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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Appealing to the Almighty’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3756 Post No. : 14722

Today’s song is from a film called ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ (1956). This is a film in which singer Talat Mahmood acted as a hero opposite heroine Roopmala. Talat Mahmood (24-2-1924 to 9-5-1998) acted in 12 films from 1945 to 1958 and he also did a cameo role, singing a song-“Shukriya Ae Pyaar Tera Shukriya“, of  three and half minutes in film Aaram-1951. In his early career starting in Calcutta, he fell in love with a Bangla actress Latika Mullick. They got married on 20-2-1951. She was converted to Islam and was renamed Nasreen, who bore two children to Talat. As per a book by Manek Premchand, ‘Talat Mahmood – The Velvet Touch’, he sang 777 songs which included Hindi film songs, NFS and unreleased films etc. As per another source he sang 451 Hindi film songs from 259 Hindi films.

Two very good singers – and my favourites – spoiled their singing careers at the cost of fulfilling their misplaced hype of making it as a singing hero, when such times had died down after Saigal. Mukesh ( 22-7-1923 to 27-8-1976 ) acted in 8 films from 1941 to 1956 and sang 928 songs from 538 films, as per one source. I personally feel, the film bug did more damage to Talat than Mukesh. Of course a money-smart Talat made it up with innumerable foreign tours for concerts and singing jaunts with a party made up of musicians, singers and mimicry artistes.

Recently, I received a copy of Talat’s handwritten inland letter, sent to one of my friends in Gujarat, who wanted to arrange his show. As per what Talat wrote on 26-12-1977, his fees was Rs. 12,000/-, plus hotel accommodation for him and others. The troupe, he said, consisted of singers, dancers, musicians and mimicry artistes. One may feel that Rs. 12,000 was too low, but remember, this was 41 years ago, when petrol was less than two rupees per litre. In late 70s, I had rented a two bedroom, 1,000 sq ft flat in prime locality like Andheri in Bombay, for just Rs. 800 pm. Today the same size flat will command a rent of Rs. 40,000 + pm.

Like the values of money and values of life changed in all these years, almost everything has changed nowadays. These changes have not come overnight, but like slow poisoning, the changes took almost 50 to 60 years to show their effect. The second world war and the independence era were the beginning when quantity started overpowering quality. The film industry was also not an exception. How good the acting or the music was, became secondary and how many films, became the testing apparatus to judge the actor or the composer. Thus the simple but the talented artistes fell behind and those who pushed hard or had the right connections (and the luck) went much ahead.

In the field of Music Direction, at least two names come to the mind, who were talented but too simple to last in the neck to neck competition of the film line. One of them was Snehal Bhatkar (the other being, Bharat Bhai’s favourite- Jaidev). He was the MD for the film ‘Diwali Ki Raat’.

White full shirt, ironed white pyjama, spectacles with big powerful lenses and the trademark white Gandhi Topi – he could easily be mistaken for a ‘Pandharpur Warkari’ (a regular pilgrim to Pandharpur) or a member of a ‘Bhajani Mandali’ or simply a middle class ‘Marathi Manoos’. Such was the appearance of one of Hindi filmdom’s talented, yet not so famous, music maestro VASUDEV GANGARAM BHATKAR or Snehal Bhatkar, as we all know him.

In Hindi film music field there were some talented composers like Ghulam Mohd, Mohd. Shafi, Iqbal Qureshi, Daan singh, C Arjun, Ramlal, Sardar Malik, Ajit Merchant, Jamal Sen, Dattaram, Ganesh, etc. who could never reach the peaks of their careers. They really deserved success and fame, but luck did not favour them. Big banners never approached them and eventually the losers were the music lovers in India. These composers did not know, perhaps, how to sell their art. May be they never wanted to enslave music to gain name and fame, instead they preferred to settle for genuine service to music!

Snehal Bhatkar was one such composer. The maxim of simple living and high thinking never worked in this Mayanagari, but he had no regrets. Till the very end he was contented with whatever God gave him, and whatever name and success he achieved.

He was born into and grew up in a family that was surrounded by traditional devotional music all around. In the lower middle class, the people had their entertainments in singing bhajans and doing keertans in temples en masse.

