Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Jagjit Singh songs’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4588 Post No. : 16210 Movie Count :

4411

Today, February 8th is the 5th Remembrance Day of the poet and lyricist, Nida Fazli (12/10/1938 – 08/02/2016) who left for the heavenly abode on this date 5 years back. 80 years ago, Ghazal singer, Jagjit Singh (08/02/1841 – 10/10/2011) was born on this date. More than a co-incidental connection between the two, they had a special connection through their collaborations. Nida Fazli was the master of expressing the romance, realities and the philosophy of life by way of ghazals and nazms while Jagjit Singh added soul to Nida Fazli’s words through his emotive voice.

There was another co-incidence about Nida Fazli and Jagjit Singh. Both came to Mumbai around the same time, 1964 and 1965 respectively, for pursuing their career. It was Jagjit Singh’s first LP album with his wife, Chitra Singh titled ‘Unforgettable’ (1976) which made him popular as a ghazal singer. Almost at the same point of time, Nida Fazli had also become one of the most sought-after poets in mushairas all over India.

Both Jagjit Singh and Nida Fazli used very simplistic approach in making their ghazals popular among the masses. Jagjit Singh rendered ghazals in his emotive voice with simple music using only 3-4 musical instruments. He mostly avoided the use of semi-classical genre such as thumri and dadra as was the convention at that time. Nida Fazli, by and large, avoided the use of Persianised Urdu words in his ghazal. He used the mix of simple words from Hindi and Urdu to make them understandable to the masses. He moved away from the convention of ghazal writing as an expression of the unrequited love and the piognant mood associated with such love. Instead, he expressed through his poems the human relationships, socio-economic and political situations as also on realities of life. His poem depicted the humanist approach.

I have selected a few of couplets from his ghazals, some of which have been sung by Jagjit Singh, as examples of his non-conventional way of putting his thoughts in simple words with deep meanings:

uss ke dushman hain bahut aadmī achchha hoga
wo bhi meri hi tarah shahar mein tanha hoga

safar mein dhoop to hogi jo chal sako to chalo
sabhi hain bheed mein tum bhi nikal sako to chalo

[Note: This entire ghazal was recited by Prime Minister, Narendra Modi during a Rajya Sabha debate on March 8, 2016 in the context of Government’s difficulties for the smooth passage of bills in Rajya Sabha]

dhoop mein niklo ghataaon mein nahaa kar dekho
zindagi kyaa hai kitaabon ko hataa kar dekho

duniya jise kahte hain jaadoo kaa khilauna hai
mil jaaye to mittī hai kho jaaye to sona hai

hukoomaton ko badalne to kuchh muhaal nahin
hukoomaten jo badalta hai wo samaaj bhī ho

Muhaal= difficult

kabhi kabhi youn bhi ham ne apne jee ko bahlaaya hai
jin baaton ko ḳhud nahin samjhe auron ko samjhaaya hai

ghar se masjid hai bahut dur chalo youn kar le
kisi rote huye bachche ko hansaaya jaaye

hoshwaalon ko khabar kya bekhudi kya cheez hai
ishq keejiye phir samjhiye zindagi kya cheez hai

Both Nida Fazli and Jagjit Singh got associated with Hindi film industry almost at the same time. Nida Fazli wrote his first lyrics for ‘Satranj Ke Mohre’ (1974). Jagjit Singh rendered his first full-pledge song as a playback singer in Hindi film, ‘Aavishkaar’ (1973) with his wife Chitra Singh.

Despite both Nida Fazli and Jagjit Singh being in Mumbai since 1965 and both having the inter-related careers, it took almost 25 years for both of them to collaborate for the first time when Nida Fazli wrote the lyrics for the film ‘Billoo Baadshah’ (1989) for which Jagjit Singh was the music director and also the playback singer for one song. It took another four years when their first non-film album, ‘Insight’ was released in 1993. for which all the songs were written by Nida Fazli. Thereafter their collaborations continued until Jagjit Singh’s death kept them apart.

Nida Fazli entered the Hindi film industry as a lyricist at a time when the quality of song writing had the initial sign of deterioration. In the post-1980’s scenarios, his filmy songs stand apart from most of the songs written during that period. And when he joined with Jagjit Singh, their collaborative as well as individual efforts took us back to the golden period of Hindi film music for few moments.

On the occasion of the 5th Rememberance Day of Nida Fazli and 80th birth anniversary of Jagjit Singh, I have selected one of those Hindi film songs where Jagjit Singh has sung the song written by Nida Fazli. The song is ‘meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar’ from ‘Tarkieb’ (2000) with Alka Yagnik joining Jagjit Singh in rendition. The song was set to music by Aadesh Srivastav.

