Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs of 1940s (1941 to 1950)’ Category


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4724 Post No. : 16436

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Geeta Dutt – Solos and Duets (06)
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Question:
Kitaaben bahot si
padhi hongi tum ne
magar koyi chehra bhi
tum na padha hai

Answer:
Padha hai meri jaan
Nazar se padha hai

Next Question:
Bata mere chehre pe
Kya kya likha hai

The above is a film song from the film ‘Baazigar” written by Zafar Gorakhpuri. There have been some songs in hindi films which refer to ‘Kitaab’, like
Dil ki kitaab kori hai kori hi rehne do and Haathhon mein kitaab baalon mein gulaab.

The second song above is my own post from 2015. As I read it again today, I found that I referred to the ‘Baazigar’ song in that post as written by Sameer, but that’s incorrect. Another reason why I am talking about books today is, in a recent post I talked about film magazines. That evoked a few comments from regulars, which in turn made me remember a lot of mishaps or near misses, which have happened in my life.

My love for reading has always been an important factor in my life. Not necessarily, useful things or text book learnings, but anything on any topic that catches my fancy and is readable and reasonably understandable to my unscientific mind. Scientific theories are beyond me, and maths was my weakest subject in school. But I was not at all lacking in analytical abilities and general knowledge, which seems to have gotten me through at least one all india level competitive exam, where lakhs of people aspiring for government jobs tried. It could have been sheer luck that I got most of ‘analytical ability’ part objective type answers correct. It certainly cannot have been the mathematical portion of the exams. One portion was of English language, that must have helped. I kept the ‘Maths’ part for the last, and some of the answers I just marked randomly :-). The exam was for undergraduates, but my father still could not believe it, when he saw the merit list.

Reading, reading and more reading, has made me a more balanced person, where I don’t get easily rattled. Never bored under any circumstances. Magazine is ‘risaala’ in urdu language. I have grown up with all kinds of publications, periodicals, weekly, fortnightly, monthly, and of course the daily newspapers. Digests also, in Urdu and ‘Reader’s digest’ in English. I have read many novels in Urdu too, which are difficult to come by now. I know, digital version is available, if I really want to read them now. All my maternal uncles and paternal uncle, would carry some newspaper or magazine with them whenever they came to our place. Now I go to their places, there is no sign of magazine or newspapers in their household. We can blame this on digital media, which has put paid to the printed material’s role, in our daily lives. It comes DTH, appears cheaper, requires no hard-work or maintenance even. Don’t have to save it from small children. That the children should be kept away from things digital, is another matter.

Thus, I was exposed to different type of publications in English, Urdu, Hindi and Marathi, while growing up. I consider myself fortunate to have seen “Blitz” in English and in Urdu, for e.g. All periodicals published in the south also I have read while growing up, be they political, sports or financial. Maybe in 1993 people still referred to books as ‘kitaab’, but now the word is rarely heard, unless I am watching an urdu drama series. There also only the older generation is heard talking of ‘kitaab’. In school textbooks were ‘kitaab’ and notebooks were ‘copy’ or kaapi.

Living and growing up in a metropolitan city has its own advantages. Major ones in my opinion are, the cosmopolitan outlook that one develops in personal and social aspects, plus the opportunities for growth and success in life professionally, are better. A thriving city is like a big machinery, it cannot afford to let any part of it be disrupted. Be it the lowest of slums or the poshest of locality. And overall people are not bothered what others are doing, which augers well in some ways. In terms of personal freedom and mental well-being.

So here I was, growing up in Mumbai, in which good fortune I had no contribution to make. It was destiny. A couple of things, like missed opportunities that have surfaced in the memory, is a job opportunity in a financial magazine. I got a call for some sort of test they were taking, I must have applied for the ‘trainee’ job, right after graduation. I attempted that test, without knowing what to expect there. I may not have fared well there, as I never got a call or any communication.

Another instance of a missed opportunity is one where I attended a walk-in interview somewhere in the Fort area for some trainee post at TCS in 1990-91. Computers were the new in-thing in the late 80’s and in college we had ‘computer science’ as optional subject. TCS was on its way up to the greater things it achieved in later years. There was group discussion also among the candidates who had turned up that day. I remember there were around 15-20 of us. At the end of it all some were shortlisted, then were told to take up the course, which was costing may be 10000/- or so, I don’t exactly remember. They said that the candidates will be absorbed in the company after that course, but the fees had to be paid. I came home and discussed all this with my parents. I was not so keen on computer programming, as it is, so didn’t press the issue. Theory subject were my forte, and I used to do well in subjects like economics. Late 80’s and early 90’s was also a period of great boom in share markets investments. It turned out that my father has shares of TCS, which he obviously got at the time of issue years ago. Lo and behold, if he knew or had an inkling of the company’s prospects and potential, then he could have guided me in that direction. But that was not to be, as it was not destined to be. After all God Almighty is the best of planners, and it is his will and his alone, that can take us in a particular direction.

Nida Fazli has said accurately:
“waqt se pehle qismat se zyada, kisi ko mila hai na kisi ko milegaa”

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Lakdi jal koyla bhayee
koyla bhayee raakh
Main baawri aisi jali
koyla bhayee na raakh

This is the actual doha, from which the initial lines of the song are inspired. Lyricist is Anjum and the composer of this truet song is Chitragupt. The singers are Geeta Dutt, Shamshad Begum, and Shanti Sharma. Shanti Sharma is a new name for me, but I see in the stats page that she has 2 songs in the blog.

This is a nice qawwali style song, I had saved the link for featuring in this series of Geeta Dutt. One more variation, in the singer’s repertoire for sure. She has been part of many qawwali’s in the career, as she was capable of singing all types and moods of film songs. She was comfortable in the mischievous songs also, with her strong vocals, with a hint of khanak, like Shamshad Begum. Asha Bhosle has in later years, tried to adopt the strength in voice which was a signature of Shamshad Begum and which Geeta Dutt has demonstrated in many songs.


Song-Dekho to dil hi dil mein jalte hain jalne waale (Hamaara Ghar)(1950) Singers- Geeta Roy, Shamshad Begum , Shanti Sharma, Lyrics-Anjum, MD-Chitragupta
All

Lyrics

Lakdi jal koylaa bhayee
Aur koyla jal bhayaa raakh
baaki dushman yoon jale ae ae
ki koyla bhaye na raakh

dekho to dil hi dil mein ean
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale

aapas mein mil jul kar hansnaa
khel naseebe waalon ka
haay khel naseebe waalon kaa

aapas mein mil jul kar hansnaa
khel naseebe waalon ka
haay khel naseebe waalon kaa

ho oo oooo
kaam nahin duniya mein kisi ko
dekh ke jalne waalon ka
haan dekh ke jalne waalon ka
aaa aa aa aa
khoob samjhte hain matlab
in ulti seedhi chaalon kaa

hai dhokhe ki ye duniyaa aa
hai dhokhe ki ye duniyaa
kehte hain kehne waale
haay kehte hain kehne waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale

dekh ke ham ko jalte ho
kya seekhe chaal zamaane ki
haay seekhe chaal zamaane ki

dekh ke ham ko jalte ho
kya seekhe chaal zamaane ki
haay seekhe chaal zamaane ki

ho oo o o o
aankhen ho to haalat dekho
deepak ki parwaane ki
haay deepak ki parwaane ki

ooo oooooo
ye baat magar kapti dil ke
nahin samajh mein aane ki

qismat mein jab likkha hai
qismat mein jab likkha hai
rote hain rone waale
haay rote hain rone waale
dekho to dil hi dil mein
jalte hain jalne waale
haay jalte hain jalne waale


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4718 Post No. : 16426

Today’s song is from the ‘1946’ movie ‘Sohni Mahiwal’. Regulars on the blog must have noticed my liking for ‘Zohrabai Ambalewali’ songs as I have shared her songs on the blog from time to time as and when I get an opportunity.
Though today’s song was initially noted by me almost seven years back, I am presenting it now with some more details about the total songs in this movie.