Vasudev G. Bhatkar was born on 17-7-1919. He knew at least 100 bhajans by heart by the time he was in his 10th class. He was invited to sing in Ganesh Melas and other celebrations and soon became a well-known name in the locality. Because of his singing and skills in playing harmonium and other instruments, he got a job with HMV in Bombay. Here he used to give accompaniment on harmonium to big classical singers. At the same time, taking cognizance of his singing skills, many Marathi bhavgeets and bhajans were recorded by HMV. Some of them are popular in Maharashtra even today.

All this while, Bhatkar was looking for opportunity to compose in films. Sudhir Phadke who also served in HMV and recorded some songs from 1943 to 1945, joined hands with Bhatkar and made a pair – Vasudev-Sudhir. In 1946, they got a film of Baburao Painter – ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’ – for music direction. The problem was that due to his service in HMV, he could not openly work outside. Hence he only gave his name as Vasudev. After this film, the pair separated and Phadke went to give music to films like ‘Gokul’ (1946), ‘Aagey Badho’ (1947), etc. Due to financial constraints Bhatkar was unable to leave his job with HMV.

In 1941, Bhatkar had come to know Kidar Sharma while recording songs for his film ‘Chitralekha’, which he was making for Ranjit Studios. Sharma had just come from Calcutta to establish himself in Bombay. He had a knack of identifying talents. He first gave a chance to Bhatkar to sing some songs with Leela Sawant in his film ‘Kaliyan’ (1944). After ‘Rukmini Swayamvar’, Kidar Sharma gave him his first break as an independent composer in his film ‘Neelkamal’ (1947), where Kidar Sharma launched Raj Kapoor and Madhubala in adult roles as the leading pair. Here Bhatkar used the name B Vasudev. In the subsequent years Bhatkar used different names for different films like VG Bhatkar in ‘Sant Tukram’ (1948), ‘Sati Ahalya’ (1949) and ‘Pagle’ (1950), and Snehal in ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948) and ‘Thes’ (1949). After doing ‘The’s and ‘Sati Ahalya’, Bhatkar resigned from HMV.

Snehal Bhatkar and Kidar Sharma were very good friends. Kidar gave him ‘Neki Aur Badi’ in 1949. Meanwhile, Kidar Sharma met Roshan Lal Nagrath in some musical event. Sharma was terribly impressed with Roshan and wanted to give him a break in his film. At that point of time, Kidar had just started work on ‘Neki Aur Badi’. He had a heart to heart talk with Bhatkar and Bhatkar gladly left the film for Roshan. Thus Roshan got his break with ‘Neki aur Badi’. Roshan never forgot Bhatkar’s magnanimity in his life and always respected Bhatkar. In return Kidar Sharma gave ‘Hamari Beti’ (1950) to Bhatkar. As he was a free bird now, Bhatkar started using the name SNEHAL BHATKAR  from this film. Snehal was the short form of Snehalata, his daughter.

Snehal Bhatkar did many Marathi films and recorded many bhajans in Marathi, which are ever popular. He did 28 films in Hindi (including one unreleased film in the 1950s) and 12 films in Marathi. Out of 27 released Hindi films, 9 were made by Kidar Sharma.

The song which made Mubarak Begum and Bhatkar famous in India was ‘Kabhi Tanhayion Mein, Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ from the film ‘Hamari Yaad Aayegi’ (1961). (This film was was originally named ‘Jawaan Mohabbat’). Actually this song was to be done by Lata Mangeshkar. Lata had already recorded two songs for this film. Due to her extremely busy schedule she was unable to do this song, so she suggested the name of Asha Bhosle. But Kidar Sharma, already upset over Lata’s refusal, opted for Mubarak Begum and the rest, as they say, is history. She imbued a unique character to this song with her special voice.

After 1960, the musical scene in India was undergoing drastic changes and there was no space for composers like Bhatkar, who used minimum orchestra and dwelt upon melody. His films came in long intervals. Even Kidar Sharma left him after ‘Fariyaad’ (1964) only to return in ‘Pehla Qadam’ (1981). Finally Bhatkar did his last Hindi film ‘Sahme Hue Sitare’ (1994), which featured his son Ramesh Bhatkar, who was already a popular hero in Marathi film, stage and TV. This obscure film did nothing good to Bhatkar. After retirement Bhatkar devoted his time for children’s welfare and his original love – Bhajan Mandali singing.

Snehal or Vasudev Gangaram Bhatkar, together with cousin Devji Bhatkar and Panchambuwa Pandurang Shivalkar, was the founder member of ‘Vishwambhar Prasadik Bhajan Mandal’ in Dadar. It is still in operation after 50 years, with new set of singers. Bhatkar was very kind hearted. Every year, during Ganapati festival he used to visit his ancestral village ‘Bhate’ in Ratnagiri district and participate in singing bhajans.

