Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Actor-Singer song’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4542 Post No. : 16112

Chandraseniya Kayastha Prabhu, popularly known as CKP is one of the numerically smallest Marathi speaking communities of Maharashtra. But he cummnity has produced many intellectuals, playwrights, writers and bureaucrats. They are also regarded as an elite and a broad-minded community. But when one of their girls, Saroj Shilotri (Shobhna Samarth after marriage) tried to venture into films, her maternal uncle (who became the guardian after the death of her father) vehemently opposed her entry into films. The reason was, ‘who will marry her’? Those days, even broad-minded communities regarded working in the films as an act of moral turpitude.

Luckily for Shobhna Samarth, before signing her first film in 1935, she got engaged to Kumar Samarth who also belonged to CKP community. He had just returned from Germany after completing a course in cinematography. Later, they married. But her maternal uncle did not forgive her for the act of what he regarded as a sacrilege of family traditions.

About 5 years later, Shobhna Samarth’s maternal uncle again faced a similar situation. This time, it was his daughter, Nalini Jaywant who was inclined to join the film industry after she was picked up by producer Chimanbhai Desai for his film, ‘Radhika’ (1941). After a great deal of persuasion by a common friend of Chimanbhai Desai and Nalini Jaywant’s maternal uncle, the latter reluctantly permitted her to act in the film.

Today, December 24, 2020 is the 10th Remembrance Day of Nalini Jaywant. 10 years ago, she died of a heart attack but it came to the notice 3 days after her death in her bungalow by neighbours, thanks to the continuing howling by her two pet dogs. She was staying alone after the death of her husband, Prabhu Dayal and was leading a life of a recluse with a couple of pet dogs to give her the company. A distant relative of her is said to have took her body on a municipal ambulance and cremated her.

This unfortunate happening shows that Nalini Jaywant’s 25 years of an active and successful filmy career with 63 films did not counted at the end. During her heydays, she used to host a number of filmy parties and get-together in her bungalow. But after the death of her husband, Prabhu Dayal, the same bungalow had witnessed almost a deserted look during her last 20 years. Her first marriage her director, Virendra Desai in 1945 who was already married with children (whom she divorced in 1948) probably the marriage arising out of infatuation. The second with Prabhu Dayal in 1963 were probably the marriage of convenience. Her parents and brothers kept distance from her. Probably, they did not like her indulgence in socially unexpected behaviour after she joined the films.

Nalini Jaywant (18/02/1926 – 24/12/2010) had two distinct phases of her filmy career. The first phase began with her debut film ‘Radhika’ (1941) produced by Chimanbhai Desai and directed by his son, Virendra Desai. Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’ magazine did not review the film by saying that he did not want to waste the costly paper by reviewing the useless film. Her second film to release was Mehboob Khan’s ‘Bahen’ (1941) where she was paired with Sheikh Mukhtar in the role of his younger sister. This was followed by ‘Nirdosh’ (1941) with Mukesh, ‘Aankh Michowli’ (1942) with Satish Batra and ‘Aadab Arz’ (1943) with Karan Diwan. These films did not create much ripples in the box office front but Nalini Jaywant established herself in the Hindi film industry as an accomplished actress.

Sometime in 1945, Nalini Jaywant married Virendra Desai who was already married with children. This was not liked by his father, Chimanbhai Desai who expelled Virendra Desai from the house and removed him from his film production company, Amar Films. Later, both of them signed a 2-year contract with Filmistan – Nalini Jaywant as an actress and Virendra Desai as a director with a monthly salary and a bungalow in Malad to stay. However, both of them did not get any assignment during the period of contract though Filmistan had produced films like ‘Shikaari’ (1946), ‘Aath Din’ (1946), ‘Safar’ (1946), ‘Do Bhai’ (1947), ‘Saajan’ (1947). ‘Shehnaai’ (1947) etc during the period of their contract. The two-year contract was like two-year ‘vanwaas’ for them from films. This gap was long enough for the film industry to forget their existence.

The first thing Nalini Jaywant and Virendra Desai did after the period of contract got over was to re-establish themselves in the film industry. Both of them formed a film production company, Nalini Films. ‘Gunjan’ (1948) was the outcome of it which was directed by Virendra Desai. After the failure of the film at the box office, Nalini Jaywant divorced Virendra Desai in 1948. My assessment of their divorce is that she may have realised that so long as her name is attached with Virendra Desai, she would not get any role in the new films in the making as her husband would insist to be the director of her films. The divorce was also good for Virendra Desai in that he went back to his family.

The first film Nalini Jaywant signed after her divorce was ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948) with Dilip Kumar and Nargis. This film gave her a new lease of life in her filmy career. Film critics praised her in the role of a flower girl. But the real-take off in her filmi career came from a hit film. ‘Samaadhi’ (1950) in which she paired with Ashok Kumar for the first time. This was followed by another big success for her in ‘Sangraam’ (1950), once again pairing with Ashok Kumar. The success of Ashok Kumar-Nalini Jaywant combination resulted in both working together in as many as 11 films during 1950-57. Her second film. ‘Shikast’ (1953) was a milestone in that she could stand-up to the acting caliber of Dilip Kumar for which he praised her for her performance.

The box office success of ‘Naastik’ (1954) in which she was paired with Ajit resulted her working with him in 11 films. But after ‘Kaala Paani’ (1958), Nalini Jaywant did not have films to much talk about. From the beginning of the 1960s, film offers started declining. Many new leading actresses had joined the film industry and the age was catching with her.

The box office failure of ‘Amar Rahe Ye Pyaar’ (1961) jointly produced by Radhakrishan and Prabhu Dayal and directed by Prabhu Dayal financially broke both of them. While Radhakrishan committed suicide by jumping from his building, Prabhu Dayal who by this time had married Nalini Jaywant, became an alcohol addict. ‘Bombay Race Course’ (1965) was virtually her last film as a heroine after which she did not work in the films until she was offered character roles in ‘Bandish’ (1980) and ‘Naastik’ (1983).

In an interview published on DNA India on the eve of Dilip Kumar’s 90th birthday, he said among other things that he consistently rated Nalini Jaywant as his formidable co-star. He further said that she was the only actress who could spring surprises in the final takes if he was not alert, thanks to the natural spontaneity she possessed.

In a rare interview of Nalini Jaywant published in the Deccan Herald after her death in 2010, she regretted that she could get the opporrtunity to show her acting prowess only in films like ‘Anokha Pyaar’ (1948), ‘Samgraam’ (1950), ‘Shikast’ (1953), ‘Raahi’ (1953) and ‘Kaala Paani’ (1958). She said that she was not interested in making a come back in the film when the offer came for a character role in ‘Naastik’ (1983). But she had to accept it after many requests from Pran and Promod Chakravarty.

Pranay Gupte, the first cousin of Nalini Jaywant [Pranay’s mother, Professor (Dr.) Charusheela Gupte and Nalini Jaywant’s mother are sisters] who had visited her bungalow many times in his teen, wrote a tributary article – ‘Alone and Forgotten’ which appeared in ‘The Hindu’- December 29, 2010. In this article, he said “Actor Nalini Jaywant was a relic of a glorious past who lived in an unforgiving present. Listening to her in the autumn of her life made you flinch”. By the way, Pranay Gupte is a veteran international journalist and authors of several books who is based in the U.S.A.

On the occasion of Nalini Jaywant’s 10th Remembrance Day, I have selected one of the songs from her second released film ‘Bahen’ (1941). In this film, there were 12 songs of which 2 songs have been covered in the Blog. The songs picturised on Nalini Jaywant in the film were sung by her.

The song I am presenting is ‘aayi jawaani jiya lehraaye’ which is rendered by and picturised on Nalini Jaywant who was 15 years of age. The song is written by Safdar Aah Sitapuri which is set to music by Anil Biswas. As the song comes to an end, one can see Shaikh Mukhtar weeping because he does not want his sister to go away from him after marriage. A young Kanhaialal, the prospective bridegroom, is also seen at the end of the song.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Aayi jawaani jiya lahraaye (Bahan)(1941) Singer-Nalini Jaiwant, Lyrics-Safdar Aah Sitapuri, MD-Anil Biswas

Lyrics (Based on Video Clip)

jiya lehraaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
piya ghar jaana
sajan ghar jaana
piya ghar jaana
sajan ghar jaana
naihar ki galiyon mein kachhu na suhaaye
naihar ki galiyon mein kachhu na suhaaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye

sakhiyaan saheliyaan hoy gayin suhaagin
sakhiyaan saheliyaan hoy gayin suhaagin
hoy hoy mora jiya lalchaaye
hoy hoy mora jiya lalchaaye
pee ke kunwar bin sooni sooni laagoon
pee ke kunwar bin sooni sooni laagoon
sundar gahanwa more man bhaaye
sundar gahanwa more man bhaaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
piya ghar jaana
sajan ghar jaana
piya ghar jaana
sajan ghar jaana
naihar ki galiyon mein kachhu na suhaaye
naihar ki galiyon mein kachhu na suhaaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye
aayi jawaani
jiya lehraaye


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4533 Post No. : 16095 Movie Count :

4394

Today, December 14, 2020 is the 86th birthday of Dadasaheb Phalke Award winner and Padma Bhushan Shyam Benegal who was born on December 14, 1934 in Hyderabad. He set a bench-mark for Hindi film industry by successfully making parallel films. His films became inspirations for some Hindi film producer-directors to venture into the ‘middle of the road’ films (a cross between mainstream and parallel films).

From the childhood, Shyam Benegal was familiar with a movie camera as his father owned a 16mm movie camera to shoot some family events. Besides, he was also exposed to English, Hindi and South Indian films which he used to watch in a theatre in an army cantonment in Secundrabad where his father worked as a professional photographer. In one of his many interviews, he had admitted that in his childhood, he was a film junkie and would watch any type of films.

At the age of 12, Shyam Benegal made his first amateur film of about 10 minutes duration from his father’s movie camera covering the visits of his family friends and relatives in summer vacations and going with them for picnics etc. As he grew up, he had already made up his mind to become a film maker. The success of ‘Baazi’ (1951) made by his cousin, Guru Dutt inspired him to the extent that ‘if Guru Dutt could do it why not me’? But those days, there was not much opportunity to pursue film-making in Hyderabad.

