” and “Chiraag kahan aur roshni kahan” I have seen on TV longback. The unforgettable “Dil Apna aur preet praayi” and “Ghazal”, “Kaajal” , “Mere apne” and “Bahu Begum” also on TV. “Pakeeza” is the only film I have seen on the big screen and revisited in recent times. The songs of ‘Pakeeza” are embedded in mind from early childhood, even before I am conscious of listening to radio.

I belong to a family of film buffs, and the only family outings known to my parents and their brothers and sisters was going to watch movies in Theatre. Discussing about the film stars and their lives and their movies was a favourite pastime of all of them. Emphasis has always been on education, doing well in studies, but watching movies was dangled as a prize in front of us while in school. But none of them bought Records or record players as far as I know. I had not seen a record player in my life or touched one till I was in college. One of my college friend’s father had one. That was one L-P record player, kept in his room, alongwith all his prized possessions of school and college days. That was a separate room, a little far from their house where the family lived. So when exams were near and I would go to the friends place and she will take me to that room, where no one would disturb us and it was a quite place. It was in a chawl system, and that room was kept separate and maintained to be used as guest room as and when need arose. So that was my actual ‘darshan’ of a record player. We played some records available on the player sometime. Afraid of damaging it, we left it alone mostly. I recall only one or two names of those records, one of them was ‘Nasbandi” and other may have been “Dastak”.

Then there is the childhood memory of Pakeeza songs. Usually on a Sunday, one of the nieghbours on the floor above us, who had ‘ishq’ with Pakeeza songs, he would play it in on his record player. That sound has never gone away from the consciousness. Right from ‘inhi logon ne’ to ‘thhaare rahiyo’ to “chalte chalte”. Childhood impressions are very strong, there is no denying that. My knowledge of the Gujarati language also belong to the same period. Terms like “advanu nathi” (don’t touch) and “saras chhe” (Its nice) were never forgotten. It was in the BEST officers quarters, so even if we shifted houses, we were in the same building and nieghbours. The kids all played and grew up together even studied together. But we kids would never go to their house as that aunty was a stickler for neatness and cleanliness of the house and the uncle was a disciplinarian sort of person. So that explains why I never actually saw the record player that played “Pakeeza“ songs most Sundays. Let me make it clear that only the songs of Pakeeza were heard from the house and nothing else. Explains the “Ishq” of Pakeeza songs.

Now of course the record playing era is also over. Youtube is, the be all and the serve all for people like me. Meena Kumari, for me is always about her urdu diction and that voice full of emotions. Some of the material read in urdu magazine’s about her is surfacing in the mind. Like someone saying that she was the most beautiful of all the female artists of her time. Meaning, more beautiful than Madhu Bala ? it is difficult to digest. But her voice and diction is the instantly recognizable feature of her persona and more appealing than her beauty, for my generation.

So I found this song of the film “Tamasha” to post on this occasion. I was put up for this post by Peevicie’s Mom. She acted as a prompt or the catalyst for this writeup. The song is a solo of Lata Mangeshkar, picturised on Meena Kumari. Lyricist is Bharat Vyas. The music composer include Manna dey with Khemchand Prakash. It is not clear whether they composed the songs as a team or separately.

The films cast includes Dev Anand, Ashok Kumar and Kishore Kumar.

I will conclude with a factual impression about Meena Kumari, that she was like a rare flower. It bloomed fascinatingly for a long while, but could not deal with its own beauty and frailty. So it wilted fast in neglect of its soul as the real beauty was in the soul.

Hazaaron saal nargis apni be-noori pe roti hai
Tab kahin jaa ke hota hai chaman mein koyi deedawar paida…..