Lata, Talat and Mukesh were his favourite singers. Although Talat has not sung many songs for him, his song “Zindagi Kis Mod Pe Laayee Hamein” from ‘Diwali Ki Raat’ was very popular. When rehearsals for this song were being done, Bhatkar had used only tabla and sitar for the practice session. The producer who chanced upon this rehearsal was so much impressed with this that he insisted recording the song only with minimum instruments. So, this song has only tabla, sitar and another instrument for accompaniment.

Though there were many melodious songs composed by Bhatkar like, Khusro’s “Lakhi Babul More Kaahe Ko Deenha Bides Re” sung soulfully by Mukesh in ‘Suhaag Raat’ (1948); “Ro-oge Pachhtaoge” by Mukesh and Rajkumari in ‘Thes’ (1949); Lata’s “Chanda Tujhko Laaj Na Aayee” from ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951); Suman Kalyanpur’s “Haal-e-Dil Unko Sunana Tha“- Fariyaad (1964), no other big banner producer opted for Snehal Bhatkar, except Kidar Sharma . May be his compositions were not so simple for common man to hum or sing, although they were quality songs.

Despite several melodious songs Bhatkar was never counted among the first line composers. Kidar Sharma returned to him in 1980, but by that time Snehal Bhatkarwas already on a descending track.

SNEHAL BHATKAR, a talented but sadly not much applauded composer, died peacefully on 29-5-2007 at his Dadar home.

Today’s song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor. As far as I know, this is my first song of Mahendra Kapoor. Today’s song was his first solo song of his career. Mahendra Kapoor was among the premier playback singers of the Golden Age of Hindi musical cinema, with hits like “Chalo Ek Baar ” and “Neele Gagan Ke Taley” vaulting him to a level of celebrity rivaling the on-screen actors miming to his vocals. Born January 9, 1934, in Amritsar,  Kapoor spent the majority of his childhood in Mumbai, where he claimed top honors in the All-India Murphy-Metro Singing competition in 1957. His victory captured the attention of filmmaker Raja Nawathe, who used him in 1958’s ‘Sohni Mahiwal’. This also caused a controversy, because the contest was for new comers and Mahendra Kapoor had already sung  songs in several films like ‘Madmast’ (1953), ‘Madhur Milan’ (1955) ‘Lalkar’ (1956) and ‘Heer’ (1956) and also his first solo song in film ‘Diwali Ki Raat (1956). Later on he gave some lame excuse that he had not got any payment for that song etc. (beetehuedin.com has all the relevant details on this controversy and the court case etc, in MK’s interview article).

A year later, Kapoor launched into the top ranks of Bollywood singers when composer and musical director Ramchandra Chitalkar tapped him to perform the show stopping “Aadha Hai Chandrama Raat Aadhi” in the film ‘Navrang’ (1959). Kapoor quickly proved himself a versatile talent even by Bollywood standards, performing in a number of regional Indian languages beyond his native Hindi. Within the sub genre of Marathi language productions, he was renowned as the playback singer of choice for superstar Dada Kondke — and over time his repertoire expanded, becoming virtually synonymous with patriotic anthems when he delivered “Mere Desh Ki Dharthi. . .” in Manoj Kumar’s 1967 film ‘Upkaar’, a rendition that also earned him the Best Male Playback Singer honors from India’s National Film Awards voters.

Kapoor remained a respected and popular figure across his five-decade cinema career, notching additional hits via “Iktara Bole. . .” (from ‘Yaadgaar’, 1970), “Fakira Chal Chala Chal” (from ‘Fakira’, 1976) and “Ab Ke Baras” (from ‘Kranti’, 1981). While his filmography embraces dozens of directors, he enjoyed his most fruitful collaboration with filmmaker BR Chopra, a partnership that extends across productions like 1959’s ‘Dhool Ka Phool’, 1963’s ‘Gumrah’, 1965’s ‘Waqt’, 1969’s ‘Aadmi Aur Insaan’ and 1973’s ‘Dhund’. From 1980 onward Kapoor appeared largely in small, regional films in the Punjabi and Bhojpuri tongues, and with son Rohan he mounted a series of live tours spanning across India and overseas. His contributions to the Bollywood industry were later recognized via the Indian government’s Padmashri Award as well as the Madhya Pradesh government’s Lata Mangeshkar Award. Poor health plagued Kapoor during the final years of his life, and he suffered a fatal heart attack in his sleep on September 27, 2008.