‘Sohni Mahiwal-1946’ was directed by Ishwar Lal and Ravindra Jaikar for ‘Jayant Desai Productions, Bombay’.

It was based on the legend of Sohni Mahiwal. It had Ishwar Lal, Begam Para, Mubarak, Dixit, Rewashankar, Sayeed Ahmed, Gharpure, Bibibai, Shobha, Nafis Begam, Kesharbai and others.

This movie had as many as eleven songs. They were written by Swami Ramanand (nine songs) and Munshi Dil (two songs). Music for this movie was composed by Lal Mohammad.

Here is the list of songs in this movie: –

SNo Song Title Singer Lyricist Posted On
01 Mujhe loot liya re mujhe … bhole sanam ne Naseem Akhtar Swami Ramanand
02 Anaaron ke baagh mein chhup chhup ke aana …o pardesi bhool na jaanaa Zohrabai Ambalewali Swami Ramanand
03 Muhabbat ke bande, muhabbat karenge Not mentioned Swami Ramanand
04 Ab to aa jaa jaani yaar tera intezaar hai Zohrabai Ambalewali Swami Ramanand
05 Koyi aankhon mein aa ke samaa gaya Zohrabai Ambalewali Swami Ramanand
06 Nahin chiraag e mohabbat jalaaye jaate hain Zohrabai Ambalewali Munshi Dil
07 Teri Sohni pukaar kare, Mahiwal dekh Zohrabai Ambalewali Swami Ramanand
08 Chali pyaar sakhi sasuraal dil kyun doley naa Zoharabai, G.M. Durrani Swami Ramanand
09 Chenab ke behte huye paani … Zoharabai, G.M. Durrani Swami Ramanand 18.09.2014
10 Dekh kar surat tumhaari dil gaya Rewashankar,chorus Swami Ramanand
11 O tujhpe salaam aye mere naakaam e muhabbat Zoharabai, G.M. Durrani Munshi Dil 13.09.2014

We can see from the above table that only two songs of this movie have been posted on the blog in September’2014. So, almost seven years have been passed without a song of this movie getting posted on the blog.

Today we will listen to the third song from this movie. IT is sung by Zohrabai Ambalewali. Lyrics are by Swami Ramanand and music is composed by Lal Muhammad.

Let us now enjoy this lovely song …( only the audio of this song is available).

Audio

Song-Anaaron ke baagh mein chhup chhup ke aana (Sohni Mahiwal)(1946) Singer-Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Lyrics-Swami Ramanand, MD-Lal Muhammad
Chorus
Zohrabai Ambalewaali+ Chorus

Lyrics

Anaaron ke baagh mein ae
Anaaron ke baagh mein ae
Chhup chhup ke aanaa
Chhup chhup ke aanaa
O pardesi ee

O pardesi ee
Bhool na jaana
Anaaron ke baagh mein

Mere gulshan ke baanke anaar hain
Mere gulshan ke baanke anaar hain
Daali daali
Daali daali pe phoolon ke haar hain

Daali daali
Daali daali pe phoolon ke haar hain

Chheda koyal ne dilkash taraana
Chheda koyal ne dilkash taraana
O pardesi ee
O pardesi ee
Bhool na jaana
Anaaron ke baagh mein ae

O o o o
O o o o
o o
Bholi bholi si meri jawaani
Bholi bholi si meri jawaani
Mere panghat ka meethha hai paani
Mere panghat ka meethha hai paani
Mast aankhon se peena pilaana
Mast aankhon se peena pilaana
O pardesi ee

O pardesi ee
Bhool na jaana
Anaaron ke baagh mein

Mere seene ki dhadkan pukaare
Mere seene ki dhadkan pukaare
Aao aao
Aao aao ji dilbar pyaare
Aao aao
Aao aao ji dilbar pyaare
Mil ke gaayen mohabbat ka gaana
Mil ke gaayen mohabbat ka gaana
O pardesi

O pardesi ee
Bhool na jaana
Anaaron ke baagh mein


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4715 Post No. : 16421

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Blog 10-Year Challenge (2011-2021) – Song No. 26
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This date ten years ago (15 June 2011) was a normal day for the blog when six songs from six different movies were were covered in the blog. Here are the details of the six songs that were covered on this day ten years ago:-

Blog post number Song Movie (Year) Remarks
4001 Dil neeke beete jaate hain Pooran Bhagat(1933) 6 songs so far covered out of 20
4002 Waah ri duniyaa waah re zamaane Grihasthhi(1948) 6 songs covered out of 8 by now
4003 Ae ishq hamen barbaad na kar Naach(1949) 9 songs covered out of 11 by now
4004 Thandi thandi hawaa jo aaye Sunehre Din(1949) 7 songs covered out of 10 by now
4005 Tum dekh rahe ho ke mite saare sahaare Sheesh Mahal(1950) All 9 songs covered. Movie YIPPEED
4006 Yahaan raat kisi ki rotey katey Jai Bhawaani(1961) 4 songs covered out of 8 by now

As many as five movies (out of six) are eligible for blog ten year challenge today on 15 June 2021.

“Naach”(1949) is one of the five eligible movies.

“Naach”(1949) was produced by Kuldeep Sehgal and directed by Ravibndra Dave for Kuldeep pictures, Bombay. The movie had Suraiyya, Shyam, Wasti, Om Prakash, Kuldip Kaur, Raj Mehra, Gulab, Yashodhara Katju, Sofia, Shyama, Urvashi, Sewak etc in it.

The movie had 11 songs in it. Nine songs have been covered in the past.

Today, as blog ten year chaallenge, here is the tenth song from “Naach”(1949) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Shamshad Begam and Rafi. Nazim Panipati is the lyricist. Music is composed by Husnlal Bhagatram.

The two female singers sing together throughout the song and they never sing alone.

Only the audio of the song is available. I request iur knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of the song.

Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.
With this song, Husnlal Bhagatram complete 300 songs in the blog as music directors.


Song-Namaste jee namaste jee (Naach)(1949) Singers-Rafi, Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Nazim Panipati, MD-Husnlal Bhagatram
Rafi + Zohrabai Ambalewaali + Shamshad Begam

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee
hamraa tumhraa jeevan beetey
hamraa tumhraa jeevan beetey
hanstey hanstey jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee..eee

subah se shaam tak
kyun gair ki galiyon mein rehte ho o o
khafa hotey hain jab hum phir
namastey hamko kehte ho
tumhaarey raaj mein kya hum
rahengey bas yoon rastey mein

namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee
hamraa tumhraa jeevan beetey
hamraa tumhraa jeevan beetey
hanstey hanstey jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee…eeee

hamaarey dil ke kamarey mein
phataaphat aake bas jaao o
naheen is dil ki kuchch pagdi
chaley aao chaley aao
khulee hai dil ki building
saikadon hain isske raste jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee
hamraa tumhra jeevan beetey
hamraa tumhra jeevan beetey
hanstey hanstey jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee ..eee

mangaa do aaj hi maathey ka jhoomar hamko dehli se
mangaa do haar soney ka hamein phauran bareilly se

hai dekho kitni mehangaayee
hai dekho kitni mehangaayee
magar zevar hain sastey jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee
hamraa tumhra jeevan beetey
hamraa tumhra jeevan beetey
hanstey hanstey jee
namastejee namastejee
namastejee namastejee eeee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4711 Post No. : 16417

MUSIC is an integral part of every Indian. From birth to death, we are drenched in music. During Vedic times, the Rishis used to teach their students verses in Taal and Sur, so that the students would remember them easily. You will have observed that whenever there is a Mahapooja or an Yadnya, the Purohits will recite the Mantras in a typical rhythm and sur.