Song-Bhool sakey na ham tumhen aur tum to jaa ke bhool gaye (Tamaasha)(1952) Singer-Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Khemchand Prakash-Manna Dey

Lyrics

Kyun Ankhiyaan bhar aayin een
kyun Phir koyi yaad aaya aaa
Aaaa aaaa
Kyun Ankhiyaan bhar aayin

Bhool sakey na ham tumhen
Aur tum to jaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen
Aur tum to jaa ke bhool gaye ae
Ro ro ke kehta hai dil
kyun dil ko lagaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen

Bewafaa
Ye kya kiyaa aa aa aa aa
Bewafaa aa
Ye kya kiyaa aa
Dil ke badle gham diyaa
Muskuraayi thhi ghadi bhar
Raat din ab roun piyaa aa
Ek pal ab chain na miley
Tum jhalak dikhaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen
Aur tum to jaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen

Kaun si thhi bairan ghadi wo
Jab ke tujh se uljhe nayan
Kaun si thhi bairan ghadi wo
Jab ke tujh se uljhe nayan
Sukh ke meethhe jhoole mein rum jhum
Jhoom uthhaa thhaa paagal sa mann
Din sunehre raatein rupehli ee eee
Tum mile main huyi magan
Aankh khuli to
Maine dekhaa
Dekhaa thhaa ek jhoothha sapan
Sapnon ke sansaar mein
Mera mann bharmaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen
Aur tum to jaa ke bhool gaye ae
Bhool sakey na ham tumhen


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4377 Post No. : 15720

“I worshipped Bimal Roy. For me, his worth as a man was more than his films… It is impossible for me to describe what a man he was.”

The above quote was by Ritwik Ghatak, one of Bimal Roy’s desciples who later became an internationally known director of parallel cinema in Bangla films.

In Hindi film industry, there are many film artists, directors and those connected with the film music who are admired for their excellent professional performances. But there would be very few among them who would also be admired as the good human beings. Among few such personalities, the name of Bimal Roy comes to my mind because for the last few months, I have extensively read on the life and works of Bimal Roy. I have found that those who have closely worked with him like Dilip Kumar, Balraj Sahani, Vyjaynatimala, Kamini Kaushal, Nutan, Dharmendra, Shashi Kapoor, Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Gulzar and many more have highly talked about Bimal Roy as a fine human being besides an being an outstanding director. What touched me most about Bimal Roy was what Manobina Roy, his wife had said in an interview. Just a few minutes before his death on January 8, 1966, Bimal Roy had called her and said that he was deeply worried about his workers in Mohan Studio as to what will happen to them after his death. Only when she assured him and repeated her assurance that she would take care of them, Bimal Roy closed his eyes never to open them again.

Today, July 12th 2020 is 111th birth anniversary of Bimal Roy (12/07/1909 – 08/01/1966), one of the greatest Hindi film directors who rose from a still photographer to a cinematographer and then as a producer-director of some of the classic and socially relevant films. Although, there were many film directors from Bengal – especially in the Bombay Talkies who had directed Hindi films in Mumbai in the 1940s, it is said that it was Bimal Roy who brought ‘Bengaliness’ in his Hindi films in Mumbai. He was a trend setter in introducing the ‘middle of the road’ films.

Arunkumar Deshmukh ji has already discussed Bimal Roy’s biographical and celluloid journey in his article covering the song, chale re chale raam vanwaas. I would, therefore, skip his profile and his sequential journey in the film industry. I propose to concentrate mainly on three important phases in his filmy career which led to his meteoric rise in the film industry – as a Cinematographer, as a Director for films produced by New Theatres and as a Producer-director of Hindi films in Mumbai. In my view, the three phases were also the important turning points in the career of Bimal Roy.

Bimal Roy joined New Theatres (NT) as an Assistant Cameraman to Nitin Bose in 1932 during which he assisted him for ‘Chandidas’ (1932, Bangla version and also Hindi version in 1934), ‘Meerabai’ (1933) etc. He was promoted as a cinematographer in NT and shot films like ‘Devdas’ (1935), ‘Manzil’ (1936), ‘Mukti’ (1937), ‘Abhagin’ (1938), ‘Abhinetri’ (1940) ‘Meenakshi’ (1942) etc.

The high point in his career as a cinematographer was ‘Mukti’ (1937) – the first film from NT which was extensively shot outdoors, mostly in the forest of Gauripur (Assam). It was a challenge for Bimal Roy as a Cinematographer to shoot outdoors, the scenes with proper lightings. Even his indoor shots were exceptional. His camera works in the opening scene of the film itself is marvelous. The camera focuses on P C Barua who walks through three rooms, one after another before knocking the door of the fourth room. Here, only the camera ‘speaks’ in the scene in complete silence without any background music to create suspense as to what is going to happen next. The light and shadow effects have been effectively used to convey the mood of the situations in the film.