In 1955, Shyam Benegal visited Kolkata and met his uncle who knew that he was interested in film-making. He advised him to first watch a Bangla film made by an unknown person who was a commercial artist and let him know his reaction. The film he watched was Satyajit Ray’s maiden film ‘Pather Panchali’ (1955). For the first time, Shyam Benegal felt that this film was quite different from what he had so far seen in the theatre which included films from Prabhat, New Theatres,Bombay Talkies, Mehboob Khan and even some English films. He took a decision that if at all he became a film maker, he would make films which would be different from the mainstream films and would have his stamp of film-making.

In 1959, after completion of M.A. in Economics from Osmania University, Shyam Benegal came to Mumbai in his pursuit to become a film maker. Much earlier, Guru Dutt had invited him to join him as Assistant Director. But he had declined the offer as he did not want to take that route to become a film-maker. After remaining unemployed for about 6 months, he got a job in an advertising agency as a copyrighter. Within a short period, he became its creative head. During his stints in advertising companies in 1959-66, he made over 900 advertising and documentary films.

The working in advertising and documentary films gave Shyam Benegal the ‘hands on’ experience of all the major departments of film-making. During 1966-73, Shyam Benegal taught at Film and Television Institute of India (FTII) in Pune.

During college days, Shyam Benegal had written a script based on what he had witnessed during Telangana Peasants Movement (1946-51). Having gain the experience of film making, he had decided to make a full-length feature film based on his script. For such type of a film, it was difficult to get a financier and more difficult to get a distributor even if the film was made. After many attempts, at last, he got a financier, Mohan Bijlani of Blaze Films for his first film. Blaze Films had distributed many of Shyam Benegal’s advertising films. The title of the film ‘Ankur’ (1974) was suggested by Anant Nag for whom it was his maiden Hindi film.

The success of ‘Ankur’ (1974) resulted in Shyam Bengal’s partnership with Blaze Films in some of his subsequent films like ‘Nishaant’ (1975), ‘Bhumika’ (1977) and ‘Mandi’ (1983). During 1979-81, Shyam Benegal got the opportunity to make ‘Junoon’ (1979) and ‘Kalyug’ (1981) with Shashi Kapoor who not only produced these films but also acted in them.

By 1983, Shyam Benegal had proved his credential as a successful parallel film maker. Almost all his feature films not only recovered the cost of production, but also made money in some films. Despite this, Shyam Benegal had somewhat lean period after “Mandi’ (1983). During this time, Shyam Benegal kept himself busy with directing TV serials – a 15-part ‘Yatra’ (1982) for Indian Railways and a 53-episode ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) for Doordarshan which are regarded as Shyam Benegal’s classic T V serials.

Shyam Benegal was back to the films with his Muslim trilogy, ‘Mammo’ (1994), ‘Sardari Begum’ (1996) and ‘Zubeida’ (2001). He continues to make films of his choice which are different not only from the mainstream cinemas but also from his earlier films.

I had become aware of Shyam Benegal from his very first film ‘Ankur’ (1974) which I saw in the theatre after its release. Afterwards, I had no opportunity to see any of his subsequent films until I watched some of them in the digital era during the last 5-6 years. So, subsequent to ‘Ankur’ (1974), I always related his name with the Doordarshan serial, ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) which I had watched almost all the episodes during its first telecast.

Before ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’, I had watched other serials shown on Doordarshan like, ‘Hum Log’ (1984), G P Sippy’s ‘Buniyaad’ (1986), Kundan Shah’s ‘Nukkad’ (1986). Ramanand Sagar’ ‘Ramayan’ (1987) etc. But, in my view, none of these could match ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) in terms of grandeurs, technical excellence, performances of the actors, music and above all the brilliant filming of each episode by the director, Shyam Benegal. It was a monumental series encompassing the period from Indus Valley Civilisation to India’s independence. And this vast history and culture of India was to be covered in 53 episodes. I regard ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) as the top classic Doordarshan serial of an epic proportion which is yet to be qualitatively matched by any of the subsequent T.V. serials.

Shyam Benegal had said after many years that it was his sheer madness that made him to undertake such a mammoth work as it involved a lot of research, coordination with the actors and crew members especially when some of them were also working in the films. Furthermore, it was a risky venture involving religious, political and social commentaries over a period of 5000 years of history. Fortunately for him, there was no interferences from Doordarshan, political parties, religious and social organisations during the making as well as during its telecast. After the completion of the shootings, he was glad that he took upon himself this project giving him a great satisfaction and an experience of life time.

The genesis of making ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ for Doordarshan as revealed by Shyam Benegal in a Doordarshan interview goes back to the year 1985 when Doordarshan had already commissioned the serials ‘Ramayan’ (1987) and ‘Mahabharat’ (1988). Once these two religious serials were ready for telecast, they wanted to commission another serial on India’s history and culture for which Shyam Benegal was invited for discussion. He was already in the making of a serial ‘Yatra’ (1986) for Indian Railways to be telecast on Doordarshan.

During the school days, one of the relatives of Shyam Benegal had gifted him a book ‘Discovery of India’ (1944), written by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru while he was in Ahmednagar jail during 1942-46 following his participation in ‘Quit India’ movement in 1942. Shyam Benegal had read this book many times as he grew from boy into his adulthood. He was enamored by the history and diverse culture of India as enumerated in the book. He discussed this subject with the Doordarshan authorities and they approved the subject.

By early 1986, Shayam Benegal started the preliminary work on the T.V. serial for writing the script of ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ with a team of 10 writers which included himself, Shama Zaidi, Vasant Deo, Ashok Mishra among others and 22 eminent historians, each with their specialised fields. Simultaneously, he sent his Art Director and the Production Designer with a team of assistants to Archaeological Survey of India’s Office at New Delhi to research on the relevant periods of artifacts, costumes etc. After spending about 8 months in Delhi and other places all over India, they submitted their works.

After the script, screen-play and dialogues were completed, the shooting started in early 1988 which continued for the next 18 months. A major part of the shooting of all the 53 episodes was done at the Film City, Goregaon where as many as 144 sets were erected during the period of 18 months. Some shootings were also done at few historical locations in some parts of India and the shooting in the open ground and forests in the Western Ghats. Over 500 actors mostly drawn from FTII. National School of Drama and other film training institutes were involved in the shooting. Some of the prominent actors included Shabana Azmi, Naseeruddin Shah, Om Puri, Amrish Puri, Roshan Seth, K K Raina, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Pallavi Joshi, Aloknath, Pankaj Berry, Ila Arun, Irfan Khan, Vijay Kashyap, Anjaan Srivastav, Mita Vashisht, Tom Alter, Jalal Agha, Urmila Bhatt, Surendra Pal and many more. Some of them had done multiples roles in the serial.

I have given all these details of the serial just to get the readers the enormity of the project which was a herculean task for Shyam Benegal to manage. The end result was that ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ was as popular in terms of viewership as ‘Buniyaad’ and ‘Mahabharat’ according to Doordarshan. Another end result of this serial as Vanraj Bhatia said in a lighter vein was that after the end of 18 months of shooting, Shyam Benegal looked much older than his age.

On the occasion of Shyam Benegal’s 86th birthday, we wish him a happy birth day and pray for his good health and an active life as a film-maker. He has said in an interview a couple of years ago that film-making will remain his passion at any age as long as he is active.

On the occasion of Shyam Benegal’s 86th birthday, I felt that I should select one of many songs from his extravagant T.V. serial, ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ (1988) which he considers to be the toughest assignment he had undertaken so far. Only a couple of songs from this serial have been uploaded on a video sharing platform of which I have selected a Sufi ghazal, ‘zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful’ in Episode-27. This Amir Khusrou’s ghazal is sung in qawwali stayle by Murlidhar who is a singer-actor in Nepali film industry. He is one of the deciples of Pandit Jasraj. I have seen him in an interview on one of the Nepali T.V. Channels and I feel that qawwali may have been picturised on him as well. Vanraj Bhatia is the music director assisted by Kersi Lord and Ashok Patki.

In the serial, the qawwali is preceded by a devotional song of Sant Tukaram. Both the song and the qawwali are reflections of the influences of thoughts and culture of Hindus on Muslims and vice versa during the start of the Bhakti Movement in North India.

One of the main features of the ghazal is that the lines in the first couplet is written half in Persian and other half in Brij Bhasha. Thereafter in rest of the two couplets, the first line is in Persian and the second line in Brij Bhasha.

The actual ghazal has been written as under:

zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan

shabaan-e-hijraan daraaz choon zulf wa rooz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan

ba-haqq-e-aan mah ki roz-e-mahshar ba-daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
sapit mann ke duraaye rakhoon jo jaaye paaun piya ki khatiyaan

The English translation of the ghazal is on the video clip.

There are two more she’rs in the ghazal which have not been included in the qawwali. The omitted two she’rs are as under:

yakayak az dil do chashm jaadoo ba-sad-farebam ba-burd taskeen
kise padi hai jo jaa sunaave piyaare pee ko hamaari batiyaan

choon sham-e-sozaan choon zarra hairaan mehr-e-aan-mah bagashtam aakhir
na neend nainaan na ang chainaan na aap aave na bheje patiyaan

Acknowledgement: Some of the information for the article is taken from the following sources:

1. ‘Yaadon Ke Saaye’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal by Irfaan on Rajya Sabha TV.

2. ‘Dil Se’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal on a TV Channel.