In our school days, teachers used to literally force us to learn poems by heart in a tune, so that it was easier to remember. Not only poems, even the Maths teacher taught us the ” Pahade ” (Paadhe or the Tables) in a particular tune. That is how we remember the difficult tables of 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, 1-1/2,or the 1-1/4 etc even today. In these days of calculators and Mobiles, the tables are nowhere now !

In ancient times, Fine Arts like Dance, Drama and Music were the exclusive preserves of the Royalties and the Rich. Over a period, the commoners too found pleasures in village arts like Folk dances and Folk songs. In every festival and during the Harvesting times, there used to be musical entertainments.

Record making came to India in 1902, when a song by a professional singer ( read Tawayaf) Gauhar Jan was recorded by a German technician in a Hotel in Calcutta. A factory was set up in Dumdum,Calcutta in 1908 by the gramophone company-UK to make records in India. There was no looking back ever since. There was a spate of records of songs and geets, Bhajans and Gazals etc, by noted singers and classical gurus. By 1925, Electrical recordings started. Gramophones became popular and singers also multiplied. Records of geets, Thumris, ghazals, natya sangeet, Bhajans, Naats,love songs, sad songs etc became available and the songs became popular quickly.

In 1930, All India Radio started and in 1931 the films started talking. However, records of film songs were in general not made those days, though the first film song record came in 1932. Until about 1939-40, records of all film songs were not made from every film. So, people continued to enjoy the NON FILM SONGS by famous singers. This trend of making records of NFS was so popular that most Film singers started their careers by recording NFS. Examples are Talat Mehmood, Hemant Kumar, S D Burman, Lata, Asha, Mukesh, Rafi etc.

Those of our readers, who were young in the 40s…50s….60s, will remember the melodious NFS played on Radios and in homes. Songs of Saigal, Jagmohan, Pankaj Mullick, Kamla Jharia, Juthika Roy, Paluskar, Talat, Mukesh, Hemant etc were played in many Hotels and restaurants too.

NON FILM SONGS played a very vital role in entertaining people and in giving opportunities to singers to become famous. As Radio became popular, these songs reached millions of Indians, and the singer’s names became famous all over India. Singers like Jagmohan, Pankaj Mullick and Talat Mehmood were invited to sing their NFS on stage shows and they toured countries all over the world for these shows.

As Radio Ceylon became more and more popular after 1950 and the Vividh Bharati after 1957, film songs started getting extensive exposure and slowly they stole the limelight from the NFS. However some NFS were immortal and are remembered even today.

There is a popular equation that Non Film Songs means Talat, Jagmohan, Pankaj mullick, Juthika Roy, Hemant etc. But the fact is from 1930 onwards, almost every Film singer sang Non Film songs, because NFS had a special place in people’s heart then.

Today we are about to enjoy one such famous and very very melodious NFS by Hemant Kumar- ” Kitna dukh bhulaya tumne pyari “, which was recorded somewhere in early 40s, when Hemant Kumar started recording Bangla and Hindi Geets, prior to his involvement in film music.

Poet Lyricist Faiyaz Hashmi and composer Kamal Dasgupta were regularly churning out wonderful melodies on 78 RPM every month and listeners all over India were enjoying them fully.

Actually,in 1985,Jagmohan Sursagar wrote in his Autobiography…..

” In the initial stages Kamal Dasgupta was influenced by Rabindranath Tagore. Tagore’s songs and compositions(Rabindra sangeet) were extremely popular, but were limited to Bangla people only. Ghazal, qawwali, Dadra, Naat, Thumri, Hori, Kajari etc used to come to market but had a very limited listenership. These never reached the top.

” The fusion of Gazal,Dadra and Qawali with Bangla Geet style gave birth to Hindi Hindi Non Film Songs or geets. As such Geet had a known and accepted place in Literature, but not in Music. To establish this new Genre, Kamal babu used lyrics by Pt.Madhur, Pt. Anjum and Faiyaz Hashmi, got them sung by Jagmohan, Hemant, Talat, Juthika etc. Their records were inscribed with ‘ Hindi Geet (Hindustani Song) ‘. What thus started as NFS Geet from 1936 continued upto next 20 years non stop. “

Let us know about Faiyyaz Hashmi first……Fayyaz was born on 18-6- 1920 at Calcutta. His father, Syed Muhammad Hussain Hashmi Dilgeer was a very famous poet and writer of stage drama. He was director at the top class theater of that time named “ MADAN THEATER LTD.” He knew 8 languages.

Senior lyricist, Faiyyaz Hashmi, passed away in Karachi on Nov 29 th 2011. He shot to fame after penning lyrics for such non-film songs as ;Ye Raatein Ye Mausam; (Pankaj Mullick), ;Tasveer Teri Dil Mera; (Talat Mehmood), ;Dil Ko Hai Tum Se Pyar Kyun; (Jagmohan), ;Bhala Tha Kitna Apna Bachpan; (Hemant Kumar), and so many more rendered by the likes of Juthika Roy and Feroza Begum.

Mr. Fayyaz Hashmi is a legendary song and dialogue writer and above all a true loving person. He is by himself an institution and a common asset of the Indo-Pakistan film-world. His admirers as ever are not confined in national frontiers. Those fond of Hindi / Urdu songs anywhere in the world have affection for him. The emergence of this bright star was evidenced much before independence of India, when Fayyaz Hashmi, still a teenager wrote the most famous song “Tasveer Teri Dil Mera Behla Na Sakhe Gi”. It was recorded in the voice of Talat Mehmood and music was composed by Kamal Das Gupta. This song brought “Talat” to limelight. Music for most of the Fayyaz Hashmi’s songs recorded at Calcutta was composed by Kamal Das Gupta.

The dynamic achievements of young Fayyaz Hashmi and his clarity of expression by using simple words were greatly appreciated by Qazi Nazrul Islam -“Tum mann main doob kar mann ka bhed nikaltey ho. Aasan shubdoon mein mushkil baat kehna buhut mushkil hay”. His unique combination of Urdu, Hindi and Sanskrit words to produce a harmonious song thus became a guideline for the future poets of geets. The transformation of some traditional Bangla songs was also facilitated. He has also written songs in Brij Bhasa and Purbi. His pre-independence songs total to about 1000.

Fayyaz Hashmi wrote his first verse “Chaman main Ghuncha-o-gul ka tabassum dekhne walo – Kabhi tum ne haseen kalyoon ka murjhana bhi dekha hai” when he was in 7th class. As a student of 9th class, he was participating in regular “mushairas”. He got an assignment in the British owned Gramophone Company at DumDum (now called Jessore Road, Kolkotta) India. He served there during 1943 to 1948 period. At that time the average monthly production of record was only 16. Once all the records (16) issued in a month were written by Mr. Fayyaz Hashmi- a record by itself. Some of the evergreen hit songs of Mr. Fayyaz Hashmi are quoted here:

1- Honton se gulfishan hain who – Aankhoon se ashkbar hum Talat Mahmood
2- Do Kafir Aankhoon ne mara Talat Mahmood
3- Dil ko hai tum se pyar kyoon Jag Mohan
4- Aaj use phir dekha hai Jag Mohan
5- Bhala tha kitna apna bachpan Hemant Kumar
6- Yeh Raaten yeh mausam yeh hansa hansana Pankhaj Mallick
(Also re-sung by Lata Mangeshkar as a tribute to the legendary Pankhaj Mallick)
7- Tasveer teri dil mera behla na sake gi Talat Mehmood
8- Ab yad hamein kyoon aati ho Hemant Kumar
9- Kitna dukh bhulaya tum ne Hemant Kumar
10-Maloom hay mujhko – ban Jao gi tum ek din taqdeer hamari Jag Mohan.