Today’s song is the 7th song from this film, to be discussed here. There are 10 songs in the film as per HFGK, but one Talat song was removed from the film. For this film, Kersi Mistry and Prabhakar Naren were the assistants for Bhatkar. Mistry later claimed that the above song was composed by him.


Song – Tere Dar Ki Bhikmangi Hai Daata Duniya Saari (Diwaali Ki Raat) (1956) Singers – Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics – Madhukar Rajasthani, Music – Snehal Bhatkar

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

tere dar ki
bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

koi maange mahal do-mehle
koi kutiya chhoti
koi maange sona chaandi
koi sookhi roti
re roti
koi maange laal salona
koi maange laal salona
koi sundar naari
maange koi sundar naari
waah re duniya rachne waale
shaan hai teri nyaari
shaan hai teri nyaari
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

koi tujh par phool chadha kar
maalik tujh rijhaaye
koi tujh par phool chadha kar
maalik tujh rijhaaye
koi bechaara dukh ka maara
aansoo bhent chadhaaye
koi bechaara dukh ka maara
aansoo bhent chadhaaye
donon hi mohtaaj hain tere
donon hi mohtaaj hain tere
donon tere pujaari
donon tere pujaari
khel rahe ho khel anokhe
kya samjhe sansaari
kya samjhe sansaari
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
tere dar ki bhikhmangi hai
daata duniya saari
ho daata duniya saari

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

तेरे दर की
भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी

कोई मांगे महल दो-महले
कोई कुटिया छोटी
कोई मांगे सोना चाँदी
कोई सूखी रोटी
रे रोटी
कोई मांगे लाल सलोना
कोई मांगे लाल सलोना
कोई सुंदर नारी
मांगे कोई सुंदर नारी
वाह रे दुनिया रचने वाले
शान है तेरी न्यारी
शान है तेरी न्यारी
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी

कोई तुझ पर फूल चढ़ा कर
मालिक तुझे रिझाये
कोई तुझ पर फूल चढ़ा कर
मालिक तुझे रिझाये
कोई बेचारा दुख का मारा
आँसू भेंट चढ़ाये
कोई बेचारा दुख का मारा
आँसू भेंट चढ़ाये
दोनों ही मोहताज हैं तेरे
दोनों ही मोहताज हैं तेरे
दोनों तेरे पुजारी
दोनों तेरे पुजारी
खेल रहे हो खेल अनोखे
क्या समझे संसारी
क्या समझे संसारी
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
तेरे दर की भिखमंगी है
दाता दुनिया सारी
हो दाता दुनिया सारी

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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3642 Post No. : 14468

A recent anniversary that I had been preparing for – and missed on account of some travel engagements – is the remembrance day for the exceptional poet and lyricist – Bharat Vyas. He passed away in 1982, on 5th July.

The mention of this name brings to mind names of films such as ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), ‘Rim Jhim’ and ‘Saawan Aaya Re’ (both 1949), ‘Janamashtami’ and ‘Hamaara Ghar’ (both 1950), ‘Parineeta’ (1953), ‘Do Aankhen Baraah Haath’ and ‘Amar Singh Rathod’ (both 1957), also ‘Janam Janam Ke Phere’ from 1957, ‘Samraat Chandragupt’ (1958), ‘Bedard Zamaana Kya Jaane’ and ‘Goonj Uthi Shehnaai’ (1959), ‘Navrang’ and ‘Raani Roopmati’ (again 1959), ‘Angulimaal’, ‘Veer Durgadas’ and ‘Saaranga’ (all 1960), ‘Jai Chittod’ and ‘Pyaar Ki Pyaas’ (1961), ‘Kan Kan Mein Bhagwan’ (1963), ‘Boond Jo Ban Gayi Moti’ (1967) – and many more films with many a memorable song.

A career that lasted well over four decades, starting in the early 1940s. with about 1200 songs from more than 130 films. And a majority of these films, say around 70%, is an exclusive list of religious and historical films that forms a very impressive read. So yes, his specialization seems to be poetry on religious themes. Even a (then) modern dance based love story – the film ‘Cha Cha Cha’ from 1964; when the producer needed a couple of songs of traditional nature, Bharat Vyas is the poet who was called upon for this task.