‘Tarkieb’ (2000) failed miserably at the box office and faded into oblivion. But the song under discussion has ensured that the name of the film is not forgotten. Such is the power of Jagjit Singh-Nida Fazli combination.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Kiska chehraa ab main dekhoon(Tarkieb)(2000) Singers-Jagjit Singh, Alka Yagnik, Lyrics-Nida Fazli, MD-Aadesh Srivastav
Both
Chorus

Lyrics

chaand bhi dekha
phool bhi dekha
baadal bijli titli jugnu
koi nahin hai aisa
tera husn hai jaisa
tera husn hai jaisa

meri nigaah ne ye kaisa khwaab dekha hai
zameen pe chalta huwa mahtaab dekha hai

meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar
kiska chehara
kiska chehara
ab main dekhoo….n
tera chehara dekh kar
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar

hu hu hu hu
ta ta ra ta ra ra ta ra

neend bhi dekhi
khwaab bhi dekha
neend bhi dekhi ee
khwaab bhi dekha aa
choodi bindiya darpan khushboo
koi nahin hai aisa
tera pyaar hai jaisa
haan tera pyaar hai jaisa aa
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar
kiska chehra
kiska chehra..aa
ab main dekhoo…n oon oon
tera chehra dekh kar
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar

ru ru ru

rang bhi dekhaa aa
roop bhi dekhaa aa aa
rang bhi dekhaa aa
roop bhi dekhaa aa
rasta manzil saahil mehfil
koi nahin hai aisa
tera saath hai jaisa
ho tera saath hai jaisa aa
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar

meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar
kiska chehra..aa
kiska chehra abb main dekhoo..n oon
tera chehra dekh kar
meri aankhon ne chuna hai tujhko duniya dekh kar

bahut khubsoorat hai aankhen tumhaari
(aaaaaa aaaaaaaa)
bana dijiye inko kismat hamaari
(aaaaaa aaaaaa )
usse aur kya chaahiye zindagi mein
(hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm)
jise mil gayi mohabbat tumhaari
(hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm)


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4510 Post No. : 16055 Movie Count :

4388

‘Vadh’ (2002) seems to have become an obscure film by now. Even though the film belongs to 21st century when the marketing through mass media has been the order of the day to promote the film, I do not recall having seen any such marketing blitzes for this film.

On-line searches revealed that it was a low budget film belonging to the genre of ‘suspense murder mystery’. A box office report suggests that the film was a ‘disaster’ as it earned about 50 per cent of the cost of production of the film. I guess, the absence of a well-conceived marketing of the film may have resulted in the prospective film audience not well-informed about the film. Otherwise, why should a film with Nana Patekar should get such a lukewarm reception at the box office? Probably, the low budget did not allow the makers of the film to indulge in high marketing blitzes.

‘Vadh’ (2002) was a maiden venture of Dilip Dhanwani who was in the film distribution business based in Mumbai. The star cast consisted of Nana Patekar, Anupama Verma, Puru Rajkumar, Meghna Kothari, Nakul Vaid, Sambhawana Seth, Arun Bakshi, Raju Mewani, Sweta Menon etc. The film was directed by N.S.R – the abbreviation for Nana Patekar, Rajesh Singh and Raj Bharath, respectively. Raj Bharath was entrusted with directing the film. However, due to alleged interferences by Nana Patekar, he left the film after which the Rajesh Singh was entrusted with the film’s direction. He also left the film on the same ground. Probably, producer thought it better to entrust the direction to Nana Patekar if he wants his film to be completed without any further delay.

The credit title of the film mentions that ‘it is a film by Nana Patekar for Dilip Dhanwani’. This shows as to how much Nana Patekar was involved in making of this film. This alone made me interested in watching the film, the DVD of which was available on one of the video sharing platforms. I watched this film in a single sitting as I found the film engrossing. The build-up of suspense till the last was superb. I could not guess as to who could be the murderer of three victims in the film which was attributed to a serial psychopath killer.

The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Dr, Arjun Singh (Nana Patekar) is a Psychiatrist who is attached to a mental hospital. He has a late marriage with Jyoti Singh (Anupama Verma) who is much younger than him. Dr. Arjun is very protective about his pregnant wife and loves her. His younger brother Vijay (Nakul Vaid) is a police inspector attached to Crime Branch who is in love with Meghna Kothari, the daughter of the Police Commissioner (Arun Bakshi).

In the mental hospital, there is a serial psychopath killer who has been kept in solitary confinement due to his violent behaviour. One day, the serial killer runs away from the hospital by breaking open the grilled door of his room. In this process, he kills three guards of the mental hospital by slicing the throats with ‘X’ slicing marks on the faces of the victims. This is his trade-mark killings. The police forces are looking out for the serial killer as this has created a panic among the residence.