3. The making of ‘Bharat Ek Khoj’ – An interview of Shyam Benegal conducted on Doordarshan.

Video Clip:

Song-Zihaal e miskin makun tagaaful ( Bharat Ek Khoj)(1988) Singer-Murlidhar, Lyrics-Amir Khusro, MD-Vanraj Bhatia
Chorus

Lyrics

aa aa aaaaaaaa
aa aa aaaaaaa aa aaaa
aa aa aaaaaa aa aa
aaaaaaaaa
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chhatiyaan
ki taab-e-hijraan nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan

ki taab-e-hijraan
nadaaram-e-jaan
na lehu kaahe lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chatiyaan
lagaaye chhatiyaan
na lehu kaaye lagaaye chatiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan

shabaan-e-hijraan daraaz choon zulf
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah
wa roz-e-waslat choo umr kotah

sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon
to kaise kaatoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan
sakhi piya ko jo main na dekhoon
to kaise kaatoon andheri ratiyaan

ba haqq-e-aan mah ki roz-e-mahshar
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
ba daad maara fareb ‘Khusro’
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
jo jaaye paaun piya ke khatiyaan
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
ha aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
sapit mann ki duraaye rakhoon
jo jaaye paaun piya ke khatiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan
zihaal-e-miskeen makun taghaaful
duraaye naina banaaye batiyaan


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4527 Post No. : 16087

“Angulimaal”(1960) was produced by M/s Prakash Veramal and directed by Vijay Bhatt for P V Films, Bombay. This historical movie had Nimmi, Bharat Bhushan, Anita Guha, Ulhas, Chandrashekhar, Achla Sachdev, Manmohan Krishn, Prem Adeeb, Kesri, Rammohan, Vinod Kumar, Sheela Kashmiri, Vimla, Helen etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Six songs have been covered in the past. Here are their details :-

Song Date of posting Singers Remarks
Aayi aayi basanti belaa 18 March 2011 Lata Mangeshkar, Manna Dey, Meena Kapoor
Dheere dheere dhal ri chanda ( 20 April 2011 Aarti Mukherjee
Bade aaye shikaari shikaar karne 5 May 2011 Manna Dey, Asha Bhonsle
Jaa ri na bataaun main to naam chitchor kaa 6 May 2011 Lata Mangeshkar, Meena Kapoor
Mere chanchal naina madhur ras ke bhare 27 October 2018 Meena Kapoor
Buddham sharnam gachhaami 11 October 2020 Manna Dey Picturised as a Five part song

The eighth and final song from the movie is sung by a male voice and Asha Bhonsle. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by Anil Biswas.

The song is picturised on Manmohan Krishn and a lady who I guess is a young Achla Sachdev. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song including the identification of the lady. I feel that the male voice is that of Manmohan Krishn himself, who was an occasional singer as well.

With this song, all the songs of “Angulimaal”(1960) are now covered and the movie joins the lists of movies that have been YIPPEED in the blog.


Song-Murliwaale Gopal teri sharan mein hai mera laal (Angulimaal)(1960) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-Anil Biswas
Murli Krishn

Lyrics

om namo brahmanayadevay
go bramhanahitayse
jagathitay krishnay govinday namo namah
om

muraliwaale gopal,
gopaal
gopal

muraliwaale gopal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan mein hai mera laal
muraliwaale gopal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan mein hai mera laal
tu hi rakhana ise sambhal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan mein hai mera laal
muraliwale gopa aa aal

phool mera hai komal-komal
kathin tera sansaar
iski dag-mag naiya kanhaiya tu hi lagaana par
khewaiyya tu hi lagaana par
har sankat dena taa aal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan me hai mera laal
muraliwale gopaa aa aal
muraliwale gopal, ho muraliwale gopal

nainon ke gangaajal se
jeewan ke paap dhula de
nainon ke gangaajal se
jeewan ke paap dhula de
apni umar chadhhaaun tujhe
mere laal ko amar bana de
mere laal ko amar bana de
hey shaanti ki liye mashaal
jagaaye jag mein jyot vishal
kare uncha bharat ka bhaa aal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan mein hai mera laal
muraliwaale gopal
teri sharan mein hai mera laal
tere charan mein hai mera laal
muraliwaale gopaa aa aal


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4524 Post No. : 16083

Today’s song is from the film 300 Days and after-1938. This was a film made by Sagar Movietone. Based on an English film “A Billionaire’s story “, directed by the famous Haward Hawks. The film was adapted to indian conditions by Babubhai Mehta and the dialogues were written by Wazahat Mirza and Waqif. Music was by Anil Biswas and the 9 songs were written by Zia Sarhadi. Cinematographer was Faredoon Irani. The film was a comedy film directed by Sarvottam Badami. Later he further directed two more comedies – Aap ki Marzi and Ladies Only both in 1939.

Badami was a living example of the famous saying ” where you come from is immaterial. What is important is where you have reached. ” An ordinary Motor Machanic became a famous film director, Head of the Documentary section of Films Division and a management consultant for an Industrial House like the Kamanis in Bangalore. His life story is very inspiring indeed.( another Motor Mechanic became a famous writer and director-Gulzar).

Sarvottam Badami was born in 1910 at Channapatna in Karnataka,to a revenue officer working in Mysore. He passed his SSLC and worked as a garage mechanic and then a projectionist in Select Picture House, Bangalore, both of which were owned by Dr. Ambalal Patel. Patel moved to Bombay and financed Ardeshir Irani of Imperial Film Company, and Chimanlal Desai as a partner forming Sagar Movietone in 1930.
At the age of 19 years, Badami went to Bombay to study automobile engineering. He was asked by Ardeshir Irani who met him at a wedding to help out with the recording equipment he had purchased from abroad.

Badami helped in the sound recording department for the first Talkie in India, Ardeshir Irani’s Alam Ara (1931). Around that time a German director making the film Harishchandra left half-way and Badami offered to complete it, the co-director was Raja Chandrasekhar, although the co-director credit has also been cited as T. C. Vadivelu Naicker. The film turned out to be successful. He was contracted by Sagar Movietone (Sagar Film Company) to direct three films, two in Telugu and one in Tamil: Galava Rishi (Tamil), Rama Paduka Pattabhishekam and Shakuntala in Telugu. The success of these films established him as a director. His working team had people like the cinematographer Faredoon Irani, music director Anil Biswas and the Sagar Movietone favourites Sabita Devi and Motilal.

Initially, to avoid embarrassment to his family he requested not to be credited in the regional language films. He did not know Hindi but from 1932-1947, he worked for Sagar Movietone and also directed nearly 30 films in Hindi, for many others. His first Hindi film was Chandrahasa (1933) starring Noor Mohammed Charlie. He was paid Rs 2000 per film with the complete film being made within Rs 50,000. He worked with most of the top actors of the time like Motilal, Nargis, Ashok Kumar and Pahari Sanyal. He brought Mehboob Khan who was then doing roles as an extra out of obscurity and gave him the role of Sabita Devi’s father in the film Vengeance is mine(1935).

He made several films based on novels. Some of the writers whose work he used were K.M.Munshi, Sarat Chandra and Ramanlal Vasanthlal Desai. The film Aap ki Marzi (1939) was inspired by the Hollywood film Paradise for Three (1938). He became known for his satirical comedies and “socially relevant films”.His film Grihalaxmi (1934), which starred Jal Merchant and Sabita Devi had the woman getting into marriage only if her doctor husband agreed not to want children. The success of the film mitigated the enraged public reaction at the time.

He showed his understanding of media publicity required for films when in 1937, Badami resorted to woo audiences by announcing cash prizes of Rs.500, Rs.200 and Rs.100 for the best reviews of his newly released film Kulvadhu (1937). The promotional gambit worked sending audiences to the theatres. According to an interview, most of Badami’s films didn’t survive as the negatives were burnt to extract the silver from the silver nitrate.

After Aap ki Marzi-38, he followed his mentor, Dr. Patel and joined Sudama Pictures, when in 1939, Sagar Movietone merged into National Films. Badami

also worked in Famous Cine Laboratories, from 46 to 48.

Apparently, in 1948 Deputy Prime Minister Vallabh bhai Patel, who was then also in charge of the Information Ministry, on a visit to the Cine Laboratories Bombay, asked Badami to help set up a NewsReel and Documentary section. The Films Division was established in 1948. He became chief producer in the newsreel department and made several documentaries. He worked in the Films Division making documentaries from 1948-1952. After that he stopped making films and returned to Bangalore to retire as “I was a forgotten man in the feature film world”. He became an industrialist by starting a manufacturing business. Later he worked as a Consultant for Kamani Group of Industries also. He died in 2005 in Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

FILMOGRAPHY: 1932: Harishchandra; Galava Rishi; Paduka Pattabhishekham; Shakuntala; 1933: Chandrahasa; 1934: Grihalakshmi; 1935: Dr. Madhurika; Vengeance is Mine; 1936: Jeevan Lata; Grama Kanya; 1937: Kokila; Kulavadhu; 1938: Three Hundred Days and After; 1939: Aap Ki Marzi; Ladies Only; 1940: Chingari; Sajani; 1941: Holiday in Bombay; 1942: Khilona; 1943: Prarthana; 1944: Bhagya Lakshmi; 1945: Ramayani; 1946: Uttara Abhimanyu; 1947: Manmani; 1951: Vinoba Bhave (Doc);1952: Roof over the head

(Ack: Sapnon ke saudagar by Vithal Pandya, Sagar Movietone by Biren Kothari, HFGK, muVyz, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, and my notes)

The cast of the film was Sabita Devi, Bibbo, Motilal, Yakub, Sankata prasad and many more. Though Motilal was the Hero, his name came after two leading ladies as they were seniors and he was comparatively a junior actor. Sabita Devi was a beautiful Anglo Indian girl who joined films in the silent film era. When Talkie started, she too had a problem of Hindi speaking and singing, like all other non indian girls in films in those days. She was a determined lady and she , just like Ruby Meyers (sulochana), learnt Hindi to speak and did singing lessons too, by taking a one year’s gap in career.

The real name of Sabita Devi was IRINA GASPER. She was an Anglo-Indian, born in an affluent family of Calcutta, in 1914.

After completing education she wanted to join films, but her family objected. Without the family’s knowledge, she sent her resume and Photo to British Dominion Film Co., owned by Dhiren Ganguly in Calcutta. When they informed their consent the family resisted and kept her locked in the house. She fell ill and finally, the family conceded to her wish.

Her first Silent film was Flames of Flesh-1930. Then came Kanthahaar, A touch of Love, After the death, Aparadhi, Money makes what not and Bhagyalaxmi as silent films.

When the talkie came, she determinedly learnt Hindustani and Urdu and also Music.

