Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Actor-Singer song’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4652 Post No. : 16317

Today’s song is from a ‘not so famous’ film from New Theatres – which had been making popular and musical films for the last few years. The song belongs to the film ” Sapera aka The Snake Charmer”-1939. The song was written by Kidar Sharma and the music was by R C Boral-The Doyen of Film music in India. The film was directed by Debaki Bose and the cast was Nawab, Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal,Prithviraj Kapoor, K C Dey, Menaka Devi and others.

Today’s song is sung by Kanan Devi. I have memories that I first heard her singing “Toofan Mail” from the film Jawab-42, sometime in the end of the 40s, when I was about 10 year old. We had a “Phono” (Gramophone) with a lot of records in 2-3 Record boxes. My father was fond of Pankaj Mullick songs, so we had many records of his film and non-film songs. Also Saigal songs, but I only remember vividly the song of Kanan Devi-Toofan mail, ye duniya hai Toofan mail. Later on, as I grew older, other film songs took over, but even today, whenever I hear this song, I get a nostalgic feeling. That was the magic of her singing !

Kanan Devi is a true example of “Rags to Riches” story. She rose from a very low level, but ended up with earning all the honours and respect a successful artiste can have ! When I first read her autobiography-‘ My Homage to all’, tears came to my eyes. Famous film writer late Pran Neville called her “an unlettered slum girl, who rose to become a much sought after social celebrity”. She did not know who her father was, she faced a failed love affair and a broken marriage, but won over all these things to become the winner.

If one sees the history of early cinema in Bengal, about 70% of the cine artistes (in all departments of filmmaking) were educated and from well to do families. Some were foreign returned, some were very rich and very few came from low level. Kanan was an example. In her childhood, she faced days when she had nowhere to go, but in the end, she led the way to other strugglers.

Kanan Devi, the melody queen and superstar of the 1930s and 40s, was a remarkable personality. An epitome of beauty, glamour and grace and the recipient of the prestigious Dadasaheb Phalke Award (1976), Kanan’s life story (1916-1992) transcends that of Eliza Doolittle in “Pygmalion” and “My Fair Lady”. Her memoir “Sabare Ami Nami” (I pay my respect to everyone) provides a fascinating account of her transformation from an unlettered slum girl into a much sought after social celebrity. The most astounding aspect of her persona was her grit, determination and courage which led her to attain the pinnacle of fame and glory and thus become a legend and an institution in her lifetime.

Kanan was born on 22 April 1916 in Howrah, West Bengal. In her autobiography, entitled ” My Homage to all”, Kanan has observed that those she considered as her parents were Ratan Chandra Das and Rajobala, who lived together. After the death of her adoptive father, Ratan Chandra Das, young Kanan and Rajobala were simply left to fend for themselves. Her life story is a true tale of rags to riches. Some say she did her schooling (not completed) from Howrah’s St. Agnes’ Convent School.

A well wisher, Tulsi Banerji, whom she called Kaka babu, introduced Kanan when she was only ten to Madan Theatres/Jyoti Studios, where she was cast in a small role in Jaidev (1926), followed by Shankaracharya in 1927. She was known as Kanan Bala.

By now, she was known as a good singer. By 1929, she was recording several songs. In this year, Kanan Bala met handsome Hiren Bose and a new chapter in her life seemed to be blooming. Hiren Bose was highly educated and had earned titles of “Vidya Bhushan” and “Sangeet Ratna”. In the years 1928 to 1932, Hiren had joined HMV as a Music Director. Here he became a close friend of Kazi Nazrul Islam and Dhiren Das. Both Kazi and Hiren wrote lyrics for songs in HMV .

Around 1929,a new , young and attractive singer came to HMV. Her name was KANAN BALA. She came to record songs. Soon the handsome Hiren cast his spell on Kanan and she started considering him as her mentor in HMV. They were a quartet of friends, Kanan, Hiren, Kazi and Dhiren. In HMV Kanan recorded many songs set to tune or written by Hiren Bose. In 1932,this team left HMV, on the issue of Royalty and joined the newly formed Megaphone Recording company. Here too after 2 years, this team left Megaphone and joined Columbia recording company. By 1934,Hiren wrote in his autobiography- JATI SMAR (My memories)-later that he had lost interest in Kananbala. She was broken-hearted.

Kanan did at least five films with Madan Theatres productions, (1926–1932) Rishir Prem (1931), Jorebarat (1931), Vishnu Maya (1932) and Prahlad, playing even male leads in the last two. She then worked with Radha Films from 1933 to 1936, then with New Theatres from 1937 to 1941, with MP Productions 1942 to 1948 and finally set up her own label Shrimati Pictures, 1949 to 1965.

From silent film roles as a child artist, Kanan made the successful transition into talkie films and was noticed with Jorebarat (1931), Manomoyee Girls School, Khooni Kaun and Maa (1934).

Her films with Jyotish Bannerjee included Joydev (1926), Rishir Prem (1931), Jorebarat (1931), Vishnumaya (1932), Kantahaar (1935) and Manomoyee Girls School (1935). Her films with Prafulla Ghosh were Sree Gouranga (1933), Char Darvesh (1933), Maa (1934) and Hari Bhakti. Others with Radha Film Company were Kanthahar (1935), Krishna Sudama (1936), Bishabriksha (1936) and Char Darvesh (1933).

New Theatres’s P.C. Barua wanted her to play the lead in his Devdas (1935), but, due to contractual reasons with Radha, she could not act in the film, a factor she regretted all her life.

The films of New Theatres, owned by Biren Sircar, established her as a superhit singer and her films ran to packed audiences. She had to travel under constant protection, given her huge fan following. During her years with New Theatres, Calcutta from 1937, she played the lead in Barua’s Mukti (1937), which was perhaps her finest performance, making her the studio’s top star. Apart from Mukti, she did Vidyapati, Saathi (1938), Street Singer (1938), Sapera (1939), Jawani Ki Reet (1939), Parajay (1939), Abhinetri (1940), Lagan (1941), Parichay (1941) and Jawab (1942). She became known as Kanan Devi from this point.

She came in contact with the music maestro Rai Chand Boral, who not only coached and familiarized her in the Hindi accent, but experimented with many classical Western and Indian forms in his music. She received her initial musical training under Alla Rakha. She was employed as a singer at the Megaphone Gramophone Company, receiving further training under Bhishmadev Chatterjee. She later learnt Rabindra Sangeet under Anadi Dastidar. Kanan remained the top star of New Theatres until she resigned her contract in 1941 and began to freelance in Bengali and Hindi films.

She worked with the biggest names in Indian cinema with K. L. Saigal, Pankaj Mullick, Pramathesh Barua, Pahari Sanyal, Chabi Biswas and Ashok Kumar.

M.P. Productions’ Jawaab was perhaps her biggest hit. Her song Duniya Yeh Duniya, Hai Toofan Mail was well received. She repeated the same feat in Hospital (1943), Banphool (1945) and Rajlakshmi (1946). Kanan Devi’s last Hindi film was Chandrashekhar (1948), with Ashok Kumar. In all, she worked in 20 Hindi films. She also sang 86 songs in 16 Hindi films.

In 1947, she went abroad to educate herself with the goings on in the western world of cinema. She was glad to visit Hollywood and meet legends like Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Robert Taylor and others. On her return she resumed her professional career and worked in some films before setting up her own Shrimati Productions. Kanan turned producer with Shrimati Pictures in 1949 and later launched the Sabyasachi Collective with the film Ananya (1949). Her own productions were mainly based on the stories of Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyay.

Kanan married Ashok Maitra in December 1940. He was the son of the staunch Brahmo Samaj educationist Heramba Chandra Maitra. Despite their best intentions, the marriage could not withstand the severe condemnation by the then conservative society. Even the poet Rabindranath Tagore, who sent a token gift to the married couple received scathing criticism for blessing the couple. The main issue was that Kanan was not expected to be working in films after her marriage. She filed for divorce in 1945. Despite the pain of the divorce, Kanan expressed her immense gratitude towards her first husband for giving her social recognition through marriage for the first time in her life. To Kanan’s credit, she maintained excellent relations with Rani Mahalanobis, sister to Ashok Maitra and her husband, the famous social scientist P.C. Mahalanobis and with Kusumkumari Devi, Ashok Maitra’s mother, even after the marriage was severed.

Kanan married Haridas Bhattacharjee around 1949. Haridas Bhattacharjee was then ADC to the Governor of Bengal. He eventually left the naval service to join Kanan in her filmmaking venture and became a competent director. While raising their son Siddharth in Calcutta, she also formed and worked as the president of Mahila Shilpi Mahal, an organization to help senior female artists and other charitable and community causes, including those for the betterment of Bengali cinema.

It was quite an uphill task for Kanan Bala to transform herself into Kanan Devi in those days when women liberation was unheard of. She had to struggle and with her strong determination and independent personality, she virtually forced the society to shower their respect and esteem on her when she became a celebrity in her own right. In her old age, she fondly remembered her days at New Theatres, full of joy and laughter. She was deeply impressed with K.L. Saigal and had the greatest regard for him.

Kanan Devi virtually stopped singing after 1947. Her last concert was at the India House in London when she was invited by Shri Krishna Menon, the High Commissioner, to perform on 15th August 1947. She mentioned it as the greatest moment in her life as a singer. Kanan inspired a whole generation of later day singers, the foremost being Lata Mangeshkar. She lived a full life both as an artiste as well as a woman. A great devotee of Lord Krishna, during her last years she spent most of her time in worshipping her lord and reading Geeta for her self-realisation and inner peace.

Kanan Devi, as the first lady of the Bengali screen, received many honours for her contribution to Indian cinema. An honorary degree from Vishwabharati, the Padma Shree in 1968 and the Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 1976.

She died on 17 July 1992 in Bellevue Clinic, Calcutta when she was around seventy-six years of age. ( based on some information from Wiki, an article by Pran Neville, book ‘ My homage to all’ by Kanan Devi, muVyz, and my notes, with thanks.)

In the film’s cast the name Menaka Devi appears. She is a part of Same Name Confusion, as another Menaka was also active at the same time. Luckily this was from Calcutta and the other one was from Bombay. However, by working in Bombay films and Calcutta films, both Menakas did create enough confusion. Let us know more about this Manaka Devi- Calcuttewali.

Menaka Devi was born in Varanasi on 23-1-1921. Her mother was a resident of the holy city although her father was from Bengal. She studied upto Matriculation. She could speak fluent English and Hindi, but not much of Bangla, having been raised in Varanasi. Her interest in music and dance took her to Bombay where she starred in a couple of films like Prince Thaksen (1929), Uttara Abhimanyu, Ishwar Ki Maut and others as a child artiste. When the Talkie started she acted and sang in Bhedi Rajkumar-34, Pyara Dushman-35 and Krishna Shishtai – 35.

Reportedly, she met the legendary film director Debaki Bose of Bengal during a train journey and he was so impressed by her that he decided to cast her in the lead role of his next venture in the Hindi version of the bilingual Sonar Sansar (1936 in Bangla and Sunehra Sansar-36 in Hindi) and thus began the illustrious career of Menaka Devi.

Her devotion to work was such that she learnt Bengali, her mother tongue although she was anything but fluent in it having spent all her life till then outside Bengal, so that she could play the same role (that of Alka) in the Bengali version also. Dhiraj Bhattacharya was her first hero on the screen. P.C.Barua, who was on the lookout for a young and fresh face to play Jharna in his forthcoming production Mukti (1937) selected her for both the versions ( Bangla and Hindi) and a flow started whereby she starred in films like Adhikar (1939), Abhigyan (1938), Bardidi (1939 in Bangla and Badi Didi in Hindi), Rajat Jayanti (1940) and others.

She decided to try her luck in Bombay around 1944 and starred in a few films there and definitely made her presence felt although playing the second lead most of the time. Kishore Sahu procured her services for Hamari Duniya (1952). She was married to Pannalal Shrivastav and had 1 daughter ( Jaya Ganguly). She turned producer also and this proved her undoing. Both her films as producer, Apna na Huye Apne (No information of this film,probably incomplete) and Jeene Do-48, both starring herself with prominent Bombay stars flopped.

She returned to Calcutta a broken woman and found to her dismay that roles were not coming to her. She joined the MG Enterprise, a drama group of Molina Devi and performed on the stage to continue to live as an actress. She even arranged magic shows along with husband Pannalal Srivastava while small roles came pouring in films like Ekti Raat (1956) and others. The feature that strikes even today while seeing her performance is the spontaneous nature of her acting. Why good roles eluded her is a mystery. She was last seen on the screen in Bhombal Sardar (1983). In all, she acted in 60 films-Bangla and Hindi together.

Her end came on 22-1- 2004 after a prolonged fight not only against poor health but also poverty. Her death was reported only in one Bengali daily although her death news received good coverage on television.