Kanan Devi, in one of her interviews had said that in ‘Mukti’ (1937), Bimalda through his camera work, made her more beautiful than what she looked in reality. P C Barua, the director, was so happy with his camera work in the film that in the publicity poster of ‘Mukti’ (1937), he made the name of Bimal Roy to appear next to his name with names of the actors appearing in the side. Probably, this may be the first occasion in NT that the publicity poster had prominently carried the name of the cinematographer.

Bimal Roy entered his second phase of his career when he turned as a director for the first time for the Bangla film ‘Udayer Pathe’ [(1944), ‘Towards the Twilight’]. A year later, a Hindi version of the film was made as ‘Hamraahi’ (1945), also directed by Bimal Roy. Manobina Roy, the wife of Bimal Roy was surprised as to why he chose the subject of exploitation by upper class of the lower strata of the society when he himself had the background of a landlord’s son. Probably, he may have seen such scenarios in his teenage days in his family and he wished to bring them to the notice of masses.

The challenge for Bimal Roy in this fiim was that NT boss, B N Sarkar has personally told to direct the film with the left-over cut pieces of the raw stock of negative film as those days, raw stock of films was rationed. There was no scope for wastage of the raw stock of films by way of reshoots. On the top of it, he had taken newcomers, Binita Bose (Roy) and Radhamohan Bhattacharya as the lead actors. With these backgrounds, it was imperative that he should also take the responsibility as a cinematographer. When the shooting of the film was completed, B N Sarkar was surprised that the film was completed by Bimal Roy without taking any extra stock of raw films.

The film though made with a small budget was one of the top box office grossers for NT. The film ran for more than one year in Kolkata’s Chitra theatre. With its Hindi version of the film, the name of Bimal Roy became well-known all-over India. In the Bengali speaking regions, ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944) became one of the highly discussed films. The film became a trend setter for some subsequent Hindi films having ‘rich girl poor boy’ love story with the background of a class conflict. Chetan Anand’s ‘Neecha Nagar’ (1946) followed, more or less, the similar pattern in the story.

The extra-ordinary success of ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944) did not help much in Bimal Roy’s career as a director as fortune of NT had taken a down turn due to the adverse impact on the film industry of the World War II and thereafter partition of Bengal by creating the then East Pakistan. Bimal Roy did direct two films for NT – ‘Anjangarh’ (1948) and ‘Pehla Aadmi’ (1950). The highlight of ‘Pehla Aadmi’ (1950) was that it was made on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. It was a challenge for Bimal Roy to shoot the battle scenes of the film in the studio itself which should look real in the film. I have watched the clip of the battle scene and it looks real. Though these two films were critically acclaimed, they did not fare well at the box office.

The downfall of NT in post-partition period and the emergence of Bombay (Mumbai) as the main film production centre prompted many artists and technicians in Kolkata to migrate to Mumbai. On the other hand, the Bombay Talkies was also going through the bad times. An opportunity came to Bimal Roy when he was invited by Ashok Kumar to direct ‘Maa’ (1952) for Bombay Talkies which he had to reluctantly accept due to the adverse conditions of the film industry in Kolkata. Bimal Roy came to Mumbai with his team consisting of Hrishikesh Mukherjee (Editor), Asit Sen (Assistant Director), Nabendu Ghosh (Dialogue writer) and Paul Mahendra (Hindi dialogue writer and actor). Later, some more artists and technicians from Kolkata like Kamal Bose (Cinematographer), Arvind Sen, Asit Sen, Debu Sen, Basu Bhattacharya and Salil Chaudhury joined Bimal Roy.

In terms of box office, ‘Maa’ (1952) did not add to the coffers of Bombay Talkies. Bimal Roy was all set to return to Kolkata along with his team when Ashok Kumar gave him another film, ‘Parineeta’ (1953) which was produced under the banner of Ashok Kumar Productions. Simultaneously, something was cooking within Bimal Roy’s team. Hrishikesh Mukherjee had revealed in an article that after watching an English film in Eros Theatre at Churchgate, Bimal Roy and his team were returning home on a BEST double decker bus and were discussing as to why they cannot make film like the one they watched. Bimal Roy asked as to who will write the story for the film to which everyone in his team offered to share the responsibilities. That was how Bimal Roy Productions was born on a double decker bus of BEST. And this was the third turning point in Bimal Roy’s career.