Aryan (Puru Rajkumar) is a childhood friend of Dr. Arjun who is rich and a charming playboy. He spends much of his time in revelry and visits bars and clubs. He prefers casual relations with his girl-friends including the married ones and has no intention of marrying any of them. Dr. Arjun’s wife, Jyoti is also involved with extra marital relation with Aryan.

Soon after the running away of serial killer, one of the girl friends of Aryan is found murdered in her house. While the Crime Branch and Dr. Arjun think that the murder is a handywork of the serial killer with his trade-mark style of killing, Inspector Vijay has a doubt on Aryan as his visiting card is found in his murdered girl-friend’s house. After few days, another girl-friend of Aryan is found murdered in the same style which come to the light when Aryan visits her house. The presence of Aryan in the house makes Vijay confident that it is Aryan who has killed his girl friends in the same style as that of the serial killer so as to wood-wink the police in thinking that it is the work of the serial killer. Inspector Vijay arrests Aryan but due to lack of evidence against him, Aryan gets bail.

In the meanwhile, both Dr Arjun and his wife Jyoti are under threat from the serial killer. as they find ‘X’ mark in blood has been put on faces in their photo-frame. As a precautionary measure, Police Commissioner shifts them to a more secured place with a Commando attached to their new residence. Inspector Vijay ensures that he is present in the house when his brother, Dr. Arjun is on hospital duties.

Despite the security, one day, Jyoti finds that their personal Commando has been murdered in the same fashion as those killed by the serial killer. She gets the panic attack thinking that she and her husband would be the next target of the serial killers. A police team headed by the Police Commissioner visit to scene of the crime. To his horror, Inspector Vijay finds that his brother, Dr Arjun’s dead body is floating in a swimming pool with Jyoti murdered in her room with the same trade mark killing style as that of the serial killer.

The film ends with Police Commissioner taking a vow that he would not leave that mad serial killer and he would find him.

At the outset, the end of the film appears tame. This is because, I have not revealed the suspense part of the film just in case those who had not watched the film and are interested in doing so. The murder mystery has been solved as far as the film’s audience is concerned but for the police in the film, the case of the serial murders is yet to be solved.

The USP of the film is that the director has been successful in keeping the suspense in the film till the last. In fact, he has build-up the suspense as the film story progresses. However, this USP was not sufficient to make the film successful at the box office.

This film belongs to Nana Patekar from start to finish. There is no long and high-pitched dialogues for him as we are used to see him doing so in most of his films. He has a normal dialogue delivery and a restrained performance. Anupama Verma has done a conventional role of a house-wife which she has performed better than what she has been performing in her pop song videos. The suspense effects of the film have been well supported by the background music of Sanjay Chaudhary.

The weakness of the film is that it is too long for a suspense thriller. The film could have been easily condensed within the duration of say, 1 hour 45 minutes instead of 2 hours and 10 minutes to make it sleek for viewers. For example, there was not need to have two club songs of about 5 minutes durations just to support the playboy image of Puru Rajkumar. Such type of songs become distraction in a film which is trying to build-up the suspense. Probably, these two songs were included as a part of box office attractions. But the way these songs were conceived and presented, it would not have been a surprise if even front-benchers had taken a break by walking out of the theatre hall when these two songs were shown on the screen.

I also felt that there was no need for a romantic sub-plot of Inspector Vijay (Nakul Vaid) and his fiancée, Meghana Kothari. In fact, the role of Meghna Kothari is redundant in the film. On top of it, the pair have one song of about 5 minutes duration which appears to be forced upon the film.

And lastly, I missed the presence of N A Ansari type of a character in the film which would have added some aura around him, enhancing the suspense to the murder mystery.

‘Vadh’ (2002) has 6 songs, a high number for a suspense thriller. Except one, none of the song has pleased my ears. I am presenting the only song out of six which I liked and the song is ‘bahut khubsoorat hai aankhen tumhaari’ rendered by Jagjit Singh. The song is written by Nida Fazli which is set to music by Vishal-Shekhar. The song is picturised on Nana Patekar and Anupama Verma.