While in India, he wrote 48 songs in 9 Hindi films, namely-Subah Shyam-44, Meghdoot-45, Zameen Aasmaan-46, Pehchan-46, Krishna Leela-46, Arabian Nights-46, Giribala-47, Faisla-47 and Iran ki ek raat-49

He chose to migrate to Pakistan after the Partition.

In 1948, he was posted as recording Manager at Dhaka Center of the Gramophone Company and thereafter in 1951 at Lahore. He promoted many talents like Farida Khanum, Saeen Marna, Saeen Akhtar and Saeen Budha. He diverted towards the writing of film songs in 1956. “Kunwari Bewa” was the first film in Pakistan with his songs. He wrote more than 2000 songs for films and Gramophone Recording Company. He had also written stories, dialogues and scripts of many hit films like AULAD, ZAMAN KIYA KAHE GA, NEHLEY PE DEHLA, INTEKHAB, PEHCHAN, KHUDA AUR MUHABBAT, GHAREEBON KA BADSHAH etc. including “ HUM AIK HAIN” which was also directed by him. It was the first Pakistani film with 5 songs filmed in colour and as such a record in Pakistan film industry.

Every film, songs of which were written by Mr. Fayyaz Hashmi became super hit like SAHELI, AULAD, ASHIANA, SUHAGAN, HONAHAR, PEGHAM, SARTAJ, SHAREEK-E-HAYAT, EID MUBARAK, SHABNAM, LOVE IN JUNGLE, TOBA, SAWAL, LAKHOON MAIN AIK, DEWAR BHABI etc.

He received Graduate Award 3 times and also Nigar award for the best song in 1978 on “Chalo Achha Hua Tum Bhool Gaye” film “Lakhoon Main Aik”. He received International award in 1986 and another Nigar award in 1988 for the best dialogue of film “ Ghareebon Ka Badshah”. In addition to these he recounts about 11 Silver Jubilee Awards and 17 Golden Jubilee**. “Deewane Tere Pyar ke” is the latest film all songs of which have been written Fayyaz Hashmi.

The first compilation of his poetry was published as “ RAG RANG” in 1944 in India. His poems were published in various journals and magazines like Adbi Duniya, Adbe Lateef, Alamgeer, Beesveen Sadi, Shama (Delhi), Chitrali (Dhaka), Nigar (Karachi), Amar Jadeed and Amrit Bazar Patrika (Calcutta, India). He wrote many Naats and Qawwalis. He also wrote many National songs like (Ae Quiad-e-Azam tera ehsan hai ehsan” & “ Suraj Kare Salam – Chanda kare Salam”.

On the publication of his mystic verses, Mr. Raees Amrohi commented that “History of Sufi poets is indicative of a glorious future for them and Mr. Fayyaz.

(Based primarily on the article by Nadeemur Rehman, courtesy shri Rajnikumar Pandya ji and my own notes. )

Today’s NFS by Hemant kumar – my favourite singer – is very melodious and had become very popular in the 40s, 50s and the 60s. Enjoy…..


Song- Kitna dukh bhulaaya tumne pyaari (Hemant Kumar NFS)(1945) Singer-Singer- Hemant Kumar, Lyricist- Fayyaz Hashmi, MD- Kamal Dasgupta

Lyrics

kitna dukh bhulaaya tumne pyaari ee
kitna dukh bhulaaya tumne pyaari ee
mere zakhmi dil pe rakhkar apna komal haath
mere zakhmi dil pe rakhkar apna komal haath
preetam kyun ghabraaye ho
preetam kyun ghabraaye ho
bas chhed ke itni baat
sab dard mitaaya tumne ae pyaari
sab dard mitaaya tumne ae pyaari

apni bal khaayi zulfen seene se mere bichha ke
apni bal khaayi zulfen seene se mere bichha ke
apne gulaabi honthon ko
apne gulaabi honthon ko
mere honthon se milaa ke ae
amrit ras pilaaya tumne pyaari
amrit ras pilaaya tumne pyaari

ham tum chup baithhe hain
ham tum chup baithhe hain
dil kahta hai kisse dil ke
churaa liyaa hai hosh hamaara
churaa liyaa hai hosh hamaara
chaar aankhon ne milke
kismat ko jagaaya tumne pyaari
kismat ko jagaaya tumne pyaari
kismat ko jagaaya tumne pyaari


This article is written by nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4710 Post No. : 16416

———————————–————––—
Rafi Sahab’s Legendary Associations – 5
———————————–————––—
The fifth post in this series is taking care of 4 artists, who are majorly important and fruitful associations of first decade of Rafi Sahab’s career. First and foremost is the composer duo of Husnlal-Bhagatram who composed many melodious scores in late 40’s and early fifties. I counted 100 plus songs in the excel sheet of Rafi sahab’s songs, which are composed by Husnlal-Bhagatram. 45 of these are written by Qamar Jalalabadi. I found these 6 songs of this team’s duets sung by Mohammad Rafi and Shamshad Begum.

Song Movie (Year) Singer(s) MD Lyricist
Ladka Aur Ladki Mile Pyar Ka Gaana Chhoti Bhabhi(1950) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi
Mere Dil Ko Jalaaya Na Karo Gauna(1950) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi
Chod Diya Ghar Baar Rani Tere Liye Meena Bazaar(1950) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi
Gori Bahon Mein Chudiyan Kaali Saja Lo Meena Bazaar(1950) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi
Le Lo Ji Maharaja Dupatta Mera Saat Rang Ka Meena Bazaar(1950) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi
Tera Mera Ho Gaya Prem Main Hun Saheb Tu Hai Mem Farmaaish(1953) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Husnlal Bhagatram Qamar Jalalabadi

As for pure duets of Rafi-Shamshad are concerned, I counted 150 in the list, out of which 94 are posted in the blog. There are many Punjabi films songs also in the 150 duets of Rafi-Shamshad. Apart from these there are many group songs of three or more singers, with these two stalwarts, who started the journey of duets right in 1946 and continued till late 60’s. There is no way I am not listing my favourite Rafi-Shamshad duets here.

Song Movie (Year) Singer(s) MD Lyricist
Solah Baras Ki Bhai Umariya Aag(1948) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Ram Ganguly Bahzad Lakhnavi
Mohabbat Mein Kise Maloom Tha Ye Din Bhi Aayega Paaras(1949) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Ghulam Mohammad Shakeel Badayuni
Bolo Ji Dil Loge-2 To Kya Kya Doge Patanga(1949) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum C Ramachandra Rajendra Krishna
Leke Pehla Pehla Pyar Bharke Aankhon Men Khumaar C I D(1956) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum O P Nayyar Majrooh Sultanpuri
Khat Khut Karti Chham Chhum Karti Gaadi Hamaari Mother India(1957) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Naushad Ali Shakeel Badayuni
Bheega Bheega Pyar Ka Sama Bata De Tujhe Jaana Sawan(1959) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Hans Raj Bahal Prem Dhawan

I found this song in the list credited to Pakeezah, but it is not available:

Song Movie (Year) Singer(s) MD Lyricist
Jayen To Kahan Jaaye Ab Tera Ye Deewana Hatkar (Unreleased) Pakeezah(1971) Mohd Rafi, Shamshad Begum Ghulam Mohammad Kaif Irfani

Guess what, there are exactly 151 songs in the list of Rafi sahab’s song where the lyricist is Qamar Jalalabadi. There seems to be perfect symmetry, here as I counted 151 for Rafi-Shamshad and 101 for rafi-Husnlal Bhagatram.