Bimal Roy embarked upon his maiden film ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953) as a producer-director. Bimal Roy had read the story ‘Rickshwala’ written by Salil Chaudhury, based on the Rabindranath Tagore’s poem, ‘Doi Bigha Zomi’. This was perhaps the first film in Bollywood depicting what is called ‘neo-realism’, a term normally used for post-war effects on the poor class of the population who tended to migrate to urban area for sustenance. Many in his team had reservations about the selection of Balraj Sahani in the role of Shambhu, the farmer because of his urban look. But Bimal Roy struck to his choice. He had seen him acting live on the sets of ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946) when he had visited Mumbai at the time of the release of his film ‘Hamraahi’ (1945) and thereafter in ‘Hum Log’ (1951).

‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953) put Bimal Roy on an international pedestal. The film won for him the Prix International Prize at 7th Cannes Film Festival (1954). The film also won him National Award for the Best Film and also the inaugural Filmfare Award, 1954 for the ‘Best Film’ and ‘The Best Director’. With the success of this film, the seeds of the ‘middle of the road’ cinema was sown in Bollywood.

One of Bimal Roy’s film which did not fit into his psyche of film making was ‘Madhumati’ (1958). The reincarnation story of the film was written by Ritwik Ghatak who was an assistant to Bimal Roy during his Kolkata days. He was without work in Kolkata and had come to Mumbai for work. Bimal Roy assigned him to write a story and screen play for his forthcoming film and also direct the film. This was how the film ‘Madhumati’ (1958) was born. But, at the last minute, he had to go back to Kolkata as he could arrange finance for his Bangla film, ‘Ajantrik’ (1958). ‘Madhumati’ (1958) was thought of mainly for the financial survival of Bimal Roy Productions. Hence, the commercial elements in the film was evident with Dilip Kumar and Vyjayantimala in lead roles, Pran as villain and Johny Walker as comedian and 11 songs. With Bimal Roy handling the direction, the mix of classic touch and commercial elements led the film to attain the status of the most commercially successful film for Bimal Roy Productions and the highest grosser among Hindi films released in 1958. The film won 9 Filmfare Awards.

Bimal Roy has shown through his films like ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Sujata’ (1959) and ‘Bandini’ (1963) that the victims of oppressions have superior morality than the oppressors. Bimal Roy had not been known to have leanings towards any political ideology. It is, therefore, a surprise to observe that in most of his films, the exploitation of downtrodden by the superior class of the society is evident though he belonged to a wealthy family of the landlords in a village near Dhaka in East Bengal (now Bangla Desh). The reasons for his ‘dislike’ for landlords or upper class probably stem from having been a victim himself when after the death of his father in 1930, his family was denied share in the estate and was expelled. He along with his mother and brothers had migrated to Kolkata where they may have initially faced the same problem as Balraj Sahani in ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ when he migrated to Kolkata.

Rinki Roy Bhattacharya believes that some characters in his films may have been modelled on the traits of a few of his family members. For instances, the arrogant and authoritarian fathers in ‘Udayer Pathe’ (1944), ‘Parineeta’ (1953) and ‘Devdas’ (1955) may have been based on Bimal Roy’s authoritarian father. The character of a whip cracking school master in ‘Devdas’ may be a whip cracking Head Master of Bimal Roy’s school in Dhaka. Pran’s character in ‘Madhumati’ (1958) may have been inspired from his uncle Jogeshchandra Roy who loved wines, women and dances.

During his filmy career, Bimal Roy directed 15 Hindi films which included his classics and popular films like ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Biraj Bahu’ (1954), ‘Devdas’ (1955) ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Yahudi’ (1958) ‘Sujata’ (1959), ‘Parakh’ (1960), ‘Prem Patra’ (1962) and ‘Bandini’ (1963) which was his last film as a director.