With this song, ‘Vadh’ (2002) makes its debut in the Blog.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Bahut khoobsoorat hain aankhen tumhaari (Vadh)(2002) Singer-Jagjit Singh, Lyrics-Nida Faazli, MD-Vishal Shekhar
Nana Patekar

Lyrics

hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm

bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
agar ho inaayat
ae jaan-e-mohabbat
bana deejiye inko
kismat hamaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari

tum in aankhon se duniya ko dekhti ho
aur main zindagi ko

jo sab se juda hai
wo andaaz ho tum
chhupa thha jo dil mein ae
wohi raaz ho tum
jo sab se juda hai ae
wo andaaz ho tum
chhupa thha jo dil mein ae
wohi raaz ho tum
tumhaari nazaakat a a
bani jab se chaahat
sukoon ban gayi hai
har ek bekaraari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari

na thhe jab talak tum
hamaari nazar mein
na thha chaand shab mein ae
na sooraj sahar mein
na the jab talak tum
hamaari nazar mein
na thha chaand shab mein ae
na sooraj sahar mein
tumhaari ijaajat
tumhaari hukoomat
ye saara gagan hai ae
ye dharti hai saari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
agar ho inaayat
ae jaan-e-mohabbat
bana deejiye ae inko
kismat hamaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari
bahut khubsoorat hain
aankhen tumhaari


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4102 Post No. : 15252 Movie Count :

4190

The Dadasaheb Phalke Award is India’s highest award in cinema. It is presented annually at the National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals, an organisation set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. The recipient is honoured for their “outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinema” and is selected by a committee consisting of eminent personalities from the Indian film industry. The award comprises a Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus) medallion, a shawl, and a cash prize of ?1,000,000 (US$14,000). Presented first in 1969, the award was introduced by the Government of India to commemorate Dadasaheb Phalke’s contribution to Indian cinema. Phalke (1870–1944), who is popularly known as and often regarded as “the father of Indian cinema”, was an Indian filmmaker who directed India’s first full-length feature film, Raja Harishchandra.

The first recipient of the award was actress Devika Rani, who was honoured at the 17th National Film Awards held in 1969. As of 2017, there have been 49 awardees. Among those, actor Prithviraj Kapoor (1971) and actor Vinod Khanna (2017) are the only posthumous recipients. Raj Kapoor accepted the award on behalf of his father Prithviraj Kapoor at the 19th National Film Awards in 1971 and was himself a recipient in 1987 at the 35th National Film Awards ceremony. Bommireddy Narasimha Reddy (1974) and Bommireddy Nagi Reddy (1986); Raj Kapoor (1987) and Shashi Kapoor (2014); Lata Mangeshkar (1989) and Asha Bhosle (2000) along with B. R. Chopra (1998) and Yash Chopra (2001) are the siblings who have won the award.

Note:- all of the above information I have extracted from Wikipedia and apologize for any wrong information therein.

October 11th 1942 was the date when Teji Bachchan- wife of Shri. Harivansh Rai Bachchan gave India the Shahenshah of Bollywood. He goes by the name Shri. Amitabh Bachchan. Anyone who has even the faintest knowledge about Indian movies -anywhere in the world- would have heard about this actor. He may have not been India’s first mega-superstar, that title will always be associated with Rajesh Khanna. The reason I have used the term Mega-Superstar for Rajesh Khanna is because Dilip Kumar- Dev Anand-Raj Kapoor were equally big stars of their generation and the trio were inspiration for the next set of actors like Manoj Kumar, Dharmendra, Rajendra Kumar, Rajesh Khanna, Jeetendra, Amitabh Bachchan etc. The popularity and fan-following that Rajesh Khanna achieved was much more than what the trio of the 50s and 60s may have experienced collectively. Amitabh Bachchan had a long journey to reach the level of popularity that was Rajesh Khanna’s; but even at the height of his superstardom one has never heard of girls writing letters to Amitabh with blood, or throwing themselves at his car or trying to commit suicide at the news of his marriage to Jaya Bhaduri etc.

What Amitabh experienced was a different kind of affection from his fans. There were people who prayed for his life in 1982 when he had an accident during the shoot of “Coolie”. There are accounts of people walking barefoot from far-flung places to the hospital where AB was admitted and battling for life after the accident; people offering prayers at various places of worship cutting across religious differences. AB has always thanked his fans for all the love they showered on him during that period. In fact, he always greets them on Sunday evenings (whenever he is in Mumbai i.e.) for which there is a huge crowd of fans waiting outside his Mumbai residence.