Filmography- Only Hindi
——————————–

Title Place of production Comments
Bhedi Rajkumar-34 in Bombay Acted and sang 1 solo
Pyara Dushman-35 Acted and sang 2 solos
Krishna Shishtai-35 Acted and sang 2 solos
Sunehra Sansar-36 in Calcutta Acted and sang 1 solo
Mukti-37 Acted and sang 1 solo
Abhagin-38 Acted
Badi Didi-39
Sapera-39
Mahakavi Kalidas-42
Shrikrishna Arjun yuddha-45 Bombay Acted
Shravan Kumar-46
1857-46
Chitod Vijay-47
Jeene Do-48 ”( produced also)
Hamari Duniya-52
Do Bigha Zamin-53 Calcutta

Now that we have seen the life stories of Kanan Devi and Menaka Devi-Calcutta Wali, let us enjoy the song from the film Sapera-1939.


Song-Morey ghar aao saajan re (Sapera)(1939) Singer- Kanan Devi, Lyricist- Kidar Sharma, MD- R C Boral

Lyrics

Morey ghar aao sajan re
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan re
ae morey pyaare sajan
roop ki bagiyaa
baras(?) rahi hai
roop ki bagiyaa
baras(?) rahi hai
man ki maina chahak rahi hai
haan aan aan aan
man ki maina chahak rahi hai
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan re
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan re

leti hai angdaiyaan
piyaa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
leti hai angdaiyaan
pi ee
sooni hai hirday ki basti ee
sooni hai hirday ki basti ee
aao ab aan baso re
ae morey pyaare sajan
aao ab aan baso re
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan

leti hai angdaiyaan
piyaa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
leti hai angdaiyaan
pi ee
sooni hai hirday ki basti ee
aao ab aan baso re
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan re
ae morey pyaare sajan
Morey ghar aao sajan re


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4651 Post No. : 16316 Movie Count :

4430

#The Decade of Seventies – 1971 – 1980 #
————————————————————————
# Bhoole-Bisre Geet # 132 # Qawwalis – 10 # Missing Films of 1971- 04#
——————————————-————————————————-—

Welcome all to the ‘tenth’ qawwali post in this series. It gives me immense satisfaction that I could present this series. I will be able to conclude this series in the next couple of posts.

Today we will listen to a ‘sufi qawwali’ rendered by the most admired ‘qawwali singing’ duo Shankar-Shambhu. I have mentioned it in my earlier posts that I have a great fascination for this name ‘Shankar-Shambhu’, may be because of the movie with same name released in ‘1976’ which I watched in my childhood, and possibly may be from the discussions of elders at home about the ‘qawwali’ and this ‘qawwali’ singing duo.

Stage shows and programs of ‘Qawwali’ were very common during the years of my childhood i.e., the ‘seventies’ and they were also part of movies where we had great qawwalis produced in HFM.

Today’s qawwali is from the movie ‘Shaan-E-Khudaa-1971’. It is directed by Nanubhai Vakeel for ‘Vanita Films, Bombay’. It had Azra, Rajpal, Chandra Mohan, Benazir, Roshan, Salam, Sukhbir Kaur, Anwari Bai, Munshi Munakka, Wazeer Muhammad Khan, Uma Dutt, Shaukat Azmi, Sujata, Master Sunil, Master Dabbu, Baby Deepali and others.

This movie was passed by Censor Board on 20.05.1971.

‘Shaan-E-Khudaa’ had seven songs written by A.H. Rizvi, S.H. Bihari, Kaifi Azmi and a traditional song. Music for this film was composed by Iqbal Qureshi. Asha Bhonsle, Mohd Rafi, Hemlata, Krishna Kalle and Shankar-Shambhu had lent their voices to the songs in this movie.

Here is the list of songs of this movie as mentioned in HFGK Vol-V (1971-1980);

S.No. Song Title Lyricist Singer/s
01 Teri zulfon ke ameer… jalwa zaraa dikhaa de A.H. Rizvi Shankar-Shambhu
02 Kaali kamli waale tujhpe laakhon salaam Asha Bhonsle
03 Ya nabi salaam aleka, ya rasul salaam aleka A.H. Rizvi Asha Bhonsle
04 Rakhta hai jo roza kabhi bhookhaa na rahegaa Asha Bhonsle
05 Dekha na kabhi hamne apnaa hai ki begaanaa Krishna Kalle
06 Milta hai kya namaaz mein sar ko jhukaa ke dekh lo A.H. Rizvi Asha Bhonsle
07 Bihar ho ki maneri ho, ye rozaa ye roze ki shaan allaah

On screen today’s qawwali is performed by Shankar-Shambu themselves. I guess that it is picturized in the premises of the famous ‘Khawaajaa Moinuddin Chishti’ dargaah at Ajmer. The picturization also shows the clips of the ‘annual fair’ at the dargaah and also the picturesque locations of Ajmer including the famous ‘Pushkar Lake’.

let us now listen to today’s qawwali in the voice of Shankar-Shambhu and chorus. Lyrics are by A.H. Rizvi and Music is composed by Iqbal Qureshi.
I have not been able to note correct words at a few places. I would request readers to provide correct ords there and would also like to request knowledgeable reader who had watched this movie to throw light on the movie and its songs..

From today the ‘holy’ month of ‘Ramaadaan’ will also start and I would take this opportunity to wish everyone a ‘very happy Ramaadaan’.It will miss the normal fervor this time due to the current ‘Covid19 pandemic’ related restrictions. I am sure people will celebrate it with the same enthusiasm and offer their prayers to God to bless everyone with good health, joy and peace in life.

This movie ‘Shaan-E-Khudaa-1971’ makes its debut on the blog ith this qawwaali.

Video

Audio

Song-Dil ki lagi bujhaa de Ajmer waale Khwaajaa(Shaan e Khuda)(1971) Singers-Shankar-Shambhu, Lyrics-A H Rizvi, MD-Iqbal Qureshy

Lyrics

raahate khal gojaan (?) Moinuddin
raahate khal gojaan (?) Moinuddin

haami e bekasaa Moinuddin
ahl-e-duniya ka wo nahin mohtaaj
jispe ho meharbaan Moinuddin

teri zulfon ke aseer aayen hain ae ae
khaa ke sab ishq ke teer aayen hain ae ae
khwajaji ee ee ee
ek mela sa lagaa hai daron par
door se tere fakir aayen hain
jalwaa zaraa dikhaa de
khawaaja ji ee ee ee
jalwaa zaraa dikha de
ajmer waale khwaaja
jalwaa zaraa dikhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa
o more khwaaja
dil lagi bujhaa de
aa aa aa aa aa aa
dil ki lagi bujhaa
aa aa aa aa aa aa
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
aa aa aa aa aa aan

har kaam mera
meri taqdeer ne bigaadaa
gham ki chali wo aandhi
dil ka nagar ujaadaa aa
ujdaa nagar basaa de
khawaaja ji ee ee ee
ujdaa nagar basaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
ujdaa nagar basaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de

ye wo chaukhat hai
jis chaukhat par sab
gardan jhukaate hain
yahaan rehmat utarti hai
farishte aate jaate hain
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
yahi dar hai jahaan
mehmood khilji rota aa aayaa thha
yahi dar hai jahaan jo
usne maanga thha wo paaya thha
haan aa aa aa aa aa
isi dar par kabhi
akbar ne bhi
daaman pasaaraa thha
yahin gardan jhukaayi thhi
yahin par taaj utaaraa thha

jhaangir aaya thha dehleez par
jaise faqir aaye
palat jaate thhe dushman ki taraf se
jitne teer aaye ae
sabko diya sahaaraa aa
tu sab ke kaam aayaa
khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
mere khwaajaa ji ee
sabko diyaa sahaaraa
tu sab ke kaam aayaa
mujhko bhi aasraa de
mujhko bhi aasraa de
ajmer waale khwaajaa
mujhko bhi aasraa de
ajmer waale khwaajaa
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
o ho more khwaajaa
haan aa aa aa aa aan
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
aa aa aa aa aa aa aan
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
aa aa aa aa aa aa
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de

jab ke ajmer mein
khwaaja ka qadam aaya thha
phool sa chehra
kadi dhoop mein murjhaayaa thha aa
saath khwaaja ke jo
deewaane chale aate thhe
aisi garmi thhi ke parwaane jaley
jaate thhe
ek jungle mein nazar
aaya kahin kuchh saayaa
kaafilaa hazaratein
khwaaja ne wahaan thhehraaya aa
aake charwaahe ye bolen ke
yahaan se jaao o
kaafilaa apnaa kahin aur hi
tum thhehraaao o o
kaise mumkin hai ki is saaye mein
insaan rahe
oont rajaa ke yahaan baithhte hain
dhyaan rahen
uthhte utthte bhi ye phir
hazrat e khwaajaa ne ae ae kahaa aa aa
lo jagah apni sambhaalo
main kahin aur chalaa aa aa
par faqiron ko sataaya hai
to pachhtaaoge
oont baithhe hi rahenge
na uthhaa paaoge
sabne us roz ye khwaajaa ki
qaraamat dekhi
oont baithhe to phir
uthhne ki na himmat dekhi

qadmon pe sar jhukhaa ke
charwaahe saare boley ae
aisi na tu sazaa de ae
khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
mere khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
aisi na tu sazaa de ae
ajmer waale khwaajaa
aisi na tu sazaa de ae
ajmer waale khwaajaa
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
o ho more khwaajaa
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
haan aa aa aa aa aan
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
aa aa aa aa aa aa aan
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
mere khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
khwaajaa ji ee ee ee
haaye khwaaja jee
aa aa aa aa aa
dil ki lagi bujha de
Ajmer aale Khwaaja
dil ki lagi bujhaa de
khwaajaa jee
jalwaa zaraa dikhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja
jalwaa zaraa dikhaa de
ajmer waale khwaaja aa aa aa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4642 Post No. : 16304 Movie Count :

4429

Today’s song is a duet from film Uski Tamanna aka Her last desire-39. Have you ever heard about this film ? I have also never known this film. But then, barring a few well known, successful film names, one really does not know any other film names in a specific year. Majority of films are like this only.

The year was 1939 and the British Government had declared war against Germany and japan, as soon as the WW II began. All countries ruled by Britain were – willingly or unwillingly, drawn into the war efforts and its effects. The war began in the month of September and soon various restrictions came into operation – like rationing, blackouts, shortages etc. The film industry which was still under its development stage suffered. It also realised the importance of remaining united as one industry. However, all that came after 1 or 2 years. In 1939 there was not much effect seen on the film industry.

The industry had its own problems. In spite of the playback system in operation, their problem was that because there was no technique of recording from the film negative yet, the singers had to sing twice. Once for the actual film shooting of the song, and later, with the same set of orchestra, for commercial records. Sometimes, the original singer was not available due to any reason, some other singer had to sing for commercial records. Thus we have many such examples, where the singer in the film song and the record is different. However, this problem continued only till mid 50’s when the Tape and the required technique became available. With just one time recording, the film and commercial recording were taken care of.

Khemchand Prakash. K.Datta (Datta Koregaonkar), Rafiq Ghaznavi and Anupam Ghatak made their Debut as Music Directors. Kavi Pradeep wrote his first film song for film Kangan. In 1939, 2 most Unusual songs were presented, for the first time ( and this record is not yet broken even after more than 80 years.). One was a Multi-Lingual song from film Aadmi-39, a film by Prabhat….Kis liye kal ki baat. This song was in Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bangla, Tamil and Telugu. ( In its Marathi film version-” माणूस “, this song was only in one language-Marathi.) Different Lyricists and MDs were used for each language. The song became very popular.

Second unusual song was from film ‘ Ghareeb ka Laal’-1939. The song lyrics had the names of 32 artistes, operating in Hindi films that time. Top Heroes and Heroines were mentioned in this song. The beginning of the song was ” Tuze Bibbo kahoon ya Sulochana, Uma shashi kahoon ki Jamuna “. This song was sung by the comedian Mirza Musharraf. In later years many songs with film artistes’ names came but none had so many names. Thus this record is still unbroken, in case of both songs.

Besides these songs, let us quickly take a look at some films of 1939….

Aadmi – Prabhat’s hit film, a remake of the Marathi film ” माणूस “. It had some good songs by Shanta Hublikar, Sundarabai Jadhav and Ram Marathe.

Adhuri Kahani – a trend of Tragedy films set by the effect of film ‘Devdas’. All the 3 main characters of this film commit suicide in the end.

Badi Didi – A New Theatres film.

Brandy ki Botal – Master Vinayak’s comedy remake of Marathi film ‘ ब्रॅंडीची बाटली ‘.

Dil hi to hai – Debut of Kidar Sharma as a Director and Ramola as a Heroine in a Hindi film.

Dushman – New Theatres’ film of Saigal, with only his 4 songs.

Ek hi Raasta – Sagar presents first film with 3 Heroes in one film.

Ghazi Salauddin – Debut of Khemchand Prakash as M.D.

Hukum ka Ikka – First film with a Triple role by Umakant Desai ( who later specialised as Lakshman in 7 films, including Ramrajya-43).

Imaandaar – Debut of actress Shamim Akhtar.