Bimal Roy also produced 7 Hindi films which he did not direct but gave the opportunity to direct most of them to his assistants. These films were ‘Amaanat’ (1955) directed by Aravind Sen, ‘Parivar’ (1956) and ‘Apraadhi Kaun’ (1957) both directed by Asit Sen (comedian), ‘Usne Kaha Thha’ (1960) directed by Moni Bhattacharya and ‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961) directed by Hemen Gupta who was unemployed at that time. ‘Benazir’ (1964) and ‘Do Dooni Chaar’ (1968) were directed by S Khalil and Debu Sen respectively due to Bimal Roy’s illness.

Those who had worked closely with Bimal Roy had said that he was a man of few words. It was very difficult to initiate a conversation with him. Dilip Kumar had said in an interview that he found the most peaceful atmosphere among the studios when he worked with Bimal Roy because no one was allowed to talk loudly. Nabendu Ghosh, his screen-play and dialogue writer, has said that Bimal Roy spoke little but smoked cigarettes a lot. Probably, his cigarette smoking may have resulted in lung cancer at a later stage which took his life on January 8, 1966.

At the time of his death, Bimal Roy had started work on ‘Do Dooni Chaar’ (1968) and ‘Sahaara’. While the first film was completed by one of his assistants, Debu Sen and got released in 1968, ‘Sahaara’ which was based on Bengali novel ‘Chaitali’ by Ashapoorna Devi got sheleved. In fact, Bimal Roy had done some shooting of the film with Dharmendra and Sharmila Tagore when he got ill on the set after which he never recovered. When Dharmendra became a top star from early 1970s, he convinced Bimal Roy’s wife, Manobina Roy to revive the film for which he arranged the finances and pursuaded Saira Bano to act in the film. Hrishikesh Mukherjee directed the film under its new title ‘Chaitali’ (1975).

One of Bimal Roy’s dream project which was very close to his heart was a bilingual film ‘Amrit Kumbh Ki Khoj Mein’ (Hindi and Bangla). He had started the work as early as 1960 when he had shot about one hour of footage of Ardha Kumbha Mela held at Allahabad in 1960. Gulzar was entrusted with writing the script for the film. It was his intention to complete the shooting of the film during the next Poorna Kumbh Mela. During the last stages of Bimal Roy’s illness when he was bed-ridden, Gulzar used to visit him every day and read out what he had written for the script of his favorite film. With the death of Bimal Roy, the film remained a dream. However, scenes shot for the film were converted into a 12 minutes of documentary film ‘Images of Kumbh Mela (1960) by his son, Joy Bimal Roy.

On the occasion of Bimal Roy’s 111th birth anniversary, I have selected a song, ‘main na boloon na boloon na boloongi’ from ‘Maa’ (1952), his first film in Mumbai as a director. The song is sung by Geeta Dutt which is picturised on Shyama. The song is written by Bharat Vyas which is set to music by S K Pal.

With this song, all the songs of ‘Maa’ (1952) have been covered in the Blog.

Acknowledgements: In writing this article, I have been greatly benefitted by the following sources:

1. ‘Bimal Roy – The Man Who Spoke in Picture’ (2009), a book containing a collection of articles, edited by Rinki Roy Bhattacharya, the daughter of Bimal Roy.

2. ‘The Cinema of Bimal Roy – An ‘Outsider’ Within’ (2017) by Shoma A, Chatterji. (Book).

3. ‘Ravi Paar Aur Anya Kahaaniyaan’ (1999) by Gulzar – Chapter on ‘Bimal da’.

4. Remembering Bimal Roy (2007) – A documentary film by Joy Bimal Roy.

Editor’s note: This song is the 5000th song from the decade of 1950s(1951 to 1960) to appear in the blog.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Main na boloon na boloon na boloongi (Maa)(1952) Singer-Geeta Dutt, Bharat Bhushan, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-S K Pal

Lyrics

main na boloongi
o main na boloon na boloon na boloongi
aaj mere chhote se dil mein
chhupa hai kya raaz main na kholoongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj

kya raaz hai
hai to bataao

saawan ki ithlaate baadal se poochh lo ji
baadal se poochh lo
kajraare nainon ke kaajal se poochh lo ji
kaajal se poochh lo
bhole baalam
mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
bhole baalam
mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
ye bharam apne man ka na kholoongi
aaj main na boloongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj
main na boloongi
ho main na boloon na boloon na boloongi
aaj mere chhote se dil mein
chhupa hai kya raaz main na kholoongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj

achcha
hum bhi nahin sunte

o o o o o
suna maine jo
wo kaise sunaaun
wo baaten tumhe main kaise bataaun
kaho ji kaise bataaun
kuchh khud samjho
kuchh khud samjho
kuchh meri palkan se samajh lo ji
palkan se samajh lo
kuchh dil mein chhupi dil ki dhadkan se samajh lo ji
dhadkan se samajh lo
bhole baalam mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
bhole baalam mohe laage sharam
haaye laage sharam
ye bharam apne man ka na kholoongi
aaj main na boloongi
aaj main na boloon na boloongi aaj