Her first Talkie film was Radhakrishna-33, in which she sang 16 out of 23 songs in the film, but no records were made. Next was Ek din ka Badshah-33. She shifted to Bombay for better opportunities. In 1934,came Shahar ka Jaadu,with Motilal as a debut actor and this film was a Hit. Later she and Motilal became a popular pair.

She did many films. Her some films were-

300 days and after, Apki marzi, kokila, Kulvadhu, Amrapali, Ladies only, Chandragupta, Chingari, Dr.madhurika, grihalaxmi, holiday in bombay, Jeevan Lata, King for a day, Lagna bandhan, Manmaani, , Phantom Of the hills, Silver king, vengeance is mine, Village Girl etc etc. In all, she acted in 23 Talkie films and sang 15 recorded songs in 7 films.

She was a good Piano and Harmonium player. In later days in 1943 onwards, she stopped singing herself. Her last picture was Amrapali-45.

In 1946, she got married and left for England. She came back again only to die in Calcutta in 1965.

The other leading lady in the film was Bibbo, whose real name was Ishrat Sultana. Besides being an actress, she was also India’s First Woman Music Director.

Film 300 Days and after-38 was a popular film which was a comedy.

I started seeing films from almost the end of the 40’s decade. During that period, some films of the 30’s were still being shown in the Morning shows in specific theatres of Hyderabad. These theaters were known to show old films at concessional rates. The tickets started at 4 Annas, 6 annas, 8 annas and 12 annas for Balcony. So, it was affordable to me. The Morning shows used to be only on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. Invariably, I used to miss school on saturdays and see different films on Saturday and Sundays regularly. As a habit, I used to note down the seen film’s details in a notebook. I remember having seen this film in Royal Talkies in Hyderabad. This way I was lucky to see some films from the 30’s. The story of this film was….

Sudhir (Motilal) is a bachelor billionaire,doing nothing and enjoying life to the fullest with wine, women and gambling. As a result, his health starts falling prematurely when he is just 25-26 yrs only.

one day he falls down and a Doctor is called. After many tests and inspection of everything his family doctor tells him that because of his wayward living and uncontrolled lifestyle he is suffering from many ailments.If he treats them now, he may get all those again and again. The only remedy is Sudhir should do hard manual work, exercises and lead a simple living, which,the doctor says, Sudhir will never be able to do.

Sudhir is angry. He challenges the doctor that he will leave all his wealth, go out in the world, do physical work and earn money for himself. The doctor takes a bet with him and the deal is Sudhir should go out for 300 days without using a single paisa from his existing wealth for himself. Sudhir is ready for this.

Next day Sudhir goes out with a few ordinary clothes, little money and a strong will to face the big bad world.

The film is full of funny situations when Motilal gets different jobs and does not know how to do them. First he tries to work as a Vegetable vendor, but he does not know the names of any vegetable.

He even takes some fruits as vegetables,to sell. Next he tries to work as an assistant in a Barber shop, where he shaves off half the mustache of a customer. He tries to work as a car driver and a Tram ticket collector also.

Finally, he joins as a worker in a Soap factory, where he has to drive sometimes Seth’s wife -Ramola devi(Bibbo), who tries to entice him. Sudhir starts liking a typist girl in the factory Sharada(Sabita Devi). Sharada teaches music to Ramola, wife of Seth Laxmi Das. Motilal takes her everyday to the tuition. They start loving each other. Motilal stays with a kind hearted Vegetable vendor woman as a tenant. She tends to him , feeds him well and takes his care as her son.

Suddenly the Factory must close down due to some loss. All workers are worried. Motilal secretly sends his own money to Sethji as an anonymous partner. The Factory is saved.

Now in this all jumble, 300 days come to an end. Surprisingly Motilal finds himself absolutely fit, healthy and understands the meaning of true life and Love.

He goes back to the doctor to claim his bet money, which he donates to a school.

Sudhir marries Sharada and brings the kind vegetable vendor lady as his family member to live with him for ever.

Today’s song is sung by Sabita Devi.


Song- Koi geet manohar nyaara (300 days and after)(1938) Singer- Sabita Devi, Lyricist- Zia Sarhadi, MD- Anil Biswas

Lyrics

Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
nit gaaye
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare ae
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare

mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
jahaan pushp hon pyaare pyaare
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
jahaan pushp hon pyaare pyaare
rahoon ban mein saanjh sakhaare
rahoon ban mein saanjh sakhaare
sun geet manohar nyaara
sun geet manohar nyaara
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
nit gaaye
nit gaaye
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4521 Post No. : 16079 Movie Count :

4391

Today’s song is from a film which is 82 years old – Baazigar-38.

It was released just 2 years before I was born. The word Baazigar means a Juggler, Magician, an Illusionist – one who can create magic or one who has the capacity to do the unimaginable things. Perhaps, like a person who wins unexpectedly at the last minute after losing all the while, or one who turns the tables when no one expects him to do so. I have not seen this film, nor I know about its storyline, but my guess is, it must be a story of a person who was daring and changed the game in his favour when everyone thought that he would surely lose it.

There were 4 films called Baazi – made in 1951,1968,1984 and 1995 and then there were 4 films called Baazigar made in 1938, 1959, 1972 and 1993. There was even a film Baazigar-The Iron Man-2008, which was dubbed from a South Indian film.Today’s film Baazigar-38 was made by Ranjit Movietone. In the early era of the Talkie films, Ranjit was a respected big name. The spirit behind Ranjit Movietone was Chandulal Shah – who was a Baazigar himself in this film. An ordinary low level operator in the Cotton market built an empire in the film industry, like a true Baazigar, indeed !

Hindi film industry’s growth in the early years of 20s to 40s was contributed by 2 major communities. One of them was the Gujarati businessmen who immediately identified this business as the future gold mine. The other major community was the Local Marathi, who lent their brain and hard work to this industry. As the time went by, people from Punjab, U.P., Bengal and other states of India joined hands to help this industry to prosper. However, till the mid 50s it was the Gujarati Sethias who poured the finances. Financiers like Sampat Sheth, Gokuldas Pasta, Manik Sheth Patel, Chunilal Munim, Mangaldas Parekh, Abdulali Yusufali, Mohd. Ali Rangwala, Chimanlal Desai, Bhogilal Dave, Mayashanker Bhatt etc only supplied the money, but never dabbled in other departments nor did they learn anything about the film making, more than what was needed to get some profits.

One person, however, was different. CHANDULAL SHAH. He not only put crores of rupees in film making, but also learnt the technique and art of making films, direction, building organisations of producers, developing political connections and what not. He did everything that was needed to become a successful filmmaker and a leader in the industry. That is why Baburao Patel called him “Sardar”. Chandulal Shah made his company Ranjit Movietone, a force to reckon with.

Chandulal Shah belonged to Jamnagar-Gujrat. He was born on 13-4-1898. He was into the cotton trade and used to visit Bombay frequently. Later he started working in Bombay Stock Exchange. He used to visit the Laxmi films, nearby to watch shootings. On one occasion, the director of a silent film ” VIMLA “-1925 fell very sick and on the recommendation of a solicitor friend, Chandulal Shah got an opportunity to direct the balance film. Impressed by his work style he was offered 2 more films. He left the Stock Exchange job and took up the film line completely.

From Laxmi, he shifted to Kohinoor Film Company, where he met actress Gauhar Jan Mamajiwala, who became his mate for the next 50 years till he died. Gauhar used to feature in his films. With Gauhar, he did GUNSUNDARI in 1927 and in 1934 (silent and Talkie respectively).

This film was a tremendous hit and it helped them to establish their own film company, Ranjit Movies in 1929. In the next 3 year’s time they made 39 silent films. After the advent of Talkie, they changed the name of Ranjit to Ranjit Movietone. Chandulal liked to do things only kingsize. Thus he established Ranjit studios with 4 large sound stages. He also hired around 300 people in the beginning. They made ,on an average, 6 feature films every year. His studio was an assembly line production house. At a time at least 5 to 6 films were being made in his studios. He had a big army of famous Actors, Writers, technicians, directors, Music directors etc. on his payroll.

Actors like Gauhar jaan, Bilimoria, Nirupa Roy, Motilal, Madhuri, Khursheed, and K L Saigal, Music directors like Gyan Dutt, Bulo C Rani, Khemchand Prakash etc, Lyricists and writers like Kidar Sharma, Pradeep, Saadat Hasan Manto and many others were on his Payroll.

Chandulal was very proud of his empire and used to advertise ” There are more stars in Ranjit than in the sky “. At the peak time, there were about 700 people employed in Ranjit and the Government had opened a Ration shop in his studio premises for the workers’ benefit ! Khemchand Prakash did 20 films in Ranjit from 1940 to 1945, Gyan Dutt 25 films from 1937 to 1943 and Bulo C Rani did 20 films from 1943 to 1954 here.

From 1929 to 1963 Ranjit made Silent films-39, Tamil-1, Marathi-1 and Hindi Talkie films 120

Unfortunately due to a fire, except 7 talkie Hindi films, all other films were destroyed. Chandulal Shah was an active person. Besides filmmaking he took interest in many Cine Associations and also led delegations abroad. He was a keen Horse racer, better and a Gambler.

In 1944, in one day he lost ONE CRORE TWENTY FIVE LAKH rupees in cotton betting and that was the beginning of his downfall. He had to mortgage all his and Gauhar jaan’s properties, but it could not save Ranjit from ruins. He returned to Film Direction to make money and his First film after 14 years was PAAPI-1953. It had the hit pair of those times-Raj Kapoor and Nargis. For the First time Raj Kapoor did a double role, but the film flopped. Clearly the times were bad for Chandulal. All his kundali was topsy turvy !

He tried 3 more films, all failed. His last film was ‘Akeli mat jaiyo’-1963.A man who ruled an Empire started travelling in local trains and buses.

Chandulal Shah died on 25-11-1975.