India in Africa – This was the First Hindi film to be shot abroad (in Africa). The Hero B. Nandrekar had also gone to Africa for its shooting. Naaz-54 was not the first such film, though HFGK mentions it so.( Ref – pp 69, Maharashtra-The Birthplace of Indian cinema by Isak Mujawar)

Kangan – First of the 4 Hit films of Ashok kumar and Leela Chitnis, made by Bombay Talkies. Kavi Pradeep’s Debut as a Lyricist in this film.

Kapal kundala – New Theatres. Pankaj mullick’s hit song ‘ Piya milan ko jaana ‘.

Leather Face – Debut of Meena kumari as a child artiste.

Navjeevan – Debut of Hansa Wadkar as a Heroine- Bombay Talkies film.

Pukar – Hit film from Minerva Movietone. Naseem Bano sings ” Zindagi ka saaz bhi kya saaz hai….”

Film Uski Tamanna aka Her last desire-1939 was directed by Yakub and the music was by Anupam Ghatak. he was employed by Sagar movietone and gave music to its 6 films.he was one artiste who died quite young.

The music Director Anupam Ghatak – the second-generation Bengali-Hindi composer (after Rai Chand Boral and Pankaj Mullick) was born in 1911 at Mymensingh(now in Bangladesh). He took music lessons from father Atul Ghatak and Keshav Ganesh Dhekan. He became an excellent Flautist. After a short stint in AIR,as a singer in 1930, he joined as assistant to Bishen Chand Boral (brother of Raichand Boral) and later to R C Boral himself for Vidyapati-1937
First independent film score: Payer Dhulo. Later worked at Sagar Film in Bombay, composing Zia Sarhadi’s Bhole Bhale and a series of films for Badami, Luhar et al. (1939). Returned to Calcutta, notably for Barua’s Shapmukti; thereafter had assignments in both Calcutta and Lahore. Known for his wide range, from the sentimental Ekti paisa dao go babu in Shapmukti to the experimental Gane more kon indradhanu in Agni Pareeksha.

His Hindi film career started with ‘Tarzan ki Beti-38 and Bhole Bhale-39. He gave music to only 17 Hindi films, which included Ladies Only, Service Ltd.,Sadhana, Uski tamanna, Civil marriage, Sri Ramanuj etc. In Lahore he did Champa, Badnami and Shalimar, before Partition. His last Hindi film was Shamsheer, which was released only in 1953,after he died in 1947 itself.

The cast of the film was Yakub, Maya Banerjee, Jyoti, Bhudo Advani, Putlibai etc etc. The name Putlibai may be unknown to many. There was a famous dacoit in Chambal Ghati, by this name in the decade of the 50’s, but actress Putlibai has no connection with that. Mothers and daughters acted as leading ladies in the same era….Miss Putli or Putlibai and Miss Gohar Mamajiwala (the term Miss was used not merely to state the marital status of the leading ladies of those days)….

Like Miss Sharifa and Husna Banu , Putli and Gohar were mother and daughter. Putli was an accomplished actress of the silent screen who championed in the Talkies because of her extraordinary singing talents. Gohar was born in 1910 and entered the screen in 1926, where her mother Miss Putli too entered more or less the same time. Information about Miss Putli is very limited however, Gohar became India’s popular iconic star and is still remembered today.

Miss Putli acted in 33 Talkie films. Her first Talkie was Ratan Manjiri-35 and her last film was Dhoke baaz-46. She sang one song each in the film Lehri Badmash-44 and Dhokebaaz-46.

Today’s song is a duet sung by Harish and Maya Banerjee. With this song, film Uski Tamanna makes its Debut on our Blog. Including this film, my last 5 posts were from films which made Debut on the Blog. Today’s rare song was given to me by shri Abhay Jain ji (USA) and was uploaded kindly by our Sadanand Kamath ji. Thanks to both.


Song- O mast nazar diljaani teri taaza rahe jawaani (Uski Tamanna)(1939) Singers- Harish, Maya Banerjee, Lyricist- Pt. Indra, MD- Anupam Ghatak

Lyrics

O mast nazar diljaani ee ee
mast nazar diljaani
o mast nazar diljaani
mast nazar diljaani
teri taaza rahe jawaani ee
teri taaza rahe jawaani ee
mast nazar diljaani
o mast nazar diljaani
hai hamko pyaas bujhaani ee
hamko pyaas bujhaani ee
hai hamko pyaas bujhaani ee
piye aankhon ka paani ee
piye aankhon ka paani ee

mast nazar diljaani
o mast nazar diljaani
mast nazar diljaani

chaar nazar hai hone waali
aaa ha haha
ha ha ha ha ha
kuchh paa ke
kuchh khone waale

aaa ha haha
ha ha ha ha ha
chaar nazar hai hone waali
aaa ha haha
ha ha ha ha ha
kuchh paa ke
kuchh khone waale

aaa ha haha
ha ha ha ha ha

jeevan ki ee ee
jeevan ki ee phulvaari mein
jeevan ki ee ee
jeevan ki ee phulvaari mein
seenche aasha ka paani
seenche aasha ka paani
madhur prem veena ki dhun se
gaaye prem kahaani
gaaye
gaaye prem kahaani
madhur prem veena ki dhun se
gaaye prem kahaani
gaaye
gaaye prem kahaani


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :4635Post No. :16290Movie Count :4426

Today’s song is from the film Durga-1939, a film made by the prestigious Bombay Talkies. The film was directed by the studio’s German Director – Franz Osten. Some readers may wonder, how a German could direct a Hindi film, without knowing or understanding the language ? For such readers, let me tell you that Franz Osten directed not just 1 or 2 but a total of 16 films for Bombay Talkies, from its beginning. Till the end, he never learnt Hindi language ! He was not the lone German , but there was a whole team of Germans who worked in Bombay Talkies !

Not only in Bombay talkies, but Germans contributed to Indian Cinema elsewhere too and in different segments of filmmaking. Let us take a quick look at Germans in Indian Cinema, in general. Germany had a very good name in India during the olden days i.e. during the early part of the last century. I remember my Grandfather ( who expired in 1975 at the age of 91 years) always praising Germany for so many things. In India,all things German, were considered to be the Best- even better than the Vilayati or the British things !

Very few people know that Indian Cinema had a little known connection with the rise of Hitler in Germany in 1932-33. A group of men , engaged in Cinema in Germany, flocked to India in the 30’s and played a vital role in Indian Cinema and the arts of that time. After Hitler took over Germany in 1933, the German Cine Studios’ glory days were over and they were turned into Nazi Propaganda Machines !

It was at this time that several of its men left the studio and arrived in India, and contributed during the Indian cinema’s formative years.

The foremost among them is Frantz Osten, a German whom Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani met at the UFA when they went to train there (they worked with Lang and Marlene Dietrich). Osten had already been directing films for the couple since 1925, when he made Light of Asia for them from Germany.

In 1934, he came to India and the next year, after Rai founded ‘ Bombay Talkies ‘ the legendary film studio in Malad, that now lies in ruins, Osten directed its first film.

He went on to direct the famous Devika Rani-Ashok Kumar starrer, Achhut Kanya, without much knowledge of Hindi. The film, which featured the song “Main ban ki chiriya”, was shot by Joseph Wirsching; the sets were designed by Karl von Spreti and the laboratory was headed by Zolle, Osten’s team of UFA ex-members who worked for Rai’s state-of-the-art studio.

Osten and his fellow Germans directed 16 films for Rai. It was a remarkable feat for people who knew little Hindi ‘ mistaking the word “bulbul” once for a pair of bulls. While in Bombay, he became a member of the Nazi Party (1936). He was interned by the British at the outbreak of WW2 in 1939, while shooting his last film there, Kangan. Released and allowed to return to Germany (1940).

“It’s not clear if they had anything to do with the Nazi ideology, either way,” said film historian Amrit Gangar.

“If they did, it did not show in their films. But there were two other people who almost certainly migrated to India because of the persecution of Jews.”

They were Walter Kauffman, a scholar and composer interested in Oriental music, and Wilhelm Haas, a writer and a friend of Franz Kafka.

“Both were Jews, and Haas came to India because of Kauffman, who went on to found the Bombay Chamber Music Society,” Gangar added.

Kauffman arrived in 1934 after meeting director-producer Mohan Bhavnani at the UFA (where V. Shantaram also did a stint).

“Haas was in Czechoslovakia, but left the country for India just after Hitler’s invasion,” Gangar said.

Kauffman, Haas and Bhavnani worked together in Premnagar (1940), Naushad’s first film as music director. Kauffman composed the background score; Haas wrote the screenplay.

“It is debatable, but Kauffman is probably also the person behind the All India Radio signature tune. Haas was a member of the Indian chapter of PEN,” Gangar said. Haas also wrote the script for Bhavnani’s Jhooti Sharam (1939).

The story of Paul Zils ( 1-6-1915 to 30-3-1979 ) stands out, though. Zils, believed to be a Nazi sympathizer, turned up in India under strange circumstances: he was bound for Indonesia in a steamer that got torpedoed by an Indian naval ship during World War II and he was taken prisoner.

After his release, because of his film experiences, the leadership of the sales department in Ezra Mir led government documentary production company, called him to join Information films of India. End of October 1945, he came to Bombay and started his work. In March 1959 he returned to Germany.

As the studio system came to an end and individual producers took over, the days of the Germans in Indian cinema were over. Many, including Osten, went back to Germany. Set designer Spreti was appointed German ambassador to Guatemala and was later shot dead by terrorists. Josef Virsching-the Cinematographer, however, stayed back in India till his death in 1967. He did few more Hindi films too.

Most of the others remained associated with the film world abroad.

Paul Zils directed 3 Dev Anand films, according to the documents. Hindustan Hamara-50 and Zalzala-52 are found in HFGK, but the third film called ‘ Shabash”, though listed in 1949, gives no details, except the film name. ( Information adapted from the book ” Walter Kauffman” by Amit Gangar, with thanks and my notes.)

It’s not just the Germans alone, but there was an American who contributed to Tamil Cinema as a Director, during the same period i.e. 1935 to 1950. He directed not just 14 Tamil films….without understanding the language….but also a Hindi film, ‘ Meera’ in 1947…..without knowing Hindi language ! On top of it this Hindi film featured the legendary Carnatic Classical singer M.S.Subbulakshmi. This American’s name was Ellis R. Dungan (11-5-1909 to 1-12-2001).

When Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani decided to establish a modern, well equipped cinema studio in Bombay, they started getting the right persons for different departments of filmmaking. While in London, he had met Niranjan Pal (son of the great patriot Bipin Chandra Pal)-a writer of stage dramas and films. They became friends. Soon after Himanshu Rai, Niranjan also returned to India. Rai called Niranjan to Bombay to work as a writer on a very attractive salary. He arrived and he wrote stories, screen plays and dialogues for the first 8 films of Bombay Talkies. He was assisted by J S Casshyap, Najam Naqvi, and S J Hasan. Their films used simple, day to day Hindi language. Prabhat Hindi films had a profound Marathi tilt, and New Theatre Hindi films were all round and round words- too much bookish Hindi. Naturally, Bombay Talkies Hindi was acceptable in the Hindi belt easily.

After Devika Rani’s elopement episode, Himanshu Rai’s male ego and Bangla Bhadralok prestige was shattered and he had lost his peace of mind. Later he also suffered from tantrums. Once Niranjan Pal wrote an article in an outside magazine, which Rai did not like and he quarrelled with Niranjan on this. They stopped talking. Then one day, when Niranjan was about to go home in his car, Rai came running and holding the car door, started arguing with Niranjan. Finally Niranjan left-never to come back to Bombay talkies again !

Niranjan Pal was one of the very important members of the team. He had written stories of the early films. One of his hits was Achhut kanya also. He proved to be a master in recreating Village atmosphere. After he left, Himanshu Rai immediately called Saradindu Bandopadhyaya from Calcutta. He was the one who had created the famous film and TV character Byomkesh Bakshi. He joined Bombay Talkies and wrote stories of 7 films.

Film Durga’s story was also by him. This is what “Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema ” says about the film Durga…..” Rural melodrama about Durga (Devika Rani), an adolescent child of nature, living with her aged mother Heera. Unable to get the medicine required to prevent her mother’s death, one misfortune after another befalls the heroine in spite of the sympathies of the newly arrived village doctor, Jawahar (Shukul). In the absence of Niranjan Pal, the studio’s main scenarist and author of its best-known rural dramas (Achhut Kanya, Janmabhoomi, both 1936), the tale reduces itself to a purely familial narrative. It is nevertheless a key production in Devika Rani’s self-projection of urbane charm clothed in primal innocence. Osten followed it with Leela Chitnis’s first big film, Kangan (1939). Wadkar was promoted to lead actress again opposite Shukul in her next big film, Navjeevan (1939).”