Here is the total tally of these artists in the blog so far:

Artist Songs posted in the blog Total songs
Husnlal-Bhagatram 296 451
Qamar Jalalabadi 393 721
Shamshad Begam 713 1273

** Shamshad Begam’s posted songs are not yet updated, after the recent 4-5 posts of her songs.

Coming to the song under discussion, it is from the film’Gauna’ 1950. A very sweet chhed-chhad genre song, very early 50ish. I had not head this song too like many of Husnlal-bhagatram’s songs, until a few days ago. I had to post a Rafi-Shamshad duet, and it is was a melodious one composed by HB, it was a double ‘sone pe suhaaga’.

Following songs of Gauna (1950) have been covered in the blog:-

Song Date of posting
Ban ban ke mit gayin hain taqdeer ki lakeeren 26 February 2012
Aaj kisi se ho gayin aankhen chaar chaar chaar 22 October 2016

The song reminded me of this famous song.

While seeing to the Rafi-Shamshad duets in the excel sheet, I could see a few, that I have written the post myself, but I have listed only the songs that are readily recognisable and are part of my old film songs listening memory. With only 94 songs posted so far in the blog, there are at least 40 such sweet/meloncholy/mischievious/romantic duets that remain to be posted. Enough for another series, if any one is of the mind. Arunkumar Deshmukh Sir, is fond of the older duets of these two singers as has posted a lion’s share of the last few such duets.

Lastly, I cannot stop listening to the duets of these two, whenever I reach one. Even unknown songs are like fresh fruit juice. The khanak in Shamshad Begum’s singing, and the soft smooth tones of Rafi Sahab, make for a delightful duet, always.

Mere dil ko jalaaya na karo – Gauna (1950)

Song-Mere dil ko jalaaya na karo (Gauna)(1950) Singers-Shamshad Begum, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics-Qamar Jalalabadi, MD-Husnlal-Bhagatram

Lyrics

Mere dil ko jalaaya na karo o o
mere dil ko jalaaya na karo
mere sang bolte nahin een
na bolo
mere sang bolte nahin een
na bolo
meri gali mein bhi ee
meri gali mein bhi aaya na karo o
mere dil ko jalaaya na karo

haha
badi aayi gali wali
dekh liya ra’ub teraa
kar chuki sawaal gori
sun lo jawaab meraa
gali tere baap ki nahin een
baap ki nahin
ho mujhe ankhiyaan dikhaaya na karo o
o o
mujhe ankhiyaan dikhaaya na karo

mere dil ko jalaaya na karo o
mere dil ko jalaaya na karo

achha meri baat suno
tab tumhen jaanen
ek baat tum maano
ek ham maanen
gali mein to aao baabuji ee
aao baabuji
mere sapnon mein aaya na karo o o
mere sapnon mein aaya na karo
mere dil ko jalaaya na karo

waah waah khoob soojhi
main na qaaboo aaungaa
gali mein bhi aaungaa aa
sapnon mein bhi aaungaa
jise nahin saathh rakhnaa aa
saathh rakhnaa
usse apnaa banaaya na karo o
usse apnaa banaaya na karo

mere dil ko jalaaya na karo o o
mere dil ko jalaaya na karo


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4708 Post No. : 16413

In the initial years of sound films, some of the story, screen-play, dialogue and song writers came with literary background who had been well-known in the literary circle due to their published works. Gaurishankar Lal ‘Akhtar’, ‘Narayan Prasad ‘Betab’, Munshi Premchand, Amritlal Nagar, Dr. Safdar Aah Sitapuri, Krishan Chander, Dewan Sharar, Pandit Mukhram Sharma, Pandit Anand Kumar were some of such writers who started their association with Hindi films in the 1930s and 40s. Vrajendra Gaur, writer, poet and journalist was one among them.

Vrajendra Gaur had a long inning of 35 years in Hindi film industry as a screen-play/dialogue writer and the lyricist, aggregating around 70 films. A good number of photos I have browsed through on the google images, gives me an impression that Vrajnedra Gaur had friendly relationship with almost all the stalwarts of Hindi film industry during 1950-1980. In Bollywood, to have a successful career, one requires building up friendly relationship with those who matters in the film industry apart from the talent. It appears that this combination was a success formula for Vrajendra Gaur in his filmy career.

Etawah-born and Lucknow-settled Vrajendra Gaur (01/04/1924 – 07/08/1980) had already published his novels like ‘Sindoor Ki Laaj’, ‘Aadhi Raat Ka Sooraj’ ‘Jaagte Raho’ and ‘Manzil’. His other novels, ‘Kalkatte Ka Qatl-E-Aam’ and ‘Parole Par’ were banned by the British government for creating anti-British sentiment. He joined Hindi film industry in 1945 not on his own volition but on an invitation from Motilal after he heard his radio play, ‘Dhai Lakh’ on All India Radio. Motilal was so impressed with his presentation on AIR that he entrusted Vrajendra Gaur to write screen-play and dialogue for Motilal-Shanta Apte film, ‘Saawan’ (1945).

After writing lyrics for the films like ‘Ratnavali’ (1945), ‘Panihaari’ (1946), ‘Mangalsutra’ (1947), ‘Gunjan’ (1948), Vrajendra Gaur was disillusioned by the way the Hindi film industry works. He went back to Lucknow and worked in different capacity including editing some Hindi periodicals.

It was in 1950 when Bombay Talkies invited him to write dialogues for their film ‘Sangram’ (1950) with Ashok Kumar and Nalini Jaywant in the lead role. The box office success of this film not only helped Bombay Talkies financially, it also gave a lease of life for the filmy career of Vrajendra Gaur who also wrote songs for the film. ‘Parineeta’ (1953) was his next major box office success film as a dialogue writer in which Ashok Kumar was the producer-actor.

Vrajendra Gaur‘ first and the only film which he directed was ‘Kasturi’ (1954) for which he also wrote dialogues and songs. In an article published in silhouette magazine, it was mentioned that during the making of ‘Kasturi’ (1954), Vrajendra Gaur was to direct ‘Bahu’ (1955). However, his contractual obligations as a director for ‘Kasturi’ (1954) under which he could not take up direction in any other film until ‘Kasturi’ 1954) was released, came in his way. So, Shakti Samanta got the opportunity to direct his debut film ‘Bahu’ (1955) as director. Vrajendra Gaur did get to write the dialogues for the film. This opened up Vrajendra Gaur’s long association with Shakti Samanta in many films as dialogue writers such as ‘Howrah Bridge (1958), Insaan Jaag Utha’ (1959) ‘Singapore’ (1960), ‘Jalli Note’ (1960), ‘China Town (1962), ‘Saawan Ki Ghata’ (1966), ‘Kati Patang’ (1970), Jaane Anjaane’ (1971), ‘Anuraag’ (1972), ‘Charitreheen’(1974), ‘The Great Gambler’ (1979) etc.

It would also appear that Vrajendra Gaur had a close rapport with Dev Anand if one goes by the number of films, he wrote story/screenplay/dialogues in which Dev Anand was the lead actor. ), ‘Baarish’ (1957), ‘Jalli Notes’ (1960), ‘Manzil’ (1960), ‘Sarhad’ (1960), ‘ Baat Ek Raat Ki’ (1962 ‘Teen Devian’ (1965), ‘Pyaar Mohabbat’ (1966), ‘Duniya’ (1968), ‘Mahal’ (1970), ‘Warrant’ (1975) were some of the films he was associated with Dev Anand. From a photograph I saw on the net of the Udaipur location shooting, it appears that Vrajendra Gaur was initially associated with ‘Guide’ (1965). Chetan Anand, who was to direct the film, had to leave the assignment when he got approval for his film ‘Haqeeqat’ (1964). Probably, when Vijay Anand took over as a director, he started with a clean slate by writing afresh, the screen-play and dialogues for ‘Guide’ (1965).