The year 1938 was a year in which the film industry was trying to shed the “carried forward” load of the Silent era and make a new beginning towards a better future. Many new production houses, actors, directors and composers were in full steam and churned out films after films. major studios contributed heavily to the total films made that year. Ranjit made 5 films, New Theatres-4, Bombay Talkies-3, Mohan Pictures-6, Sagar Movietone-6, Minerva Movietone-4, Mohan Bhavnani-4, Prakash Pictures-4 etc.

In 1938, Master Bhagwan debuted as a Director with Bahadur kissan, Renuka Devi (Begum Khursheed Mirza) debuted as an actress with Bhabhi, Meenakshi Shirodkar debuted in film Bramhachari, Lalita Pawar produced a film Duniya kya hai. Surprisingly, all these 3 Heroines were married at the time of their Debut. There was a variety in film subjects – comedy, suspense, crime, social, mythological, social evils, stunts, adventure, historical, musical and various other Genres were tried in films. If one goes through the films made this year, it indicates the way the film industry was growing in its initial years.

Baazigar-38 a Costume Drama by Ranjit was directed by Manibhai Vyas- who started his career from the Silent era and became an independent Talkie director with Dukhiyari-1937. He directed 26 Talkie films. His last film was Bajrang Bali-1976. The cast of the film was Khatun, Trilok Kapoor, N M Charlie, Ila Devi, Anis, Suresh etc.etc. All the 13 songs of the film were written by P L Santoshi and Gyan Dutt provided the music.

Iladevi was a new name. Even after efforts, no information was available to me about her. From the question-answer column of the magazine Film India, I learnt that Ila Devi’s original film name was Miss Ilmas. I do not know in which religion or community, this name is used.After making her debut in Hindi films in ‘ Nishan -E- Jung ‘-1937, she changed her name to Ila Devi and acted in 6 more films. Four films in 1938 (Billi, Bazigar, Rikshawala and Gorakh Aaya) and two films in 1939 (Adhuri Kahani and Kahan hai teri manzil). After this her name is not found in any films, when I checked.

This change of name, after using one name in a film, is not unique, though,this seems to be the First such instance. I know, off hand, at least two more such instances in Film industry. Actress Ameeta (Tumsa nahi dekha fame) had used name Jaijaiwanti in her first film Thokar-1953 ( her second film kaafila -52 was released first as Ameeta,however), but she changed it to her name Ameeta from next film onwards. ( her real name was Qamar Sultana). The second example is actress Zeb Rehman who was known first as Preetibala, then she changed her name to Zeb Rehman.

There is another name ‘ Khatun ‘ in the cast. Miss Khatun Bano was born and brought up in a poor Muslim family of Lahore. As per the family tradition, she learnt dancing and singing. Once, when she was performing on stage in Lahore, the Talent hunter of Sagar movietone spotted her and she was offered a role in a Talkie film- which was a novelty in 1931. Her first film was Abul Hasan-31. Then came Subhadra haran-32, Meerabai-32, Maya Bazar-32 etc etc. In all, she acted in 59 films, till her last film Ibrat-60. She also sang 25 songs in 12 films.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey and Noor Mohd. Charlie, as per the uploader’s information on the You Tube. With this song film Baazigar-38 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Hai koi dil lene waala (Baazigar)(1938) Singers- Rajkumari Dubey, Charlie, Lyricist-P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

Haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan
kya tum dil bechti ho
haan
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan

aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa aa
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa
kya keemat hai bol
kya keemat hai bol

dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil hai ye anmol ol
dil hai ye anmol ol
haa aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4471 Post No. : 15971

We in this blog remember the personalities of HFM during their anniversaries. But in case of Ashok Kumar’s birth anniversary, we are constrained to defer it to next day because this day unfortunately turned out to be the death anniversary of Kishore Kumar, his younger brother.

Ashok Kumar (13 October 1911 – 10 December 2001) was easily the first superstar of HFM. He achieved his stardom in early 1940s, at a time when many actors now regarded as superstars had not even made their debuts. For instance, people like Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand, Raj Kapoor had not even made their debuts by that time. Rajesh Khanna and Amitabh Bachchan, future superstars were mere toddlers at that time.

Ashok Kumar began his film career as a lab technician. His rise to superstardom from that position was quite meteoric. Unlike meteors, he stayed on top throughout his career. He was not just a top actor, he was also a film maker. He never had to look for work. He was himself an employer of film actors. Unlike many film personalities who fell on hard times and survived in penury in old age, Ashok Kumar managed his finances well and he was always financially well secured. This is one quality of his that most film personalities needed to learn from.

Ashok Kumar was well connected to lots and lots of other well known film personalities through blood relations as well as marriage alliances. In his own household he had Anup Kumar and Kishore Kumar as his brothers. His sister Sati Rani Devi was married to film producer Shashdhar Mukherjee (founder of Filmalaya), whose brother Subodh Mukherjee was a director. Shashdhar Mukherjee’s sons were Rono Mukherjee, Joy Mukherjee, Deb Mukherjee, Shomu Mukherjee and Shubir Mukherjee, all into films. Shomu Mukherjee’s wife is Tanuja. Their daughter is Kajol.

If one looks at the filmy connections of Ashok Kumar, thanks to Kishore Kumar’s various marriages, it will turn out that Ashok Kumar was related to almost every major star in HFM and beyond. Ashok Kumar is related to Kapoors, Bachchans, Rabindranath Tagore, Mithun Chakraborty etc. Exploring all these connections can be used as an exercise in timepass by those interested. 🙂

Ashok Kumar was an actor-singer during the early parts of his career. Some of his songs have gone on to become immortal songs. Who can forget the immortal “Achhot Kanya”(1937) duet Main ban ki chidiya ban ban doloon re with Devika Rani.

Here is another Ashok Kumar-Devika Rani duet. This song is from “Anjaan”(1941). It is penned by Kavi Pradeep. Music is composed by Pannalal Ghosh.

A very nice retro style romantic song. One would love watching the picturisation.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.


Song-Mere jeewan ke pathh par chhaayi ye kaun (Anjaan)(1941) Singers-Ashok Kumar, Devika Rani , Lyrics-Kavi Pradeep, MD-Pannalal Ghosh

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
aa Haa ha haa haa aa
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

Mere jeewan ke path par chhaayi ye kaun
Poonam ki chaandni
Kaun
Poonam ki chaandni ee ee
Mere jeewan ke path par chhaayi ye kaun
Poonam ki chaandni
Badi madhur madhur man bhaayi
Madhur madhur man bhaayi
Ye kaun
Badi madhur madhur man bhaayi
Poonam ki chaandni

Mere jeewan ka path par chhaayi ye kaun
Poonam ki chaandni

Dheeme dheeme meri kuti mein
Dheeme dheeme meri kuti mein ae
Ithlaati huyi
Bal khaati huyi
Ithlaati huyi
Bal khaati huyi
Chup chaap kahin se aayi ee ee
Chup chaap kahin se aayi ee ee
Ye kaun
Chup chaap kahin se aayi
Poonam ki chaandni ee ee

Mere jeewan ka path par chhaayi ye kaun
Poonam ki chaandni

Kaun pari ye swarg se utri
Kaun pari ye swarg se utri
Badi laaj bhari mere aas paas
Khelan laagi ras rang raas
Khelan laagi ras rang raas
Pal pal lekar angdaayi
Pal pal lekar angdaayi
Ye kaun
Pal pal lekar angdaayi
Poonam ki chaandni ee ee

Mere jeewan ka path par chhaayi ye kaun
Poonam ki chaandni
Tum kaun
Poonam ki chaandni


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4450 Post No. : 15909

Today’s song is a comedy song from a Costume/Action film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. The film was a production from Basant Pictures, owned by producer/Director Homi Wadia. In 1942, brothers JBH Wadia and Homi Wadia separated from each other on a very important point. The elder brother JBH Wadia was of the opinion that the life of the action-stunt films is a short one. He firmly believed that the market for action films will dry up within the next 10-15 years, hence the company should change over to Social films.

The younger brother Homi Wadia differed and wanted to continue with stunt films. He separated and established his own Basant Pictures. Most stunt actors joined his group – especially Fearless Nadia. Besides the Human artistes, Homi Wadia also replaced Animals used in stunt films. In Wadia films there was a Horse named ‘Punjab ka Beta’, a dog named ‘Tiger’, and a Motor car called ‘Rolls Royce ki Beti’. Basant Pictures brought a Horse named ‘Rajput’, dog called ‘Moti’, and a Motor Car called ‘Austin ki Bachhi’. In addition they also acquired a Motorcycle named ‘Runnio’.

The history of stunt action films is as old as the Silent film history. Silent films were essentially a Visual medium, as there was no sound. What could be achieved by dialogues had to be conveyed only with the visuals, hence there was not much scope for emotional films. In the initial stages of silent films, the audience was mainly of the middle and lower class of the society. Impressing and attracting them was easy with action films. That’s how the majority of silent films consisted of action or stunt scenes.

After the advent of Talkie films, the trend of stunt films continued and also became money spinners. Those days stunt films did not need any well known or famous actors or beautiful heroines. These films were made with minimum budgets. Master Bhagwan used to make a stunt film in just 60 to 70 thousand Rupees, covering all expenses. The Wadia, Mohan, Imperial or Ranjit action films cost a little more as they were more elaborate with some story and known actors.

There were specialist actors like Baburao Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Fearless Nadia, Prakash, Boman Shroff, Billimoria brothers, John Cawas and few others who were fixed stars of stunt films. In those days “SPL FX” techniques were not there and all the stunts were actually done by the actors themselves.

Veeru Devgan – yesteryear Fight Master, has written an article on “Stunts and Actions” in the “Encyclopedia of Hindi Cinema”. He says in it,

“It was from film Aan-52 that professionals were employed for the first time. Azeembhai handled the Horses and Douglas took care of the fights and fencing….
“Evolution of action hero began with “Phool aur Pathar”-66, when Dharmendra bared his chest for the first time….
“Stunts in Hindi cinema started taking centre stage in the late 60s and early 70s…..
“What is creditable is that most of today’s actors are ready to do all the action scenes themselves “.

These days, no film is complete without “SPL FX”. What we miss now is the Human involvement in film stunts !