Today’s song is sung by Devika Rani and Rama Shukul. With this song, film Durga-39 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Shankar arpan maala koyi haath na ise lagaana (Durga)(1939) Singers- Devika Rani, Rama Shukul, Lyricist- Narendranath Tuli, MD- Saraswati Devi

Lyrics

Shankar arpan maala
koyi haath ise na lagaana
haan dil bhi na tarsaana
kali kali ko man se goondha
maala to hai meri
haan koi hathh hai teri
neer neer ki rajni jaisi
neer neer ki rajni jaisi
main jungle ki cheri (??)
haan main jungle ki cheri(??)
main devi ka daas
mujhe nahin vishvaas
main devi ka daas
mujhe nahin vishvaas
Shankar(?) sunke laaj karo
kuchh bhool gayi saugandhh
main thhaa tujhe pasand

jhhagdaa chhodo milkar baithhen
jhhagdaa chhodo milkar baithhen
Shankar se li thhi maange var ki bheekh
Shankar se li thhi maange var ki bheekh

hey yogiraaj mahaan
do teri bhanvarjaal
sun yogi chatur sujaan mujhe teri de do shaan


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4633 Post No. : 16287 Movie Count :

4425

Today’s song is from an obscure ‘never heard of’ type film of the early times of the Talkie era – Kaun Kisi ka-1939. The film was made by Hindustan Cinetone. It was directed by Chimanlal Luhar, a talented person. He was a rarity in those days as he was a Science graduate. In times when there were very few educated people in the film industry, he was respected everywhere.

Director CHIMANLAL MULJIBHOY LUHAR ( 1901-1948) was a Chemistry graduate from Bombay University. He started writing as a critic and author in journals like Beesvin sadee, Navchetan and Bombay Chronicle. He joined the film line as a lab Assistant in Kohinoor studios in his early 20s. Soon he became a noted cameraman for several documentaries, with K.D.Brothers, Bombay,under a British cameraman of Prince of Wales’ official entourage. After a brief stint at Rajkot with Saurashtra Films and a longer one at Krishna Films-where he shot 20 films, he joined Sharada Studios with ‘Dagabaz Duniya-1926 and several stunt films by Master Vithal. He turned a producer for a few stunt films.

Later he was a partner in Sharda films and a Director with Sagar Movietone(1934-1940). From 1941 to 46 he worked for Prakash Pictures. He directed Sassi Punnu-32,Silver King-35 Talash-E-haq (first film of Nargis, made by Jaddanbai)-35, Do deewane, Kharab Jaan, Capt. Kirtikumar, Dynamite, Kaun kisika, Sewa Samaj, Saubhagya, Darshan, Station master, School Master, Uss paar and Bindiya. He died at the young age of 47 years,in 1948. He had established his own production outfit ‘Sun Art Pictures’ in 1943, but he made only 3 films with it -School Master-43, Uss Paar-44 and Bindiya-46, before he died, after a prolonged illness.

FILMOGRAPHY: 1932: Sassi Punnu; 1935: Silver King; Talash-e-Haq; 1936: Do Diwane/Be Kharab Jan; 1937: Captain Kirti Kumar; 1938: Dynamite; 1939: Kaun Kisika; Seva Samaj; 1940: Saubhagya; 1941: Darshan; 1942: Station Master; 1943: School Master; 1944: Us Paar; 1946: Bindiya.

The Music Director of this film was Rafiq Ghaznavi, Lyricist was Munshi Dil and the cast of the film was Padma Devi, Shobhana Samarth, Khurshid, Nazir Ahmed, Mubarak, K N Singh, Maruti Rao, Khalil Ahmed, Gope etc.etc. Most of these actors, director and the MD disappeared by the end of the 40’s, because many of them were the spill overs from the Silent Era. Except a few like K.N.Singh, Gope, Mubarak or Shobhana Samarth, none of the other names will mean anything to our readers in the age bracket of 40 to 60 years. The Partition further precipitated this condition and made matters difficult to track old artistes and get their information. Considering the poor conditions in India of preserving and documenting events, information and life stories of old time artistes, it became a Herculean task to collect information on such persons.

I have written articles on films of the early cinema i.e. from the decade of the 1930s. In these articles, I have introduced few unknown or less known heroes and heroines of those times, to our readers. Some of these are Vijay Kumar, Ram Singh, Shankar Rao Vazare, Gul Hamid, Prakash and heroines like Shamim, Nazma, Anjali Devi, Shahzadi, Menaka, Radha Rani, Meera Mishra, Meera Devi etc. Today also we will talk about yet another less known artiste of the silent and early talkie films – Master Khalil Ahmed.

From the lot of the “brought forward” actors and actresses from the silent to the talkie films, two heroes were the true super stars. Master Khalil and Master Vithal. Since they had started their careers from the silent era of the 1920’s, they did not go beyond the 1940’s, when their competition increased and the newer breed of heroes took over with ease!

Though world’s first first feature film, originally presented as a talkie ,’The Jazz Singer’, released in October 1927, it took about 4 years more for talkie films to come to India. When it did come in March 1931, there was tremendous enthusiasm amongst the film makers. Initially, however, there was skepticism in the minds of well established silent film makers. Famous film makers like Dadasaheb Phalke and even V Shantaram are on record having expressed their views that talkie films will not survive. However, the same people later on, not only supported the talkie, but V Shantaram became one of the best proponents of Hindi talkie films. Even Dada Saheb Phalke ended his career by making his only Talkie, ‘Gangavataran’ in 1937. (Leela Mishra had acted in it.)

The coming of sound to films changed the film making for ever. Till then what was a fragmented production activity, slowly became an industry. Earlier, silent films were made at a cost of 8 to 10 thousand rupees. Now the talkie needed 25 to 50 thousand per film. Automatically, the hobbyists and poorer film makers disappeared. So did the acting crew who could not speak Hindi fluently or sing a song.

One finds that suddenly, there was a deluge of talented, creative and enterprising people from various professions and different backgrounds to take up the challenges of this new industry. The changing society in India is partly responsible for this deluge. Due to education and attraction to cities, many people were rapidly getting uprooted from their traditional occupations and they looked forward to these opportunities. For example a motor mechanic Sarvottam Badami became a sound recordist (and later, a director too) and a traditional carpenter like S Fattelal became the great set designer in Prabhat films. An ordinary poster painter, Baburao Painter became a director. Many such examples are available. The deluge was made up of producers, directors, sound recordists, writers, lyricists, singers, technical staff and of course the actors and actresses.

Among the first generation of heroes, namely Khalil, Sandow, Sohrab Modi, Master Nissar, Chandramohan, Prithviraj Kapoor, Motilal, Ashok Kumar, Master Vithal, Jal Merchant, Bilimoria brothers and Saigal emerged as the main players. Among actresses Mehtab, Bibbo, Kajjan, Gauhar, Sitara, Sita Devi, Zubeida, Cooper sisters, Sabita Devi, Leela Chitnis, Durga Khote, Devika Rani, Naseem, Jamuna, Kanan Bala etc. became popular.

Master Khalil Ahmed (variously mentioned as Khalil, Master Khalil, and Khalil Ahmed) was the first ever star of the silent era as well as talkie films from 1920 to 1940s. Born in 1903, he became a hero in Kohinoor’s ‘Gul E Bakavali’ (1924), opposite Zubeida. He was the first handsome and macho hero of those times. He acted with all top heroines of his time. Some of his 30 silent films are, ‘Kaala Naag, ‘Kulin Kanta’, ‘Lanka Ni Laadi’, ‘Cinema Queen’ etc.

He featured in his first talkie film, ‘Draupadi’ (1931), made by Imperial, opposite Ermeline (aka Sudhabala ). Then came ‘Daulat Ka Nasha’ (1931), ‘Bharati Mata’ (1932), ‘Niti Vijay’ (1932), Do Rangi Duniya’ (1933) and ‘Saubhagya Sundari’ (1933). In 1934 Khalil went to Calcutta on the invitation of East India Films. His first film in Calcutta was ‘Kismet Ki Kasauti’ (1934). Then he joined Tollywood Studio (Madon Theatres). Here his first film was ‘ Gaibi Gola’ (1935), in which Baby Noorjehan made her debut as a child star.

He was in great demand in Bombay also, so Khalil started doing films in Calcutta and Bombay, by frequently travelling between the two cities. This caused a lot of stress on him, but he always kept his commitments. During this period, he also got married and got children. He settled in Calcutta and travelled often to Bombay to do films there.

Khalil did different roles, including Hindu Gods. He never changed his name. in those days very few Muslim actors kept their real names. Incidentally, during his peak time, there were two more artists named Khalil. One was Khalil Aftab, who was a lyricist and he acted in film ‘Dard E Dil’ (1934) and ‘ The Mill’ (1934) (this latter film was banned and was released later in 1936 as ‘ Ghareeb Parwar’). The other actor was Khalil Khan, who had acted in film ‘Deepak Mahal’ (1940). In all, Khalil acted in 28 Talkie films. He died quite young, on 28-11-1941, at Calcutta. Too much travelling and stress must have taken its toll on him. He was only 38 year old. He left behind a wife with 5 children.

Khalil did 13 films in Calcutta – ‘Kismet Ki Kasauti (1934), ‘Gaibi Gola’ (1935), ‘Miss Manorama’ (1935), ‘Jawaani Ka Nasha’ (1935), ‘Divine Sacrifice’ (1935), ‘Raj Dulari (1936), ‘Bulbul e Iran’ (1936), ‘Parivartan’ (1936), ‘Adarsh Mahila’ (1937), ‘Aflatoon’ (1937), ‘Karmaveer’ (1938), ‘Abla Ki Shakti’ (1941) and ‘Merchant Of Venice’ (1941).

In Bombay, he did 15 films in Bombay – ‘Draupadi’ (1931), Daulat Ka Nasha’ (1931), ‘Bharati Mata’ (1932), ‘Niti Vijay’ (1932), ‘Do Rangi Duniya’ (1933), ‘Saubhagya Sundari’ (1933), Typist Girl (1935), ‘Shaitan Ka Paash’ (1936), ‘Khudai Khidamadgar’ (1937), ‘Kiski Pyaari’ (1937), ‘Kaun Kisi Ka'(1939), ‘Hamara Desh’ (1940), ‘Pyaar’ (1940), ‘Waayada’ (1940) and ‘Taj Mahal’ (1941).

Khalil acted with most of the leading heroines of his time like, Noorjehan (Sr), Jilloo (Zulekha Ibrahim – she was known by Jilloo Bai in her later career), Kajjan- 6 films, Mushtari – 3 films (She died too young, in her teens only), Miss Rose – 2 films, Violet Cooper – 2 films, Radha Rani, Ram Pyari, Begum Akhtar (she was then known as Akhtari Faizabadi), Sulochana, Ameena, Leela Desai, Indurani, Gulab, Ermelin and Sheela etc. Khalil was very good natured and a popular actor among his co stars and producers.

A Muslim by birth, he performed a variety of roles in films. His initial acting phase included roles of Shri Krishna and Shri Ram. Disenchanted by the communal riots during those times, he gave a speech in the Indian Motion Picture Congress, on 4th May 1939. Baburao Patel’s Film India published this extract from his speech- “I have played Hindu Gods in films. I worked under Hindu producers only. I am disturbed by these riots. I am popular among Hindus and Muslims. We are the devotees of Art and Art has no religion.” Indian Film Industry is perhaps the only industry which is mostly a secular one, since its inception. Master Khalil Ahmed was an example of that.

I could not get any information about this film, its story or other details. I was surprised that this song was available on the You Tube channel. The song is sung by Khurshid, Nazir Ahmed and chorus. With this song, film Kaun Kisi Ka-39 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Phool le lo phool (Kaun Kisi Ka)(1939) Singers-Khursheed, Nazeer Ahmad, Lyrics-Munshi Dil, MD-Rafiq Ghaznavi
Chorus

Lyrics

Phool le lo phool
Phool le lo phool
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
joban barsaaya hai singaar
ae man ??
jhoole jhool
ae man ??
jhoole jhool
Phool le lo phool
Phool le lo phool

kaisa ?? hai tera singaar
phoolon mein lipti ho jaise talwaar

madam jee sadqe
hum donon ??
joban ke badle
hum donon ??

haaan
aankhon mein teri daaloon dhool
aankhon mein teri daaloon dhool
Phool le lo phool
Phool le lo phool

aayi basant ki saari bahaar
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
gali gali par barse phuhaar
gali gali par barse phuhaar
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
aayi basant ki saari bahaar

baaghon se maalan laayi sandes
baaghon se maalan laayi sandes
aate hain preetam apne des
hey ae ae es
aate hain preetam apne des
sun sun kaliyaan sej sajaawo o o
sun sun kaliyaan sej sajaawo o o
phool bechaaron ho na malool
phool bechaaron ho na malool
Phool le lo phool
Phool le lo phool
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
kali kali par barse ??
kali kali par barse ??
aayi basant ki saari bahaar
aayi basant ki saari bahaar


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4632 Post No. : 16286

With the advent of sound films in India in 1931, many actors faced difficulties in on-screen performances with their voices. Only few actors of silent films who could, fluently or otherwise, speak Urdu and Hindi made a transition from silent to talkies. Master Vitthal, Master Nissar, Mazhar Khan, Prithviraj Kapoor, Baburao Pendharkar, Raja Sandow, Hiralal, Patience Cooper, Zubeida, Sulochana (Ruby Mayers), Gohar Mamajiwala, Madhuri (Beryl Claessen), Sabita Devi (Irin Gasper), Gulab, Jillo Bai, Lalita Pawar, Durga Khote etc were some of the actors who switched over from silent to talkies without much of difficulties. A few of them even learnt speaking Hindi and Urdu during the transition.