He may have been dubbed the angry-young-man in the early phase of his career but he was equally adept at emotional, romantic or comic roles. “Mahaan” (1983) had him in three roles where we had him as an emotional father/ husband, serious-faced inspector and comic stage artist. The turn of the century saw him change his style and take on a variety of roles and characters- strict father who will not accept his son marrying against his wishes (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham), strict principal who wanted all his students to adhere to the ‘parampara’ ‘pratishtha’ etc laid down by the college (Mohabbatein), friendly-indulgent father to Akshay Kumar (“Ek Rishtaa: the bond of love” and “Waqt: the race against time”) etc. etc. etc. We saw him as a rustic near-bumbling cop in “Bunty Aur Babli”; aging teacher of a deaf-blind girl in “Black”; these successful experiments have seen him through 50 years in an industry which has many talented actors but no one has been given epithets like “Shahenshah of Bollywood”, “Big B” or “Star Of The Millennium”. He continues his reign over the hearts of his fans in spite of the next generation and the one after it giving movies that gross over 100 crores per film. He still gets author backed roles that befit his age and many-a-times is the central character of the story as in “Baghban” and “Baabul”. His detractors may feel that he is the most off-key (besura) singer (and I believe he agrees that he is mostly off-key) but the songs that he has sung (from the first full song “mere pass aao mere doston”) have been well received by his die-hard fans-yours truly included. 🙂

Coming back to the opening para of this post- here is the connection- Amitabh Bachchan is the recipient of this prestigious award for this year. He joins an august list of personalities who have had a major influence on the Indian film industry beginning from Devika Rani who is acknowledged as the first lady of Indian cinema.

This is the latest feather in AB’s cap in addition to the Padma awards – Padma Shri, Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan; 4 National Awards for best actor and 15 Filmfare awards and numerous other awards from various national and international organisations.

Today he turns 77 and I am confused as to which is an appropriate song that should go with this post- I have a big collection to choose from- the blog has about 20 songs which have had Amitabh Bachchan in the recording room as a singer or uttering a few words with the main singer.

Today’s song is from the BR films produced 2006 release “Baabul”. It had AB play an indulgent and friendly father to Salman Khan and a loving father-in-law to Rani Mukherjee. The movie had a simple story of the loving father-in-law, fighting the opposition from his own wife and other family members, against his decision of getting his son’s widow remarried. The song comes at the fag end of the movie. It was on my list of songs under consideration for this post. What clinched the matter in its favour is that the song has two versions to it. The version in the movie is in the voice of Amitabh Bachchan and the album version is in Jagjit Singh’s voice. And only this morning I saw a message on our WhatsApp group that yesterday was Jagjit Singh’s anniversary.

So, we wish our Big B a long and healthy life and lots more years of entertaining us along with remembering Jagjit Singh and his smooth voice.

Video (Amitabh Bachchan voice)

Audio

Song-Kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya (Baabul)(2006) Singer-Amitabh Bachchan/ Jagjit Singh, Lyrics-Sameer, MD-Aadesh Srivastava

Lyrics

kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
daakiya koyi jab aayega
tujhko churaa ke le jaayega
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata aa aa
jiyuga kaise tanha tere bina bata

tu suhaagan rahe sang saajan rahe raat din
iss khushi ke liye har sitam main uthha loonga aa
tere jaane kaa gham mujhko hoga magar laadli
leke iss dard ko main sada muskuraaoonga
baabul toh dil se de raha duaa yahi
khushi ke saaye mein ho zindagi teri
baabul toh dil se de raha duaa yahi ee
khushi ke saaye mein ho zindagi teri

waqt ke saath zakhm yeh bhar jayega
pal guzar jayega tu meri baat maan le ae
yaadon ke aasre umr kat’ti nahin
hai haqeeqat yahi abb too jaan le ae ae
samundaron ka paani koyi naa pi saka
akela khaara jeevan koyi naa jee saka aa
samundaron ka paani koyi naa pi saka
akela khaara jeevan koyi naa jee saka

kehta hai baabul o meri bitiya
tu toh hai mere jigar ki chitthiya
daakiya koyi jab aayega
tujh ko churaa ke le jaayega
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata
katega kaise lamha tere bina bata
jiyunga kaise tanha tere bina bata


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3965 Post No. : 15047

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

One of the most iconic songs of Saigal Sb. A song that is a definitive representation of Hindi film music of the 1930s. That incomparable rendition by Saigal Sb under the music direction of RC Boral was recorded live for the film ‘Street Singer’ (1938). Recorded more than eight decades ago, this remains a signature piece for time immemorial. The vision of Saigal Sb, leaving his home, just carrying his harmonium with him, walking with a slow measured pace, and singing this thumri – it is one of the lasting images of Hindi cinema. That version of the thumri from the ‘Street Singer’ can be viewed here – “Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye“.

Anecdotes around that live recording and shooting tell of a microphone hidden in the harmonium, of the slow pace of walking so as to complete the singing and the visual shot keeping within the range of the camera. Playback singing had already been invented (1935) and was in progressive use in the industry. And yet, this song was recorded live. The performance can only be called – unprecedented, incomparable and peerless. Nothing more fascinates the diehard fans of Saigal Sb, than this one song by him. Many singers have sung this, but the Saigal version remains untouched, unsurpassed.

