Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Patriotic song’ Category


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4411 Post No. : 15807

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No.55
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Today is 15 august 2020, the 74th independence day of India. 10 years ago, on the occasion of 64th independence day of India, this blog had covered as many as eight patriotic songs. Here are the details:-

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Door hato ae duniya waalon Hindustan hamaara hai Kismat-1943 All songs covered
Watan ki raah mein watan ke naujawaan shaheed hon Shaheed-1948 All songs covered
kadam kadam badhaaye jaa Samadhi-1950 6 songs covered out of 7
Vande Maatram Anand Mathh-1952 8 songs covered out of 9
Ab koi gulshan na ujde ab watan aazaad hai Mujhe Jeene Do-1963 All songs covered
Ganga meri maa ka naam baap ka naam Himaalay Tumse Achcha Kaun Hai-1969 All songs covered
Taaqat watan ki ham se hai Prem Pujaari-1970 All songs covered
Mile sur mera tumhaara NFS-1988 Mile sur mera tumhaara- first NFS in the blog

As can be seen from above, one song from “Samadhi”(1950) still remains to be posted. It is this to be covered. And that song is an appropriate song for the occasion. This movie ‘Samadhi’ (1950) was about the freedom struggle of India and about Subhash Chandra’s Bose. No wonder that the songs of this movie were mostly patriotic songs as can be seen from the list of the songs of this movie covered in the blog:-

Song Remarks
Gore gore o baanke chhore
kadam kadam badhaaye jaa
Abhi shaam aayegi niklenge taare
Wo paas aa rahe hain ham door jaa rahe hain
Idhar muhabbat udhar zamaaana
Netaji ka jeewan hai balidaan ki ek kahaani

Here is this seventh and final song from “Samadhi” to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Chorus. Rajinder Krishan is the lyricist of this song with resembles Indian national anthem. Music is composed by C Ramchandra. The tune resembles the tune of national anthem.

[Editor’s Note: As per the information provided by Sadanand ji, the original authors of this song are Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani of INA. The song has been adapted for this film, and Rajinder Krishan has added the following three lines only,

sab milkar Hind pukaaren
Jai Aazaad Hind ke naare
pyaara desh hamaara

The film credits do not acknowledge the original lyricists and the original composer of this song.]

I take this opportunity to greet each and everyone a happy 74th independence day.

Lyrics of this song have been sent in by Prakash ji.

With this song, all songs of ‘Samadhi’ (1950) get covered in the blog and the movie gets YIPPEEE’D.

(Version at Start of Film)

(Version at End of Film)

Song – Sab Milkar Hind Pukaaren (Samaadhi) (1950) Lyrics – Rajinder Krishan, MD – C Ramchandra
[Note: The original lyrics of this song were created by Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani of INA. The original tune of this song is the same as that of India’s National Anthem, composed by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore.]

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

shubh sukhchain ki barkha barse
Bharat bhaag hai jaaga
Punjab Sindh Gujarat Maratha
Dravid Utkal Banga
chanchal saagar Vindhy Himala
neela jamuna Ganga
sab milkar Hind pukaaren
Jai Aazaad Hind ke naare
pyaara desh hamaara
sooraj bankar jag par chamke
Bharat naam subhaaga

sooraj bankar jag par chamke
Bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho
jai ho
jai ho
jai jai jai jai ho
Bharat naam subhaaga

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————–

शुभ सुख चैन की बरखा बरसे
भारत भाग है जागा
पंजाब सिंध गुजरात मराठा
द्रविड़ उत्कल बंग
चंचल सागर विंध्य हिमाला
नीला जमुना गंगा
सब मिलकर हिन्द पुकारें
जय आज़ाद हिन्द के नारे
प्यारा देश हमारा

सूरन बन कर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो
जय हो
जय हो
जय जय जय जय हो
भारत नाम सुभागा


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4411 Post No. : 15806 Movie Count :

4356

Happy Independence Day

15th August- a very very important day in the life of any Indian. The day we are thankful to our predecessors who laid down their lives for getting us freedom from foreign rule.

Predecessors includes even those unnamed freedom fighters who walked along with the leaders of those times. It includes those who did not like to be ordered around by people who didn’t have an iota of understanding why India was the way it was.

Thinking back we can see that beginning from Alexander there have been regular invasions and intrusions into India. Our history books have taught us that prior to that there were the Aryans who moved in to make this their land. Plus we have read how the Persians fled from their country and were given a place in our land and hearts. All this was before the Muslim rulers of say Turkish or Mughal dynasty. Some of them came to plunder or conquer; they either stayed back or plundered and left. But those were the times when this part of the continent was made up of various small kingdoms or states and each was a country of its own.

As I have understood Indian History, it was only after Akbar took charge in the north and some of the existing rulers of that period accepted his supremacy, was there a semblance of oneness among those who, he ruled over, in that region. Even at that time we had chieftains or Kings or Ranas who opposed being ruled by an outsider. This I am speaking of the 1500s when Rana Pratap was against bowing to the might of Akbar. Similarly, about 100 years later, we have had Chhatrapati Shivaji standing up for his right over his motherland and fighting the forces of Aurangazeb.

The European rulers also looked towards India around the 1500s when the Portuguese rule began which lasted till 1961. The French and the British followed in the 1600s. They started as traders and stayed back to rule.
A few small kingdoms joined forces to stand against the Muslim rulers. But when the people realized that the Europeans had also taken over a large part of the territory and were not interested in fair governance they united to try and shake the reigns off. At that point there was no difference between Hindu or Muslim kingdoms and we had a Rani Lakshmibai, Tatya Tope, Nanashaeb working alongside Begum Hazrat Mahal and Bahadurshah Zafar. There were numerous smaller kings too who joined hands for this purpose.

Rana Pratap, Chhtrapati Shivaji, Rani Lakshmibai, Tatya Tope, Nanasaheb, Bahadur Shah Zafar, Begum Hazrat Mahal are the predecessors of Mahatma Gandhi, Balgangadhar Tilak, Netaji, Sardar Patel, Pandit Nehru etc. who nailed the final nails into foreign rule and united all the small kingdoms into what is today INDIA.

All these so-called outsiders have left their mark on the psyche of the country. There are elements in our cuisine for which we can thank the Persians:- it is said that the national favourite Samosa is of Persian ancestry (should ask some researcher for confirmation). The Biriyani was introduced to us by the Muslim rulers. We should be thankful to the Europeans for bringing the cake to us. Just as these outsiders liked our spices we also accepted their soups, salads and art of baking and made it our own.

Those days most of our clothing used to be one long un-stitched garment we don’t even know who taught us the art of stitching.
In our haste to rectify what has happened in the 200 to 300 years of foreign rule we should stop to think what all we can give up. We are slaves to our modes of transport and communication which was not there before the 18th century- posts, telegraph, vehicles, trains, phones can we live without them? Can we live without electricity? Are we ready to give up cooking with LPG which is more comfortable than cooking with firewood. And most important we converse also freely in a foreign language. There are many among us who cannot write a sentence in their own mother tongue without errors. (I plead guilty)

Yes we have our own culture that makes us proud of being Indians. We are proud that we welcome everyone with open arms. We have a concept of “Attithi Devo Bhava”. Even if later we regret welcoming them as it happened when the foreign rulers came.

We are proud that there is a family system in place and even in this 21st century a child obeys his/her parents and elders even when he/ she is 50 or grownup or old. We look down upon people who don’t take care or abandon their elders. We still have mothers worrying about their children through her lifetime. Even children know that they have a family to fall back on in times of crisis.

All the things about India and Indians that I want to state is present in this new (by blog’s standards) song so I shall jump to the song as my post has become rather long.

The song is clearly an extension or we can say inspired from Manoj Kumar’s “Hai preet jahaan ki reet sada” that came in 1970. And the choreography seems to be inspired by “pag ghunghru baand meera naachi thi” to start off with.

The song is set in a restaurant. The hero (Govinda) has just been shown the door at a job interview where (according to the interviewer) he has given an absurd answer to the question “Tell me something about India”. He equates India with Cow saying that ‘a cow is our mother just as India is our mother. It has four legs India has four pillars- Hindu Mulsim Sikh Issai (christianity)’ He says a few more similarities between India and a Cow and he is thrown out. He sings this song on his way out and the public present at the restaurant appreciates and enjoy themselves. But the end result is he still doesn’t get the job but that is beyond the realm of today’s post.

It is sung, written and composed by Anand Raj Anand in the 1998 Raveena Tandon-Shilpa Shetty-Govinda starrer “Pardesi Babu”. The movie and the singer/lyricist/ composer also make their debut on the blog.

Jai Hind!!!


Song-It happens only in India (Pardesi Babu)(1998) Singer-Anand Raj Anand, Lyrics-Anand Raj Anand, MD-Anand Raj Anand

Lyrics

jahaan paaon mein paayal
haath mein kangan
ho maathe pe bindiya aa aa

(chorus)

jahaan paaon mein mein paayal,
haath mein kangan
jahaan paaon mein paayal,
haath mein kangan
jahaan paaon mein paayal,
haath mein kangan,
ho mathe pe bindiya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India
jahaan paaon mein paayal,
haath mein kangan,
ho maathe pe bindiya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India

jahaan jung pe jaaye sipaahi toh khud sajani tilak lagaaye
jahaan jung pe jaaye sipaahi toh khud sajani tilak lagaaye
munh se toh kuchh na bole chupke chupke neer bahaaye
jahaan jung pe jaaye sipaahi toh khud sajani tilak lagaaye
munh se toh kuchh na bole chupke chupke neer bahaaye
aur ashkon se apne likh kar bheje pyaar ki chithhiya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India

oh ho oh ho ohhoo
oh ho oh ho oh hoo

jahaan din nikale sunkar shlok gurbaani aur azaan,
allah o allah
jahaan din nikale sunkar shlok gurbaani aur azaan
jahaan mazhab se ooncha hai insaan saare ek samaan
arre aanch nahin hai saanch ko chahe dekh le sari duniya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India

(some swar by chorus)

shabari ke khaake ber Raam ne prem ki pratha chalaayi
shabari ke khaake ber Raam ne prem ki pratha chalayi
Meera ne pikar zehar ka pyaala preet ki reet nibhaayi
jahaan prem ki dhun pe gopiyo sang naache krishna kanhaiya
kahin hota hai re bhaiya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India

saawan ke jhoole kahin pe baisaakhi ke mele
arre saawan ke jhoole kahin pe baisaakhi ke mele
lagta hai khud kudrat iss dharti pe aakar khele
jahaan maa se lori sune bina bachchon ko na aaye nindiya
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India

prem kahaani mere desh ki ee ee
ek se ek niraali
jahaan sohni ne mahiwal ke khaatir apni jaan ganwaayi
jahaan raanjhe ne heer ki ik pal na sahi judaai
aaaa aaaaaa
jahaan sohni ne mahiwal ke khatir apni jaan ganwaayi
aur raanjhe ne heer ki ik pal na sahi judaai
jahaan shirin aur farhaad ke ishq mein bahi doodh ki nadiya
it happens only in India
it happens only in India
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India
it happens only in India,
it happens only in India
it happens only in India


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4388 Post No. : 15750 Movie Count :

4342

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films: 35

‘Gumnaami’ (2019) is a Bangla film with fairly good parts of dialogues in Hindi and English. The film is produced under the banner of Shri Venkatesh Films and is directed by Srijit Mukherjee. The main star cast consists of Prosenjit Chatterjee (as Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose and later as Gumnaami Baba), Anirban Bhattacharya (as journalist, Chandrachur Dhar), Tanushri Chakraborty (as Ronita Dhar), Surendra Rajan (as Mahatma Gandhi), Sanjay Gurubuxani (as Jawaharlal Nehru) etc. The film was released on October 2, 2019. Being a recent release, as of now, the movie is not available on video sharing platforms.

I watched the film on one of the OTT platforms. The film is not a biopic on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. It is based on later events, relating to the investigations by Mukherjee Commission, which was set up by Government of India in 1999 to probe the death of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. The Commission was assigned the task to tackle the three broad theories surrounding the alleged mysteries and unanswered questions related to Netaji’s death. First, Netaji died in a plane crash while taking off from an airport in Taiwan. Second, he staged a fake plane crash to escape to Russia where he died in prison. Lastly, Netaji staged a plane crash, escaped to Russia and returned to India as a sanyasi (monk) known as ‘Bhagwan ji’ or ‘Gumnaami Baba’ who died in September 1985 in Faizabad.

Film starts with Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru advising Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, who was the then Congress President, that he should support the British Government during World War II. They also advocate non-violent methods for attaining India’s freedom from the British Rule. Netaji disagrees by saying that freedom is to be snatched from Britishers rather than demanding from them. Due to his differences with Congress High Command, he resigns from the Indian National Congress. He goes abroad to make allies with Japan and Germany who are at war with Great Britain and the Allied forces. He sets up Indian National Army with the support of Japan.

After the surrender of Japan to allied forces in Burma, Netaji shifts his forces to Singapore and then to Bangkok. He advises his forces to surrender while he with Rahman will go to Tokyo for onward escape to Soviet Union which, according to his view, would become anti-British after the war. He can then fight for India’s independence from there. While travelling to Soviet Union, Netaji’s plane catches fire and he dies after a few hours of the accident due to burn injury on August 18, 1945. He is cremated and his ashes are taken to Tokyo.