The makers of talkies faced another difficulty. They realised that most of the actors did not have a good voice for singing on-screen. While some actors could get away with their less than average singing ability due to their popularity with the film audience, the film-makers felt the need for new actors who could sing better and/or the trained singers who could also act. So, in early 1930s, a new category of actors who could also sing with good voices emerged in Hindi film industry. In this category, K L Saigal, Kanan Devi, Asit Baran, Ratan Bai, Uma Shashi, Pahadi Sanyal, Rajkumari Dubey, Shanta Apte, Surendra, Bibbo, Sitara Devi, Shahu Modak, Sardar Akhtar, Vatsala Kumthekar among many others emerged. Barring few exceptions, most of actor-singer (and singer-actor) lasted in the Hindi film industry as singers until system of playback singing was firmly established by early 1940s. Some of them continued to act in the films, their on-screen songs being lip synced by the playback singers.

In the early 1930s, there was one more category of singers in which film-makers were interested in taking them as singer-actor because of their popularity as Hindustani classical singers on All India Radio and in private concerts. Apart from filling up the void in singers for Hindi films, these trained singers were regarded ‘icing in the cake’ in the films for their box office success.

While most of the ‘hard-core’ Hindustani classical vocalists kept distance from the Hindi films, some of the popular singers of the semi-classical genres such as thumri, dadra and ghazal got attracted to work in Hindi films as singer-actor. Thus, the popular Hindustani semi-classical singers like Mukhtar Begum, Jahanara Kajjan, Akhtari Faizabadi (Begum Akhtar), Jaddan Bai, Indubala, Kamala Jharia among others entered the Hindi film industry during the early 1930s. Some of their large repertoire of semi-classical singing was replicated on the screen albeit in shorter forms. One can judge the importance of these songstresses for attracting the film audience when posters of a few Hindi films of early 1930s had their names in the bold letters of the same size as that of the films’ titles.

It is worthwhile to note that mostly female Hindustani semi-classical singers got associated with Hindi films as singer-actor in the early phase of sound films. Most of them were having their background as tawaifs or private concert singers. They mostly sang thumri, dadra, ghazals and other semi-classical genres. The male Hindustani classical singers felt it below their dignity to sing or record songs in these genres especially up to the beginning of early 20th century. It was only when Hindustani classical singing maestros like Ustad Abdul Karim Khan, Ustad Faiyyaz Khan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan etc started singing thumri and dadra in their concerts in early 1930s with their respective gharana style, these sub-genres of Hindustani semi-classical music attained respectability.

In this context, I recall that even in post independent period, Ustad Amir Khan who was an exponent of Khayal singing, never sang thumri, dadra and ghazals in the concerts nor did he record songs in these genres. The only exceptions he made was that he sang a Ghalib ghazal, rahiye ab aisi jagah chalkar jahaan koi na ho, composed by Pandit Amarnath Chawla, his senior-most disciple, for a documentary film ‘Mirza Ghalib’ (1969). And he rendered this ghazal in Khayal style. (Ref: ‘Indore Ke Maseeha’, 2008 by Bindu Chawla). The second exception was for a Bengali film ‘Kshudito Pashan’ (1960) in which he sang a dadra under the music direction of Ustad Ali Akbar Khan.

Among the Hindustani semi-classical singers, Wahidan Bai of Agra was one of the late entrants in Hindi films. Although she was trained as Hindustani classical vocalist and was an occasional singr on All-India Radio, she did not like to pursue the career as a professional singer due to stigma attached to this profession. So, she got married to a businessman and settled as a housewife in Agra. However, the business went in doldrum and they shifted to Calcutta (Kolkata) in early 1930s to start a fresh business. Even the new business incurred losses and the couple were in dire financial condition. At this point of time, she approached A R Kardar who was her neighbour in Kolkata, for a role in the film. She got a song to sing in a small role and everyone was impressed with her voice.

Chandulal Shah, the owner of Ranjit Movietone offered Wahidan Bai to join his company as actor-singer. In Ranjit Movietone, she worked in ‘Toofaani Toli’ (1937), ‘Ban Ki Chidiya’ (1938), ‘Prithvi Putra’ (1938), ‘Professor Waman, M Sc’ (1938), ‘Rickshawala’ (1938), ‘The Secretary’ (1938) and ‘Thokar’ (1939). In all these films, she sang semi-classical genres of songs most of which became popular.

Wahidan Bai switched over to Sagar Movietone and played a lead role opposite Surendra in ‘Alibaba’ (1940), made in Hindi and Punjabi. In this film, she rendered for the first time a waltz music-based song, ham aur tum aur ye khushi with Surendra which became very popular. With the merger of Sagar Movietone with National Studios in 1940, Wahidan Bai worked in ‘Sanskaar’ (1940) as actor-singer which was her last film. Thereafter, she was mostly bed-ridden as she suffered from tuberculosis from which she did not recovered and died sometime in 1942. During her short filmy career, Wahidan Bai was associated with 11 films and rendered 26 songs.

[Note: Information on Wahidan Bai is mainly based on a chapter, ‘Jewels of Sagar’ in the Book ‘Sagar Movietone’ by Biren Kothari (2014), translated in English by Parth Pandya].

‘Thokar/The Kick’ (1939) was Wahidan Bai’s last film with Ranjit Movietone. The film was directed by A R Kardar. The star cast included M Kumar, Madhuri, Yakub, Noor Mohammed Charlie, Ishwarlal, Wahidan Bai, Wasti, Ram Marathe, Suresh, K N Singh, Dixit etc.

A short synopsis of the film’s story as given in http://www.indiancine.ma is reproduced below:

This is story about wealth not bringing happiness. The blind Mohan (Kumar) lives in a village with his ward Radha (Madhuri). He wins a fortune with a sweepstake ticket sold to him by the tramp Ramesh (Charlie), who claims his due and begins to take over Mohan’s life, making him move to the city and getting him married to Chinta (Wahidan Bai), a prostitute. When Mohan’s eyesight is restored, he finds that his wife is having an affair with Ramesh. Mohan takes revenge and eventually lands up in his old village, a poor man, but with Radha still unchanged, waiting for him.

There were 10 songs in the film – all written by P L Santoshi which were set to music by Gyan Dutt. One song from the film has been covered in the Blog. I present the second song from the film ‘kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai’ rendered by Wahidan Bai in the semi-classical singing style.

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai (Thokar)(1939) Singer-Wahidan Bai, Lyrics-P L Santoshi, MD-Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

aa aa aaa
aankhon aankhon mein
pila di mere saaqi ne mujhe
ab na sheeshe ki zuroorat hai na paimaane ki
kaali..eee
kaali….eeee ee ee
kaali jo ghata chhaayi hai
haan haan jee ghata chhaayi
zulfen saaqi..ee.ee.ee ee
saaqi mujhe yaad aayi hai
haan haan mujhe yaad aayi

gudguda…aa deti hai
ae ae
deti hai dil ko zaalim
deti hai dil ko
shokh a a kitneeeee…ee ee ee
kitni teri angadaayi hai ae ae
haan teri angadaayi hai….ai
haan teri angadaayi

hum hain beemaa…..r e
beemaar-e-mohabbat
jab se…ae ae ae
na maseeha ho aa aaa aaa
maseeha na maseehaaayi hai…..ai
maseeha na maseeha aaye hain
haan na maseeha aaye
kaali ghata chhaaye hai…ai


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4630 Post No. : 16283 Movie Count :

4423

Today’s song is from the film Dil hi to hai aka Aulad-1939. It was made by the Film Corporation of India, Calcutta. The film was directed by Kidar Sharma. This was his first film as an independent Director. Kidar Sharma (12-4-1910 to 29-4-1999) went on to direct 35 more films. His last film as a Director was Sehme huye Sitare-1994. Sharma acted in 8 films.He even sang 1 song each in 2 films – Inquilab-35 and kavi Sammelan-72. As a Lyricist, he wrote 312 songs for 44 films, from Inquilab-35 to Jalo Tarang-49. Some of his famous films as a Director were Chitralekha-41, Bhanwar-44, Neel Kamal-47, Jogan-50, Bawre Nain-50, Hamari yaad aayegi-61 and others.

The music for the 12 songs written by kidar Sharma was composed by Acharya Bhishma Dev Chatterji. He was born on 8-11-1909 in Hooghly, West Bengal. He studied upto M.A. in English. He became a Teacher and taught English in a college. Few years after learning Music from stalwarts of Bengal, he left the job of teacher and joined Megaphone Record Company as a Composer. He used to meet Kidar Sharma in the Recording studio.

Taking permission from his company, he became a Music Director for his First film – Dil hi to hai aka Aulad-1939, made by the Film Corporation of India, Calcutta. He composed some Ghazals, which Ramola and Ramdulari sang. After this film, Bhishma Dev gave music to 3 more Hindi films – The Rise-1939, Qaidi-1940 and Hamara Hindustan-1940. All films made by Film Corporation of India and in Calcutta. This was the end of his Hindi film music .

Bhishma Dev was highly respected in Bengal for his knowledge of Classical Music. Even S D Burman learnt music from him. His nature was saintly. He cut many records on Dhrupad sangeet. I am not aware of his contribution to Bangla films.

Suddenly, one day, he left his job, work, music, family, everything and he became a Sanyasi. He remained so till he died on 8-8-1977.

The film was originally titled and censored as Dil hi to hai, but advertised itself in Magazines and Newspapers as ” Aulad” and in brackets ‘ Dil hi to hai ‘. All the records were issued in the name of Dil hi to hai. Looking at the short synopsis of the film, as given in Film India magazine, I feel the title of ” Aulad” was more appropriate. The story deals with traditional parents and their modern thinking children. The film ends with the heroine (Ramola) committing suicide.

It was the first film of Ramola as a Heroine and she had to die at the end of the film ! There is a story behind how Ramola, who was a small time actress in Bangla films initially, got the heroine’s role in Kidar Sharma’s first Directorial venture. Sharma has described it in his autobiography.

Actress Ramola (real name- Rachel Cohen) was born in a Jew family on 5-7-1917, at Bombay. Her father Hayam Cohem was a school Teacher. Her initial education was done in Bombay. Later they shifted to Calcutta where she completed her matriculation and joined films. Her first film was ‘ Graher fer’-38,a Bangla film. She did a few small roles and then came ‘Khazanchi’-41 from Pancholi of Lahore. This changed her career and she became a popular actress. She did films like Masoom,Khamoshi manchali.etc etc.

Initially, Ramola was a small time actress. First she acted on stage along with her two sisters. Then she got a Bangla film. It was Jagdish Sethi who introduced her to director/lyricist/dialogue writer Kidar Sharma. According to Kidar Sharma,

“She was smart and a charming young lady. Her only drawback was her height. She was not tall, just about 5 feet, but she had lofty ambitions. One day she came to see me and I promised I would personally take her to the director of her choice. She said, “I would like to be introduced to Mr. Nitin Bose, and no one else.” I took her to Mr. Bose, and was sure that her charm and talent would impress him.

Mr. Bose scanned her, from top to toe, while I praised her talent and her choice of a director, like Nitin Bose. After a long silence, Mr. Bose addressed me and said, “When you brought her to me, why did you forget to bring some bricks for her to stand on?” Poor Romola was hurt and heart-broken by this great director’s caustic remark. She quietly said, “Goodbye” and walked away from his office.

I followed her and found that she was in tears. ‘I was moved by the plight of a struggling youngster having high hopes, being ridiculed for something for which the nature was responsible. I knew what it felt like to be ridiculed. I had experienced it often enough. I escorted her to the tram junction and there she bid me goodbye. To encourage her, I said, “Please, Romola, don’t be heart-broken. One day, when I become a director, you will be my first heroine, and we will prove to Mr. Bose and the world, what a great star you are.” Romola laughed and said,- “Poor Mr. Kidarnath, the dialogue-writer will never be a director and I will never be a heroine.” So saying, she jumped into the tram.”

However, Kidar Sharma kept his promise and cast her in his first film as director Aulad / Dil Hi To Hai (1939). Aulad/Dil Hi To hai was a down-to-earth story of a middle-class father, who had sacrificed all his life to educate his son and his darling daughter, hoping that they would be worthy children to the society and to the family. Little did the old man know that the generation gap would present a different, horrifying reality, which would destroy him completely. The modern college Miss, who destroys the dreams of her old father, the aged struggling middle class man, was played by Ramola.

Later Ramola appeared in many films including Qaidi, Khazanchi, Khamoshi, Swan Aya Re, Rim Jhim etc. When she acted in Pancholi’s famous film Khazanchi-41, she became famous all over India and film offers started pouring on her. She looked so cute in her Punjabi dress- Salwar and Kurta- in that film, that this dress became famous and popular as Khazanchi dress amongst the women in India.