The cast of today’s film was Fearless Nadia, John Cawas, Goldstein, Dalpat, Leela kumari, Rajani, Shyamsundar, Raja Sandow etc. This film is remarkable for 2 reasons. First is – for its Music Director, Madholal Damodar Master, this was his last film as MD. He retired from films, but excelled in another field with International fame, after retirement. More of it later in this post.

Secondly, one of the names in the film cast today was Raja Sandow. He indeed was in the film and film credits, though he had died on 25-11-1943 only ! Surprised ? Not only this film, but a total of 5 Hindi films and over a dozen Tamil films featured Raja Sandow in their films till 1960 ! This is because this legend of stunt films was so popular that his film shots were used again in different films for over a decade as a member of film cast. This must be unique in the world.

Raja Sandow (born P. K. Nagalingam) was an Indian film actor, film director and producer. He began his career as an actor in silent films and later became a prominent actor and director in Tamil and Hindi films of the 1930s. He is considered to be one of the pioneers of early Indian cinema.

Raja Sandow was born in Pudukottai, Tamil Nadu. He was trained as a gymnast and started his film career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film Company at Bombay. He was given the name “Raja Sandow” because of his physique (after strongman Eugen Sandow). His first lead role was in Patankar’s Bhaktha Bhodhana (1922), for which he was paid Rs. 101 as salary. A passionate gymnast, he started his career as a stunt actor in S.N. Patankar’s National Film (1922). Top star at Kohinoor and its associate LAxmi Pics. (1922-8) under Manilal Joshi (Mojili Mumbai), R.S. Choudhury and Homi Master. Achieved fame when he formed a trio with director Chandulal Shah and heroine Gohar starting Jagdish Film with them (1928) and its successor, Ranjit Film (1929-36). Sandow’s star image in reformist melodramas, playing complex psychological characters opposite Gohar, was launched with Gunsundari and extended in several classic ‘negative’ roles in Shah-Gohar sound films, e.g. Desh Dasi, Prabhu Ka Pyara and Barrister’s Wife. Other noted roles include Indira MA where he plays Kishore.

He became famous by starring in silent films like Veer Bhemsen (1923), The Telephone Girl (1926). After acting in a few silent films he also worked as a director in Ranjit Studios for a monthly salary. His first film as director was Sneh Jyoti (1928).
Returning to Tamil Nadu, he directed and acted in a number of silent films for R. Padmanaban’s Associate Film Company. Many of his silent films had reformist social themes like Peyum pennum (1930), Nandhanar (1930), Anadhai Penn (1931), Pride of Hindustan (1931) and sathi usha sundari (1931). After talking films were introduced with Alam Ara in 1931, he went back to Bombay and starred in many Hindi and Tamil talkies. He was often paired with the actresses Gohar and Sulochana (Ruby Myers). Between 1932–35, he acted in many socially themed Hindi films like Shyam sundar (1932), Devaki (1934) and Indira MA (1935). In 1935, he was commissioned to direct his first Tamil film Menaka and returned to Madras. He continued directing and acting in films till his death in 1943. Vasantha Sena(1936), Chalak Chor (1936), Chandrakanta (1936), Vishnuleela (1938), Thiruneelakantar (1939) and Choodamani (1941) were some of the films he directed and starred in during that period. The last film he worked in was Sivakavi (1943). Sandow suffered a heart attack and died at Coimbatore on 25 November 1943. He was survived by his wife Leelabai and one Son.

As far as films are concerned, he acted in 58 Silent films, 16 Hindi Talkie films and also directed 2 Hindi Talkie films.

Sandow was the first Tamil film director to adopt the practice of using names of actors in film titles. He was the first to introduce intimate kissing scenes and dancers in revealing costumes to the then conservative Tamil film industry. He was also the first director and producer to move Tamil cinema from remaking mythological stories and into making social themed films. He even advertised his films as “Don’t miss to see your own picture”. Sandow was also the first director to use Tamil literary works for film by directing Anadhai penn in 1931 based on Vai. Mu. Kothainayagi Ammal’s novel of the same name.

Writing about Sandow, film historian Theodore Baskaran says: “As a director, actor, scriptwriter and producer, his contribution to Tamil cinema is significant. Many of the stars of the Forties and Fifties have worked with him. He was very competent at coaching actors and maintained complete control over his films. He was a martinet on the sets and was often compared to a ringmaster in a circus. In his films, the emphasis shifted from songs to the spoken word.”

Film historian Randor Guy has also described him as a tough task master: “Raja Sandow was a tough and no-nonsense guy who would not hesitate to shout at and slap his crew and cast including women! Regretfully there are no such directors these days!.”

The Tamil Nadu Government has instituted an annual award in his name called Raja Sandow memorial Award, given for outstanding services to Tamil Cinema. A Postage stamp had been issued in recognition of his contributions to Indian cinema.

Filmography-Talkie films in Hindi…Pardesi preetam-33, Noor e imaan-33, Toofani Taruni-34, Partha Kumar-34, kashmeera-34, Indira M.A.-34, Gunsundari-34, Ratan Manjiri-35, Raat ki rani-35, Desh Dasi-35, College girl-35, Barrister’s wife-35, Prabhu ka pyara-36, Matlabi Duniya-36, Dil ka Daku-36 and Chalaak Chor-36. He directed Raat ki rani-35 and Chalaak Chor-36.

An extraordinary point. Raja Sandow was so popular during the Silent era and early Talkie period, that even after his death in 1943 at Coimbatore, his film shots and leftover films were used in 5 Hindi films till 1953-that is till 10 years after his death. Even his name appeared in the film cast and credits !. I feel this is an exclusive honour, which I have never heard in case of any other actor. The films using his shots in them were Dhoomketu-49, Alladin and Wonderful lamp-52, Jungle ka Jawahar-52, Nav Durga-53 and Husn ka chor-53. This information is given in The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema.

(Thanks for information from wiki, The Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, Atit ke sitare by Nand kishore, muVyz, HFGK and my notes).

The name Madholal Master must be unknown to the newer crop of Music lovers, because he retired from film music in 1952- much before most readers were even born. The story of Madhulal Master is as strange as his death. On the morning of 19th June 1990, The Times of India, Bombay flashed a news…” The old time Music Director and a Director of Indian Institute of Puppetry, shri Madholal Damodar Master is found murdered in his Shivaji Park home.”

Born on 21-6-1903, Madholal joined the film industry to become a Comedian, but he was first made a sound recordist assistant, then an assistant MD for two films and finally independent MD for Krishna Tone Film Company for their film, ‘ Navchetan’-32. In the next 21 years he gave music to 34 Hindi films, few Gujarati films and some documentaries, composing 267 Hindi songs. Unable to cope up with the changed pattern of Music and public taste, he retired from this profession after his last film- Jungle ka Jawahir-52. After this he pursued his hobby of Puppet making and soon developed a flourishing business. Internationally well known, he was the only Indian member honoured by the International Puppetiers’ Organization. Very few people know that it was his JOKER PUPPET which was used by Raj Kapoor in his ambitious film MERA NAAM JOKER-1970.

He was invited as a special guest for the release ceremony for the HFGK-Vol I, on 8-10-1988, after Harmandir ji meticulously made special efforts to locate him in Bombay. He was overwhelmed with this gesture. Madholal ji showed a Catalogue to Harmandir ji, in which Madholal ji had recorded information about all songs composed by him with details of every film that he did in his career. Harmandir ji was wonder struck with his systematic records. In the ceremony, senior artistes like Naushad, Sitara Devi, Rajkumari ji etc all touched his feet with respect. He regaled the audience with his humorous talk for an hour. He had spent 38 years before this in anonymity. It is very sad that his life ended in such a tragic way. ( His murderer was never found out, nor was the motive known and the case file was closed.)

Here is today’s duet from the film “Jungle ka Jawahar”-52. It is shot on Rajni and actor singer Shyamsundar. Enjoy….


Song- Pyaare Pappu Gore Gappu paas tu mere aa (Jungle Ka Jawaahar)(1952)Singers- Sulochana Kadam, Shyamsundar, Lyricist- Saraswati Kumar Deepak, MD- Madholal Damodar Master

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhallo
chhod de mujhko ja

pyaare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapak jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithhalli chhod mera palla
kahoon main mutalle chhod de muhalla
kahoon main nithalli chhod mera palla
main jungle ki sherni
tu shahar ka pilla
khaati gaajar mooli tu
main khaata rasgulla
main khata rasgulla
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubaab tera
are ja ja ja na phira dimaag mera
ho ho ho dekha bada rubab mera
mujhe jaan le,
nahin
kahaa maan le
nahin nahin
mujhe jaan le
kaha maan le
o tauba hai ??
mujhko nahi sata
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat

pyare pappu gore gappu
pass tu mere aa
o ri kallo jhapk jhalo
chhod de mujhko ja

adiyal tattu mere mitthu
meethe bol suna
ulti sulti khoti khoti
baaten nahin bana
bhaiya bhaiya bhaiya
bhaiya aurat ki ye jaat
iski koi na samjhe baat
karti baaton ki barsat
chaahe din ho chaahe raat
maare ghodi ban ke laat


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4399 Post No. : 15776

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No.49
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In my younger days, I remember to have watched Marathi film ‘Kunku’ (1937) on Bombay Doordarshan (now ‘Sahyadri’ Channel). At that time, I was not aware that ‘Duniya Na Maane’ (1937) was its Hindi version. Even it did not occur to me that the subject chosen for the film was very bold. I have no much recollections of the songs of the film but Shanta Apte’s performance has remained in my mind as it was quite different as compared with the theatrical acting by most of the actors of that time. Even her song renditions were looking natural as against the ‘fixed gaze’ style of song renditions witnessed in most of the films at that time.