There have been many commissions and reports to inquire about the circumstances of Netaji’s death but there still remains uncertainty and the doubts have been raised in various quarters about the death of Netaji from time to time. In 1999, Government of India decides to set up the Mukherjee Commission go into the mysteries behind Netaji’s death afresh.

In 2003, a journalist, Chandrachur Dhar is given an independent assignment by his employer, Indiatimes to make a research-based study on the mystery of Netaji’s death. Chandrachur believes that all the myths surrounding Netaji’s death are hoaxes. Nevertheless, he takes up the assignment and spends much of his time in gathering evidences. During this period, his entire thinking about Netaji’s life changes. The study and research on the Netaji’s life becomes his obsession to such an extent that he neglects his personal life. His wife, Ronita feels that she is living with a husband who is unstable, crazy and unpredictable. In a fit of anger, she ransacks all the papers and documents which Chandrachur had collected in the course of his reasearch. She files for a divorce and gets it. In frustration, Chandrachur resigns his job. Instead, he forms a passionate group of his friends called ‘Mission Netaji’ to study and research to solve the mystery of Netaji’s death.

Based on extensive studies and research, Chandrachur makes presentations before the Mukherjee Commission with evidences to prove that Netaji did not die in plane crash but escaped to Russia by staging a fake plane crash. From Russia, he came to India via Tibet as a wandering monk and stayed in Lucknow. He submits 19 evidences in support of his contention.  In 2005, Mukherjee Commission presented the report to the Government of India. The Report was presented to Lok Sabha and was publicly released.

Chandrachur and his friends of ‘Mission Netaji’ have assembled in his house to read the Commission’s report. Ronita, his ex-wife has come to wish her best to Chandrachur. While Commission has come to the conclusion that Netaji has not died in the plane crash based on the various evidences including the DNA report of his remains which have been kept in Tokyo, which was identified as that of a Japanese soldier. However, due to absence of any concrete evidence, the Commission is unable to come to the conclusion whether Netaji escaped to Russia. Further, the DNA test of Gumnaami Baba did not match with that of Netaji.  The Government of India rejected the report without giving any reasons.

The rejection of the Commission’s report affected Chandrachur so much that he locks himself in a room full of the books, and documents collected over the last 3 years for his ‘Mission Netaji’. He starts burning every documents, files and books connected with his research so much so the entire room engulfs with fire. Ronita calls his friends and gets the door broken to rescue Chandrachur. The film ends with Ronita convincing Chandrachur to keep on fighting for the truth of Netaji’s death. Hence, the fight must go on until an end to the mystery.

Before I started watching this film, I did not have a very high expectation from the film because, there has been many films on the life of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose. Furthermore, I was one of the believers that Netaji died in the plane crash in August 1945 and the talks thereafter about the mystery of his death were all myths and conjectures. But once I completed watching the film in one sitting, I must admit that the director, Srijit Mukherjee has managed to present the film in a way which made me to rethink about the controversies surrounding Netaji’s death. This film is a class by itself putting it on a different pedestal.

Prosenjit Chatterjee, in the role of Netaji as well as Gumnaami Baba has given an excellent performance which was a pleasant surprise for me as most of his roles in Bangla films are that of a romantic hero. His performance as a Gumnaami Baba looks so real that for once, I started feeling that Gumnaami Baba could really be Netaji in disguise. As Netaji, almost all of his dialogues are in Hindi and English. It is only when he turns to act as Gumnaami Baba, his dialogues are in Bangla.

Another roll of honor in the film goes to Anirban Bhattacharya, who in the role of Chandrachur Dhar, has given the superb performance as a journalist. His submissions to the Mukherjee Commission and the crazy reactions to the news that the Commission’s reports have been rejected by the Government are his top-most performances in the film. In fact, he has an equal presence in the film if not more than Prosenjit Chatterjee.

The film is a mix of black & white and colour. The scenes involving Netaji in pre-1945 period are in black & white while scenes representing Gumnaami Baba, Chandrachur Dhar, the journalist and the proceedings of the Mukherjee Commission are in colour. The film has dialogues in Bangla, Hindi, English and few dialogues in Japanese. These combinations in the film give a feel of a period atmosphere as well as the natural proceedings of the story in the film.

While on Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, it is incidental and interesting to note that today, July 23rd,is the Remembrance Day of one of Netaji’s closest aides who led  INA’s Women Wing named the Rani Jhansi Regiment. She is Captain (Dr) Lakshmi Sehgal (24/20/1914 – 23/07/2012) of INA born as Lakshmi Swaminathan. She had barely completed her MBBS and arrived in Singapore, where she met with Netaji and got immersed in the Azad Hind movement.

During the surrender of Singapore by British to the Japanese, Dr Lakshmi helped heal the wounded soldiers of prisoners of war, many of whom were Indians. They desired to form the Azad Hind Fauj. After the arrival of Netaji in Singapore in July 1943, Dr. Lakshmi met Netaji who was keen to take women into INA. Thus she became Captain Lakshmi Swaminathan of Rani Jhansi Regiment of INA.

In Burma operations, INA joined Japanese in December 1944 but by March 1945, Japanese were on the losing ground. INA decided to beat a retreat from Burma. While crossing into Imphal, Captain Lakshmi was arrested in Burma by the British Forces and held in prison in Burma until March 1946 when she was sent to Delhi for trials as a war criminal. However, on the eve of India getting independence,  Captain Sehgal and many of the INA facing trials were set free.

In March 1947, Captain Lakshmi married Prem Kumar Sehgal and shifted to Kanpur. She continued her medical practice in Kanpur. She became a Rajya Sabha member in 1971. During the Bangla Desh crisis in 1971, she set up relief and medical camps for refugees from East Pakistan in Kolkata. During the Bhopal gas tragedy in December 1984, she led a medical team to look after those affected by the gas. She was active as a medical practitioner until the age of 92.

‘Gumnaami’ (2019) has 5 songs of which 3 are in Hindi. All songs have been used in the film as background songs. I am presenting “Shubh Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barse” rendered by Babul Supriyo and chorus. There is an interesting history behind this song.

After the establishment of the provisional Government in exile of INA in 1943, Netaji decided to have a National Anthem for his Government. He himself selected Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s “Jan Gan Man Adhinayak Jai He” and asked Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani of INA to translate it into Hindustani so that it becomes easy to understand the meaning to all. He selected Captain Ram Singh Thakur to composed in the martial music so that the listeners would be awaken. It is significant to note that on the day of India’s independence on August 15, 1947, Jawaharlal Nehru unfurled the Tricolour on the ramparts of the Red Fort after which Captain Ram Singh Thakur of INA conducted the orchestra with his musicians, playing the tune of the National Anthem of INA.

In the film, this song appears towards the end of the film, incorporating the flashback of what has happened in the life of Netaji from 1940-45 and the efforts made by the journalist to unlock the mystery of Netaji’s death. The credit title of the film gives credit to Mumtaz Hussain and Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani as lyricists and the music to Captain Ram Singh Thakur. However, I feel that Rabindranath Tagore should also get the credit since the tune was originally composed by him for “Jan Gan Man Adhinayak Jai He”. The audio clip of the song has one extra stanza.

It is the song which reminds us with moist eyes, the fond memory of Netaji of his sacrifice for the freedom of the motherland.

Video

Audio

Song – Shubh Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barse (Gumnaami) (Bangla) (2019) Singer – Babul Supriyo, Lyrics – Mumtaz Hussain, Colonel Abid Hussain Saffarani , MD – Captain Ram Singh Thakur
[Note on MD – The original score of this song is created by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore, the creator of the “Jan Gan Man. . .” anthem.]
Chorus

Lyrics

shubh sukh chain ki barkha barse
bharat bhaag hai jaaga
punjab, sindh, gujarat, maratha
draavid, utkal, banga
chanchal sagar, vindh, himaalaya
neela yamuna, ganga
tere nit gun gaaye
tujh se jeewan paaye
har tan paaye asha
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai jai jai ho..o
bharat naam subhaaga
 
sab ke dil mein preet basaaye
teri meethi baani
har subey ke rahne waale
har mazhab ke praani
sab bhed aur farak mita ke
sab god mein teri aa ke
goondhe prem ki maala
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai  jai  jai ho…o
bharat naam subhaaga
 
subah savere pankh pakheru
tere hi gun gaayen
baas bhari bharpur hawaayen
jeewan mein rut laayen
sab mil kar hind pukaaren
jai azad hind ke naare
pyaara desh hamaara
suraj ban kar jag par chamke
bharat naam subhaaga
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai ho…o
jai jai jai jai ho…o
bharat naam subhaaga…aa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
शुभ सुख चैन की बरखा बरसे
भारत भाग है जागा
पंजाब सिंध गुजरात मराठा
द्राविड़ उत्कल बंग
चंचल सागर विंध्य हिमाला
नीर यमुना गंगा
तेरे नित गुण गाये
तुझ से जीवन पाये
हर तन पाये आशा
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय जय जय जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
भारत नाम सुभागा

सबके दिल में प्रीत बसाये
तेरी मीठी बानी
हर सूबे के रहने वाले
हर मज़हब के प्राणी
सब भेद और फर्क मिटा के
सब गोद में तेरी आ के
गूँधे प्रेम की माला
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय जय जय जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
भारत नाम सुभागा

सुबह सवेरे पंख पखेरू
तेरे ही गुण गायें
बास भरी भरपूर हवाएं
जीवन में रूत लाएँ
सब मिल कर हिन्द पुकारें
जय आज़ाद हिन्द के नारे
प्यारा देश हमारा
सूरज बनकर जग पर चमके
भारत नाम सुभागा
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
जय हो॰ ॰ ॰
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Today (14 July 2020) is the 101st birth anniversary of Sagat Singh (14 july 1919- 26 September 2001). He had nothing to do with HFM, but I am discussing him today. why ? Because I think that he deserves to be known to all of us. His name should occupy a pride of place among the great sons of India.

Sagat Singh started his military career in pre independence era as a JCO (Naik) with Bikaner Ganga Risala (army of the riyasat of Bikaner). Later he was promoted as Naib Sebedar and then as second lieutenant.

On amalgamation of the State Forces into Indian Army in 1950 after independence, he joined Third Gorkha Rifles of Indian Army. He commanded the Second and Third Battalions of the Third Gorkha Rifles.

In September 1961, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier and he was posted as the brigade commander of India’s only parachute brigade, the 50th Parachute Brigade. Most army officers would scoff at joining Parachute brigade, but Sagat Singh joined it enthusiastically and became a paratrooper himself.

Goa liberation war 1961
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The first memorable event in Sagat Singh’s career came in december 1961 which was liberation of Goa. Though India had become independent on 15 August 1947, Goa continued to be under Portugal occupation. Portugal refused to leave Goa, claiming that Goa was not a colony but part of metropolitan Portugal and hence its transfer to India was non-negotiable, and that India had no rights to this territory because the Republic of India did not exist at the time when Goa came under Portuguese rule.

The public opinion in Goa was to join India, but these movements were being forcibly suppressed by Portuguese authorities. The relations between Goa and India became tense. On 24 November 1961, Sabarmati, a passenger boat passing between the Indian port of Kochi and the Portuguese-held island of Anjidiv, was fired upon by Portuguese ground troops, resulting in the death of a passenger and injuries to the chief engineer. The action was precipitated by Portuguese fears that the boat carried a military landing party intent on storming the island. The incidents lent themselves to fostering widespread public support in India for military action in Goa.

On receiving the go-ahead for military action and a mandate for the capture of all occupied territories for the Indian government, Lieutenant-General Chaudhari of the Indian Army’s Southern Command fielded the 17th Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth and the 50th Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh.

The operation for the liberation of Goa, code named ‘Vijay’, was planned for 14 December, 1961. In order to prevent international intervention, and reinforcements from Portugal reaching Goa, it was essential that the operation was quick, and decisive. After a quick appreciation, Chaudhury decided to mount a two pronged attack. The main force, comprising 17 Infantry Division, was to move into Goa from the East, while 50 Parachute Brigade, under Brigadier Sagat Singh, was to mount a subsidiary thrust from the North. Major General K.P. Candeth, GOC 17 Infantry Division, was placed in overall command of the task force.

It was decided during meeting in Delhi that 2 Para battalion of 50 para brigade would be air dropped by Air force in Goa. But airforce later backed off and this plan had to be abandoned. This 2 para moved to Belgaum where it was met by 1 para of 50 para brigade. 2 Sikh Light infantry (based at Madras) also joined them. They along with 7th cavalry and 8th cavalty were also put under the command of Sagat Singh. So in summary, Sagat Singh commanded 50th Para Brigade, which had as its units 1st para battalion, 2nd Para battalion, 2 Sikh Light Infantry battalion, 7th Light cavalry and 8th light cavalry.

The brigade moved to Savantvadi on 13 December, and thence to its assembly area East of Dodamarg on the 16th. Meanwhile, 17 Infantry Division had also commenced its move from Ambala on 2 December, and had concentrated in Belgaum by 12 December. A tactical headquarters was established by HQ Southern Command at Belgaum on 13 December, and the Army Commander with his staff began to function from here. D Day for the operation was initially decided as 14 December, but was later postponed, due to political reasons, in an attempt to avert the conflict, and resolve the problem by diplomatic means. It was finally decided that the operation would commence on the night of 18 December.