I am presenting this surprisingly very fun song from a nondescript children’s film ‘Phool Aur Kaliyaan’ from (1960). When I landed at this song and started listening, it seemed to be some sort of a normal bhajan beginning, being sung by a group of young children. The earnestness and sincerity writ upon their faces as they start the singing, is very engaging. And the mind prepares itself for some wonderful bhajan to follow. But just after the introductory lines are done with, the song transforms into a hilarious entreaty to the Almighty, wherein the children are praying for a very specific boon from Him.

As the song continues, the play of emotions continues to transform from one antaraa to the next, adding more and more hilarity with every passing line. The earnestness on the faces of these children, their expressions of entreaties, and their actions to the words in the song, adds to the humor. And the listener realizes that the children are dead serious with their pleadings to the Lord. In the entire process, the children use all forms of inducement – literally following the traditional method of “साम, दाम, दंड, भेद” which is inducement by praising, by promises of alluring gifts, by threats, and by logic.

The picturization of this song is excellently imaginative. I am just continuously laughing whenever I start listening to this song. The चाचा (uncle) of the children is a tailor. The song is being performed in his work place. The children pick up miscellaneous things from around them and contrive some very peculiar instruments to create the orchestra for the music. The expressions and the fervour of their delivery has been handled extremely well by the director, and of course by the kids themselves.

As the songs gets to its closing lines, the fervour and the intensity of expressions starts to increase. Suddenly come to mind certain other bhajans, in which the picturization shows a similar amplification of fervour and music, and by experience we know – a miracle is about to happen; the statue of God will shed a flower, or a tear. Or an unconscious, near dead person will start breathing and mumbling.

The film ‘Phool Aur Kaliyan’ comes from the banner of Rajkamal Kala Mandir of Bombay, which has been the flagship banner of V Shantaram after his separation from Prabhat Studios in 1942. The film is directed by Ram Gabaale. Geet Kosh lists four songs for this film, all from the pen of Bharat Vyas. The music composition is by Pt Shivram. The singing voice is that of Charusheela, the daughter of V Shantaram from his first wife Vimalabai.

So watch and listen to this oh so engaging song, and I promise you will be smirking and laughing all the way through, to the last when the miracle occurs. Needless to say, I am verily bowled over by this song. And if any listener disagrees and is not fully satisfied, I am ready to return their money. 🙂 🙂

 

Song – Jai Jai Krishn Murari, Jai Jai Krishn Murari  (Phool Aur Kaliyan) (1960) Singer – Charusheela Shantaram, Lyrics – Bharat Vyas, MD – Pt Shivram
Chorus

Lyrics

jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
khel kood mein kho gai dekho
hum se gend hamaari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
khel kood mein kho gai dekho
hum se gend hamaari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari

gol gol is gend ke jaise laddu khilwaayen
laddu laddu laddu
ke gol gol laddu
ke laddu khilwaayen
gol gol is gend ke jaise laddu khilwaayen
gend miley jo humko
gend miley jo humko din bhar tere gun gaayen
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
khel kood mein kho gai dekho
hum se gend hamaari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari

dhruv ji aur prehlad se
hum bhi baalak hain saare
dhruv ji aur prehlad se
hum bhi baalak hain saare
ik to rakshak tum ho
ik to rakshak tum ho
ik hain chacha bechaare
ik to rakshak tum ho
ik hain chacha bechaare
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
khel kood mein kho gai dekho
hum se gend hamaari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari

ik din gend tumhaari bhi
gir gai thi jamuna jal mein
naag naath ke kaise laaye
apni gend ko pal mein
ik din gend tumhaari bhi
gir gai thi jamuna jal mein
naag naath ke kaise laaye
apni gend ko pal mein
hum bhi sharan tumhaari aaye
hamri baat banaa do
dhoondh dhaandh ke kahin se bhagwan
gend hamaari la do
gend hamaari la do
gend hamaari la do

jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari
jai jai krishna murari

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
खेल कूद में खो गई देखो
हमसे गेंद हमारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
खेल कूद में खो गई देखो
हमसे गेंद हमारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी

गोल गोल इस गेंद के जैसे लड्डू खिलवाएँ
लड्डू लड्डू लड्डू
के गोल गोल लड्डू
के लड्डू खिलवाएँ
गोल गोल इस गेंद के जैसे लड्डू खिलवाएँ
गेंद मिले जो हमको
गेंद मिले जो हमको
दिन भर तेरे गुण गाएँ
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
खेल कूद में खो गई देखो
हमसे गेंद हमारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी

ध्रुव जी और प्रहलद से हम भी हैं बालक सारे
ध्रुव जी और प्रहलद से हम भी हैं बालक सारे
इक तो रक्षक तुम हो
इक तो रक्षक तुम हो
इक हैं चाचा बेचारे
इक तो रक्षक तुम हो
इक हैं चाचा बेचारे
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
खेल कूद में खो गई देखो
हमसे गेंद हमारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी

इक दिन गेंद तुम्हारी भी
गिर गई थी जमुना जल में
नाग नाथ के कैसे लाये
अपनी गेंद को पल में
इक दिन गेंद तुम्हारी भी
गिर गई थी जमुना जल में
नाग नाथ के कैसे लाये
अपनी गेंद को पल में
हम भी शरण तुम्हारी आए
हमरी बात बना दो
ढूंढ ढांढ के कहीं से भगवन्
गेंद हमारी ला दो
गेंद हमारी ला दो
गेंद हमारी ला दो

जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी
जय जय कृष्ण मुरारी


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3636 Post No. : 14464

Today’s song is from a very old film, ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ from 1938.

It is generally said that in this era, most actors and actresses came from poor families and most artists had no or had negligible education. While it is true to a great extent, it is not 100% true. It is not that even in this period, there were no educated persons in the film industry. Right from the beginning of the silent era to talkie film era up to the end of the 1940s decade, there were actors, actresses, directors, producers and musicians who were quite educated. Some of them had even been trained in western countries.

Take the case of Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani and their team of writers like Niranjan Pal, from the silent era. They were all highly educated and from rich, cultured families. Niranjan Pal was the son of the freedom fighter Bipin Chandra Pal. BN Sircar is another example. Director Nanubhai Vakil was actually an advocate with BA LLB degree. Surendra was BA, LLB. Motilal was a graduate, so were Ramchandra Thakur, Nandlal Jaswantlal, Jayant Desai, Jairaj, Umakant Desai. Ashok kumar, Dev Anand and his 2 brothers etc.

Among actresses, Leela Chitnis, Shanta Apte, Durga Khote, Renuka Devi were graduates. Vanmala was BA, BT. Kamini Kaushal was BA. The point here is, that educated and people with respectable family background were also a part of the film industry. But of course, initially their number was smaller compared to others who were either illiterate or less educated. For example, the beautiful Meena Shorey and Sitara Kanpuri could not even sign – leave alone reading and writing! That is why, they were cheated in their contracts by Sohrab Modi and WZ Ahmed (of Shalimar Pictures and husband of actress Neena).

In the film under discussion today – ‘Himalay Ki Beti, the hero, heroine and the director were all highly educated. The heroine, Enakshi Ram Rao was the daughter of an ICS officer of Madras Presidency. She came to England for her graduation. After graduation, she took part in some stage dramas, where she got introduced to Niranjan Pal and Himanshu Rai. When Himanshu Rai decided to make a silent film on the story of Taj Mahal, he asked Niranjan Pal to write the film story. Sita Devi aka Renee Smith was selected for the vamp’s role and Enakshi was selected for the main role of Selima (who was later named Mumtaj Mahal by Prince Khurram – who was later known as Shahjehan.). The film was named ‘Shiraz’ (1928).

Enakshi is a very unusual name. Comparatively, Meenakshi is a well known name. Meenakshi means ‘one with eyes like a fish’.  Enakshi means ‘one with the eyes of doe or deer’. In other words, Enakshi means Mrignayani. Except name of this actress, I have never ever come across this name (Enakshi) in my life elsewhere!

Her work in film ‘Shiraz’ was applauded in England, Germany and India. When she returned to India, She met Bhavnani, who made a silent film ‘Vasantsena’ (1931), with her in the lead role. More than as an actress of silent and talkie films, Enakshi’s name was known in elite circles for different achievements, after she stopped working in films.