After about 3 decades when I had watched the Hindi version on a video sharing platform, I still found that even in the present juncture, the subject handled in the film appears bold. I sometime feel that V Shantaram, the director, must be having a knack of convincing his other partners in Prabhat Films to agree to produce the film with a bold subject who may have thought that the film would receive the brickbats especially from the orthodox segment of the society after the release. That the film was a box office hit proves the capability of V Shantaram as a director for handling the bold subject in a way that convinced a large number of cine-goers about the evil of mismatched marriage

14-year old Nirmala (Shanta Apte) is married through a deciet by her uncle to a widower (Keshavrao Date), a lawyer, who is old enough to be her father. But she does not accept him to be her husband. While she takes care of the family as a housewife, she refuses to consummate the marriage by saying that while sufferings can be borne, injustice can not be tolerated. Over a period of time, her husband feels guilty and treat Nirmala as his daughter. He release her from the marriage but the conservative society does not accept this arrangement. In the end, the widower commits suicide with a note to Nirmala that she is free to remarry.

In selecting Shanta Apte in the role of Nirmala, V Shantaram must have observed her as a woman of substance who would perform her reel role of an enlightened woman who fights for her rights in a same way as she had done in her real life. In this film, there is a scene in which she gives a trashing with a cane to her college going step son for misbehaving with her as well as with his father and forces him to seek forgiveness from his father. I recall an instance when she had gone to ‘Filmindia’ office with a cane (or whip?) to trash Baburao Patel, the firebrand editor for writing some unpleasant comments about her acting. It was reported that to avoid trashing, Baburao Patel had to hide below his table.

10 years back, one song from the film ‘Duniya Naa Maane’ (1937) was posted on the Blog. So far, 5 songs from the film have been posted on the Blog details of which are as under:

Songs Name of the Film
ek thha raaja 03/08/2010
in the worlds broad field of battle 04/08/2010
man saaf tera hai ya nahin 12/11/2012
jai ambe gauri maiyya 09/10/2013
saawan jhoola jhool ke nikla 19/03/2014

I am presenting the 6th song, ‘samjha kya hai duniya daana’ from the film which is rendered by actor-singer, Shanta Apte. The song is written by Munshi Aziz which is set to music by Keshavrao Bhole. In this song, there is no musical interludes. I liked the way, Shanta Apte sang the line ‘kisi ki chup’ followed by a very brief pause and then continuing singing ‘walwala kisi kaa’.

One of the features of the film was that the music director, Keshavrao Bhole did not use orchestra for all its songs, Instead, he relied on using a couple of musical instruments. Two of its 12 songs (including the one under discussion) were sung by Shanta Apte by playing gramophone records.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Samjha kya hai duniya daana (Duniya Na Maane)(1937) Singer-Shanta Apte, Lyrics-Munshi Aziz, MD-Keshavrao Bhole

Lyrics

samjha…aa kya hai duniya….aa ….aa
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa
daana
yahaan pe aake har ek apni
yahaan pe aake har ek apni
niraali duniya bana raha hai
niraali duniya bana raha hai
deewaana daana zamaana kya kya
deewaana daana zamaana kya kya
hamein tamaashe dikha raha hai
hamein tamaashe dikha raha hai
kisi ki chup
walwala kisi kaa
chhuri kisi ki
gala kisi kaa
kisi ki chup
walwala kisi kaa
chhuri kisi ki
gala kisi kaa
bura kisi ka
bhala kisi kaa
bura kisi ka
bhala kisi kaa
dharam yahi kya sikha raha hai
dharam yahi kya sikha raha hai
sitam kaa sahna
sitam kaa sahna
har ek taakat
badhega dil aur badhegi himmat
sitam ka sahna
aa aa aa aa
sitam ka sahna
har ek taakat
badhega dil aur badhegi himmat
hai ye bhi ek zindagi ki daulat
hai ye bhi ek zindagi ki daulat
suno ye aaj suna raha hai
suno ye aaj suna raha hai


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4390 Post No. : 15755

Yesterday, 24th July, was the 40th remembrance day of the ‘Mahanayak’, as he is fondly referred to by his fans and friends.

Uttam Kumar, was born as Arun Kumar Chatterji on 3rd September, 1926 in Calcutta (now Kolkata). After his schooling, he joined college, but was not able to complete his graduation. He joined the amateur stage drama group – Suhrid Samaj, which was owned by his extended joint family, Starting from humble beginnings in amateur theatre, he went on to become the most successful actor in Bengali cinema. He rode the waves of popularity and continued to be a beloved icon of Bangla cinema. He was still at the height of his professional career when he passed away all too soon at the age of 54, this day in 1980.

‘Bandi’ from 1978, is one of the short list of Hindi films that he appeared in. Here is a song from that film, a romantic duet that he performs with Sulakshana Pandit. The words of this song are written by Indeewar and the music is by Shyamal Mitra.

The lyrics of this song have been sent in by Peevesie’s Mom.

A song to honor the memory of the ‘Mahanayak’ -Uttam Kumar.

Song – Jisey Yaar Ka Sachcha Pyaar Miley  (Bandi) (1978) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Sulakshana Pandit, Lyrics – Indeewar, MD – Shyamal Mitra
Kishore Kumar + Sulakshana Pandit

Lyrics (Provided by Peevesie’s Mom)

jisey yaar ka sachcha pyaar miley
usey saare jahaan ki daulat kya
jisey yaar ka sachcha pyaar miley
usey saare jahaan ki daulat kya
teri aankhon mein chamke pyaar agar
heeron ki mujhko zaroorat kya
duniya mein jiska mol nahin
wo kya hai 
pyaar
pyaar
pyaar

tu jo saath ho 
dil ke paas ho
har gham hai gawaara
bharti nahin nigaah tera
kar ke nazaara
humraaz tu 
mera saaz tu
mere dil ka tu gehna
hai swarg se pyaara mujhe
teri baahon mein rehna
jab dekhoon main tujhko
lagta hai mujhko
rab ka hua deedar
jisey yaar ka sachcha pyaar miley
usey saare jahaan ki daulat kya
teri aankhon mein chamke pyaar agar
heeron ki mujhko zaroorat kya

tera sahaara 
main ban jaaun
mera sahaara tu ho
ang mila ke aise 
sang chaloon jaise
phool ke sang khusboo ho
tera sahaara 
main ban jaaun
mera sahaara tu ho
ang mila ke aise 
sang chaloon jaise
phool ke sang khusboo ho
tum jaise rakhoge waise rahungi
karti hun iqraar
jisey yaar ka sachcha pyaar miley
usey saare jahaan ki daulat kya
teri aankhon mein chamke pyaar agar
heeron ki mujhko zaroorat kya
duniya mein jiska mol nahin
wo kya hai 
pyaar
pyaar
pyaar

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

जिसे यार का सच्चा प्यार मिले
उसे सारे जहां की दौलत क्या
जिसे यार का सच्चा प्यार मिले
उसे सारे जहां की दौलत क्या
तेरी आँखों में चमके प्यार अगर
हीरों की मुझको ज़रूरत क्या
दुनिया में जिसका मोल नहीं
वो क्या है
प्यार
प्यार
प्यार

तू जो साथ हो
दिल के पास हो
हर ग़म है गवारा
भरती नहीं निगाह तेरा
करके इशारा
हमराज़ तू
मेरा साज़ तू
मेरे दिल का तू गहना
है स्वर्ग से प्यारा मुझे
तेरी बाहों में रहना
जब देखूँ मैं तुझको
लगता है मुझको
रब का हुआ दीदार
जिसे यार का सच्चा प्यार मिले
उसे सारे जहां की दौलत क्या
तेरी आँखों में चमके प्यार अगर
हीरों की मुझको ज़रूरत क्या

तेरा सहारा
मैं बन जाऊँ
मेरा सहारा तू हो
अंग मिला के ऐसे
संग चलूँ जैसे
फूल के संग खुशबू हो
तेरा सहारा
मैं बन जाऊँ
मेरा सहारा तू हो
अंग मिला के ऐसे
संग चलूँ जैसे
फूल के संग खुशबू हो
तुम जैसे रखोगे वैसे रहूँगी
करती हूँ इक़रार
जिसे यार का सच्चा प्यार मिले
उसे सारे जहां की दौलत क्या
तेरी आँखों में चमके प्यार अगर
हीरों की मुझको ज़रूरत क्या
दुनिया में जिसका मोल नहीं
वो क्या है
प्यार
प्यार
प्यार


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4382 Post No. : 15730

Today’s song is from the film Albeli-45. This was the first of the three same Title films. The other two were made in 1955 and 1974 ( interestingly, its masculine counterpart Albela was made 4 times- in 1951,1971,1990 and 2001 !).

The film was made by Talwar Productions, Calcutta. The music was composed by G A Chisti, who, while in India, got only B and C grade films. He became a big composer in Pakistan, after he migrated there in 1949. He was not only successful, but also got many awards. At the end of his life, he had become a Faqir. He was popularly known as ” Babaji” in the film industry, here and in Pakistan, due to his helpful and simple nature. As per HFGK, the lyricists of film Albeli were Shanti Swarup and Chisti. The cast was Ramola, Rooplekha, Manorama, Satish, Hiralal, Usha and many others. Albeli-45 is perhaps the only film in which there were three Jew girls as Heroines – Ramola, Rooplekha and Manorama.

The film was directed by R C Talwar. R.C.Talwar aka Raghubir Chand Talwar was born on 21-4-1910, at Tolaganj, in Western Punjab-now in Pakistan. His film life, as many others of his ilk, started in Calcutta and ended in Bombay. While at Calcutta, he worked as an assistant to Kidar Sharma. After the success of the film, Aulad / Dil Hi Toh Hai (1939), Ramola got romantically involved with R.C. Talwar, Kidar Sharma’s assistant who later became a director in his own right. According to Kidar Sharma, “R.C. Talwar was a classmate and friend so I ignored his relationship with Ramola.”

He was a screenplay writer, producer and Director. Starting from Manchali-43, produced by Talwar productions,Calcutta, which he had established there, Talwar directed films like Khamoshi-42, Albeli-45, Khiladi-50, Sangdil-52, Ilzam-54, Rukhsana-55, Memsahib-56, Ek dil sau afsane-63 and Naya Kanoon-1965. He produced 2 films, Sangdil and Memsahib-for which he had written the screenplay also.

Talwar directed Kishore Kumar in 3 films, Ilzam, Rukhsana and Memsahib. In all these films, the Heroine was Meena Kumari. While Ilzam was a social film, Rukhsana was a Costume film and Memsahib was supposed to be a comedy film. This was also produced by him.