Three days before D Day, the COAS, General P.N. Thapar, accompanied by Lieut General P.P. Kumaramangalam, the Adjutant General, and Lieut General J.N. Chaudhury, the Army Commander, visited the brigade, and Sagat presented his plan for the operation. At the end of the presentation, the Army Commander expressed the view that Sagat’s timings were too optimistic, and had reservations about them being adhered to. Sagat then gave the timings in writing, and the party left, after wishing the brigade good luck. On return to his tactical HQ, The Army Commander conveyed his doubts to his staff. However, Air Vice Marshal Pinto, and the Chief of Staff, Major General P.O. Dunn, as well as Mr. G.N. Handoo, of the IB, who knew Sagat well, supported him, and he was allowed to proceed according to his plan. As it happened, Sagat had already kept a reserve of four hours, and was able to remain well ahead of the estimated timings, when the operations took place.

50 Parachute Brigade had been given a subsidiary task, of advancing from the North, primarily to tie down the Portuguese troops in that area. However, Sagat was not the type to be shackled by rigid orders, and had already visualised a larger role for himself. He had decided to move on a wide front on two axes, with a vehicle mounted battalion group on each, supported by armour and artillery. He reasoned that if he was held up on one axis, he would continue the advance on the other, and using the reserve battalion, advance deeper into Goa, either through Bicholim-Mapuca-Panjim Creek, or via Sanquelim-Usgaon-Ponda-Velha Goa, on to Panjim. 2 Sikh Light Infantry group, supported by a squadron of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8 Cavalry, was tasked to advance on the Bicholim axis. 2 Para, supported by rest of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8th Cavalry, was assigned the Sanquelim axis. 1 Para was kept in reserve.

Though the operation was to commence on the night of 18 December, Sagat had decided to launch fighting patrols the previous night, to overcome the border outposts, in order to facilitate the entry of the main column across the border the following morning. Accordingly, Sagat had tasked 1 Para to capture two border outposts, and 2 Para to proceed along the ‘smugglers route’ and capture the single span 110 feet long bridge over the Sanquelim river, on the previous night. As these preliminary operations were going on, All India Radio gave the game away, by announcing shortly after midnight, that Indian troops were crossing into Goa. This alerted the Portuguese, and the element of surprise, so important in such operations, was lost. One company of 2 Para, after a swift night approach, had reached within 200 yards of the bridge, when barking dogs alerted the defending troops, who quickly fired the demolitions and fled.

The Portuguese Governor General and C-in-C, Major General Vassalo De Silva, was from the Corps of Engineers, and had got demolition chambers made in all the bridges, with explosives attached, for rapid demolitions. However, the company of 2 Para found a crossing place, and secured the home bank, enabling the tanks, guns and vehicles to cross the river. The Portuguese had not been able to fire all the demolition charges, and only those at the two ends had exploded. The single span had fallen down but was undamaged. Using marine jacks, the span was lifted, and with the addition of abutments at both ends, the bridge was soon re-commissioned. 1 Para also managed to capture the villages of Ibrampur, Maulinguem and Doromaoga, by first light of 18 December, though it suffered some casualties.

The main force, viz 17 Infantry Division commenced from its assembly area South of Belgaum, at dawn on 18 December, with 63 Infantry Brigade in the lead. It was planned to advance up to Ponda, by way of Mollem. 48 Infantry Brigade, which was following, was to pass through at Ponda, and go for Panjim, which was the final objective. Due to the advance on foot and abnormally large bridging column which was following the leading brigade, 48 Infantry Brigade could not keep up its advance, and when it reached River Candepar in evening, it found it was already occupied by paratroopers. Two battalions of 50 Parachute Brigade, 2 Para and 2 Sikh LI, had also commenced their advance at first light, on 18 December. Moving on converging axes, they did not let the blown up bridges deter them and simply swam across. The absence of heavy equipment, and light opposition from the enemy, coupled with initiative of the leaders, made this possible. As a result, the para troopers made excellent progress, and achieved more than what was expected from them. By 8.30 a.m. 2 Sikh LI had taken Bicholim and by 10.30 a.m. 2 Para reached Sanquelim, and by 5.30 p.m., occupied Ponda. This was done in spite of two major obstacles, in the form of the rivers Usgaon and Candepar, which were crossed by means of improvised rafts and fording.

After the crossing of the wide Usgaon river, Sagat felt that there was now no need to hold 1 Para in reserve, and he ordered them to head straight for Banasterim, after crossing the ferry at Piligao. According to his initial plan, on reaching Panjim, 2 Para was to establish a firm base close to the city, and 1 Para would be tasked to clear the expected resistance in the built up area. The lack of enemy resistance, and speed of advance had altered the situation. Another development took place at tactical HQ of Southern Command, at Belgaum. A wireless intercept indicated that the Portuguese Governor General had called for a meeting next morning at 8 a.m., to consider surrender. The Army Commander, when informed of this, realised that the Portuguese had lost the battle. Seeing the slow progress of 17 Infantry Division, and the rapid advance of 50 Para Brigade, he decided to change the plan. The task of capturing Panjim, which had been earlier assigned to 17 Division, was now given to the paratroopers, who were asked resume advance during the night. Due to break down in signal communications, this order could not be passed to HQ 17 Infantry Division, which had ordered 50 Para Brigade to firm in at Ponda, and tasked 48 Brigade to capture Panjim. However, Lieut-General Chaudhury personally spoke to the Brigade Major of 50 Para Brigade, and passed these instructions, since Sagat was away from his headquarters, visiting 2 Para, at that time. Incidentally, 50 Para Brigade was able to maintain contact with Belgaum throughout the operation, thanks to a radio relay detachment, which Sagat had managed to get from Major General R.N. Batra, the Signal Officer-in-Chief, on the ‘old boy’ net.

The advance of 2 Sikh LI was initially slow, even though it was led by the squadron of 7 Cavalry, and a troop of AMX tanks. Sagat felt that they had a tendency to hug the ground, and this accounted for their slow progress. He had to personally push them hard, before they speeded up their advance, and reached the Betim ferry, on the Panjim Creek, by last light. By this time, 1 Para had reached the outskirts of Panjim. With two battalions around Panjim by the evening of 18 December, 50 Para Brigade was now poised to capture the town, from the East as well as the North. However, it was almost dark, and Sagat did not want to enter the built up area of Panjim by night. He ordered 1 Para and 2 Sikh LI to halt, and establish harbours, for the night.

On the morning of 19 December, using the Betim ferry, some troops of 2 Sikh LI crossed the Panjim Creek, and arrived in Panjim at 8 am. Shortly afterwards, 1 Para also reached Panjim. Except for some firing from the customs house, there was no effective resistance, and the city was in Indian hands by 9 a.m. By a remarkable coincidence, the COs of both battalions had the same name. 1 Para was being commanded by Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh, VrC, MC, while the CO of 2 Sikh LI was Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh. It was the latter who won the race by an hour, and had the honour of accepting the surrender of the Portuguese troops, who had assembled in the officers mess. Major General Vassalo De’ Silva, the Governor General and C-in-C, escaped to Marmagao, and surrendered later. The Navy had already taken Anjidiv island the previous day, and also sunk the Portuguese frigate ‘Albuquerque’. At 11 a.m., Lieut-General Chaudhury, accompanied by Air Vice Marshal Pinto arrived in a helicopter, and got the tri-colour hoisted on the Secretariat building. Goa had been liberated, in an operation which lasted a little over 24 hours.

So, one can say that Goa was supposed to be liberated by 17st Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth, with 50th. Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh supposed to play a supporting role. But it was the other way round. Sagat Singh’s 50th Parachute Brigade reached Panjim and accepted surrender of Goan authority, while 17th Infantry Division was still struggling to reach Panjim.

Though the result of the operations in Goa was along expected lines, the speed of the Indian advance surprised many observers. The credit for this goes to Sagat, and his troops, who exceeded their brief, and managing to reach Panjim, which they had not been asked to do. The fact that 17 Infantry Division, in spite of the vastly superior resources at their disposal, and almost no opposition from the enemy, could make little headway, goes to show that the going was not easy. If the paratroopers succeeded, it was because of better fighting spirit, morale and leadership. The ability to take risks, and seize fleeting opportunities is the hall mark of a successful military leader, and Sagat proved beyond doubt that he had these qualities in ample measure.

Bangladesh Liberation War 1971
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In 1971 war, time was of essence. As soon as Pakistan started the war, on 3 December 1971 (by carrying out what they thought was an Israeli style bombing on Indian airfields), India retaliated and Pakistan ran to the UN on 4 December 1971 (in a very un Israel like manner), requesting UN to intervene and order ceasefire. Pakistan was supported by USA and China, while USSR vetoed the proposal, Britain and France abstained. So, India had limited time in which to achieve their task before Pakistan could manage to get ceasefire, like how they had managed to force India, then on the verge of defeating Pakistan soundly, into ceasefire in 1965, thanks to Chinese aggression at Sikkim.

In 1971, The task of liberating Bangla Desh, then called East Pakistan, was given to Lieut General Jagjit Singh Aurora, GOC-in-C Eastern Command. He had four corps under him, namely- 2 Corps, commanded by Lieut General (later General) T.N. Raina; 33 Corps, commanded by Lieut General M.L. Thapan; 4 Corps, commanded by Lieut General Sagat Singh; and 101 Communication Zone Area, commanded by Major General G.S. Gill.

East Pakistan had three major rivers and that divided it into four major territories. Each of the corps was given the task of capturing one territory each. The part south of river Padma (that is known as Ganga in India) was to be captured by Corps II, advancing from West (viz from West Bengal). The part between Padma (Ganga in India) and Jamuna (known as Brahmputra in India) was to be captured by Corps XXXIII, advancing from North west. Another major river is river Meghna (combination of Barak river and Kushtia river, both originating in Assam), which flows south west and joins Padma (which is already merged with Jamuna by then). The mighty river that thus gets formed is known as Meghna from then onwards and it flows into bay of Bengal. Sagat Singh’s corps 4 was given the task of capturing the territory east of River Meghna, attacking from east. The fourth territory, viz the northern territory between Jamuna and Meghna rivers was to be captured by 101 Communication Zone Area, attacking from north.

Bangladesh is a territory full of rivers. Crossing them is tough because there are very few bridges on them.

Pakistan had three infantry divisions, comprising about 42 battalions of regular troops, and five squadrons of armour, for the defence of the region, and more than 2000 kilometres of border. Lieut General A.A.K. Niazi, who was commanding the Eastern Command of the Pakistan Army, had appreciated that the Indian advance would have to be along the major road axes, and had deployed his troops accordingly. Strong points had been created along the likely axes, and it was visualised that unless these were cleared, the advancing enemy could make little headway.

Lt General Niazi’s hunch was correct as far as corps II, corps XXXIII and 101 communication zone were concerned. They advanced in the conventional way along the predicted route where Pakistani forces awaited them. Fighting them and defeating them consumed precious time of these corps of Indian Army. As a result, these corps fell way behind schedule in achieving their targets. Time was important because the longer the war prolonged, more was the possibility that UN would force a ceasefire and like in 1965, it would end up in a stalemate, with nothing to show for by India.

Just when it looked gloomy for Indian forces, Sagat Singh employed some unconventional strategies that no military strategist had ever thought of. Realising that time was important and using the same conventional method of advancing on land was time consuming, he decided to air drop his troops across river Meghna. He had antique helicopters which were not meant for this purpose, but he made them fly hundreds of sorties, and in each sortie 17 troops were carried (about 5 more than the carrying capacity). It was a risky gamble, and these helicopters were shot at by Pakistani troops. On one occasion, one helicopter was hit by these shots. The bullets hit the pilot and grazed past Sagat Singh, also flying in the helicopter. Sagat Singh was playing for broke, and his gamble paid off big time.

When his Corps had reached the Meghna River and he was trying to cross the river to advance to Dacca, Aurora tried to restrain him. Sagat told him that he was surprised at his reluctance when he was not only fulfilling the task given to him but achieving task plus. Hesuccessfully conducted an ad hoc and impromptu river crossing operation across one of the widest rivers of the world.

The air lift began on the afternoon of December 9, and continued for the next 36 hours. A total of 110 sorties were flown, from a stadium, and crossed the Meghna, which was 4,000 yards wide, to land at helipads which had been marked by torches, with their reflectors removed. During day, the troops were landed in paddy fields, with helicopters hovering low above the ground. The first battalion of 311 Mountain Brigade, 4 Guards, was landed in Raipura. while 9 Punjab crossed the river using country boats.

Next day, the troops were landed directly at Narsingdi. Meanwhile, 73 Brigade had started to cross, using boats, which had been rounded up. The ferrying of artillery and tanks was a serious problem, and required considerable ingenuity on the part of the Engineers. By 11 December, both 311 and 73 Mountain Brigade had crossed the Meghna, and were ordered to advance to Dacca, on different axes. Using all modes of transport, including bullock carts and cycle rickshaws, both brigades advanced rapidly, and on December 14, the first artillery shell was fired on Dacca. Meanwhile, 101 communication zone too advanced towards Dacca from north. This, as well as other units that began arriving towards Dhaka were put under the command of Sagat Singh on 15 December. Shelling commenced and the message for Pakistan Army was clear, surrender or perish. One way or the other, Dacca was bound to fall to Indian forces on 16 December 1971.