Other successful films for which Vrajendra Gaur wrote dialogues were ‘Saraswatichandra’ (1968), ‘Sharmeelee’ (1971), Geet Gaata Chal’ (1975), ‘Dulhan Wahi Jo Piya Man Bhaaye’ (1977), ‘Akhiyon Ke Jharokhon Se’ (1978) etc.

[Note: Some of the information about early life of Vrajendra Gaur mentioned in the article are gathered from the Facebook page, ‘Vrajendra Gaur’.]

Vrajendra Gaur’s stature as a dialogue writer has been so impressive that his contribution as a lyricist seems to have remained in the sideline. He had to write songs during the early phase of his career as at that time his assignments as a dialogue writer were few. After going through some of the songs among 60 odd songs he wrote for a dozen films, mainly during 1945-55, I feel that his literary bend of mind is reflected in some of the songs. A few examples:

Song Movie (Year)
nain baan se karke ghaayal ‘Ratnavali’ (1945)
kiska saath nibhaaun ‘Gunjan’ (1948)
wo unka muskuraanaa sharmaanaa chaley jaana ‘Sangram’ (1950)
kabhi inko chaahen kabhi unko ‘Zalzala’ (1952)
wo meri taraf yoon chale aa rahe hain ‘Kaafila’ (1952)
main to haar gayi mann ‘Kasturi’ (1954)

Incidentally, lyricist Yogesh is the first cousin of Vrajendra Gaur.

To highlight Vrajendra Gaur also as a lyricist, I am presenting the only song he wrote for the film ‘Muqaddar’ (1950) out of 9 songs. The song is ‘tum mere paas raho mujhse kuchh baat kaho’ which is rendered by Shamshad Begum. During the making of the film, Khemchand Prakash, the music director for the film died. The songs were completed by his music assistant, Bhola Shreshta. The song is, therefore, accredited to Khemchand Prakash/Bhola Shreshta as the music directors.

A highlight of this song is that each antara of the song has been set in slightly different tune and pitch.

Audio Clip:

Song-Tum mere paas raho mujhse kuchh baat kaho (Muqaddar)(1950) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-Vrajendra Gaur, MD-Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

meri duniya mein bahaaren hain
chaman aabaad hai
roothh jaaoge jo tum
to zindagi barbaad hai

tum mere paas raho
mujhse kuchh baat kaho
tum mere paas raho
mujhse kuchh baat kaho
ho ho ho…o
o o o o

maine tumko jo kabhi pyaar kiya dil se kiya
maine tumko jo kabhi pyaar kiya dil se kiya
tumne badle mein mujhe dard diya dil na diya
meri ulfat mein sitam dhha ke mujhe loot liya
loot liya aa
tum mere paas raho
mujhse kuchh baat kaho
ho ho ho…o
o o o o

bewafa bhool na jaana meri aahon ko kabhi
bewafa bhool na jaana meri aahon ko kabhi
mere liye tum jo nahin haay to phir to kuchh bhi nahi
mere liye tum jo nahin haay to phir to kuchh bhi nahi
mere sapnon ko sawera dikha ke loot liya
loot liya aa
tum mere paas raho
mujhse kuchh baat kaho
ho ho ho…o
o o o o

tumne samjha hi nahin meri mohabbat ko kabhi
tumne samjha hi nahin meri mohabbat ko kabhi
agar jo hukm ho to jaan bhi de doon abhi
agar jo hukm ho to jaan bhi de doon abhi
mujhe ulfat ka tamaasha bana ke loot liya
loot liya aa
tum mere paas raho
mujhse kuchh baat kaho
ho ho ho…o
o o o o o
ho ho ho…o
o o o o o
o o o


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4706 Post No. : 16410

After about 8 transfers in different states on promotions, I was promoted further and brought to our Head office in Bombay ( it had yet to become Mumbai). I settled down here for good. The year was 1983. While going to the office everyday, I used to see a beautiful Housing society at the corner of Versova Road and Juhu Road junction. The society’s name was ” Karachi Residents’ society-No.4″. I was very curious about this name. On one Sunday, while returning from a friend’s house, I stopped my car near this society, I saw a middle-aged person coming out of the gate. I stopped him and enquired. From what he told me, I gathered that this was a society of those people who lived in Karachi, before the Partition. He further enlightened me that there were 5 such societies in Bombay and there was also a “Lahore Residents’ Society ” which too had 5 numbers. People who fled from Karachi and Lahore at the time of Partition still loved their original abode !

Later I read somewhere that there was a Bombay Residents’ Society in Karachi also ! So the attachments were on both sides !! Partition not only divided the Country in 1947 but also affected the Film industry badly on both sides. Few days ago I was reading a book “Mourning the Nation – Indian cinema in the wake of Partition” written by Bhaskar Sarkar. Then I remembered those societies. Today, those society buildings have been pulled down and new buildings have come up, with different new names. However, a closer look shows older names mentioned in small letters in brackets on the new name boards.

According to the book, Indian film industry lost some Gems, but Pakistan was not in a position to do justice to these Gems, as their film industry was in doldrums. Everything had to be started all over again. Till that time the artistes had to wait. Problem in India was the void created by the exit of artistes, but this was easily done by a strong reserve available, waiting in the wings for opportunities. This was the second line. The problem in Pakistan was having to establish the infrastructure itself plus financers for the film production, since the economy was yet to develop.

In undivided India, Lahore (then in the Punjab) was important as a showbiz centre. It was an established film-making centre. The first Talkie film ever to be made in a Lahore studio was Heer Ranjha-1932 and thereafter many Urdu and Punjabi films were produced from Lahore every year. The partition of India into two independent states – India and Pakistan, caused irreparable damage to film production in Lahore. Most of Lahore’s film producers were Hindus and as the city fell on the side of the Islamic state of Pakistan, they migrated to India. This deprived Lollywood, as Lahore is referred to in film circles, of much needed investment and expertise in film production and distribution. Many talented actors and musicians from Punjab and Sindh area tried their luck in the Cine Industry at Lahore. Nevertheless, the biggest centre of film production was Bombay and it was every aspiring artiste’s dream to go to Bombay and shine there.

The film activity at Lahore increased considerably in the early 40s in terms of film production and Music. Those days many actors and musicians shifted their base to Bombay from Lahore, Calcutta and other places too.

The list of such people is very long, but it will suffice to mention some well known names-
Noorjehan, Pran, Saigal, Prithwiraj Kapoor, Shyam, Dilip Kumar, Surinder, Karan Dewan, Dev Anand, Balraj Sahni, Singer Khursheed, Mumtaz Shanti, Veena, Begum Para, Meena Shorey, Suraiya, Manorama, Kamini Kaushal, Shyama(Khursheed Akhtar), A R Kardar, M Sadiq, Suresh(Nazim Ahmed), Amar, Chetan Anand, Zande Khan, Ghulam Hyder, Pt.Amarnath and his brothers Husnlal-Bhagatram, Hansraj Behl, S.Mohinder, Firoz Nizami, Khursheed Anwar, Khayyam, Vinod, Shyamsunder, Kidar Sharma, Krishna Chander, O P Dutta, Saadat Hasan Manto, Qamar Jalalabadi, D N Madhok, Tanvir Naqvi, Prem Dhawan etc etc. Many of the actors and producers used to shuttle between Lahore and Bombay for their work.

And when the PARTITION took place in 1947, in the communal frenzy, polarisation of artistes took place. Some Hindus shifted to Bombay and Some Muslims left for Lahore.

At the actual time of Partition some Indian artists were in Lahore for film work. They were B R Chopra, Ramanand Sagar, I S Johar, Gulshan Rai, Omprakash, Jeevan, O P Nayyar, Rajinder Singh Bedi, Naqsh Lyallpuri, Surinder and Prakash Kaur Manorama and Pushpa Huns. They all left Lahore hurriedly and reached Bombay Safely.