The cast of the film Aulad aka Dil hi to hai-39 was Ramola, Ramdulari, Nand kishore, Amarnath, Purno Chaudhari, Ibrahim etc.etc. There is one interesting name in the cast, for whom this film was his Debut film as an actor. He was only in his Teens, but with a good personality. His Name – Amarnath.

Amarnath (Bharadwaj) is one of the “same name confusions” victims. There were two Pt. Amarnath Music Directors, 1 actor Amar, 1 actor Amarnath and 1 actor/Director (K.) Amarnath.

This Amarnath was born in Hafizabad, in Gujranwala district of Punjab (Now in Pakistan) in 1922. He started acting in 1939 with Kidar Sharma’s “Dil hi to hai”. Graduating from doing small roles he made it as a Leading Man in Dalsukh Pancholi’s film “Patjhad”, started in 1947 opposite Meena (Shorey). Pancholi had to flee Lahore due to Partition riots, but he carried the negatives of Patjhad. Though the film was censored in India in 1948, it seems it was never released.

Amarnath starred as Hero in many other films,like Naghma E Sehra-45, Papiha re-48, Barsat ki ek raat-48, Swayam sidha-49, Nai Bhabhi-50, Kamal ke phool-50, Sheesh Mahal-50, Jalte Deep-50, Johri-51, Nai zindagi-51, Nirmohi-52, Nirmal-52, Izzat-52, Bahu Beti-53, Nav Durga-53, Toofan-54, Danka-54 etc. Then he switched over to side roles. In all, he worked in 81 films (CITWF data). His last film was Kaun ho tum-70.

Today’s song is sung by Ramdulari. This is a very rare song. It was given to me by Mr. Abhay Jain (US) and uploaded for me by our own Sadanand Kamath ji, as he always does for all my songs. With this song, film Dil hi to hai aka Aulad-1939 and Bhishm Dev Chatterji as MD, make their Debut on this Blog.


Song- Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka (Dil Hi To Hai)(1939) Singer-Ram Dulari, Lyrics-Kidar Sharma, MD-Bheesmdev Chatterjee

Lyrics

Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa
Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa
dil to shikaar hua nainwa ke teer kaa
maiyya mori peer ka
bhaiyya mori peer ka
daiyya mori peer ka
peer ka
peer ka
Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa
Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa

Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa
main jamunaaaa jal
bharne ko nikli aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
main jamuna jal
bharne ko nikli
haaaaaan

main jamuna jal bharne ko nikli
main jamuna jal bharne ko nikli
main jamuna jal bharne ko nikli
main jamuna jal bharne ko nikli
milna thha Shyam se
bahaana kiya neer ka aa
milna thha Shyam se
bahaana kiya neer ka
maiyya mori peer ka
bhaiyya mori peer ka
daiyya mori peer ka
peer ka
peer ka
Hoga na vaidya se ilaaj mori peer ka aa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4624 Post No. : 16273

Today’s song is from a film of the first decade of the talkie era – Adhoori kahani-1939.

In the first decade of the Talkie era, Calcutta’s New Theatres was far ahead of other film studios of India in presenting musical and successful films. However, when its successful film Devdas-1935 came, it, possibly, unintentionally stressed on the painful dark emotions of Human Behaviour. It also, almost, glorified a failed Love, alcoholism and death of the Hero. I understand that the film was based on a famous novel by Sharat chandra Chatterjee. New Theatres being the leader in the industry, other filmmakers followed suit and there was a spate of films depicting Sadism, Pessimism, Tragedy, Perversion, Psychoti Behavious and similar not so good Human Emotions in their films.

Thus we had, in and around that period films like Minerva’s ‘Jailor’ (1938) and ‘Main Haari’ (1940), Ranjit’s ‘Adhoori Kahaani’ (1939), Kardar’s ‘Paagal’ (1940) and ‘Pooja’ (1940), Prabhat’s ‘Aadmi’ (1939), New Theatre’s ‘Badi Didi’ (1939) and ‘Dushman’ (1939), Sagar Movietone’s ‘Ek Hi Rasta’ (1939), Mehboob’s ‘Aurat’ (1940), Circo’s ‘Geeta’ (1940), New Theatres ‘Nartaki’ (1940), Mehboob’s ‘Behan’ (1941) and few other films.

In these circumstances, came a welcome relief from Bombay Talkies, in the form of pure, innocent, romantic Love stories featuring a cute Ashok Kumar with heroines like Devika Rani, leela Chitnis and others. This again changed the trend and the audience had good, healthy, entertaining musical films, till the mid 40’s, when the Crime stories invaded in the form of Kismat, Geeta and others, taking the film trend in a different way.

Today’s film Adhoori Kahani-39 had a tragic story, was directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi and the music was by Gyan Dutt. The cast was Durga Khote, Prithviraj, Rose, Keshav rao Datey, Ila Devi, Ishwarlal,Yaqub, Khatun, Mirza Musharraf and others. During the early era of talkie films, till the 1960s, there was a horde of Gujarati directors and producers. Bhatts, Trivedi, Thakur, Shahs, Desais, Pancholi, Doshi, Daves were some names frequently found directing various genres. Usually they specialised in certain class and type of films. The Bhatts (Shankar and Vijay) liked to do Mythological films, Ramnik Shah handled stunt, action, fantasy films, Jayant Desai was social film oriented etc.

Chaturbhuj Doshi (1894–1969) was a Hindi and Gujarati writer-director of Indian cinema. He was one of the top Gujarati screenplay writers, who helped script stories for the Punatar productions. He is stated to be one of the leading figures who launched the Gujarati film industry with work on notable films like ‘Gunsundari’ (1948) and ‘Nanand Bhojai’ (1948). He was ‘well known’ for his family socials and had become ‘a celebrity in his own right’. He made a name for himself as a journalist initially and was referred to as the ‘famous journalist’ & publicist by Baburao Patel, editor of Filmindia.

His debut film as a director was ‘Gorakh Aya’ (1938), produced by Ranjit Movietone, though he joined Ranjit in 1929, as a scriptwriter. In 1938, he directed another film for Ranjit, a social comedy, ‘The Secretary’, and both films were box-office successes for Doshi. His forte was socials, regularly adapting stories and novels for films. He worked initially on comedies like ‘Secretary’ and ‘Musafir’ (1940), but then ‘shifted to more significant films’.

Chaturbhuj Anandji Doshi was born in 1894 in Kathiawad, Gujarat, British India. He was educated at the University of Bombay, after graduation he started work as a journalist for a daily, Hindustan (1926), working for editor Indulal Yagnik. His entry into films was working as a scenarist in the silent era for directors like Jayant Desai, Nandlal Jaswantlal & Nanubhai Vakil. He joined Ranjit Movietone in 1929, and wrote stories and screenplay for several of Ranjit films.

Film ‘Gorakh Aya’ (Gorakh has come) in 1938, was the first film directed by Doshi. It was produced by Ranjit Movietone with screenplay by Gunvantrai Acharya & dialogues by PL Santoshi. The music, termed ‘good’ was composed by Gyan Dutt. ‘The Secretary’ (1938), was a “riotous comedy”, starring Madhuri, Trilok Kapoor. Charlie. The music was composed by Gyan Dutt, who became a regular in most of the films directed by Doshi. Musafir in 1940 was a comedy costume drama, which had Charlie playing a prince.

‘Bhakta Surdas’, a devotional film directed by Doshi in 1942, is stated to be the “most famous” of the several versions made. It starred KL Saigal and Khursheed “the singing idol(s) of millions”, winning “unprecedented popularity” everywhere.

‘Mehemaan’ (1942) starred Madhuri, Ishwarlal, Shamim and Mubarak. Music director Bulo C. Rani had come to Bombay in 1942, and joined Ranjit Studios assisting Khemchand Prakash in music direction.

Doshi helped enormously in the development of the Gujarati cinema. During 1948-49 he directed three successful Gujarati films which “brought immense success to the industry”. The success of the Gujarati film ‘Kariyavar’ in 1948, directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi from a story by Shaida, called Vanzari Vaav, helped establish the Gujarati film industry along with other films like ‘Vadilo Ne Vanke’ (1948) by Ram Chandra Thakur and ‘Gadono Bel’ (1950) by Ratibhai Punatar. His next Gujarati film was ‘Jesal Toral’ (1948) based on folk-lore, which proved a big box-office success. In 1949, Doshi directed another Gujarati film, ‘Vevishal’, an adaptation of Meghani’s novel of the same name.

He also wrote stories, and one of his stories ‘Pati Bhakti’ was used in the Tamil film ‘En Kanawar’ (1948) produced by Ajit Pictures, which starred the Veena maestro, Sundaram Balachander, who was also the debut director and music composer for the film. In all he directed 24 Hindi films. His last Hindi film was ‘Sanskar’ (1958). He had also written few songs in the film ‘Maya Bazaar’ (1932).

Chaturbhuj Doshi died on 21 January 1969 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India. Filmography

1932: Narasinh Mehta (Writer), 1934: Sitamgarh (Writer), 1938: Gorakh Aya, Secretary, 1939: Adhuri Kahani, 1940: Musafir, 1941:Pardesi, Sasural, 1942: Bhakta Surdas, Dhiraj, Mehmaan, 1943: Chhoti Maa, Shankar Parvati (Director, Writer), 1944: Bhartrahari, 1945:Murti, 1946: Phulwari, 1947: Bela, Kaun Hamara, 1948: Jesal Toral, Kariyavar (Director, Writer), Sati Sone, 1949: Bhakta Puran, Vevishal, 1950: Akhand Saubhagya, Kisi Ki Yaad, Ramtaram, 1954: Aurat Teri Yahi Kahani, 1956: Aabroo, Dashera, Dassehra, 1957: Khuda Ka Banda, Shesh Naag, 1958: Sanskar, 1960: Mehndi Rang Lagyo (Writer, Lyricist).

In the early era of cinema, there were many Marathi heroines in films. Naturally so, because Bombay was the biggest film making centre and it was in Maharashtra. Out of these early Heroines,- Shanta Apte (1916-1964), Snehprabha Pradhan (1920-1930 ), Leela Chitnis ( 1912-2003), Durga Khote (1905-1991), Shobhana Samarth (1915-2000), Hansa Wadkar (Ratan Salgaonkar in real life (1924-1971) and Shanta Hublikar (1914-1992) had few things common.
They operated in films almost same period.
They were educated and hailed from upper castes.
They all were rebellious in nature.
They all had failed or no marriages.
They all worked in Marathi stage dramas and
They all ( except Shobhana Samarth) wrote Autobiographies in Marathi …. Shanta Apte- Jau mee Cinemaat ? means- shall I join films ? , Snehprabha Pradhan-Snehankita, Hansa Wadkar- Sangte Ayka means- Listen to me (A Hindi film – Bhoomika-1977, with Smita Patil- was made based on this book ). I, Durga Khote by Durga Khote, Chanderi Duniyet by Leela Chitnis and Kashala Udyachi baat by Shanta Hublikar.

One of these actresses was Durga Khote, whose life story is very inspiring. A girl from a well to do family marries and after her husband dies, fights the circumstances, going against the existing society norms and becomes successful. Despite the major ups and downs in life she maintains her reputation of being an actress without a blemish or controversy in her professional career. She ends her life with a success story.

Durga Khote (14 January 1905 − 22 September 1991) was one of the foremost leading ladies of her times, she remained active in Hindi and Marathi cinema, as well as theatre, for over 50 years, starring in 182 Hindi films and numerous theatre productions.

In 2000, in a millennium issue, India Today named her among “100 People Who Shaped India”, noting: “Durga Khote marks the pioneering phase for women in Indian Cinema” as she was one of the first women from respectable families to enter the film industry, thus breaking a social taboo.

She also ranks among the top ten actresses in mother roles in Hindi cinema, most notable among them were as Jodhabai in K. Asif’s Mughal-e-Azam (1960); as Kaikeyi in Vijay Bhatt’s classic Bharat Milap (1942); her other memorable roles as mother were in Charnon Ki Dasi (1941); Mirza Ghalib; Bobby (1973) and Bidaai (1974). She has received the highest award in Indian cinema, the Dadasaheb Phalke Award (1983), for lifetime contribution to Indian cinema.

Khote was born as Vitha Lad, to a family which hailed from Goa and spoke Konkani at home. Her father’s name was Pandurang Shamrao Lad and her mother’s name was Manjulabai. She grew up in a large joint family in Kandewadi. She was educated at Cathedral High School and St. Xavier’s College where she studied for B.A. While still a college-going teenager, she married into the Khote family and settled down with her husband.

By the age of 26, Durga Khote was a widowed mother with two young sons; Bakul and Harin. She had to seek work in film to support her children. In doing so, she became a pioneer of sorts: She hailed from a traditional family and the film industry was regarded as the preserve of the base and the bawdy. Also, most of the female characters were played by men at the time.