Niazi surrendered on 16 december 1971. Unlike in 1965, when Pakistan avoided a humiliating defeat, this time, Pakistan could not save face. On 12 December, with Pakistan facing imminent defeat, the United States requested that the Security Council be reconvened. Pakistan’s Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was rushed to New York City to make the case for a resolution on the cease fire. The council continued deliberations for four days. By the time proposals were finalised, Pakistan’s forces in the East had surrendered and the war had ended, making the measures merely academic. Bhutto, frustrated by the failure of the resolution and the inaction of the United Nations, ripped up his speech and left the council. 🙂

So, Sagat Singh’s unconventional tactics bamboozled Pakistani army and Pakistani rulers alike. Pakistan was forced to surrender several days before than they had expected. Some “experts” thought that Niazi should have deferred his decision by another one day. But these experts forget that Niazi had no choice. There was no way he would have left Dacca alive without Indian forces’ protection. Even if there was ceasefire, Indian troops would have just handed him over to Mukti Bahini. So surrendering before Indian army was an offer that Niazi could not refuse. 🙂

Here is that famous surrender photo. Sagat Singh is seen standing immediately behind Niazi.

So, one can see that Sagat Singh caused liberation of Goa on 19 december 1961 and liberation of Bangladesh on 16 december 1971. It was almost a “ten year liberation challenge” (dec 1961-dec 1971) as far as he was concerned ! 🙂

But, neither of these two feats were the biggest achievements of his career, in my opinion. His biggest achievement, in my opinion, that had far reaching implications for India, and therefore world affairs, came about in 1967 and ironically, very few people know about it and even talk about it. and that was :-

1967 India China War
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I have mentioned it earlier that India was winning against Pakistan decisively in 1965 when China, in a bid to save Pakistan, opened a front at Sikkim, and accused India of provocation and made some unreasonable demands on India. Indian government got nervous and declared ceasefire when on the verge of victory against Pakistan. This saved Pakistan big time. On the negotiating table, Pakistan got back everything that it had lost in the war. India not only surrendered all the gains of the war, even its PM Lal Bahadur Shashtri died mysteriously at Tashkant, where this meeting was taking place. So to many Indians it felt as if the entire world ganged up against India and India was stabbed in the back for the misdeed of Pakistan and Pakistan got away scot free.

Among the threats made by China while opening the Sikkim front with India, was the unreasonable demand that India vacated the two passes that were under Indian occupation, claiming that they were Chinese territories. These passes were Nathu La pass and Jelep La pass.

Nathu La was under mountain division 17 (headed by its Division Commander Major General Sagat Singh) while Jelep La was under mountain division 27 (headed by another Major General ). Both were under Lt Gen G G Bewoor, Corps commander of corps XXXIII.

In the opinion of Corps Commander Lt Gen Bewoor, the main defences of 17 Mountain Division were at Changgu, while Nathu La was only an observation post. Likewise In the adjoining sector, manned by 27 Mountain Division, Jelep La was also considered an observation post, with the main defences located at Lungthu. In case of hostilities, the divisional commanders had been given the authority to vacate the posts, and fall back on the main defences. Accordingly, orders were issued by Corps HQ to both divisions to vacate Nathu La and Jelep La.

Sagat did not agree with the views of the Corps HQ. Nathu La and Jelep La were passes, on the watershed, which was the natural boundary. The MacMahon Line, which India claimed as the International Border, followed the water shed principle, and India and China had gone to war over this issue, three years earlier. Vacating the passes on the watershed would give the Chinese the tactical advantage of observation and fire, into India, while denying the same to our own troops. Nathu La and Jelep La were also important because they were on the trade routes between India and Tibet, and provided the only means of ingress through the Chumbi Valley. Handing it over to the enemy on a platter was not Sagat’s idea of sound military strategy. Sagat also reasoned that the discretion to vacate the posts lay with the divisional commander, and he was not obliged to do so, based on instructions from Corps HQ.

As a result of orders issued by Corps HQ, 27 Mountain Division vacated Jelep La, which the Chinese promptly occupied. However, Sagat refused to vacate Nathu La, and when the Chinese became belligerent, and opened fire, he also opened up with guns and mortars, though there was a restriction imposed by Corps on the use of artillery. Lieut-General (later General) G.G. Bewoor, the Corps Commander, was extremely annoyed, and tried to speak to Sagat, to ask him to explain his actions. But Sagat was not in his HQ, and was with the forward troops. So it was his GSO 1, Lieut Colonel Lakhpat Singh, who bore the brunt of the Corps Commander’s wrath.

The Chinese had installed loudspeakers at Nathu La, and warned the Indians that they would suffer as they did in 1962, if they did not withdraw. However, Sagat had carried out a detailed appreciation of the situation, and reached the conclusion that the Chinese were bluffing. They made threatening postures, such as advancing in large numbers, but on reaching the border, always stopped, turned about and withdrew. They also did not use any artillery, for covering fire, which they would have certainly done if they were serious about capturing any Indian positions. Indian defences at Nathu La were strong. Sagat had put artillery observation posts on adjoining high features called Camel’s Back and Sebu La, which overlooked into the Yatung valley for several kilometres, and could bring down accurate fire on the enemy, an advantage that the Chinese did not have. It would be a tactical blunder to vacate Nathu La, and gift it to the Chinese.

During the crisis, the Chinese had occupied Jelep La, but had gained nothing in the sector under Sagat’s division. This was galling for them, and they continued their pressure on the Indians, and making threatening gestures. In December 1965, the Chinese fired on a patrol of 17 Assam Rifles, in North Sikkim, at a height of 16,000 feet, killing two men. The patrol was in Indian territory, but the Chinese claimed that it had crossed over to their side. They made regular broadcasts from loudspeakers at Nathu La, pointing out to Indian troops the pathetic conditions in which they lived, their low salaries and lack of amenities, comparing these to that of officers. It was a form of psychological warfare in which the Chinese were adept, and had to be countered. Sagat had similar loud speakers installed on our own side, and tape recorded messages, in Chinese language, were broadcast every day. However, he was not satisfied with this, and kept looking for a chance to avenge the death of the Indian soldiers who had fallen to Chinese bullets.

Throughout 1966, and early 1967, Chinese propaganda, intimidation and attempted incursions into Indian territory continued. The border was not marked, and there were several vantage points on the crest line which both sides thought belonged to them. Patrols which walked along the border often clashed, resulting in tension, and sometimes even casualties.

In 1967, Sagat discussed the problem with the new Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora. He suggested that the border at Nathu La should be clearly marked, to prevent such incidents, and offered to walk along the crest line, to test the Chinese resolve. If they did not object, the line along which he walked could be taken to be acceptable to them. This was agreed to, and Sagat, accompanied by an escort, began walking along the crest. The Chinese commander also walked alongside, accompanied by a photographer, who kept taking pictures. However, there was no confrontation, and the ‘walk’ ended peacefully.

Sagat then obtained the concurrence of the Corps Commander to mark the crest line, along which he had walked. He ordered a double wire fence to be erected, from Nathu La towards the North and South Shoulders. However, as soon as work began on the fence, on 20 August 1967, the Chinese became agitated, and asked the Indians to stop. One strand of wire was laid that day, and two more were added over the next two days. On 6 September, a patrol of 2 Grenadiers, the battalion which was holding defences at Nathula, was going towards the South Shoulder, when it was surrounded by about seventy Chinese, and threatened. The next day, the Chinese physically tried to interfere with the construction of the fence, and there was a scuffle. However, work continued on the next two days, and was almost completed on the 10th.

Since the Chinese appeared determined to prevent completion of the fence, it was decided to start early on 11th, and finish the job before first light. All available manpower, including a platoon of Engineers and another of Pioneers, was deployed for the task. A company of 18 Rajput was also brought in, to reinforce the position, and protect the men who were to construct the fence. As soon as work commenced, the Chinese came upto the fence, and tried to stop the work. There was a heated discussion between the Chinese commander, who was accompanied by the political commissar, and Lieut Colonel Rai Singh, CO 2 Grenadiers. Sagat had foreseen this eventuality, and told Lieut Colonel Rai Singh not to expose himself, and remain in his bunker, where the Brigade Commander, Brigadier M.M.S. Bakshi, was also present. But this was not heeded, and the CO, with an escort, came out in the open, to stand face to face with the Chinese officers. As the arguments became more heated, tempers rose, but both sides stood their ground. Suddenly, the Chinese opened fire, causing several casualties among the troops working on the wire fence. Lieut Colonel Rai Singh was hit by a Chinese bullet, and fell down.

Seeing their CO fall, the Grenadiers became mad with rage. In a fit of fury, they came out of their trenches, and attacked the Chinese post, led by Captain P.S. Dagar. The company of 18 Rajput, under Major Harbhajan Singh, and the Engineers working on the fence had been caught in the open, and suffered a few casualties from the Chinese firing. Realising that the only way to neutralise the Chinese fire was a physical assault, Harbhajan shouted to his men, and led them in a charge on the Chinese position. Several of the Indian troops were mowed down, by Chinese machine guns, but those who reached the Chinese bunkers used their bayonets, and accounted for many of the enemy. Both Harbhajan and Dagar lost their lives in the action, which developed into a full scale battle, lasting three days. Sagat had asked for some medium guns, and these were moved up to Kyangnosa La, at a height of over 10,000 ft.

Those day, authority to use artillery was only with Army Chief. Sagat Singh asked for permission to use artillery. His commanding officer sent the request to Delhi where the request went tthrough various channels in a proper bureaucratic manner. Seeing that it would be too late if he kept waiting for the orders from Delhi, Sagat Singh ordered firing of artillery on his own.

The artillery observation posts, which Sagat had sited earlier, proved their worth in bringing down effective fire on the Chinese. Because of lack of visibility, and the steep incline West of Nathu La, most Chinese shells fell behind the forward defences, and did not harm the Indians. Indian artillery shelling caused heavy damage on Chinese. Based on their observation of meek Indian behaviour so far, Chinese forces had never expected such a furious response.

The Indian casualties in the action were just over two hundred – 65 dead and 145 wounded. The Chinese are estimated to have suffered about three hundred casualties. Though the action taken by Sagat, in marking the border with a wire fence, had the approval of higher authorities, the large number of casualties suffered by both sides created a furore. The casualties to Indian troops would not have occurred if they had remained in their defences, and not exposed themselves by coming out of their trenches and rushing at the Chinese post. This happened in the heat of the moment, because seeing their CO fall, the troops lost their cool, and rushed forward under the orders of a young officer, who lost his life in the action.

The Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora, visited Nathu La, to assess the situation. Sagat was advised to prevent further escalation of hostilities, and avoid casualties to Indian troops.

The Chinese had already announced that it was the Indians who started the conflict, and the large number of Indian bodies, and wounded Indian soldiers, in their possession, seemed to support their claim. However, Sagat was not perturbed. For the last two years, the Chinese had been instigating him, and had killed several Indian soldiers. The specter of Chinese attack, of 1962, still haunted the military and political leadership in India and had prevented them from taking effective action against them. This was the first time the Chinese got a bloody nose, and the myth of their invincibility was broken.

This was not the end of the face-off with the Chinese. They had suffered more than 300 casualties and seemed unwilling to let the watershed cool down. On 1 Oct, a confrontation ensued between the Chinese and 7/11 Gorkha Regiment at Chola, a pass west of Nathu La and under the responsibility of 63 Brigade. The Gorkhas had that very day taken over the post at Pt 15450 from 10 J&K Rifles. A scuffle ensued between the JCO post commander and his Chinese counterpart over a boulder which was on the watershed. The Chinese bayoneted the JCO and his men retaliated with the deadly use of the khukhri. A fierce hand to hand struggle ensued and a neighbouring post came under attack. The Gorkhas were unwilling to start their tenure with a defeat and got clearance from the Brigade Commander to raise the stakes. Pt 15450, which had been taken by the Chinese, was vigorously attacked with close quarter khukhri work and the Chinese were evicted. This was a clear signal to them that the Indians would not surrender an inch of territory and the area around the watershed stabilised, ultimately being designated as the Line of Actual Control.

These two incidents were so unexpected and demoralising for the Chinese that there has been no firing on the LAC from that time in 1967 till today (2020). They kept threatening Indian even later, but the mental scars left on them in 1967 have not healed. That has acted as a brake on Chinese aggression.

Had India surrendered Nathu La under pressure of China then China would have had a free passage to Sikkim (then an Indian protectorate). China would have occupied Sikkim in no time. From Sikkim, cutting off Indian North East through Siliguri Corridor (aka Chicken neck) would have been a piece of cake for China. Occupying Sikkim would have enabled them to occupy the entire North East part of India. And all that before 1970. So there would have been no Bangladesh war and no win for India in that war. All this was avoided just because India had the right man at the right time as the incharge of protecting the borders at Nathu La during 1965 to 1967. And he took a decision in national interest that was at variance with the decision of his superior. Obeying that wrong decision cost India Jelep La pass, but Sagat Singh ensured that he would not surrender Nathu La. And two years later, he gave China a bloody nose, once again, by taking a decision that was against rules but in national interest.

His feat at Nathu La has been downplayed and its long term significance in ensuring the morale of Indian armed forces, and also in ensuring the unity and integrity of the nation, has not been fully appreciated.

During 1971 war, China did not interfere by opening another front, unlike what they had done in 1965. For that India must be thankful to Sagat Singh. The bloody nose that Chinese had received in 1967 was only too fresh in Chinese minds, so they stayed out of this conflict even though China Sikkim border was quite close to the war zone in East Pakistan !