Not many of us know that Enakashi Bhavnani  (Enakshi Rama Rao before her marriage) has done an enormous service to bring Indian dances and designs to the western world. She made immense contribution to bring the Kashmir handicrafts and designs (fabric, wood and papier-mâché) to the west.  An American tourist told in Kerala recently about her detailed work on Kashmir designs (shawls, jackets etc.). This side of Enakshi’s personality and work is in addition to her contribution as a dancer, photographer and actress. Two scholarly books written by Enakshi Bhavnani were also published. Both the books are preserved in the American Museum of Natural History. These are,
(1) Folk And Tribal Designs of India, and
(2) The Dance of India: The Origin and History, Foundation, Art and Science of the Dance in India .

This exceptionally talented woman stayed in Kashmir for sometime in 1950 and met a cross section of people connected with arts and crafts. She had been a visitor thereafter as well. She also visited Leh and Kargil for her book. During this period she also clicked some photographs in Kashmir portraying its rich culture and scenic beauty. She also shot a documentary ‘Valley Of Kashmir’ during this period.

Enakshi was an active membmer of the Crafts Council of India, which was founded in 1964 to support artisans and keep their crafts relevant and marketable amid rapidly changing economies at home and abroad. The photographs clicked by her have also appeared in National Geographic magazine, especially her series. And in her book on folk dances of India, Enakshi covers all forms folk dances of Kashmir.

Enakshi married film maker Mohan Bhavnanai (1903-1962) who was trained in Germany and Hollywood. She was a dancer, actor, photographer and writer on arts, crafts and culture.  From 1929 to 1938, she acted in six films as a leading lady. Out of these six films, five, namely ‘Vasantsena’ (1931), ‘Trapped’ (1931), ‘Jaagaran’ (1936) , ‘Himalaya Ki Beti’ (1938) and ‘Yangrilla’ (1938) were directed by her husband Mohan Bhavnani. Only ‘Shiraz’ (1928) produced by Himanshu Roy was directed by Franz Osten.

Producer director Mohan Bhavnani was a learned and illustrious person. This is what the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about him-

Mohan Dayaram Bhavnani (1903-62)
Hindi director born in Hyderabad, Sind. Studied at College of Technology, Manchester (1921-4), then studied film-making in Germany at UFA (1924). Contracted to Kohinoor (1925-6) where his Sulochana? films were the earliest efforts in the Indian cinema to create a Hollywood-type movie star, e.g. Cinema Ni Rani where she plays a famous actress with whom the painter hero falls in love, or Wildcat of Bombay where she played multiple roles. Joined Imperial (1927-9), where he made Khwab-e-Hasti, adapted from the novel Dreamland (later also adapted by N. Taurog’s Strike me Pink, 1936). Scripted by A.S. Desai, this film is not to be confused with Kashmiri?’s play of the same title. Vasantsena was the first Kannada intertitled film. Became independent producer with Indian Art Prod. (1931-2). Returned to Germany to study sound film technique. Started Ajanta Cinetone (1933-4) and his own Bhavnani Prod. (1935-48). Sound début was a flop, but it introduced ​Dur ga Khote. Hired Premchand to script Mazdoor, representing the author’s only direct encounter with film, following it with the unemployment melodrama ​Jagran. Produced and directed the first full-length colour film shot on 16mm Kodachrome and blown up to 35mm, Ajit. Joined Films Division and became its first Chief Producer (1948-55). In 1958 Bhavnani followed up an invitation from Zhou En-Lai to make a documentary on China and travelled extensively throughout the country shooting with cameramen Kishore Rege and S.K. Kulkarni. His wife Enakshi Rama Rao, who acted in Vasantsena, had earlier played the lead in Shiraz (1928) and became a noted dancer and author of the book The Dance of India (1965).