In the film, this song spans an extended sequence of scenes. And small parts of this song are also rendered by Kanan Devi. There is a sequence where Kanan Devi attempts to sing this song in the theatre. Later, Bhola (KLS) departs from their shared home, upset that Manju (Kanan Devi) is enamored by Amar Babu (Jagdish Sethi), and wants to move in with him. But after just one day away from Bhola, Manju returns home searching for him. And finds that he has left. She makes a phone call to Amar Babu, requesting him to bring his car. They start to drive towards the road that leads to Bhola and Manju’s home village. In the meantime, the scene shifts between Manju searching for Bhola, and Bhola walking away with the harmonium. The song is reprised here three or four times, sometimes just the mukhda, sometimes just the antaraa.

Amar Babu is driving the car with dismay in his heart. A windstorm arrives. There is lot of dust in the air, and visibility is not good. Manju alights from the car, and starts following the path on foot – the path that Bhola would have taken returning to his village. Tired and overcome by storm, Bhola falls down by the roadside. Manju sees someone lying on the road and rushes to him. The tryst happens again. Amar Babu watches them from a distance. And then with a wry smile on his face, he returns to his car, to start the lonely journey back to his home. Bhola and Manju start their foot journey back to their village. Once again the song is heard in the voice of Kanan Devi, as the visual shows the two mates, in a silhouette against a darkening sky. The hearts have met, they are returning home, and the lady’s voice is telling – “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

Thirty five years later, in 1973, this classical thumri is now included in the film ‘Aavishkaar’, starring Sharmila Tagore and Rajesh Khanna. This time, the music composition is by Kanu Roy, who transformed it into a duet, with the participating voices of Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh. This time, in the picturization, this is presented as a background song, as the visual action on screen is mostly silent – and yet very expressive.

‘Aavishkaar’ presents a scenario of a brief hiatus in the lives of two people very much in love. In love they are, and they get married, and they start to live together. Maybe, just love is never enough. What love is – it needs to be examined, re examined and re invented often. And then it becomes love, more love and more meaningful. Else, just the drudgery of the consistent proximity, which used to be like heaven to start with, turns into stagnant boredom. Expectations still riding high, the lull now breeds contempt – a contempt that is actually screaming for and seeking a rejuvenated level of understanding and sharing. That is what ‘Aavishkaar’ is about.

The film starts on a day when it is the wedding anniversary of the protagonist couple. Amar (Rajesh Khanna) is aware, but still, broodingly ignores. He works late in office, he goes to see a film with a female co-worker, giving the audience the impression that he is seeking extra marital happiness. On his way back at night, he finally musters enough thought and courage, and buys a bouquet of Rajnigandha flowers. Arriving home, a certain scene transpires before he enters the house, and on an impulse, he places the bouquet in a flower pot next to the door, and enters the house, pretending that he does not remember the anniversary. A long night passes. There are flashbacks, there are arguments, there is even physical violence – highlighting the drift that has occurred in the relationship. Basu Bhattacharya has handled the conflict and the interactions very deftly. In my mind, this is the best handling of the situation of a very loving relationship gone sour. Many other films come to mind – ‘Arth’, ‘Dooriyaan’, ‘Anubhav’, ‘Aandhi’, ‘Grih Pravesh’, ‘Aap Ki Kasam’, the comical ‘Pati, Patni Aur Who’, ‘Abhimaan’ . . . and more. In ‘Aavishkaar’, the director portrays the conflict, the pain, and the reconciliation, at a very psychological level.

So, after a distraught and a tension filled hostile night, mostly sleepless and lot of exchanges and memories, the new day dawns. The rigmarole of the daily routine beckons. Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) gets up early and opens the front door to pick up the milk delivery. And then she sees. . . the bouquet standing in the flower pot. She picks it up. And the voice of Jagjit Singh drifts in from the background. She finds Amar standing behind her. . . and there is an embrace. A lot changed and a lot settled in that night of strife.

The two stanzas play out slowly. The first one as the couple are embracing and then they move back into the home. The second stanza is an external shot, mixing flashback again possibly, as we see the couple on the beach, in a mood of frolic, as the singer croons yet once again to say. . . “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

The two instances that we are so familiar with, of the use of this song in Hindi films, both seem to have happy conclusion. But that was not the original thought when Wajid Ali Shah wrote and composed this thumri, way back in 1856. The British had played a game of deception with the Nawab of Awadh. In a bloodless coup, Wajid Ali Shah was dethroned and sent to Calcutta, and the British annexed Lucknow and the kingdom of Awadh. The Nawab was completely heartbroken, on leaving his beloved city, and his cultural roots. That is the time when this timeless poem was conceived.