Durga Khote debuted in a minor role in the obscure 1931 silent film Farebi Jaal or trapped, by M. Bhavnani. She had to sing 3 songs also in this film. Followed by Maya Machindra (1932) by Prabhat Film company.. She was soon promoted to play heroine in the 1932 double version (Hindi and Marathi) Ayodhyecha Raja, another Prabhat film, which was the first ever Marathi talkie, and proved to be a runaway hit, where she played the role of Rani Taramati. Indeed, she ventured yet another pioneering trend: Despite working closely with the Prabhat Film Company, she broke away from the “studio system” (exclusive contract with a studio to work in its films on a monthly salary) then in vogue and became one of the first “freelance” artistes of that era by working occasionally with the New Theatres, East India Film Co. (both at Calcutta), and Prakash Pictures.

In 1936, she played Saudamini in Amar Jyoti, which is one of her most memorable roles. The characters played by her were very much like her regal personality and she commanded a screen presence even in front of legendary actors like Chandra Mohan, Sohrab Modi and Prithviraj Kapoor.

In 1937, she produced and directed a film titled Saathi ( Sawangadi in Marathi), making her one of the first women to step into this role in Indian cinema. The 40s opened for her in a big way, with award-winning performances in Aachary Atre’s Payachi Dasi (Marathi) and Charnon Ki Dasi (Hindi) (1941) and Vijay Bhatt’s classic Bharat Milap (1942), both of which got her the BFJA Best Actress Award for two consecutive years.

Durga Khote remained active in the theatre circuit for many years, especially the Marathi theatre in Mumbai. She was actively associated with the Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA) and worked in several plays for the Mumbai Marathi Sahitya Sangh. In 1954, she famously performed the role of Lady Macbeth in V.V. Shirwadkar’s Marathi adaptations of Macbeth, as Rajmukut, (The Royal Crown), along with Nanasaheb Phatak.

Durga Khote played a wide variety of roles over a career that was not only long, but also untouched by scandal. She was the inspiration for several generations of Indian actresses, including veterans such as the late Shobhna Samarth, who frequently spoke of how she had been inspired by Khote’s example.

During later years, she played several important character roles, such as the mother of the protagonist. Her portrayal of Jodhabai, the queen of Akbar torn between duty towards her husband and love towards her son in Mughal-e-Azam (1960) was well received. In 1963, she acted in Merchant Ivory’s debut film The Householder (1963).

She went on to play other widely appreciated character roles in later movies, such as the role of the grandmother of the heroine in Bobby (1973), the hero’s aunt in Abhimaan (1973), and the very memorable Bidaai (1974), where she played a mother, a very sensitive role that can make one cry and received the Filmfare Best Supporting Actress Award.

Her final memorable role was in Subhash Ghai’s Karz (1980), where she played the role of the mother of Raj Kiran and later, mother to Rishi Kapoor, who played the role of Raj Kiran’s reincarnation after the screen death of Raj Kiran in the movie.

She acted in 182 Hindi films in her career. Her last film as an actress was Daulat ka Dushman-1983. She had also sung 32 songs in 13 films. Her last song was in film Panna Dai-1945. By the 1980s she successfully diversified into production of short films, ad films and documentaries by setting up Fact Films and later, Durga Khote Productions, which produced the Doordarshan TV series Wagle Ki Duniya.

Durga Khote was married when she was a teenager to Vishwanath Khote, a gentleman of her own caste and similar social background, in a match arranged by their parents in the usual Indian manner. It was a traditional marriage into an orthodox family, the couple lived a harmonious and happy life, and the marriage was blessed with two sons. Vishwanath was a mechanical engineer who had graduated from Banaras Hindu University. His family was upper middle class and professional, with modern English education and high social standing; his ancestors had been prominent bankers.

Unfortunately, Vishwanath Khote died young, when Durga was barely into her 20s. She and her sons continued to reside with her in-laws, as is traditional in India, but she was not comfortable with her dependent position, especially because her father-in-law was no more, and they were dependent on other family members for their expenses. She thus felt impelled to make a living any which way she could, and the opening in films happened entirely by chance. The fact that she came from a modern and English-educated family meant that, even as a widow, she was able to act in films, which was derided as a disreputable profession in those days.

She thus raised her two sons, Bakul and Harin, single-handedly. Both of them went on to become well-settled in life. But she suffered the loss of her son Harin, who predeceased her and died in his 40s. Harin was married to Vijaya Jaywant, and they were the parents of two sons. After Harin’s early death, his widow married a Parsi man named Farrokh Mehta and became famous as the film-maker Vijaya Mehta.

Durga Khote’s grandchildren (children of Bakul and Harin) include her grandson Ravi, a filmmaker; granddaughter Anjali Khote, an actress; and grandson Deven Khote, a successful producer who is one of the co-founders of UTV, and who has also directed a film. Deven Khote is noted for producing films such as Jodhaa Akbar and Life in a Metro.

Durga Khote’s brother-in-law, Nandu Khote (brother of Vishwanath), was a noted stage and silent movie actor. Two of Nandu’s children also became actors in the film industry. His son Viju Khote (1941-2019) was an actor perhaps best known for his role of “Kalia” in Sholay (1975). Nandu’s daughter is the actress Shubha Khote, who debuted in Seema (1955) and worked as a heroine in several films before moving to character roles. Still later, she moved to directing and producing Marathi films and also entered television in the 90s. Shubha’s daughter, Bhavana Balsavar, is also an award-winning TV actress who appeared in sitcoms like Dekh Bhai Dekh and Zabaan Sambhalke before deciding to settle down and raise a family. Thus, the acting profession which was pioneered by Durga Khote in her family has been fully embraced by her late husband’s family.

Later in life, Durga Khote wrote an autobiography in Marathi, entitled Mee, Durga Khote, which was translated into English as I, Durga Khote. For the last part of her life, she moved to Alibaug, near Mumbai. Durga Khote died in Mumbai on 22 September 1991. ( Thanks to her autobiography, wiki, muVyz and my notes.)

Today’s song is sung by Durga Khote and an unknown male, with chorus.


Song-Maiyya soona Mandir tera (Adhoori Kahaani)(1939) Singers-Durga Khote, unknown male voice,Lyricist – P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt
Chorus
Durga Khote + Chorus

Lyrics

Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
dhoop nahin hai
deep nahin hai
koi nahin pujaari
dhoop nahin hai
deep nahin hai
koi nahin pujaari
chhaayi hai andhiyaari
chhaayi hai andhiyaari
tan-man ke jag deep jalaaye
kar de door andheraa
tan-man ke jag deep jalaaye
kar de door andheraa
maiyya
soona mandir teraa
maiyya
soona mandir teraa

madhuhaasini
priya bhaashini
dukh naashini
maateshwari
maateshwari
sukh taarini(?)
var daayini
hitkaaarini

pooja karne laal badhenge
praanon ke balidaan karenge
pooja karne laal badhenge
praanon ke balidaan karenge

bhakti bhaav ke thhaal sajenge
nav prabhat ke shankh bajenge
bhakti bhaav ke thhaal sajenge
nav prabhat ke shankh bajenge
jaag uthhega Bharat saara
hoga sarvatr(?) saveraa
jaag uthhega Bharat saara
hoga sarvatr(?) saveraa
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera
Maiyya
soona Mandir tera


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4619 Post No. : 16262

Today’s song is from a film of the early 40s – Apna Ghar-1942. One song from this film was discussed about 5 years back here. That makes today’s song its second song. This film was made by Circo Productions, belonging to a professional- Chimanlal Trivedi. The film was directed by Debki Bose. This was his first Hindi film in Bombay after he moved from New Theatres, Calcutta, due to some differences.

Debaki Kumar Bose, Bengali and Hindi director was born in Akalpoush, Burdwan Dist., West Bengal on 25-11-1898.He was the Son of a noted solicitor, Madhusudhan Bose. Influenced by Sisir Bhaduri, his teacher at Bidyasagar College, Calcutta (1920), he left university to join the non-co- operation movement of Calcutta Congress (1920). He was caught and jailed. After coming out,his father threw him out. He started selling ‘Gamachhas’ on the road. He started and Edited journal, Shakti, from Burdwan (1927-8). One day he was seen and hired by Dhiren Ganguly as actor and scenarist for Dinesh Ranjan Dass’ Kamonar Aagun (1930), Devotee of Vaishnava evangelical movement. He joined British Dominion Films (1927) as scenarist, then director.

He became friendly with the Cinematographer Krishna Gopal, with whom he went to Lucknow where they made a film ” A shadow of dead”. The film flopped and Debki returned to Calcutta, but Krishna Gopal was held hostage by the producers till he paid their investment. Debki took a loan from P C Barua and paid that amount to get Krishna Gopal released.

He joined P.C. Barua’s Barua Pics (1930), then entered New Theatres (1932-4) together with Barua, directing the studio’s first hit, Chandidas, after 7 consecutive flops by New Theatres.. This was the First film in India,with Background music. Its cinematic validation of a major stage genre – the quasi-legendary biographical – helped lessen Bengali cinema’s dependence on the Calcutta Theatres for its themes as well as its literary, musical and acting talent. Early work known mainly for his free and inventive approach to established genres, esp. the mythological and the Saint film, creating a Bengali quality cinema (e.g. Aparadhi and Chandidas). He was the one who promoted film music as a mix of Rabindra sangeet and Indian Classical music. It helped New Theatres to make its film songs popular all over India.

He also made Pooran Bhagat-1933. Handsome actor Mijjan (Syed Hasan Ali Zaidi) was the Hero. When the film was ready and about to be released,communal riots started in Calcutta,between Hindu and Muslims. After the peace returned,New Theatres was worried about Mijjan’s name in this Mythological film. Debaki kumar Bose,who hailed from a rich Zamindar family,told Mijjan “dont worry. From today I give you half of my name-Kumar.” Mijjan’s name became Kumar and he went on to become a big actor. After this,Debaki Bose himself never used the suffix Kumar to his name,in his life.

He made Rajrani Meera in 1933. During this film making he had a quarrel with director Nitin Bose and he decided to leave New Theatres.

After this he Went to East India Film (1934-6) where he made the lyrical Seeta which launched Prithviraj Kapoor and Durga Khote as a star duo. Seeta became the First Indian film to be sent to the International film festival at Venice. Here the film won a Diploma too and thus Debaki Bose was the first Indian artiste to win an International award for his film. He then Returned to New Theatres (1937-41), on invitation of B N Sarkar, making the classic Bidyapati.

In 1942 he left Calcutta and came to Bombay. His first film here as a Director was Circo’s Apna Ghar, made also in Marathi as ‘ आपले घर ‘. This also he directed.

His independent Debaki Bose Prod. (1945) with stars from the Hindi and Marathi cinemas paved the way for other Calcutta cine artistes after the decline of New Theatres in the early 40s. Made Arghya, a documentary on the caste system, based on four narrative poems by Tagore to celebrate the centenary of his birth. Debaki Bose was not just a director,but he was an actor (3 films),a producer (1 film) and also a writer (14 films). He was given the Sangeet Natak Academy award in 1957 and a Padmashree in 1958. He was India’s star director.

He died on 17-11-1971 at Calcutta. In his career of 31 years he made 50 films,in Bangla,Hindi,Marathi,Tamil and English.

FILMOGRAPHY: 1930: Kamaner Aagun (only act); Panchasar (also act); 1931: Aparadhi; Shadows of the Dead; 1932: Nishir Dak (all St); Chandidas; 1933: Puran Bhakt; Meerabai/Rajrani? Meera; Dulari Bibi; 1934: Seeta; 1935: Inquilab; Jeevan Natak; 1936: Sonar Sansar/Sunehra? Sansar; 1937: Bidyapati/Vidyapati?; 1939: Sapurey/ Sapera; 1940: Nartaki; Abhinav; 1942: Apna Ghar/Aple Ghar; 1943: Shri Ramanuja; 1945: Meghdoot; Swarg Se Sundar Desh Hamara; 1946: Krishna Leela; 1947: Chandrasekhar; 1948: Sir Shankarnath; 1949: Kavi; 1951:Ratnadeep/Ratnadeepam; 1953: Pathik; 1954: Kavi; Bhagwan Shri Krishna Chaitanya; 1955: Bhalobasha; 1956: Chirakumar Sabha; Nabajanma; 1958: Sonar Kathi; 1959: Sagar Sangamey; 1961: Arghya (adapted from Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema,with thanks)

The cast of the film Apna Ghar-42 was Shanta Apte, Chandra mohan, Maya Banerjee, Jagdish Sethi, Jeevan, Nimbalkar, Mahesh Kaul, David, Gope etc.etc. This film was also made in Marathi and that also was directed by Debki Bose. Chandra mohan, who started his career with Prabhat’s film Amrit Manthan-1934 could not act in its Marathi Version as he did not know Marathi. His role was done by Keshavrao Datey, in the Marathi version. Chandra Mohan felt very bad and with some difficulty started learning Marathi and in a period of few months he became fluent in it. With this added qualification he acted in 3 Marathi film versions, including Apna Ghar, which was titled ‘ आपले घर ‘. Hats off to his determination. The other two films were Jwala-38 and Geeta-40 ( he had a double role in it). He used to speak only Marathi on the sets of these films.