However this journey was not so safe for one actor-Comedian Durga Prasad, known as Durga Mota. He was very fat. In the melee, he reached the Lahore station and somehow entered the Train to Bombay. Suddenly a group of mad rioters entered the Lahore station and started killing the travellers. Most people ran helter skelter, but due to his heavy body, Durga Mota could not run and was cut into pieces on the Lahore station platform itself !

Same way many artists from Bombay left for Lahore and ALL of them reached safely. some of the Directors who migrated to Pakistan were-

Syed Shaukat Hussain Rizvi, S M Yousuf, Najam Naqvi, Munshi Dil, Nakshab Jarachavi, M Sadiq, Zia Sarhadi, Sibtain Fazli(of Fazli Brothers), S T Zaidi , Zahoor Raja, Wali saheb, A R Kardar,Nazir,W Z Ahmed,Masood Pervez, Shareef Nayyar,Luqmaan, Dawood Chaand, Rakhan, Nusrat Mansoori, M H Qasim, Roop K Shorey, Butt Kasher, Barkat Mehra and Manto.

Some of the Actors/actresses were- Nazeer, Sadiq Ali, Masood, Sudhir, Santosh, Ratan Kumar, Najmul Hussain, Suresh and Nasir khan(both came back to India later), Sh.Mukhtar, M.Ismail, Ajmal, Gulam Mohd, Kumar, Ghori, Majeed, Shahnawaz, Himalayawala, Shyam Kumar, Allauddin, Shah Shikarpuri, Charlie, Nazar Faizi Noorjehan, Meena Shorey, Khursheed, Zeenat Begum, Asha Posley, Najma, Kalawati, Rehana, Swarnalata, Ragini, Bibbo, Renuka Devi, Geeta Nizami, Maya Devi etc.

Some from the music field were- Khursheed Anwar, Inayat Hussain, Rafiq gaznavi, G A Chisti, Ghulam Hyder, Firoz Nizami, Nissar Bazmi, Nashaad, Tufail Faruqi, Tanvir Naqvi, Faiyaz Hasmi, Iqbal Bano, Premlata,Khursheed,Zeenat Begum,Shevan Rizvi,Rasheed Atre,Fateh Ali khan,Babul etc.

With so many people migrating to Pakistan at a time and given the condition of the Pakistan Film Industry then, it is a moot question, whether all these migrants could get work there and shine ?

There were 2 types of people who migrated-

1. Those who had achieved their peaks already in India and
2. Those who had just started their careers.

Obviously the second group, at least some of them, could do well there eventually.

Some of the successful migrants there were- Noor jahan, Khursheed Anwar, G A Chisti, Nissar Bazmi, Firoz Nizami, Najam Naqvi, Nakshab Jarachavi, Sibtain Fazli, Wali Saheb,Manto, Rashid Atre, Sudhir, Santosh, Asha Posley, Shameem, Najma, Yasmeen, Ragini, Zahoor Shah, Shaikh Iqbal, Himalayawala, Nazar, Rafiq Gaznavi, Tanvir Naqvi, Iqbal Bano etc.

The unfortunate ones were-some of them- Meena Shorey, Ratan Kumar, M Sadiq, Charlie, Ghori, Kumar, Shaikh Mukhtar, Najmul Hussain, Neena, Kalavati, Maya devi, Gulam Hyder, Nashaad, Premlata etc.

Almost all the artists who shifted to Bombay prior to Partition did very well here.

(Notes- 1.All lists are only indicative and not exhaustive
2.Migrants means between 1947 to 1970 period.)

About two years ago, there was a fruitful discussion on my Facebook page about Partition effects on Film industry in India and Pakistan. Many senior experts (from US and UK too !) participated and some more new information came out of this discussion…..

The rioting of 1947 set in motion irreversible, irrevocable migration. B R. Chopra and I S Johar were planning films in a big way in Lahore but had to run for their lives. Ramanand Sagar left in July, as did Gulshan Rai. Character actor Om Prakash (of Fateh Din fame, an all-time favourite skit relayed for years by Radio Lahore), comedian-bad man Jeevan and many others also left Lahore for Bombay. O P Nayyar recorded his immortal song Priyatam Aan Milo/ Dukhia Jiya Bullai, Aan Milo at the His Master’s Voice studio in Lahore. He left Lahore only in 1948 when it became clear that people with the wrong religion were not going to return to their homes on either side of the Punjab. Writer Rajinder Singh Bedi escaped, sitting on top of a railway carriage carrying loads of Hindus and Sikhs out of Lahore. Song-writer Naqsh Lyallpuri began his literary career in Lahore as a journalist but had to leave in 1947. Punjabi singers Surinder Kaur and Prakash Kaur, and Pushpa Hans also left Lahore.

Migration in the other direction also took place. Nazir and his wife Swarnlata, Noorjahan and her husband Shaukat Husain Rizvi, character actor Alauddin and many others headed for Lahore. Manto came in January 1948, music directors Ghulam Haider and Khurshid Anwar followed some years later and director M. Sadiq probably in 1969 or 1970. Meena Shorey, Khurshid and Mumtaz Shanti also immigrated to Lahore. Some Pakistani actors in Lahore continued to use Hindu filmic names. Santosh Kumar (Musa Raza) and Sudhir (Shah Zaman), the two most famous heroes of the 1950s and 60s followed such practice. On both sides, initially considerable goodwill existed between the two film communities.

Some families were divided. Thus for example, while Nazir Ahmed khan shifted to Lahore, his nephew K. Asif stayed on in Bombay. Kardar stayed on but his brother Nusrat Kardar and son Rauf Kardar returned to Lahore. While Suraiya, her mother and grandmother settled in Bombay, many of her other relatives shifted to Lahore. Rafi stayed on to reign supreme in Bombay while his parents and siblings were in Lahore.

There were some cross-religion marriages that created peculiar challenges. Raj Kapoor’s maama (maternal uncle) Mr Mehra married a Muslim actress Anwari, converted to Islam and stayed in Lahore. A unique case of reverse migration took place as well: poet Sahir Ludhianvi (Abdul Hai) left Lahore for India.

Luckily,except for few like Noorjehan, Khursheed Anwar and some others, the well established Muslim artistes like Rafi, Talat, Shamshad, Naushad and hundreds of others chose to remain in India. They prospered here and became popular in Pakistan as well.

After partition,this turmoil subsided after a short period in India and it was business as usual here, while in Lahore, Pakistan had to build up from scratch, but the Film Industry there too stabilised in a few years’ time. The base of Film industry in Pakistan was built by people who migrated from India. Migration from India to Pakistan continued till about 1970 for the pre-partition artistes. In fact till about 1965 there was an exchange of artistes from both sides to work in other countries, but after the 65 war, this working stopped almost completely.

Music Directors who left India after Partition had done a very good job here. Composers like Nissar Bazmi and Feroz Nizami became exceptionally successful in Pakistan, but Nashad, Rafiq Ghaznavi and others were not successful to that extent. Khursheed Anwar, a very highly respected composer here remained a father figure even in Pakistan.

Partition did a lot of damage to both countries and the film industry. With so many artistes leaving at a time surely affected the filmdom, but it also opened up new avenues for new singers and new blood composers.

Despite all this in the Partition year – 1947 saw making of a Record number of films in India – 181 (this record remained till 1985). Of course most films were made in a hurry to complete before the deadline of August-1947. Still, even in these circumstances also some very good, meaningful, milestone and musical films were made in 1947, like… Aaj aur Kal (the first Sci Fi film), Bhakta Dhruv, Dard, Do Bhai, Elan, Jugnu, Leela, Meera, Meerabai, Mirza Sahiban, Natak, Parwana, Shehnai, Sindoor etc.etc.