Yes, the interpretations works both ways. There is this indication of a newlywed bride, going to her new matrimonial home. There is sadness on leaving the parent’s home, but there is also an eagerness and joyful elation of being with the one, with whom a new bond of love will be explored. And, there is the gloomy and poignant interpretation. Looking at the sad dilemma that was faced by Wajid Ali Shah – he was sentenced to leave behind his beloved city, his happy pastimes, and the people who made up his life that far. The discussions in literature talk about the passing passage of life into afterlife. That too, is a leaving behind of the home that one thinks to be their own, and then embark on a journey to meet the Maker. This jusxtaposition is captured so beautifully and so splendidly in this brief two verse thumri – “Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

In the context of this series, I bring on this song today to highlight another dimension of reuse that we see so often in Hindi films – the reuse of traditional poetry and folk music. This particular thumri is so simply a dear favorite of singers, that gathering the number of different renditions by different artists would be a big exercise in itself. Just to give you an idea, this thumri has been sung by the following singers – the list goes all the way from Bade Ghulam Ali Khan to Alisha Chinoy. The names, in no particular order are – Ustad Faiyaz Khan, Gauhar Jaan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Siddheswari Devi, Begum Akhtar, Rasoolan Bai, Naina Devi, Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Mushtaq Hussain Khan, Malka Jaan, KL Saigal, Jagmohan Sursagar, Kannan Devi, Ustad Khadim Husain Khan, Girija Devi, Shobha Gurtu, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Pandit Jitendra Abhisheki, Kishori Amonkar, Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, Jagjit Singh (solo), Rajan-Sajan Mishra, Alisha Chinoy, Mahendra Chopra. . . and I am sure, many more artists of repute.

If I talk about Hindi films, then besides the two instances already covered in the write up above, this thumri appears in two more films. In 1954, Manna Dey has sung this for the film ‘Mahatama Kabir’ – a really wonderful rendition. Then later in 1964, Lata Mangeshkar has sung this for the Bhojpuri film ‘Naihar Chhutal Jaaye’.
[Ed Note: Dear Arun ji adds two more instances of this song being used in Hindi films, both from early 1930s. This song has been rendered by Durga Khote in the 1931 film ‘Trapped’ aka ‘Farebi Jaal’. Then again in 1934, this thumri appears in the list of songs for the film ‘Naachwaali’ – no information available regarding singer or music director.]

Such reuse that involves traditional poetry and folk songs, is really very simple, because this material is beyond the intellectual property disputes. For that matter, we have seen many such other creations being used in films across the decades. On the devotional side, the poems of Meerabai, Kabir Das, and Soordas are very popular and are used quite freely by the producers. Then we have the adabi poets, once again a traditional treasure that does not have any copyright issues attached. Ghazals of Ghalib are quite popular and have been used in many films across the decades. As I scanned the songs in HFGK I find that the ghazal “Dil e Nadaan Tujhe Hua Kya Hai” appears in 9 films from 1931 to 1980. The ghazal “Nuktacheen Hai Gham e Dil” appears in four films, “Ye Na Thee Hamaari Qismat” appears three times, “Phir Mujhe Deeda e Tar Yaad Aaya” also appears in three films, and so on.

Checking for Meerabai’s bhajans, one finds the popular ones like “Mere To Girdhar Gopal”, “Main To Gidhar Ke Ghar Jaaun”, “Tum Jo Todo Piya” etc., being used in many films. Not a precise search, but my estimate is that Meerabai’s bhajans appear in Hindi films more than 100 times. The search cannot be precise because there are many instances where the traditional bhajans or ghazals have been used without giving credit to the original poet. Additional note – Amir Khusro’s poetry appears in Hindi films no less than 10 times, of which at least 4 are occurrences of “Kaahe Ko Byaahi Bides. . .”.

The more difficult proposition would be to trace the folk songs reuse across Hindi films. With so much variations, and without acknowledgement to the original folk source, it is difficult to make an estimate of folk music reuse in films. But I will surely add that this segment would be more voluminous than the bhajans and ghazals. The song, or variations thereof, of “Jhumka Gira Re. . .” has been used in no less than four films.

Coming to the film ‘Aavishkaar’. The film is produced under the banner of Aarohi Film Makers and is directed by Basu Bhattacharya. The songs of this film are written by Gyandev Agnihotri and Kapil Kumar. And yes, this traditional thumri originally created by Wajid Ali Shah. The cast of actors is listed as Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Deena Gandhi, Denis Klement, Satyendra Kappu, Monika Jasnani, Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, Mahesh Sharma, and Minna Johar etc.