One army officer, who has followed his career closely rightly observed that Sagat Singh was one of the greatest army commanders of all times. He is comparable to German Army commander Rommel and US army commander George Patten. Like Patten, Sagat Singh too found his war expoits being overlooked by his superiors, but Sagat Singh would not let that stop him from giving his best for the nation.

Just as this episode of Indian forces giving China a bloody nose in 1967 has been carefully shoved under the carpet, even Hindi movies have not covered this glorious chapter of Indian Army. Or so I thought. I came to know a few months back that a movie “Paltan”(2018) has been made on this event. But unlike other war movies, few moviegoers seem to have watched it. The movie seemingly flopped, which is a great pity.

The movie is available on zee5, and I especially subscribed to zee5 to watch this movie. The movie was directed by J P Datta. It had Jackie Shroff, Arjun Rampal, Sonu Sood, Harshvardhan Rane, Esha Gupta, Sonal Chauhan etc in it. Jackie Shroff plays Sagat Singh in the movie.

Here is a song from “Paltan” (2018) in honour of Late Lt Gen (Retd)Sagat Singh, the hero of Goa Liberation war, Bangladesh liberation war and the person who gave Indians the belief that Chinese armymen were not invincible, unlike what we were told since 1962.

The song is sung by Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II and Divya Kumar. Jawed Akhtar is the lyricist. Anu Malik is the music director. Knowing Anu Malik’s reputation, it should come as no surprise if his tunes turn out to be “inspired” tunes. Here it is lifted from the theme music of “The bridge on the river Kwai”.

The picturisation of the song is just two minutes long. The audio version is six minutes long.

Video

Audio full


Song-Paltan o paltan (Paltan)(2018) Singers-Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II, Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
ik saathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
ik sathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
hatein na hum jo kisi morche par datt jaayein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

tez nigaahein tez dhadkanein tez kadam hain
hilta hai aakaash bhi jab yoon chalte hum hain
pairon ko chhoone aati hain khud hi raahein
har manzil hai milti humse khole baahein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

aangaaron ki baarish ho ya aag ke saagar
hum badhhte hi jaate hain in sab ko o bujhaa kar
josh bhi hai aur hosh bhi hai aur taakat bhi hai
har dushman se takraane ki himmat bhi hai
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tan mann
o sathi o
o sathi o
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
vande maataram
vande maataram
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande ae maataram
vandee ae maataram


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4376 Post No. : 15718

Today’s song is from the film Amrapali-1945. The film was made by Murlitone. This historical film was directed by Nandlal Jaswantlal. The music was composed by Saraswati devi, who had left Bombay Talkies, after the exit of Devika Rani. The 11 songs of the film were written by Miss Kamal, B.A.. Most readers who are knowledgeable about the vintage films of the 40’s know that Miss Kamal, B.A. was a pseudonym of Kavi Pradeep. At that time, he was under contract with Bombay Talkies and could not use his real name . Under this Pen name, he wrote lyrics for four films, namely Kadambari-44, Amrapali-45, Sati Toral-47 and Veerangana-47. Incidentally, all these films were directed by Nandlal Jaswantlal.

Nandlal was born on 15-3-1907 at Bardoli in Surat. His father was Admin. Officer in Kohinoor films. He started his career by joining it in 1924. He assisted Chandulal Shah(1926-29) and also directed silent and Talkie films for Ranjit from 1929 to 1933. Nandlal left the job and went to Europe on tour. On his return he joined the Imperial company(34-36) and directed some remakes of silent films of Sulochana into Talkie films. For one year-1937- he went to Madras and ran a Laboratory also.

His first Talkie film as a Director was Pardesi preetam-33 and last was Akeli mat jaiyo-63. Both were Ranjit films. Due to his death in 1961, Akeli mat Jaiyo was delayed and completed by Chandulal Shah himself. Best known for his later Filmistan musicals: Anarkali (with Bina Rai and music by C. Ramchandra) and Nagin (with Vyjayanthimala), one of the biggest post-Independence musical hits. Admired for his sophisticated lighting (with cameraman Pandurang Naik). Used extreme close-ups and unusual angles creating disjointed but dramatic and sensual spaces (e.g. the beginning of Anarkali). Last film Akeli Mat Jaiyo was completed by Chandulal Shah. Apparently filmed many of the famous song sequences of M. Sadiq’s musical Taj Mahal (1963).

FILMOGRAPHY: 1929: Jawani Diwani; Pardesi Saiyan; 1930: Pahadi Kanya; 1931: Premi Jogan; Ghunghatwali (all St); 1933: Pardesi Preetam; 1934: Indira MA; Kashmeera; 1935: Pujarini; 1936: Bambai Ki Billi; Jungle Queen; 1939: Jeevan Saathi; 1941: Kamadhenu; 1943: Pratigya; 1944: Kadambari; 1945: Amrapali; 1945: Sati Toral; Veerangana; 1951: Sanam; 1953: Anarkali; 1954: Nagin; 1956: Taj; 1957: Champakali; 1963: Akeli Mat Jaiyo (1963). (Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.)

In film Amrapali-45, the film story was by Ramchandra Thakur. Actually, this was based on Thakur’s own famous novel Amrapali. The dialogues were by Munshi Dil. The film, made under the banner of Murli Cinetone, was shot entirely in the Andheri studios of Lakshmi productions. The story of Amrapali is a real story, which took place in the times of Gautam Buddha. Although the original novel of Tamchandra Thakur depicted the reality in his book very nicely, the film story was twisted and under the guise of taking ‘ Cinematic liberty’, the main events of the story were drastically changed, twisting the history. Comparatively, the film ‘Amrapali’ made later in 1966 was much better. At least it did not change the original story. Amrapali or Ambapalika’s story is mentioned in old Pali language Texts and Buddhist literature.

The cast of the film was Prem Adib, Sabita Devi,Jeevan, Arun Ahuja, Jagdish Sethi, Badri Prasad, Sankatha Prasad, Gulab etc.etc. This film was special for its Heroine, because it was her last film as an actress. In the silent era, many Anglo Indian, Jew and European girls acted in films. They were preferred too, for their free uninhibited acting. Kissing and hugging was no problem for them. However, when the Talkie films arrived, most of these girls had to leave films, because they could not speak Hindi or sing a song. Only some few dedicated actresses from the lot like Sulochana (Ruby Meyers), Sabita Devi (Irina Gasper) etc, continued in films, because they learnt Hindi and singing, with great efforts.

The real name of Sabita Devi was IRINA GASPER. She was an Anglo-Indian,born in an affluent family of Calcutta, in 1914.

After completing education she wanted to join films, but her family objected. Without the family’s knowledge, she sent her resume and Photo to British Dominion Film Co., owned by Dhiren Ganguly in Calcutta. When they informed their consent the family resisted and kept her locked in the house. She fell ill and finally, the family conceded to her wish.

Her first Silent film was Flames of Flesh-1930. Then came Kanthahaar, A touch of Love, After the death, Aparadhi, Money makes what not and Bhagyalaxmi as silent films.

When the talkie came, she determinedly learnt Hindustani and Urdu and also Music.
Her first Talkie film was Radhakrishna-33, in which she sang 16 out of 23 songs in the film, but no records were made. Next was Ek din ka Badshah-33. She shifted to Bombay for better opportunities. In 1934,came Shahar ka Jaadu,with Motilal as a debut actor and this film was a Hit. Later she and Motilal became a popular pair.

She did many films. Her some films were-
300 days and after, Apki marzi, kokila, Kulvadhu, Amrapali, Ladies only, Chandragupta, Chingari, Dr.madhurika, grihalaxmi, holiday in bombay, Jeevan Lata, King for a day, Lagna bandhan, Manmaani, , Phantom Of the hills, Silver king, vengeance is mine, Village Girl etc etc. In all, she acted in 23 Talkie films and sang 15 recorded songs in 7 films.

She was a good Piano and Harmonium player. In later days in 1943 onwards, she stopped singing herself. Her last picture was Amrapali-45.

In 1946, she got married and left for England. She came back again only to die in Calcutta in 1965.

The story of Amrapali or Ambalika as per history and the Pali literature is.. Amrapali was a Nagarvadhu (Public Courtesan) in the kingdom of Vaishali (present day Bihar), and the king of the neighbouring Magadha kingdom fell in her love. To get her, he attacks Vaishali and wins. However, before he approaches Amrapali, she has transformed into an Arihant (a female Monk), after her encounter with Gautam Buddha.

This simple story was twisted and many side plots were added to it, thereby making the filma drab one, without evoking any excitement. Sabita devi in her 30’s and Prem Adib’s growing in size, after his own marriage and huge success of film Ram Rajya in 1943, were not suitable anymore for Romantic roles. All in all, the film was not a successful one. According to Baburao Patel’s review of the film,the technical aspects of the film were excellent. These are, in any way, not of any cognisance by the audience. The film was released on 2-11-1945 at Roxy theatre, Bombay.

Today’s song is a very good Marching song. This must be at the time of motivating Vaishali’s people when Magadh sena attacked them. It reminded me of the Marching song ‘ Zindagi hai pyar se’ from the film Sikandar-1941. This is the third song Aamrapali (1945) to appear on this Blog.


Song-Aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re (Aamrpaali)(1945) Singer-Ameerbai Karnataki, Lyrics-Kavi Pradeep, MD-Saraswati Devi
Chorus

Lyrics

Aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re
aag re
naujawaan jaag re
jaag re
jaag re
Aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re

apne desh ka wo jal raha hai baag re
apne desh ka wo jal raha hai baag re
apni maata ka
apni dharti ka lut raha suhaag re
naujawaan jaag re
Aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re
aag re
naujawan jaag re
jaag re

jaag re
jaag re
jaag re

?? jo aag chaaron oar
??
takraane do
takraane do
maidaan mein talwaar se talwaar

hey karmveer jaago
hey shoorveer jaago
ranbheri baj rahi hai
praanon ka moh tyaago
aazaadi ke matwaalon
shamsheer ab uthhaalo
aazaadi ke matwaalon
shamsheer ab uthhaalo
apni izzat pe lag na jaaye daag re
naujawaan jaag re
Aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re
aag re
naujawan jaag re
naujawaanjaag re
naujawaan jaag re

(jaag re
jaag re
jaag re)

hey ae ae
kisi ke aage jhukna mat
jhukna mat
jhukna mat
kadam badhaa ke rukna mat
rukna mat
rukna mat

o naujawaan
naujawaan
desh maangta hai aaj tera balidaan
o naujawaan
desh maangta hai aaj tera balidaan
tera balidaan
tu khud ko mita de
sarwasw lutaa de
aaj dushman se khul ke khel phaag re
naujawaan jaag re

aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re
aaj apne ghar mein lagi aag re
aag re
naujawaan jaag re
aag re
naujawaan jaag re

aaj apne ghar mein lagai aag re
aaj apne ghar mein lagai aag re
aag re
naujawaan jaag re
aag re
naujawaan jaag re


This article is written by Nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4209 Post No. : 15405

 

Preamble of the Indian Constitution

WE, THE PEOPLE OF INDIA, having solemnly resolved to constitute India into a SOVEREIGN SOCIALIST SECULAR DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC and to secure to all its citizens:

JUSTICE, social, economic and political;

LIBERTY of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship;

EQUALITY of status and of opportunity;

and to promote among them all FRATERNITY assuring the dignity of the individual and the unity and integrity of the Nation;

IN OUR CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY this twenty sixth day of November, 1949, do HEREBY ADOPT, ENACT AND GIVE TO OURSELVES THIS CONSTITUTION.

 

Components of Preamble
1. It is indicated by the Preamble that the source of authority of the Constitution lies with the people of India.
2. Preamble declares India to be a sovereign, socialist, secular and democratic republic.
3. The objectives stated by the Preamble are to secure justice, liberty, equality to all citizens and promote fraternity to maintain unity and integrity of the nation.
4. The date is mentioned in the preamble when it was adopted i.e. November 26, 1949.

Key Words In The Preamble

1. Sovereign

The term ‘Sovereign’ which is proclaimed by the Preamble means that India has its own independent authority and it is not a dominion of any other external power. In the country, the legislature has the power to make laws which is subjected to certain limitations.

2. Socialist

The term ‘Socialist’ was added in the Preamble by 42nd Amendment, 1976 which means the achievement of socialist ends through democratic means. It is basically a ‘Democratic Socialism’ that holds faith in a mixed economy where both private and public sectors co-exist side by side.

3. Secular

The term ‘Secular’ was incorporated in the Preamble by 42nd Constitutional Amendment, 1976 which means that all the religions in India get equal respect, protection and support from the state.

4. Democratic

The term ‘Democratic’ implies that the Constitution of India has an established form of Constitution which gets its authority from the will of the people expressed in an election.

5. Republic

The term ‘Republic’ indicates that the head of the state is elected by the people directly or indirectly. In India, the President is the head of the state and he is elected indirectly by the people.

BR Ambedkar said about the preamble:-

It was, indeed, a way of life, which recognizes liberty, equality, and fraternity as the principles of life and which cannot be divorced from each other: Liberty cannot be divorced from equality; equality cannot be divorced from liberty. Nor can liberty and equality be divorced from fraternity. Without equality, liberty would produce the supremacy of the few over the many. Equality without liberty would kill individual initiative. Without fraternity, liberty and equality could not become a natural course of things.