FILMOGRAPHY: 1925: Cinema Ni Rani; Matri Prem; Veer Bala; Seth Sagalsha; 1 9 2 6 : Pagal Premi; Diwan Bhamasha; Mena Kumari; Ra Kawat; Samrat Shiladitya; Bhamto Bhoot; 1 9 2 7 : Naseeb Ni Lili; Daya Ni Devi; Trust Your Wife; Wildcat of Bombay; Gamdeni Gori; 1929: Hawai Swar; Khwab-e- Hasti; Mysore, Gem City of India (Doc); Khedda (Doc); 1 9 3 0 : Vasantsena (all St); 1 9 3 1 : Shakuntala; Farebi Jaal; Lafanga Langoor (Sh); 1 932: Veer Kunal; 1 933: Afzal; Rangila Rajput; 1 9 3 4 : Dard-e-Dil; Mazdoor; Sair-e-Paristan; 1935: Jung Bahadur; Navjeevan; Shadi Ki Raat; 1936: Dilawar; Garib Parwar; Jagran; Wrestling (Doc); 1 9 3 7 : Zambo the Ape Man; 1 9 3 8 : Double Cross; Himalay Ki Beti; Yangrilla; 1 9 3 9 : Zambo Ka Beta; 1940: Jhoothi Sharm; PremNagar?; 1945: Biswi Sadi; 1 946: Rang Bhoomi; 1 948: Ajit; 1 9 4 9 : Vale of Kashmir (Doc); 1 9 5 0 : The Private Life of a Silkworm (Doc); 1 9 5 1 : Lest We Forget (Doc); 1 9 5 2 : Kumaon Hills (Doc); 1 9 5 3 : Folk Dances of India (Doc); Republic Day Record (Doc); 1 9 5 5 : Republic Day 1955 (Doc); 1 956: Operation Khedda (Doc); 1 957: The Himalayan Tapestry (Doc)

The film ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ had 11 songs. Today’s song is sung by Prof Ramanand. He had 4 solos and 1 duet with Enakshi. She had 2 solos. One song was by Maya Chatterjee. There is no information in HFGK about the balance 3 songs. Pt Badri Prasad had given the music. I heard 4 more songs from this film, but all are copies of stage style songs. Prof Ramanand, the actor and the singer was different than Swamy Ramanand, the lyricist in few films.

The hero of the film was Prof Pt Ramanand Sharma. If you are a regular listener of radio early in the mornings,you would have heard many Bhajans sung by Sharma Brothers of Shriram Darbar. These four brothers – Gopal, Shukdev, Kaushalendra and Raghavendra are the sons of this Ramanand Sharma. These Sharma brothers have sung the famous Bhajan “Sooraj Ki Garmi Se” from the film ‘Parinay’ (1972). Ramanand was the singing hero of many early talkie films like ‘Noor-e-Islam’ or ‘Aurat Ka Dil’ (1934) and ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ (1938). He also sang many songs in other films. After his work in ‘Premnagar’ (1940), RC Boral of the New Theatres, Calcutta came down to Bombay and took Ramanand to Calcutta to act in films. But Ramanand was fed up with the film world and decided to only sing Ram Bhajans for his Shri Ram Darbar which he had established. He went back to Muzaffarpur and used to sing Ram Bhajans all over India. His 7 albums were released by HMV.

Here is a rare song from a rare film, ‘Himalay Ki Beti’ (1938). The film makes its debut on the blog.

[Author’s Note: Credits – Chinar Shade, autarmota.blogspot.com, HFGK, MuVyz, Wikipedia, indiancine.ma, and my notes.]

Song – Siddhraaj Jaago Aaj (Himalay Ki Beti) (1938) Singer – Prof Ramanand, Lyrics – Pt Narottam Vyas, Music – Pt Badri Prasad

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

jaaa..aa..aa..go..oo..o

sidhraaj jaago aaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj
padi hai vipat gaaj
padi hai vipat gaaj
bigade banaawo kaaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

tum ho paropkaari
tum ho paropkaari
duniya jaanat saari
duniya jaanat saari
meri raakho laaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

charan pada hoon aaye
charan pada hoon aaye
sharnaagat sahaaye
sharnaagat sahaaye
tum naam di awaaj (??)
sidhraaj jaago aaj
sidhraaj jaago aaj

sidhraa..aa..aa..aaj

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
जा॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰गो॰॰ओ॰॰ओ

सिद्धराज जागो आज
सिद्धराज जागो आज
पड़ी है विपत गाज
पड़ी है विपत गाज
बिगड़े बनावो काज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

तुम हो परोपकारी
तुम हो परोपकारी
दुनिया जानत सारी
दुनिया जानत सारी
मेरी राखो लाज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

चरण पड़ा हूँ आए
चरण पड़ा हूँ आए
शरणागत सहाय
शरणागत सहाय
तुम नाम दी आवाज (??)
सिद्धराज जागो आज
सिद्धराज जागो आज

सिद्धरा॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आज


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Wandering into the world of movies of 1930s and 40s gives me immense pleasure. Digging for difficult to find information about old films, directors, music directors, singers or actors is an interesting challenge for me.While on a chase for such information, I frequently come to dead ends and then have to seek another road to gaining knowledge. It is very sad that in our country, documentation about films of 1930s and 40s is very poor.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 14700 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3700 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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