From the day silent films started being made, till today, thousands of people must have joined this film industry as actors and in many other departments, from a Clapper Boy to a big producer. By one estimate about 7000 people had joined film industry between 1913 to 2000. I wonder how so many people joined an industry which did not provide any security, nor did it assure continuous earnings. Leave aside the stigma of working in” films” in olden times, but this industry neither had permanent jobs nor a fixed income or a Pension. Take a look at any film-Silent or Talkie-only a handful people were credited. Later in the Talkie films, this list became larger. One can see this in any volume of HFGK of 30s or 40s. But then, if you exclude the names which got repeated in films, the total list of actors may not cross 2-3 thousand, perhaps. Then there were nother department people also.

Barring the main and known actors, most other actors are not even identifiable for the general public. Names without faces! Such actors constitute the bulk of numbers in the industry. If you take a look at the cast of a film, more than half of names are unknown or known by only repeat value in many films. These names have no faces. Information about them is not available in any books. They remain only names, replaced by other names after few years. The extras or junior artistes who are seen on screens in many scenes, throughout the film are also members of the industry.

Like any other language, there are writers and authors in Marathi too, who write on old films and old actors etc from the vintage Hindi films. One such author calls himself ” Babu Moshoi “. His articles are published regularly in newspapers, magazines etc. He has written several books. His real name is Hemant Desai. Another such writer in Hindi and Gujarati is Vithal Pandya. I have many such books in my library. Through these books I get to know old actors and their information, sometimes. I get surprised at many names as I read about some names about whom I had never known. For example, do you know who did King Dashrath’s role in films Bharat Milap-42 and Ramrajya-43, or the role of Kanva Muni in film Shakuntala-43 ? Who was the actress in Kaushalya’s role in Ramrajya-43 or Ram Vivah-49 ?

This actor was I.T. Nimbalkar and this actress was Shanta Kothari (nee Shanta Kumari). These were artistes from Silent film era, spilled over the Talkie films. They started as Hero and Heroine, but shifted to character roles, as the time went by. In our film industry, such cases are not new. In fact such type of actors who remained practically unknown to later generations of audiences, were highly respected by film people during shootings. Their seniority and work was respected.

This is a very good practice in the industry, by directors and other actors to give respect to old timers. Raj Kapoor used to send his car to fetch Bhudo Advani for shootings of film Boot Polish scenes. Hrishikesh Mukherjee kept special chair for Master Shiraz, during the shooting of film Guddi. He also ensured to feature Shiraz in the film credits. In one of the film related functions, I have myself witnessed how Amir Khan, Anil Kapoor and others treated yesteryear actress Susheela Rani, with great respect. These are only samples to stress what I have said. Not every such matter is published but it is a special feature of the industry.

I try to gather information on such unknown and forgotten artistes and write on them. Not everytime I am successful, but I have written about many such actors, directors, MDs etc. Some of them are Omkar Devaskar, Zunzar rao Pawar, Ganapat rao Bakare, Shankar rao Vazare, Naseem Junior, Shamim Jr, Altaf, Urmila, Ranjana, Kusum Deshpande, Vasant rao Thengadi, Jamshed ji etc etc. Today, we will know more about one such old time actor who was prolific and worked in films of Bombay and Calcutta.

I.T. Nimbalkar aka Indurao T. Nimbalkar ( he was always credited as only ‘ Nimbalkar ‘ in all films) was born on 6-12-1893, in Kolhapur state. This was the time Kolhapur was slowly developing as Kalapur (hub of arts) and the seeds of film making were being planted there. Baburao Painter, one of the original film makers had started his ” Maharashtra Film Company” on 1-12 1917.

Baburao, Damle, Fattelal etc were taught painting By Anandrao painter, who was an extraordinary painter of those times. All these people, along with V Shantaram, Keshavrao Dhaiber and few more also joined Baburao painter’s Maharashtra Film company. True that, film making had started even earlier in Maharashtra, but Baburao painter is credited with making films a form of art and spreading it on a larger canvas of India.

Indurao Nimbalkar grew up in this atmosphere in Kolhapur. He passed his Matriculation exam and also did a diploma in Printing. Nimbalkar was six feet tall and had a good physique. He was expert in riding, swimming and wrestling. He did 1000 sit-ups every day. Shahu Maharaj, the king of Kolhapur encouraged all arts as well as development of lower castes. Arya Samaj had a ‘ Gurukul’ in Kolhapur. Impressed with Nimbalkar’s education and body, Shahu ji appointed him as Editor of the weekly ‘ Arya’ and secretary of Gurukul.

One day Baburao Painter, along with assistant V Shantaram visited his press and offered Nimbalkar a role in his proposed film Sairandhri. Shahu Maharaj also permitted and encouraged him ,so Nimbalkar joined the film line. He was already famous due to his fiery editorials and now people came to see his shootings too. However, due to money shortage, the film did not complete. ( It was later made in 1919, but with different cast. V Shantaram made coloured Sairandhri in 1933 with Nimbalkar again).

Nimbalkar acted in many silent films like Baji Deshpande, Khazanchi (directed by Moti Gidwani- England returned), Lanka, Kismet (directed by Baburao Patel) etc etc. After the closure of Maharashtra F. Co., Nimbalkar was invited by V Shantaram to do Vishvamitra’s role in its first Talkie film ” Ayodhya ka Raja” -1932, in Hindi and Marathi. After this, he did Jalti Nishani-32, Sairandhri-33, Maya Machhindra, Sinhagadh etc.

After this, Nimbalkar went to Calcutta on invitation and worked in films made by Radha Films, Laxmi Studios, Devdatta films and New Theatres. From 1934 to 1938, he acted in 12 Hindi films. He was provided a Bungalow, car with driver, servants etc. His son studied in local school there. Returning to Bombay he worked as an assistant director to Keshavrao Dhaiber for film ‘Nandkumar’, made by his Jayashree Films. Next 2 years he shuttled between Calcutta and Bombay. He did King Dashrath’s role in Prakash films’ Bharat Milap-42 and Ramrajya-43 in this period.

He was invited by V Shantaram for acting in his first film under banner of Rajkamal- Shakuntala-43. Nimbalkar did the role of Kanva Muni in it. He later also acted in Jeevan yatra, Subah ka tara, Parchhain, Teen batti char rasta, Toofan aur Diya, Z Z Payal baje. Earlier he did Aapki sewa mein, prarthana,Nal Damayanti, Seedha Rasta, Gokul, Apna Ghar, Maharathi karna, Seeta Swayamvar. He worked in Pyasa, Mera Naam Joker, Amar Prem etc etc. From 1928 to 1970 he acted in over 250 films.

His wife Sushila was also educated and looked after his home and children. She never visited any sets in her life time. Nimbalkar died on 17-1-1973 at Kolhapur. (Thanks to an article in book Chandraat-चांदरात by बाबू मोशाय ).

Today’s song is sung by Shanta Apte, an unknown male and Chorus. This could be one of the early Fishermen songs.


Song-Paani ke raja Machharia ho (Apna Ghar)(1942) Singers- Shanta Apte, unknown male, Lyrics-Pt Narottam Vyas, MD-Harishchandra Bali
chorus
Male voice + chorus
Shanta Apte + Male voice + chorus

Lyrics

Paani ke raja Machharia ho o o
mahariya ho
paani ke raaja
ho paani ke raaja
machhariya ho o o
mahariya ho
nadi pe jaana
jaal bichhaana
nadi pe jaana
jaal bichhaana
machhri pakadna patariya ho o
machhri pakadna patariya ho o o o
mahariya ho
Paani ke raja Macheria ho o o
mahariya ho

laayenge seepi
seepi ke moti

laayenge seepi
seepi ke moti

moti jadaau gagariya ho
moti jadaau gagariya ho o o
mahariya ho

chaandi ki hansulee
sone ke jhumke
chaandi ki hansulee
sone ke jhumke
laana rangeelee chunariya ho
laana rangeelee chunariya ho o o
mahariya ho

shaan se aayenge
cheezen bhi laayenge

shaan se aayenge
cheezen bhi laayenge

jaise bahaadur sipahiya ho
jaise bahaadur sipahiya ho o o
mahariya ho

roti khilaayengee
hukka pilaayengee
roti khilaayengee
hukka pilaayengee
tumhree sajaayen sejariyaa ho o
tumhree sajaayen sejariyaa ho o o
mahariya ho

raani ke raaja
hum paani ke raaja
tum raani ke raaja


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4618 Post No. : 16259

‘Lalaji’ (1942) was produced by Mehboob Khan under the banner of National Studios and was jointly directed by Chimanlal Gandhi and Lalitchandra Mehta. The star cast included Krishnakant, Yashodara Katju, Yakoob, Vatsala Kumthekar, Amar, Sunalini Devi, Maya Devi, AR Kabuli, Kayam Ali etc. I have no idea about the story of the film. The montages of the film indicate that it was a comedy film with Yakub having an important role as Hiralal and A R Kabuli as Lalaji though the lead pairs of the film were Yashodara Katju and Krishnakant.

There were 12 songs in the film of which one song has been covered in the Blog. As many as 8 songs were written by Arzoo Lucknawi. Two songs were written by Neelkanth Tiwari. The name of the lyricist was not mentioned in respect of one song. That leaves one song which created some curiosity in me as this song was a ghazal attributed to Mirza Ghalib. However, I could not locate the audio clip of this ghazal on any video sharing platform. Finally, I could listen to this song in full on gaana.com and got it confirmed that this ghazal was written by Mirza Ghalib as his name de plume, ‘Ghalib’ appears in the last she’r of the ghazal.

The problem was not yet over as the audio quality of the ghazal was not up to the mark. Moreover, there were some high sounding Urdu/Persian/Arabic words used in the ghazal which made my task difficult to decipher the ghazal. http://www.rekhta.org came to my rescue as fortunately, this ghazal was listed under Mirza Ghalib.

I am presenting the second song from the fiim, ‘Lalaji’ (1942) – hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din which is a ghazal written by Mirza Ghalib and sung by Vatsala Kumthekar and Amar. The ghazal is set to music by Vasant Kumar Naidu.

The original ghazal have 5 she’rs while the ghazal in the film has 4 she’rs. But the second she’r in the ghazal used for the film is not a part of the original ghazal of Mirza Ghalib. Even while reading the ghazal, the second she’r sounds off-kilter with the rest of the ghazal. My own guess is that probably, Arzoo Lucknawi who had written 8 songs in the film may have written this she’r keeping in view the situation in the film.

The ghazal is written as imageries of conversation of the poet with his beloved. Let me attempt English translation of 3 she’r of the original ghazal included in the song with the help of the meanings of some of the high-sounding Urdu/Persian/Arabic words, given by Ali Sardar Jafri in his book ‘Diwan-e-Ghalib’.

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din

ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti= at the time of drinking wine.
uzr-e-masti= pretext of pleasure (intoxication)

You be frank and open up to me while I am drinking wine some day.
Or else, in the pretext of drunkenness, one day, I will tease you (creating a nuisance).

qarz ki peete thhe mai lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din

faqa-masti=pleasure in adversity.

I drank wine on credit and yes, I thought that my wine-induced
cheerfulness in the midst of debt would be rewarded one day.

dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’ pesh-dasti ek din

dhaul-dappa=fist-fight

saraapa-naaz= proud from head to toe, coyness from head to toe.

shewa=habit, manner.

pesh-dasti=taking initiative, first move.

She, who is coquettish from head to toe is not in the habit of fighting.
I was the one who did the first move one day to make that (fight) happen.

The role of Vatsala Kumthekar as I understand from IDMb is that of a mujra dancer. Since Amar is acting in the film and is also singing along with her in this ghazal, I thought that the song may have been picturised on Vatsala Kumthekar and Amar. But the last she’r of the ghazal gives a hint that Amar may have sung this song for Yakub when he sings ….

hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’
nahin nahin
hum hi kar baithhe thhe ‘Hira’ pesh-dasti ek din

In this film, Yakub plays the role of ‘Hiralal’.

Audio Link:

Song-Hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din (Lalaji)(1942) Singers-Vatsala Kumthekar, Amar, Lyrics-Mirza Ghalib, MD-Vasant Kumar Naidu

Lyrics

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din
warna hum chhedenge rakh kar uzr-e-masti ek din

tujh se aankhen lad gayin aur dil machal kar rah gaya
kaise
tujh se aankhen lad gayin
aur dil machal kar rah gaya
doob gayi re
lut gayi
haay
haay
lut gayi re lut gayi is dil ki basti ek din
lut gayi re lut gayi is dil ki basti ek din

aa aa aa aaa
qarz ki peete thhe mai
lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
haan aah aaah
qarz ki peete thhe mai
lekin samajhte thhe ki haan
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din
rang laayegi hamaari faaqa-masti ek din

dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
dhaul-dhappa uss saraapa-naaz ka shewa nahin
hum bhi kar baithhe thhe ‘Ghaalib’
nahin nahin
hum bhi kar baithhe thhe ‘Hira’ pesh-dasti ek din

hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din
hum se khul jaao ba-waqt-e-mai-parasti ek din


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

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Active for more than 4000 days.

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