As today we all are celebrating the 71 Republic Day , being the day of inception of the constitution of India, I thought that we should start this post with ‘The Preamble to the Constitution’.  The Preamble though is very much part of the constitution itself.

I have the great pleasure of writing the post on this song celebrating the very appropriateness of the justice, liberty, equality and fraternity. This is also the song which brought me to this blog incidentally on 25th of January 2011, and this was my first comment on this blog’s farmaish page.

 

47 | nahm
January 25, 2011 at 1:06 am

I have surfed the net all over for this song/nazm:

khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do,
yehi to hai zindagi ka raasta,
tumhien aman ka shanti ka vasta,

This is not available even on youtube. i am very much surprised did not anticipate this difficulty. This was widely used in school assembly , and i found on some website that today itself that it is sung by the great Mohammed Rafi (also). Frankly i was expecting many versions (by various singers). If u could find and just send the lyrics at least, on urgent basis. i shall be ever grateful.

It was exactly 9 years ago that I stumbled upon this blog and life as I knew it before, changed for me.  In many ways I can define the journey of my life before and after 26th January 2011.

Now about the page “Readers farmaishes” :  I wonder at how beautifully the word “Farmaish” has adapted to its Anglicized plural ‘farmaishes’. Another unique word which require a few sentences to get at the spirit of it, in any other language.  Google’s English is showing the pathetically legal “Petition”, or it is most likely a Victorian equivalent. The concept of ‘farmaishi programme’ is so intrinsically Indian, be it a much indulged child’s or an overindulged housewife’s.  Or it fits us ‘spoilt-for-choices’ lovers of Hindi film music.

So it turns out that all those years ago I was looking for the lyrics of this song and in my search found that it is a Rafi song picturized on Prithvi Raj Kapoor in a classroom singing in front of school children. That time, the archives page of the website of Films Division of India was empty. I was searching the youtube intermittently for this song, in the hope that it will surface somehow.  I tried everything I could for this was a Rafi song and no effort was to be spared.  As luck would have it a few months ago I again searched for it and this time found a FDI film ‘Khud Jiyo Auron Ko Bhi Jeene Do’ in the Films Division archives pages. I requested Sudhir Sir to try and find the song, if it exists.

A few days ago Sudhir Sir had emailed me that the song is located and he had the video of the song, but it was not Rafi Sahab’s song. A decade old search has come to an end. All the info pertaining to it was correct, except for the singing voice. But when I heard the song today, when Sudhir Sir, sent the upload link to me, I am so glad that I persisted in the search, my search and quest is very much justified. Though it is not in Rafi Sahab’s voice, but a wonderfully worthy song written, composed and sung by the multi-talented Prem Dhawan. All the thanks and gratitude we the listeners, the beneficiaries of hard work of Sudhir Sir, can give to him, are just not enough.

The tune, voice, rendition and the lyrics are all soothing to the jaded soul.

 

Song – Khud Jiyo Auron Ko Bhi Jeene Do (NFS) (1971) Singer – Prem Dhawan, Lyrics – Prem Dhawan, MD – Prem Dhawan
Chorus
Chorus + Prem Dhawan

Lyrics

khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

aa aaaa aaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaa

hmm mmmmm
mmmmmmmmm

chaman mein phool khilte bhaant bhaant ke
magar sabhi ka hota ek hi chaman
magar sabhi ka hota ek hi chaman
hon rehnewaale ham kisi bhi praant ke
hai ek apni dharti ek hi watan
hai ek apni dharti ek hi watan
to phir khinche khinche se dil hain kis liye
chalo dilon mein le ke ek hi lagan
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

yahi likhaa hai geeta aur quraan mein
yahi hai baani nanak aur kabir ki
isi liye to gandhi ji ne jaan di
ke jaane ham ye baat us faqeer ki
unhin ki zindagi hai  kisi kaam ki
samajhte hain jo doosron ki peed bhi
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

alag alag hai apni bhaasha to bhi kya
ke dil jo samjhe wo zubaan to ek hai
ke dil jo samjhe wo zubaan to ek hai
punjab ho bangal ho madras ho
hamaara ye hindostan to ek hai
hamaara ye hindostan to ek hai
allah kaho ishwar kaho ke wah guru
jaana jahan hai wo nishaan to ek hai
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

ha aaa aaaa
haa aaaa
haa aaaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaaa aaaaa

hai ladna hi to mil ke lado bhook se
jo bhook saare desh ko hai khaa rahi
mitaao zaat paat lado phoot se
wo phoot jo hamaare ghar jalaa rahi
hai khelna hi khoon se to aao phir
tumhe hai seema desh ki bulaa rahi
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

diye diwaali ke jalaao mil ke sab
manaao gale mil se saare eid bhi
manaao gale mil se saare eid bhi
mitaa hai bhagat singh jo apne desh pe
to tipu bhi mitaa hai aur hameed bhi
to tipu bhi mitaa hai aur hameed bhi
hai desh zindaa kyun ke desh sab ka hai
na rehti warna jeene ki ummeed bhi
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

aa aaaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaa
hmmm mmmmm
mmmmmmm

wo swarg jo rakhaa hai aasmaan pe
usey na kyun zameen pe utaar len
chalo uss apne ujde huey bagh ko
nayi nayi bahaaron se nikhaar len
banaayen taaj jaise aur mahal kayi
ajanta jaise but naye sanwaar len
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

mili hain aise saath apni qismatien
ke jaise saath ganga ke jamnaa bahe
ke jaise saath ganga ke jamnaa bahe
to kyun na tere dil ki baat main kahoon
to kyun na mere dil ka raaz tu kahe
to kyun na mere dil ka raaz tu kahe
samajh len ek doosre ke gham ko ham
to phir jahaan mein koyi gham hi kyun rahe
khud jiyo auron ko bhi jeene do
yahi to hai zindagi ka raastaa
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta
tumhen aman ka shanti ka waasta

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

 


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4209 Post No. : 15404

Greetings all for the celebration today – the anniversary of declaration of our nation as a Sovereign Socialist Secular Democratic Republic.

The Constituent Assembly, consisting of 389 eminent people from across all walks of life and all population segments in the country, was established on 6th December, 1946. After a string of debates, which included public debates in different parts of the country, the Assembly agreed to adopt our constitution on 6th November, 1949. And then on 26th January of 1950, the nation of India, that is Bharat, was declared as being governed according to this document which is the supreme law of our land.

The Preamble to the constitution states the following,

WE, THE PEOPLE OF INDIA, having solemnly resolved to constitute India into a SOVEREIGN SOCIALIST SECULAR DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC and to secure to all its citizens:

JUSTICE, social, economic and political;

LIBERTY of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship;

EQUALITY of status and of opportunity;

and to promote among them all FRATERNITY assuring the dignity of the individual and the unity and integrity of the Nation;

IN OUR CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY this twenty sixth day of November, 1949, do HEREBY ADOPT, ENACT AND GIVE TO OURSELVES THIS CONSTITUTION.

 

The constitution become the bedrock foundation for enunciating all the defining principles of governance and jurisprudence, which in turn form the source of all the laws that apply to our country and its citizens.

In terms of an identity, a nation is characterized and represented by a set of symbols which identify and define it. Wherever we may be in this world, whatever may be the query about what India is, the answers will always be in terms of certain symbols that are constant and do not change – our flag, our national emblem, our national anthem, our currency, and more.

As a matter of fact, symbols and symbolism form a very imperative part of our lives. All around us, in our everyday environment, we encounter a multitude of symbols that relate to every aspect of our lives. They could be fashion brands, corporate houses, currency, governments, services, road traffic – well, just any class and category of ‘things’ in and around our lives. These symbols are significant artifacts that represent, convey, and inspire a plethora of meanings and emotions relating to our everyday lives and experiences. These symbols may be local or universal. Everywhere in the world, the sign of dollar is a symbol for money. Traffic lights and signs are universal symbols, recognized across national boundaries. Emoticons we use every day now in our communications, are symbols that represents emotions, things, communication snippets. I could go on describing, and there would be no end to how symbols have become such an integral and pervasive part of our lives.

In a world we live in – a fragmented world of divisions that are represented and controlled on the basis of multiple criteria. We are a world of nation states. And the world over, the national identities are represented and underscored by a set of symbols. The flags, the emblem, colors, badges, plants/birds/animals – in fact each nation has a collection of symbols to characterize and epitomize its national identity. In our native Hindi, the word for flag is ‘निशान’ (nishan), which is a synonym for ‘symbol’.

National anniversaries are also in the nature of symbols of a nation. The celebrations of these anniversaries represent a dynamic continuity of the national identity across the pages of history. There is an evolution and transformation that happens with time, but the basic elements and definitions remain a constant. That constancy is an edifice of identity and a hallmark of stability and continuity in the matters of everyday interactions in the lives of the people of the nation. The presence of these symbols in our lives, and their everyday transactions, generates in our hearts a comfortable feeling of being – being an Indian.

For example, encountering the flag – our Tricolour, evokes in the heart, overwhelming emotions of pride, honor, affinity, affection and belonging. These symbols have become so much a part of our existence, that inside ourselves very strong emotions are now linked with these symbols. These symbols are now a cornerstone of our and our country’s existence.

The matter of honor and pride, linked with symbols and the emotions that these symbols evoke, has been a matter of very personal and a very human experience all across the history. The song being presented in this post today is a very forceful and compelling testimony on the inherent relationship between symbols and matter of national honor. Here is a brief slice of history representing a true episode from the annals of the Rajput history. As the reader will go through this song, one will find many symbols – that of patriotism, personal relations and personal sacrifices – being invoked.

The episode tells a piece of history, about Haadi Rani, who is now a folk heroine in Rajasthan. Haadi Rani was the daughter of King Haada Chauhan of the Kingdom of Boondi. She was married to Rawat Ratan Singh Chundaawat of Salumber (in Udaipur). Ratan Singh was the commander of the army of Maharana Raj Singh of Mewar, India was ruled at that time by the sixth Mughal Emperor – Aurangzeb Alamgir.

In a turn of events, the royal Mughal forces invaded Mewar. Maharana Raj Singh sent an urgent emissary to Rawat Ratan Singh, to raise the army and join the battle against Aurangzeb’s forces. As circumstances would have it, Ratan Singh had just been married one week prior. Initially, he was hesitant to leave his newlywed bride, and go to the battlefield. However, Haadi Rani reminded him of his duty towards the king and the kingdom, and prevailed upon him to join the battle. Ratan Singh left Salumber and his bride, and proceeded to join Maharana Raj Singh with his contingent. However, his mind was still engrossed with the amorous affections for Haadi Rani.

Midway from his march towards Udaipur, he sent back a messenger to his palace, with a message for his bride – that she should send him some token symbol of love – ‘प्रेम चिन्ह’, to sustain him through the times he is away from her. On reading the message, Rani sensed the state of mind of her husband, and at first, was quite bewildered as to what she should do. She apprehended that his mind being engrossed with her, he would not be an effective soldier and commander on the battlefield. But quickly she made up her mind, and decided the commit the ultimate sacrifice. She instructed the messenger quite sternly. Then she proceeded to behead herself with a sword. The messenger, very shocked and shaken, followed her instructions, and carried her bleeding head on golden tray, covered with her bridal finery, to Ratan Singh.

Ratan Singh, waiting eagerly for the ‘प्रेम चिन्ह’, received what he never expected in his wildest dreams. Uncovering the tray, he saw the head of his newlywed bride. His grief and his repentance had no bounds, for in a flash he realized what Haadi Rani had done, and why had she done it. As the folklore goes, he picked up the head and slung it around his neck with the tresses that he had once caressed with love. With this demeanor, he launched himself into the battle. It is said that fought valiantly like a man possessed, and led his army to victory against the forces of the Mughal Emperor. Once the victory was attained and the opposition army was in retreat, Ratan Singh alighted from his horse, knelt down on the ground and proceeded to behead himself.

In the intense and turbulent martial history of Rajasthan, this episode stands amongst the most powerful and most emotional, where the honor of the kingdom, and its security is perceived as a paramount commitment, even above personal engagements and requirements. Haadi Rani made the supreme sacrifice for the sake that her commander husband would not be swayed by the thoughts of his recent matrimony, and that the sight that she eventually presented to her husband would have served as a vicious impetus for him to give his utmost in the battle against the enemy.

The symbolism of honor – the trumpets announcing the onset of warfare. The symbolism of love – the ‘प्रेम चिन्ह’ that  Ratan Singh request for. And the symbolism of sacrifice – the ultimate step taken by Haadi Rani. This song converges these symbolisms into itself. A wonderfully emotional and a soul stirring presentation of one of the most chilling episodes of Rajput history.

The song is from the 1965 film ‘Nai Umar Ki Nai Fasal’. In the film, the setting of this song is as follows. A group of students, including Tanuja, Rajeev and Raj Kishore, are visiting another college in another city, for the annual festival of the latter college. As part of the program, all participant colleges are to present a stage item at the festival. This performance is presented by the protagonist group. In the film, Rajeev is the creative spirit of the team, and he completes the writing of this poem just in time for preparing the performance. On stage, the role of Haadi Rani is played by Tanuja, and that of Rawat Ratan Singh by Raj Kishore. We can see Rajeev doing the rendition of the poem on the mike placed in the wings of the stage.