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4372 Post No. : 15708

“Jungle Ka Jawaahar” (1952) was a Basant Pictures production movie. It was directed by Homi Wadia. The movie had John Cawas, Nadia, Dalpat, Goldstein, Shapur, Agha, Abdulla etc in it.

The movie had five songs in it. One song has been covered in the past.

Today is the 102nd birth anniversary of Saraswati Kumar Deepak (7 july 1918-8 july 1986). While searching the dates of his anniversaries, I drew a blank on google. So it turns out that the anniversary page of this blog is perehaps one of the very few places online where these dates are available.

On this occasion, here is a song from “Jungle Ka Jawaahar”(1952). This song is sung by Shyam Sundar (singer) and Sulochana Kadam. Saraswati Kumar Deepak is the lyricist. Music is composed by Madholal Damodar Master.

The song picturised as a Tarzan and Jane kind of picturisation. My guess is that the actors are the famous John Cawas and Nadia. I request our knowledgeable readers to help identify them.

The lyrics are cute. The city slicker gentleman wants to introduce the lady to the charms of Big cities like Bombay and Delhi, but the lady, comfortable is jungle, wants none of that.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

Video

Song-Shrimati shrimati aao aao (Jungle Ka Jawaahar)(1952) Singers-Shyam Sundar, Sulochana Kadam, Lyrics-Saraswati Kumar Deepak, MD-Madholal Damodar Master

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

O o
shrimati
shrimati
Aao aao aao
Aao o
O na na na na
Na main aaun

Tu aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

Nayi duniya dikhaaun
Na na na na main aaun
Nayi duniya dikhaaun
Na na na na main aaun
Albeli dikhlaaun main
Chamak damak
Nayi duniya ki
Ja ja
Albeli dikhlaaun main
Chamak damak
Nayi duniya ki
Sun meri pyaari baat
Na na na na
Sharmeeli chal tu saath
Chhod de jungle ka mangal
Badhaa de
Badhaa de apna haath
Na na na na
Haan haan haan haan
Haa

Main tere haath na aaun
Pedon mein
Pedon mein ja chhip jaaun
Main tere haath na aaun
Pedon mein ja chhip jaaun

Sharmeeli dikhlaaun main
Tadak bhadak nayi duniya ki
o meri pyaari ??
sharmeeli chal tu saath
Chhod de jungle ka mangal
Badhaa de apna haath
Na na na
Na na na
na na na na

Aa jungle ki billi
Billi?
Aa jungle ki billi
Tujhe dikhaaun dilli
Dilli se bambai le jaaun
Motor mein juhu dikhlaaun
Na na na na
Na na na na
Na main aaun

Aa jungle ki billi
Tujhe dikhaaun dilli
Dilli se bambai le jaaun
Motor mein juhu dikhlaaun
Halwa khilaaun
Laddoo khilaaun
Chaupaati ki chaat khilaaun
Halwa khilaaun
Laddoo khilaaun
Chaupaati ki chaat khilaaun

Is jungle ko chhod ke
Chau

Chaupaati
Chaupaati na aaun
Haan main chaupaati na aaun

Bambai le jaaun
Raani banaaun
Na na na na na
Achhi achhi film dikhaaun
Achhi achhi film dikhaaun
La la laa
Oon oon oon
Jo kal ??
Sheesh mahal ??
Jo kal??
Sheesh mahal ??
Mila pardesi mehmaan
Ab to kehna mera maan
Jo kal ??
Sheesh mahal ??
Mila pardesi mehmaan
Ab to kehna mera maan
O Na na na
Haan haan haan haan