Interesting side note – this film is the 2nd in the now famous trilogy by Basu Bhattacharya, on the topic of marital discord, the first one being ‘Anubahv’ (1971) and the 3rd being ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1977).

More interesting side notes. As we talk about reuse, I must mention the other interesting reuse in this film. Probably this is the only film where we can hear Sharmila Tagore singing. At one place in the film, the iconic Manna Dey song “Hansne Ki Chaah Ne. . .” is being sung by Sharmila. Then, at another place in the film, the song from ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) – “Duniya Banaane Waale, Kya Tere Mann Mein Samaai” is playing on the radio, and we can also hear Sharmila singing along with it.

So much for today. In the next episode, we shall explore another very interesting aspect of re-use of songs.

Song – Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye  (Aavishkaar) (1973) Singers – Jagjit Singh, Chitra Singh, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Kanu Roy
Jagjit Singh + Chitra Singh

Lyrics

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

baabul mora. . .
baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

chaar kahaar mil mori
doliyaan sajaaye re
mora apna begaana
chhuto jaaye. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

[dialogue – Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila]

angnaa to parbat bhaya
deori bhai bides
le babul ghar aapno
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

चार कहार मिल मोरी
डोलियाँ सजाये रे
मोरा अपना बेगाना
छूटो जाये॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

[संवाद – राजेश खन्ना, शर्मिला टागोर]

अंगना तो परबत भया॰ ॰ ॰
डेयोड़ी भई बिदेस
ले बाबुल घर आपनो
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

 


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws. This is his 400th writeup in the blog

apni marzi se kahaan apne safar ke hum hain
rukh hawaaon kaa jidhar kaa hai udhar ke hum hain

-Nida Fazli

[There is no choice for us as to where we embark on the journey.
Where the direction of the wind is the place to which we belong].
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

He was a freedom fighter, a revolutionary, a journalist, a parliamentarian and a poet. He was associated with Indian National Congress, Communist Party of India and later Indian Muslim League. Bal Gangadhar Tilak was his mentor. He was the man behind coining the slogan ‘Inquilab Zindabad’. He was a member of Constituent Assembly for drafting the constitution of independent India. He was a devoutly muslim who made his annual pilgrimage to Mecca. But he also made it a point to visit Mathura on Krishna Janmashtmi day. He described himself as:

darwesh o inquilab maslak hai mera
Sufi Momin hoon and ishtiraaki muslim

(I have chosen a path of asceticism and revolution. I am a Sufi Momin and a socialist Muslim).

He was Maulana Hasrat Mohani.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Last year, I had presented a pair of hamradeef ghazals of Jigar Moradabadi and Mirza Ghalib wo jo rootheen to manaana chaahiye sung by Mukesh and Talat Mehmood, respectively as a duet making them into one combined ghazal. The main features of hamradeef ghazals are that they have the same ‘qaafiya’ (rhythmic patterns), the same ‘baher’ (meter) and the same radeef (the last word in the second line of each she’r).
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Ava Suri, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The Unforgettable was the first album of ghazals and nazms launched by Jagjit-Chitra. It was released in 1977.

These days television and FM radio stations bombard the viewers/listeners with new film songs. A song becomes popular at once, or not at all. In a month or two, another song takes its place at the top of the Pop charts and it’s gone forever.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

The 3rd death anniversary of Ghazal King Jagjit Singh was on October 1Oth and the 76th birth day of Urdu poet and lyricist Nida Fazli was on October 12th. For the occasions, I had planned to write a combined post and had selected a song months back to be posted on the Blog in October 1Oth or 12th. But some other activities relating to travels and pre Deewali atmosphere in my house resulted in diversion of my mind and in the process, I completely forgot about writing the article for the occasion. It was only when I saw a post on the occasion of the birthday of Nida Fazli that I got reminded of my pending article. Even though anniversary dates have passed, it is never late for paying tributes.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

shahar ki raat aur main naashaad o naakaara phiroon
jagmagaati jaagti sadakon pe aawaara phiroon
ae gham e dil kya karoon
ae vahshat e dil kya karoon

This is the mukhda of a very popular song from the film ‘Thokar’ (1953). Most of the lovers of old Hindi film songs would know that the song was rendered by Talat Mehmood and there is a version song sung by Asha Bhonsle. Many among them may also be aware that the song was composed by music director Sardar Malik. But I am not sure as to how many would to know the name of the poet who created this beautiful nazm of despair and loneliness. I was one among them. Many years later, I came to know that it was the creation of Majaz. Then the next question – who was Majaz?. I had no inclination then in seeking an answer to this question.
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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

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