The words of this poem are written by Manmohan Tiwari, the only song of this film that is not written by Neeraj. Music composition is by Roshan. The singing voice is of Manna Dey – the song has been rendered with such flourish and emotional dexterity.

A stirring reminder again today, the price of breathing in free air is defined through examples like this episode from our history. The finale of the song brings us back into convergence of the historical and the present tense – “O Bharat Maa Teri Jai Ho”.

Whatever else may be our compulsions, our personal motivations, our limitations, our interests, I am sure none of us differs about this sentiment – “O Bharat Maa Teri Jai Ho”.

[Ed Note: With this post, all songs of this film are now represented on our blog. The film ‘Nai Umar Ki Nai Fasal’ is now yippeee’d.]

Song – Thi Shubh Suhaag Ki Raat Madhur  (Nai Umar Ki Nai Fasal) (1965) Singer – Manna Dey, Lyrics – Manmohan Tiwari, MD – Roshan

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

thi shubh suhaag ki raat madhur
madhu chalak rahaa tha kan kan mein
sapne jagtey the nainon mein
armaan machaltey the mann mein
sardaar magan mann jhoom raha
pal pal har ang phadakta tha
honthon par pyaas mahakti thi
praanon mein pyaar dhadakta tha
tab hi ghunghat mein muskaati

tab hi ghunghat mein muskaati
pag paayal cham cham chamkaati
raani antahpur mein aayi
kuch sakuchaati kuch sharmaati

mehndi se haath rache donon
maathe par kumkum ka teeka
gora mukhda muskaa de to
poonam ka chaand lagey pheeka
dheere se badh choodavat ne

dheere se badh choodavat ne
raani ka ghunghat pat khola
nas nas mein kaundh gayi bijli
peepal patte sa tan dola

adharon se adhar miley jab tak
lajja ke toote chhand band
rann-bigul dwaar par goonj uthaa aa
rann-bigul dwaar par goonj uthaa
shehnaayi ka swar huaa mand
bhuj bandhan bhoola aalingan
aalingan bhool gaya chumban
chumban ko bhool gayi saansen
saanson ko bhool gayi dhadkan
taj kar suhaag ki sej saji

taj kar suhaag ki sej saji
bola aa na yuddh ko jaaunga
teri kajraari alkon mein
mann moti aaj guthaaunga

pehle to raani rahi maun
phir kaal jwaal si bhabhak utthi
bin baadal bin barkhaa maano
kya bijli koyi kadak utthi
ghayal naagan si bhaunh taan
ghunghat ukhaadkar yoon boli
talwaar mujhe de do apni
tum pehan raho choodi choli
pinjde mein koyi band sher

pinjde mein koyi band sher
sehsa sote se jaag utthe
yaa aandhi andhad saath liye
jaise pahaad se aag utthe

ho gaya khadaa tan kar ranaa
haathon mein bhaala utthaa liya
har har bam bam bam mahadev
har har bam bam bam mahadev
kah kar rann ko prasthaan kiya

dekha pati ka jab veer vesh
pehle to raani harshaayi
phir sehmi tthitthki akulaayi
aankhon mein badli ghir aayi
paagal si gayi jharokhe par

paagal si gayi jharokhe par
par-kite hansini thi adheer
ghodey par chadhaa dikhaa ranaa
jaise kamaan par chadhaa teer

donon ki aankhen huyi chaar
choodavat phir sudhbudh khoyi
sandesh pathaa kar raani ko
mangwaaya prem chinh koi

sewak ja pahunchaa mehlon mein
raani se maangi sainaani
raani jhijhki phir cheekh utthi
boli kah de mar gayi raani

le khadag haath
phir kahaa thahar
le sainaani
le sainaani
ambar bola
le sainaani
dharti boli
le sainaani

rakh kar chaandi ki thaali mein
sewak bhaaga le sainaani
ranaa adheer bola badhkar
laa
laa
laa
laa
laa sainaani

kapda jab magar hataaya to
rah gaya khada moorat ban kar
lahuluhaan raani ka sir
hansta tha rakha thaali par
sardaar dekh kar chitkaar uttha
haa raani
haa meri raani
adbhut hai teri qurbaani
tu sach much hi hai kshatraani

phir ed lagaayi ghode par
dharti boli jai ho jai ho
haadi raani teri jai ho
o bharat maa teri jai ho
o bharat maa teri jai ho o
teri jai ho
o bharat maa teri jai ho o

————————————————————————————-
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————————————-

थी शुभ सुहाग कि रात मधुर
मधु छलक रहा था कण कण में
सपने जगते थे नैनों में
अरमान मचलते थे मन में
सरदार मगन मन झूम रहा
पल पल हर अंग फड़कता था
होंठों पर प्यास महकती थी
प्राणों में प्यार धड़कता था
तब ही घूँघट में मुस्काती

तब ही घूँघट में मुस्काती
पग पायल छम छम छमकाती
रानी अन्तःपुर में आयी
कुछ सकुचाती कुछ शरमाती

मेहँदी से हाथ रचे दोनों
माथे पर कुमकुम का टिका
गोरा मुखड़ा मुस्का दे तो
पूनम का चाँद लगे फीका
धीरे से बढ़ चूंडावत ने

धीरे से बढ़ चूंडावत ने
रानी का घूँघट पट खोला
नस नस में कौंध गयी बिजली
पीपल पत्ते सा तन डोला

अधरों से अधर मिले जब तक
लज्जा के टूटे छंद बन्द
रण बिगुल द्वार पर गूँज उठा आ

रण बिगुल द्वार पर गूँज उठा
शहनाई का स्वर हुआ मन्द
भुज बंधन भूला आलिंगन
आलिंगन भूल गया चुम्बन
चुम्बन को भूल गयी साँसें
साँसों को भूल गयी धड़कन
तज कर सुहाग कि सेज सजी

तज कर सुहाग कि सेज सजी
बोला॰॰आ न युद्ध को जाऊँगा
तेरी कजरारी अलकों में
मन मोती आज गुंथाऊंगा

पहले तो रानी रही मौन
फिर काल ज्वाल सी भभक उठी
बिन बादल बिन बरखा मानो
क्या बिजली कोई कड़क उठी
घायल नागन सी भौंह तान
घूँघट उखाड़कर यूं बोली
तलवार मुझे दे दो अपनी
तुम पहन रहो चूड़ी चोली
पिंजड़े में कोई बंद शेर

पिंजड़े में कोई बंद शेर
सहसा सोते से जाग उठे
या आंधी अंधड़ साथ लिए
जैसे पहाड़ से आग उठे

हो गया खडा तन कर राणा
हाथों में भाला उठा लिया
हर हर बम बम बम महादेव
हर हर बम बम बम महादेव
कह कर रण को प्रस्थान किया

देखा पति का जब वीर वेश
पहले तो रानी हर्षाई
फिर सहमी ठिठकी अकुलाई
आँखों में बदली घिर आई
पागल सी गयी झरोखे पर

पागल सी गयी झरोखे पर
पर-कटी हंसनी थी अधीर
घोडे पर चढ़ा दिखा राणा
जैसे कमान पर चढ़ा तीर

दोनों कि आँखें हुयी चार
चूंडावत फिर सुधबुध खोयी
सन्देश पठा कर रानी को
मंगवाया प्रेमचिन्ह कोई

सेवक जा पहुंचा महलों में
रानी से मांगी सैनाणी
रानी झिझकी फिर चीख उठी
बोली कह दे मर गयी रानी

ले खड्ग हाथ
फिर कहा ठहर
ले सैनाणी
ले सैनाणी
अम्बर बोला
ले सैनाणी
धरती बोली
ले सैनाणी

रख कर चांदी कि थाली में
सेवक भागा ले सैनाणी
राणा अधीर बोला बढ़कर
ला
ला
ला
ला
ला सैनाणी

कपडा जब मगर हटाया तो
रह गया खडा मूरत बन कर
लहुलुहान रानी का सर
हंसता था रक्खा थाली पर

सरदार देख कर चीत्कार उठा
हा रानी
हा मेरी रानी
अद्भुत है तेरी कुर्बानी
तू सचमुच ही है क्षत्राणी

फिर एड़ लगाई घोड़े पर
धरती बोली जय हो जय हो
हाड़ी रानी तेरी जय हो
ओ भारत माँ तेरी जय हो ओ
ओ भारत माँ तेरी जय हो
तेरी जय हो
ओ भारत माँ तेरी जय हो

 


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4209 Post No. : 15403

Hullo Atuldom

26th January is a national occasion which is celebrated across the country with hoisting of the national tricolour in the country’s capital New Delhi followed by the rest of the country in educational institutions, government buildings and some private housing complexes. There are speeches and parades all around showcasing india’s diverse cultures and achievements.

Our housing society too celebrates this national day with flag hoisting and a gathering of the residents. There is a small difference in that we also conduct a small Pooja the previous evening followed by small acts by the children of the apartment, dinner and games (in that order, mind it). The night always comes to an end with a game of housie and antakshari, I am going to be enjoying it this year after a long gap.

25th January happened to be the birthday of Kavita Krishnamurthy who was born Sharada Krishnamurthy in New Delhi. She is a trained classical singer who has also learnt Rabindra Sangeet. She first recorded a song under the baton of Hemant Kumar as a co-singer to Lata Mangeshkar in 1971 for a Bengali movie. In the second half of the 70s she was reintroduced to Hemantda by Ranu Mukherjee and was used as a singer in Hemantdas’ live shows from where Manna Dey spotted her and her slow journey into film music began.

Initially she was a dubbing artist and cut demos of songs intended to be sung by established singers. the 1980 release “Maang Bharo Sajna” featured a song in her own voice but was deleted from the final cut of the film. Her first major hit was in 1985 when “Pyaar Jhukta Nahin” hit the screens and “tumse milkar na jaane kyun” became a hit. From then she has been on the Indian film firmament with songs in Kannada (where she had recorded her first film song), Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, English, Urdu, Nepali, Bengali, Odiya, Konkani etc. She was a Padmashri winner in 2005 and four time filmfare award winner. A humble and courteous human being who I had the luck to meet on one of my trips between Bangalore and Mumbai. She is very approachable and forever smiling. Here is wishing that smile stays forever.

Today we have a version of our National Song “Vande Mataram” in the voices of Kavita Krishnamurthy and Usha Uthup from the 2001 Karan Johar directed Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham. We have various artists who have presented this song in their own styles. The ones which I love to hear on repeat are by Hemant Kumar in the 1952 release “Anand Math” and A.R.Rahman’s non-film version which came in 1997 which starts as “Maa tujhe salaam”. K3G had 5 songs by Jatin-Lalit, 5 by Sandesh Shandilya and one by Aadesh Shrivastva. Today’s “Vande Matram” is by Sandesh Shandilya.

Wishing everyone a Happy Republic Day. Let us try and be good citizens who are responsible towards our country with our actions.

Audio
(Audio)
Video

Song-Vande Maatram (Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham)(2001) Singer-Kavita Krishnamurthy, Usha Uthup, MD-Sandesh Shandilya

Lyrics

mmmmmm mmmmmmm
vande ae ae maatram
vande ae ae maatram
maatram
hehe
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram

sujalaam sufalaam maatram
malayaj sheetalam maatram
sujalaam sufalaam maatram
malayaj sheetalam maatram
shashya shamlam maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande maatram
vande ae ae ae
maatram

aaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaa

hum bulbule hain iski
ye gulsitan hamaara hamaara
sare jaha se achcha
hindustan hamaara
hamara
saare jahan se achcha
Hindustan hamaara


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4206 Post No. : 15396

Today 23rd January (2020) is the 123rd birth anniversary of one of the greatest ‘sons of this soil’, a great visionary, courageous and brave leader Subhash Chandra Bose.

On this occasion, today I am presenting a song from the ‘1966’ movie ‘Netaji Subhashchandra Bose-1966’.

If we look at the movies made on the life of Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, we have the following movies represented on the blog so far.

SNo Movie Year of the movie
01 Pehla Aadmi 1950
02 Netaji Subhashchandra Bose 1966
03 Subhash Chandra 1978
04 Bose- The forgotten hero 2004

Other films inspired by Subhash Bose and INA are,

  1. ’Samadhi’ (1950) was inspired from Indian National Army and it had couple of patriotic songs too).
  2. ‘Ami Subhash Bolchi’ (2011) (Bangla) – a film about a social movement in Bengal inspired by the vision of Subhash Bose (something akin to ‘Lage Raho Munna Bhai’ (2006)).
  3. ‘Raag Desh’ (2017) – a film about the famous Red Fort trials in which the leading soldiers of INA, Colonel Prem Sahgal, Colonel Gurbaksh Singh Dhillon, and Major General Shah Nawaz Khan, were tried by the British Govt. for sedition and waging war against the British Empire. They were sentenced to deportation for life, but the public outcry in favor of these soldiers was so great that the British were forced to release all the defendants. The protest slogan of ‘Sehgal-Dhillon-Shah Nawaz’ became very popular amongst the masses.
  4. ‘Gumnaami’ (2019) – a film based on the Mukherjee Commission Hearings during 1999 to 2005, which investigated the question whether Subhash Bose had died in a plane crash in Taiwan (in 1946).

*(I would request our knowledgeable readers to correct and suggest if  there are any other movies that may have been missed above).

‘Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose’ was directed by Hemen Gupta for ‘Adarshlok, Bombay’.