After the film Memsahib was completed, Talwar had to pay a balance amount of Rs. 8000/- to Kishore Kumar. Even after Kishore’s several reminders, Talwar failed to pay Kishore his dues. Kishore Kumar employed a novel idea. Everyday, in the morning, before proceeding for shooting, Kishore would go to Talwar’s house. Standing outside at his gate, Kishore used to shout loudly,” Hey Talwar, de de mera Aath Hazaar “. This continued for a few days and Talwar was so annoyed that he paid off Kishore’s dues.

India is a country in which many religions co exist and thrive happily. India’s history says, it was Secular from times immemorial and it never preveted any religions from growing here. The Indian culture believes that all religions are different roads to God. That is why India is considered a Heaven for other religions.

As per records, the first ever outside religious group that came to India was Jews – who landed near Cochin, in Kerala, in the 6th Century. Islam came to India in the 7th Century and a Mosque built by the early visitors in 629 AD still exists in India. The Parsis came to India in the 8th Century. Such was the tolerance of the Indians, since the beginning. No wonder, these religions not only sought growth here but also prospered safely.

Muslims, Parsis and Jews joined the film industry, since its beginning in the Silent Era.

The number of artistes given by one of the single Non Indian communities, in those days was the Jews. The Jews came to India in 562 BCE and in 70 CE in two lots. They settled in various parts of India. It was the first foreign religion to come to India, even before Islam or the Zorostrian. There were 8 types of Jews, based on their locations in India.

1. Cochin Jews
2. Madras Jews
3. Bene Israeli Jews in Bombay and Konkan areas
4. Baghdadi Jews-Gujarat, Bengal and Eastern India
5. South Asian Jews
6. Bnei Menashe- NE states
7. Bene Ephraim- Telugu and
8. Delhi Jews- Punjabi

Though the Jews mingled freely and adapted themselves to local atmosphere- maintaining and following Judaism-, the Jews who took up to Film Industry were only the Bene Israeli and Baghdadi Jews. A point to note was that no Jews from Kerala or Madras even entered the film line. It was only the Hindi films and that too mainly Jew women joined films. The earliest recorded Jew girl to work as a Heroine in a film was Ruby Meyers ( Sulochana ). She acted in silent film Veer Bala-1925, made by Mohan Bhavnani for Kohinoor Film company, Bombay. She went on working in films and became very popular. When the Talkie film age came, she contacted Imperial film co. to stake her claim, but was rejected as she was not fluent in speaking Hindustani. Learning from this, she took one year off and became an expert in Hindi and learnt singing too. She made a thumping entry with the Talkie film Madhuri-1932, in which she sang 4 songs also ! Hats off to the dedication !

There were other Jew actresses like Rose Musleah (Miss Rose), Lilian Ezra (Lilian), Marcia Soloman(Vimla), Rachel Sofaer(Arti Devi), Esther Abraham (Pramila), Rachel Cohen (Ramola), Sofia Cohen (Rooplekha), Sofia Abraham (Romilla), Irene Issac (Manorama), Patience Cooper, Violet Cooper, Susan Soloman(Feroza Begum), Florence Ezekiel(Nadira) and many more. Among the males- David Joseph Penkar wrote the story and dialogues of Alam Ara-1931, Actor David Cheulkar (David ), Ezekiel Penkar (Viju Penkar- Tarzan film Tarzan and the Cobra-88 and few more films) and Lily Ezekiel (Asha Bhende), Edvyn Meyers (Ezra Mir) and Pearl Padamsi are well known Jews. There were some male Jews in the Technical side also.

Actress Ramola (real name- Rachel Cohen) was born in a Jew family on 5-7-1917, at Bombay. Her father Hayam Cohem was a school Teacher. Her initial education was done in Bombay. Later they shifted to Calcutta where she completed her matriculation and joined films. Her first film was ‘ Graher fer’-38,a Bangla film. She did a few small roles and then came ‘Khazanchi’-41 from Pancholi of Lahore. This changed her career and she became a popular actress. She did films like Masoom,Khamoshi manchali.etc etc.

Initially,Ramola was a small actress. First she acted on stage along with her two sisters. Then she got a Bangla film. It was Jagdish Sethi who introduced her to director/lyricist/dialogue writer Kidar Sharma.

According to Kidar Sharma,

“She was smart and a charming young lady. Her only drawback was her height. She was not tall, just about 5 feet, but she had lofty ambitions. One day she came to see me and I promised I would personally take her to the director of her choice. She said, “I would like to be introduced to Mr. Nitin Bose, and no one else.” I took her to Mr. Bose, and was sure that her charm and talent would impress him.

Mr. Bose scanned her, from top to toe, while I praised her talent and her choice of a director, like Nitin Bose. After a long silence, Mr. Bose addressed me and said, “When you brought her to me, why did you forget to bring some bricks for her to stand on?” Poor Romola was hurt and heart-broken by this great director’s caustic remark. She quietly said, “Goodbye” and walked away from his office.

I followed her and found that she was in tears. ‘I was moved by the plight of a struggling youngster having high hopes, being ridiculed for something which nature was responsible for. I knew what it felt like to be ridiculed. I had experienced it often enough. I escorted her to the tram junction and there she bid me goodbye. To encourage her, I said, “Please, Romola, don’t be heart-broken. One day, when I become a director, you will be my first heroine, and we will prove to Mr. Bose and the world, what a great star you are.” Romola laughed and said,- “Poor Mr. Kidarnath, the dialogue-writer will never be a director and I will never be a heroine.” So saying, she jumped into the tram.”

However, Kidar Sharma kept his promise and cast her in his first film as director Aulad / Dil Hi To Hai (1939). Aulad/Dil Hi To hai was a down-to-earth story of a middle-class father, who had sacrificed all his life to educate his son and his darling daughter, hoping that they would be worthy children to the society and to the family. Little did the old man know that the generation gap would present a different, horrifying reality, which would destroy him completely. The modern college Miss, who destroys the dreams of her old father, the aged struggling middle class man, was played by Ramola.

After the success of the film, Ramola got romantically involved with R.C. Talwar, Kidar Sharma’s assistant who later became a director in his own right. According to Kidar Sharma, “R.C. Talwar was a classmate and friend so I ignored his relationship with Ramola.”

Later Ramola appeared in many films including Qaidi, Khazanchi, Khamoshi, Swan Aya Re, Rim Jhim etc. When she acted in Pancholi’s famous film Khazanchi-41, she became famous all over India and film offers started pouring on her. She looked so cute in her Punjabi dress- Salwar and Kurta- in that film, that this dress became famous and popular as Khazanchi dress amongst the women in India.

Ramola’s sister Rooplekha (Sofia Cohen) was also in films. Her first film was Nishani-42. After this she worked in 3 films, all with Ramola. The films were, Shukriya-44, Albeli-45 and Jhoothi kasmen-48. Later she got married and left films.

Ramola acted in 23 films in Hindi and 5 films in Bangla. She even sang 14 songs in 4 Hindi films. She also worked in a Punjabi film “Pardesi Dhola”, for which R C Talwar was the director. After the arrival of new heroines including Madhubala, Nargis, Meena Kumari etc, Ramola’s career got eclipsed and she bid farewell to her film career. Her last 3 films Actor, Jawani Ki Aag and Stage were released in 1951. However her actual last film was the Bangla film, Anurag-51.

Ramola was married twice. Her second husband, Leslie Rondeau, was a Captain in the British Air Force, who helped to train Indian pilots in the IAF post Indian Independence. Her son, Sam, from her first husband, migrated to Israel in the 1950s. She had two daughters, Dena and Linda, from her second marriage. Dena, based in London today, even acted in a film, GP Sippy’s Ahsaas (1979), and works in the fashion industry while Linda, a resident of Bombay, was an air-hostess with Air India. With her generous and large hearted spirit, Ramola also ‘adopted’ and looked after another 14 families, helping them move ahead in life.

Ramola passed away in Bombay on 10-12-1988.

Film Albeli’s review came in the March – 46 issue of Film India magazine. As usual, Baburao Patel had nothing good to say about this film. The film’s story centred around the love affair of a street girl and a Gypsy boy, who is loved by two more girls. The film was released on 22-12-1945 at Central Cinema, Bombay. The story was by Talwar himself. Dialogues and Screenplay was by J.S.Casshyap. Out of the 12 songs of the film, I heard 5 songs and I felt that today’s song was the best amongst them. The song is a duet sung by Zeenat begum and Satish, the film’s hero. Despite all efforts,I could not get any information about this Satish. All that I know is he acted in 24 films-from Uski Tamanna-39 to Bus Conductor-59. He seems to have sung 33 songs in 22 films, from Sanskar-40 to Baghi Sardar-56.

( Information for this post is culled from articles ” Shalom Bollywood” and ‘The rise and fall of Jews in Bollywood’ from Weekly news dated 6-4-2013, wiki, HFGK, muVyz,Film Directory-46, ” The one and lonely Kidar Sharma” by Kidar Sharma and my notes)


Song-Do Saajan ki aur do apni aankhen ho gayeen chaar (Albeli)(1945) Singers-Zeenat Begum, Satish, Lyricist- Not known, MD- G A Chishti
Both

<strong.Lyrics

Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
donon ke is madhur milan se
donon ke is madhur milan se
basa naya sansaar

Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar

tum samjhaao(?) saajan beena
main beena ke taaaar
tum samjhaao(?) saajan beena
main beena ke taaaar
jhoom jhoom kar naachen gaayen
jhoom jhoom kar naachen gaayen

gaayen raag malhaar
gaayen raag malhaar

Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar

haan aan aan aan
sundar sundar naina teekhe
main unke balihaar
haan haan
sundar sundar naina teekhe
main unke balihaar
palkon pe bithhlaa ke peechhe ae ae ae ae
palkpn pe bithhlaa ke peechhe
ud jaaun us paar
palkpn pe bithhlaa ke peechhe
ud jaaun us paar
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
Do Saajan ki aur do apni
aankhen ho gayeen chaar
aankhen ho gayeen chaar


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has more than 16100 song posts by now.

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