Nayi duniya dikhaaun
Na na na na main aaun
Albeli dikhlaaun main
Chamak damak
Nayi duniya ki
Sun meri pyaari baat
Pyaari baat
Sharmeeli chal tu saath
Chal tu saath
Chhod de jungle ka mangal
Badhaa de apna haath
Badhaa de apna haath
Badhaa de apna haath
Teri meri Jodi niraali hai
Matwaali hai
Nakhrewaali hai
Teri meri Jodi niraali hai
Ma ma ma ma matwaali hai
Nakhre nakhre nakhre nakhrewaali hai
Nakhre
Nakhre
Nakhre
Nakhrewaali hai
Teri meri Jodi niraali hai


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4356 Post No. : 15677

“Sapna” (1952) was directed by Kidar Sharma for Hindustan production company. The movie had Kishore Sahu, Bina Rai, Cuckoo, Shakuntala, Moni C, Hiralal, Rani Chanda, Narbada Shanker, Paul Sharma etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Three songs from the movie have been covered in the blog.

Here is the fourth song from “Sapna”(1952) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Rafi, Shamshad Begam along with male and female chorus. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by Shyambabu Pathak.

Only the audio of the song is available. It sounds like a community dance song. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Ae ghanan ghanan ghan garje (Sapna) (1952) Singers-Rafi, Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Shyambabu Pathak
Male Chorus
Female Chorus

Lyrics

babadik babadik
babadik baabdik
babadik babadik baabdik

hoy hoy
hoy hoy
hoy hoy
hoy hoy
ho rara ho

aa aa aa
aa aa aa

raa raa ho
ho ho ho
raa raa ho
ho ho ho
raa raa ho
ho ho ho

raa raa ho
ho ho ho
raa raa ho
ho ho ho
raa raa ho
ho ho ho

Ae ghanan ghanan ghan ghanananan ghanan garje
ba ba ba baadarwa
baadal ke dil mein khinch gayi
khinch gayi bilji ki rekha
?? bijli ki rekha
arre gori ki aankhen
mit gayi mit gayi
ye kisne dekha
kahoji bhai ye kisne dekha
baat ye sau baaton ki baat
raat ye sau raaton ki raat
baat ye sau baaton ki baat
raat ye sau raaton ki raat

Hoy
laar lilla
laar lilla
naar naweli aayi re
laar lilla
laar lilla
naar naweli aayi re
chamak chamak kar chale chaal ye
bijli si lugaai re
chamak chamak kar chale chaal ye
bijli si lugaai re
laar lilla
laar lilla
naar naweli aayi re

jyun jungle ki ee ee ee laakdi
gaanthh gathheelee hoye
baalaapan ki ee ee preetdi
bahot hathheelee ho o o o o ye

phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
teekho teekho kaanto
meethho meethho kaanto
bagiya mein hamko nindiya jo aayee
nindiya
jo aayee
main to kaliyon ki godi mein so gayee re
ho main to
ho main to
ho main to kaliyon ki godi mein so gayee re
chupke se ungli ko kaante ne kaat liya

kaante ne kaat liya
daiyya re ghaayal main ho gayee re
haay daiyya re ghaayal main

ho gayee re
ho gayee
phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
teekho teekho kaanto
meethho meethho kaanto

bhanwron ke bhole bhaale jigar par
nainon ka teer mera

chal gaya re chal gaya
phoolon ke sang muskaate yoon dekhoon main
phoolon ke sang muskaate yoon dekhoon main
kaanta nigoda kyun jal gaya re
haaye kaanta nigoda kyun jal gaya re jal gaya

phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
phulwa chunte kaanto lago ree
teekho teekho kaanto
meethho meethho kaanto

phulwa phulwa phulwa phulwa
aa aa aa aa
phulwa phulwa phulwa phulwa
aa aa aa aa

kisne chheda kaanon mein mere
zaalim jawaani ka raag re

raag re
raag re
raag re

tadpan lagi more man ki machhariyaa
tadpan lagi more man ki machhariyaa
paani mein laagi hai aag re
aag re
aag re
aag re

aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
phulwa phulwa phulwa phulwaa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
phulwa phulwa phulwa phulwaa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa

aa aa aa aa aa aa
phulwa phulwa phulwa phulwaa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15916

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1221
Total Number of movies covered =4362

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Active for more than 4000 days.

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