The cast of this movie included Abhi Bhattacharya, Jaimala, Bipin Gupta, Ulhas, Maxworth, Padma Devi, Niranjan Sharma, N.R. Madholkar, Leela Mishra, Rajeshwar Dayal, Sudarshan Sethi, Mouni Chatterjee, Kant Kumar, Paresh Kumar, Munshi Niyamatulla, Kishan Raj, Mohan Kaul, Jaisingh, Sawant, Kamal Kapoor, Moore, Vulga, Supariwala, Panna Kapoor, Harry, Pears and Kelli.

This movie had five songs penned by Kavi Pradeep and composed to music by Salil Chaudhary. Mohd Rafi, Manna Dey, Savita Bannerjee, Hemant Kumar had given their voices to the songs in this movie.

Three songs from this movie have been posted on the blog earlier. Today’s song is the fourth song from this movie to be posted on the blog. As per HFGK this song is sung by Mohd Rafi, Hemant Kumar and chorus.

As mentioned above lyrics are by Kavi Pradeep and music is by Salil Chaudhary.

Let us listen to this song and pay our tributes and salute to Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose and his contribution in the freedom struggle of India.


Song-Dushmanon Saavdhaan (Netaji Subhashchandra Bose)(1966) Singers-Rafi, Hemant Kumar, Lyrics-Kavi Pradeep, MD-Salil Chaudhary
Rafi + Hemant Kumar
Chorus

Lyrics

dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan
chal pade hai aaj
hind ke jawaan
sar pe baandh kar kafan
seena taan
chhod do
chhod do
chhod do o o
paapiyon hamaara hindustaan

dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan

chal pade hai aaj
hind ke jawaan
sar pe baandh kar kafan
seena taan
chhod do
chhod do
chhod do o o
paapiyon hamaara Hindustaan

dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan

jaa chukaa hai waqt
dagaabaaz tumhaara
ab na rahega
ye takht-o-taaj tumhaara
jaa chukaa hai waqt
dagaabaaz tumhaara
ab na rahega
ye takht-o-taaj tumhaara
dhool mein mil jaayega
ye raaj tumhaara
maut se muqaabla hai
aaj tumhaara
tumpe ham m m
tumpe ham girenge
vajr ke samaan
dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan

jhanjhanaa rahaa suno
akaash zaalimon
hoga ab tumhaara sarvnaash
zaalimon
jhanjhanaa rahaa suno
akaash zaalimon
hoga ab tumhaara sarvnaash
zaalimon
denge ham bichhaa
tumhaari laash zaalimon
kaal ban ke aaya hai
subhash zaalimon
ham chaley ae
ham chaley
hatheliyon pe leke jaan

dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan
chal pade hai aaj
hind ke jawaan
sar pe baandh kar kafan
seena taan
chhod do
chhod do
chhod do o o
paapiyon hamaara Hindustaan
dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan

o ho o o o o
o ho o o o o
o ho o o o o
o ho o o o o

——————————————

(lines* not included in above song)

ham ladenge tumse
jab talak hai dam mein dam
hamko apni pyaari Janmabhoomi ki qasam
ab nahin rukenge
ye badhte huye qadam
mar kar bhi kar jaayenge
aazaad Hind ham
mar kar bhi rakhenge
ham watan ki shaan
dushmanon
saavdhaan
shatruon
saavdhan

(*as mentioned in the complete lyrics of Kavi Pradeep in the book ‘Kavi Pradeep Ka Hindi Sahitya Mein Avdaan’ by Dr. Dinesh Chandra Awasthi)
—————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
—————————————————–
दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान
चल पड़े है आज
हिन्द के जवान
सर पे बाँध कर कफ़न
सीना तान
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो ओ ओ
पापियों हमारा हिंदुस्तान

दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान

चल पड़े है आज
हिन्द के जवान
सर पे बाँध कर कफ़न
सीना तान
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो ओ ओ
पापियों हमारा हिंदुस्तान

दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान

जा चुका है वक़्त
दगाबाज़ तुम्हारा
अब न रहेगा
ये तख़्त ओ ताज तुम्हारा
जा चुका है वक़्त
दगाबाज़ तुम्हारा
अब न रहेगा
ये तख़्त ओ ताज तुम्हारा
धुल में मिल जाएगा
ये राज तुम्हारा
मौत से मुकाबला है
आज तुम्हारा
तुमपे हम म म
तुमपे हम गिरेंगे
वज्र के सामान
दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान

झनझना रहा सुनो
आकाश जालिमों
होगा अब तुम्हारा सर्वनाश
जालिमों
झनझना रहा सुनो
आकाश जालिमों
होगा अब तुम्हारा सर्वनाश
जालिमों
देंगे हम बिछा
तुम्हारी लाश जालिमों
काल बन के आया है
सुभाष जालिमों
हम चले ए
हम चले
हथेलियों पे लेके जान

दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान

चल पड़े है आज
हिन्द के जवान
सर पे बाँध कर कफ़न
सीना तान
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो
छोड़ दो ओ ओ
पापियों हमारा हिंदुस्तान
दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान

ओ हो ओ ओ ओ ओ
ओ हो ओ ओ ओ ओ
ओ हो ओ ओ ओ ओ
ओ हो ओ ओ ओ ओ

(*पंक्तियाँ जो कवि प्रदीप के गीत में है और शायद यहाँ फिल्म में या रिकॉर्डिंग में शामिल नहीं की गयी)

हम लड़ेंगे तुमसे
जब तलक है दम में दम
हमको अपनी प्यारी जन्मभूमि कि क़सम
अब नहीं रुकेंगे
ये बढ़ते हुए क़दम
मर कर भी कर जायेंगे
आज़ाद हिन्द हम
मर कर भी रखेंगे
हम वतन की शान
दुश्मनों
सावधान
शत्रुओं
सावधान


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4099 Post No. : 15246

Today’s song is from a historical film ” Woh Zamana “-47.

In India, importance is rarely given to history and to historical personalities born and bred in the local soil. The so called ‘ Historical Films’ made here are mostly on Mughal Kings or other invaders like Sikander or Changez Khan etc, who can not be called the sons of soil. Many of them came from out of India, stayed here till they benefited and left when they finished looting India. True sons of India or locals like Marathas, Rajputs, Gujars or Sikhs have been rare cases of subject matters for Hindi films.

Films on Vikramaditya, Chandragupta, Shivaji, Rana Pratap and brave kings from other states like Gujarat, Rajasthan, Bengal, Orissa, the UP and the southern states like Andhra, Karnataka, Tamilnadu or Kerala have been rare and can be counted on fingers. Very sad state of affairs indeed. This was the result of wanton and systematic planning by the Britishers in their, about 200 years of rule, to teach a distorted history to last about 5 to 6 generations. This was to suppress any patriotic feelings to rise against them. Our generations learnt only about the valour and generosity of the British and the Mughal kings, thereby totally blacking out the true history of original sons of soil leaders and kings, which was the true Indian History.

For example, can you name one king from any of these Indian kingdoms ? Mauryas, Saatwahans, Guptas, Pandyas, Cholas, Pallavas, Chalukyas, or Ahoms ? Ask any average educated Indian to name the kings of Mughal period (only 250 years) 99 out of 100 will name them in the sequence – Babar, Humayun, Akbar, Jehangir, Shahjehan and Aurangzeb. That is how ill-informed almost everyone is about Indian kings and dynasties. The so called Historical films have not helped either.

I have not seen film “Woh Zamana”, but I know that this film was based on the stories of bravery of a king of Kathiawad and how he saved his kingdom from the invaders from the Middle East. Kathiawad was the main part of Saurashtra, which comprised the districts of Junagadh, Amreli, Bhavnagar, Botad, Jamnagar, Rajkot, Morbi, Surendra nagar, Somnath and Dwaraka. After India’s Independence, the Nawab of Junagadh wanted to merge with Pakistan, but his subjects revolted and Sardar Patel merged Junagadh into India. The Nawab migrated to Pakistan with his entourage.

Film “Woh Zamana” was made by Ranjit Movietone. The owner of Ranjit – Sardar Chandulal Shah was from Kathiawad and so had a special interest in this film. Chandulal was keen that the then well known actor singer of Kathiawad, Rati kumar Vyas should act and sing in this film. Rati kumar declined acting in Hindi, but sang 1 duet (with Mohantara) and 1 solo song in this film. This was his only Hindi film. His duet song is already discussed on the Blog.

The lyricist was Pt. Indra and MD was Bulo C Rani, who had joined Ranjit after his Guru Khemchand left it. The cast of the film was Khurshid junior, Altaf, lalita Pawar, S N Tripathi, Pt. Iqbal, Padma Banerjee, Joshi, Kabuli etc.etc.

Khurshid Jr. – the film’s Heroine – was the eldest daughter of Master Ali Baksh, Music Director and Iqbal Begum, film artiste and one time a famous and popular stage artist of Madon, Alfred and other Drama companies in the Eastern India. The family actually belonged to Sargodha in Punjab, but Khurshid was born in Bombay on 10-4-1930. Being born in a filmi family, the atmosphere was very conducive for Khurshid to join films.

After getting school education upto 12 years of age, she entered films. Her first film was Zameen-43 as a side Heroine. Then came Minerva’s Dr. Kumar-44 and Naghma E Sehra-45 – in which she was the Heroine of Master Vithal. Due to her good acting skill, there was no shortage of film offers. She had to add Jr. to her name , as there was a more famous actress singer Khurshid Bano, already in film line, in the same period.

Khurshid’s younger sisters Baby Meena (later Meena kumari) and Baby Madhuri Later actress Madhu- Mehmood’s wife) were also working in films. Khurshid Jr. married her handsome co-star Altaf. who did few films as a Hero but then shifted to side roles soon. After Partition, the couple considered shifting to Pakistan, but decided to stay here as her both sisters were here and doing better.

As long as Meena kumari was alive, they were comfortable, but after her demise, they became helpless and went down financially. They had to live in smaller tenement and roles also dwindled. Khurshid Jr. acted in 65 films. Her last film was Oh Bewafa-80. Altaf acted in just 21 films from Sipahi-41 to Pakiza-71. Even Khurshid had also acted in it.

One more name seems odd in the cast – Kabuli. Abdul Rehman Kabuli was from Afganistan. An expert stage artiste, he had his own Drama Company-Elphinston Theatre Company in Bombay. He sold the company, went to Calcutta and joined Madon Theatres/studios as an actor and director. He first acted in Shirin Farhad-31, Indrasabha-32,Guluru Zarina-32, Zahri saanp-33 etc etc, in all 39 films, both at Calcutta and Bombay, in the early era. Further he directed 12 films, starting with Shravan Kumar-32 up to Veer Bala-38. He wrote 55 songs in 6 films and sang 15 songs in 7 films. After Partition, he returned to his native country.

Today’s song is sung by Kathiawad’s well known actor singer Rati Kumar Vyas. He used to live in Ahmedabad, but was born in Gondal (Rajkot district) on 10-8-1921. Gondal was his maternal grandfather’s town. Due to his inclination towards singing, he was admitted in Vanita Ashram National School, by his father. He was also trained by Pt. Narayan rao Vyas and learnt Classical singing.

He worked as a Music Teacher in Bombay. He recorded his first song at A.I.R. Bombay on 7-2-1941 and got a fabulous amount of Rs. 5 as fees ! His record was brought out by Young India Record company. he acted and sang in several stage dramas. He got into Gujarati films too. His songs in film Allabeli (Good-Bye) were quite famous.

His role and songs in film Jogidas Khuman-48 and 62, both versions became popular and famous. He acted in films directed by Manhar Raskapoor. He was honoured by Delhi Gujarati Samaj and the Kaag Dhaam award also. Rati kumar Vyas died on 12-5-1991. ( Thanks for information, to shri Rajni kumar Pandya ji and Harish Raghuwanshi ji).

Today’s song is a typical Kathiawadi Folk Tune.


Song –Hey ae mulak Kathiyawad (Woh Zamaana)(1947) Singer – Rati Kumar Vyas, Lyricist – Pt. Indra, MD – Bulo C Rani

Lyrics

hey ae ae ae
ae ae ae ae
ae ae ae ae
ae ae ae
hey ae ae ae
ae ae ae ae
ae ae ae
ae ae ae de
ae de de
ae de de

ae mulak kathiawad
ae mulak kathiawad
dharti par doojo nahin
ae ae ae ae
jaise atal pahaaad
ae toote par na jhuke kabhi ee
ae jaise atal pahaad
ae toote par na jhuke kabhi ee
ae jagat raha gun gaaye
ae jagat raha gun gaaye
baghero ka raat din
hey ae ae ae
sheesh jaaye to jaaye
ae moonch rahe oonchi sada
dushman khele daanv
ae dushman khele daanv
peethh na dekhe mard ki
ae dushman khele daanv
peethh na dekhe mard ki
ae ae ae ae ??
haathhi ghaav
ae hans hans jhele soorma
ae jag mein miley na jod
ae jag mein miley na jod
maan ek kul teri kahi ee
hey ae ae ae ae
ae byaah adhoora chhod
ae mard jaaye rann mein lade
mulak kathiawaad
mulak kathiawaad
dharti par doojo nahin ee
hey ae ae jaise atal pahaad
ae toote par na jhuke kabhi


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 15900 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1221
Total Number of movies covered =4362

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