Today’s song is from one of the unknown films of 1947 – Bela. The only noteworthy point about this film was, it was the first ever film of Zohrabai, where she sang all the 10 songs of the film. The other film surpassing this record was film Meerabai – 47, where Sitara Kanpuri sang all the 13 songs of the film. However even this record was broken in 1947 itself when M. S. Subbulakshmi sang all 17 songs of her film Meera-1947. As far as I remember this record is yet unbeaten.

Bela-47 was made by Ranjit Cinetone. It was directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi and the MD was Bulo C Rani. The film had 10 songs. 9 songs are already discussed. Today’s song is the last 10th song and the film says YIPPEE. I was given this song by Abhay Jain ji of US, but it was a slightly short one. Sadanand Kamath ji found another version song which was longer and uploaded it for me. I thank both of them.


Song- Peepal ke patve se chikni meri gori re (Bela)(1947) Singers- A R Oza, Zohrabai Ambalewaali, Lyricist- D N Madhok, MD- Bulo C Rani

Lyrics

peepal ke patve se chikni meri gori re
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho

peepal ke patve se chikni meri gori re
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho

torey nainon mein chhoti si duniya basaayi hai
gham e aasha umang sang naachne ko aayi hai
torey nainon mein chhoti si duniya basaayi hai
gham e aasha umang sang naachne ko aayi hai
meri umang meri chhoti si gori re
mera sahaara mera baalmaa ho
meri umang meri chhoti si gori re
mera sahaara mera baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho

peepal ke patve se chikni meri gori re
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho

pyaar ke phool mein balma kaante lage hain
lag na jaaye
pyaar ke phool mein balma kaante lage hain
lag na jaaye
dekho ulfat ke pehloo mein furkat chhupi hai
wo din na aayen
dekho ulfat ke pehloo mein furkat chhupi hai
wo din na aayen
kehti rahoon
kit dhoondhoon kit jaaun re
kehti rahoon
kit dhoondhoon kit jaaun re
mera to haal mere baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho

peepal ke patve se chikni meri gori re
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho
chanda se pyaara mera baalmaa ho


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4703 Post No. : 16407

“Ghar Ki Izzat”(1948) was produced and directed by Ram Daryani for Murli Movietone Bombay. The movie had Mumtaz Shanti, Dilip Kumar, Manorama, Jeevan, Dixit, Suleman, Gulab, Gope etc in it. The movie had 12 songs in it. Eight songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the ninth song from “Ghar Ki Izzat”(1948) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Shamshad Begam. I C Kapur is the lyricist. Music is composed by Pt Govindram.

The song is picturised on Mumtaz Shanti. Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Prakashchandra.


Song-Dar dar ki thokaren hain (Ghar Ki Izzat)(1948) Singer-Shamshad Begam, Lyrics-I C Kapur, MD-Pt Govindram

Lyrics(Provided by Prakashchandra)

dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
phootaa naseeb lekar
jaanaa mujhe kahaan hai ae
phootaa naseeb lekar
jaanaa mujhe kahaan hai ae ae
dar dar ki thokrein hain

bhatkaa huaa hai raahee
hain paaon dagmagaatey ae ae
bhatkaa huaa hai raahee
hain paaon dagmagaatey ae ae
manzil kaa kya thhikaanaa aan aa
rastaa hai na nishaan hai ae ae
manzil kaa kya thhikaanaa aan aa aa
rastaa hai na nishaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokarein hain
dushman mera jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki ee thokrein hain

shikwaa kisi se kyaa ho
jab apne huye paraaye
shikwaa kisi se kyaa ho o
jab apne huye ae paraaye aey
na zindagi hai saathi
naa maut meharbaan hai
na zindagi hai saathi ee
na maut meharbaan hai ae
dar dar ki thokarein hain
dushman meraa jahaan hai ae
dar dar ki thokarein hain


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4702 Post No. : 16404

During my school days it was my hobby (or habit?) to see films on every Saturday and Sunday. Ours was a big joint family and my absence was hardly noticed by anyone. May be my absence was welcome ! I do not know. Anyway, during the holidays more films were seen. Language was no bar. I saw Hindi, English, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil and Kannada films. Out of these Hindi films were kore and other languages films were much less.

The preference for films was Hindi-English-Telugu-Tamil-Marathi and kannada. The basis for this was that kannada films were rare. Marathi ran for a month, Telugu/Tamil changed every week and Hindi films were in many theatres and different films for Morning and Regular shows. English films were generally in Morning shows only. But there were some theatres which showed exclusively English films in regular shows. These were in the Cantonment area of Secunderabad-the twin city. We used to see films there also at night.

In the 50’s decade a lot of remakes of South films used to come. Sometimes the same film in 3 languages ran in 3 different theatres, like the film Miss Mary-57 for example. Hindi film Miss Mary was running in one Cinema, Missiamma, the Tamil original was in another and Missamma, Telugu version was in yet another theatre. It became a game for us friends to see these films and discuss what the differences were in each version.

Forget our game, but in South India, the game of competition in capturing the Hindi market was in full swing in the 50’s. Since the film Chandralekha-48 became extremely successful all over India, with its Hindi version, other producers of the South started observing SS Vasan, who had found ” Alibaba’s Cave ‘ in the Hindi market. He had started making films in 3 languages to capture Hindi markets.

He dug up his old Tamil hit films and made remakes in Telugu and Hindi. Thus Tamil film Apoorva Sahodargal-49 ( based on Alexandre Dumas’ ‘The Corsican Brothers’) was made in Telugu as Apoorva Sahodarlu and in Hindi as Nishan-49. Then Vasan remembered his hit film Mangamma Sabatham-1943 in Tamil. He made a Hindi remake as Mangala-50. Later a Telugu remake Mangala Shapatham-65 was made, with NTR and Jamuna in the lead.He even made a remake in Simhalese language as Mathalan.

Observing Vasan making remakes and running to his bank very often, the other South producers were not to be outdone. The giant AVM dug up their Tamil hit of the 1949 Vazhkai and made a Telugu remake Jeevitham-50 as well as a Hindi remake Bahar-50, introducing Vaijayanti mala. In 1953 AVM made the film Ladki in Hindi and its remakes in Tamil and Telugu. AVM’s Tamil hit film Missiamma was made in Telugu as Missamma and in Hindi as Miss Mary, all in 1957. Film Chandirani was made in 3 languages in 1953.

The number of multi language films was huge. If you visit IMDB and look for remade Hindi films, you will get a loooooong list.During the 50’s a time came when multi language films were made at Calcutta, Madras and Kolhapur/Poona/Bombay. To get the actors speaking both the language dialogues was comparatively easy in Maharashtra, where Hindi speaking is not a problem. But for films remade in Bangla-Hindi or Tamil/Telugu- Hindi was indeed a problem.

As a solution, while the original actors remained the same in all versions, their Hindi dialogues were dubbed. Sometimes it caused a lip-synch problem, especially in close-ups. Some actors spoke their dialogues in Hindi themselves, but the pronunciation was a give away. This problem caused most Bangla, Tamil and Telugu actors to independently work in Hindi films. So, we find that most lead actors of these languages stayed away from Bombay made Hindi films. There were, however, few actors who did this successfully.

Thus, while we can see most lead actors of South and Bangla films in either dubbed or remade versions, it is only Dr. Rajkumar- the Kannada Superstar who NEVER acted in any Hindi films. In fact except ONE Telugu film ” Kalahasti Mahatmyam”-1954, he did not act in any other language than only Kannada..

By the end of the 50’s the South markets developed rapidly and fully, so the necessity of Hindi market diminished and so also remade and dubbed films. Today’s song is from film Mangala-50. It was a Gemini film directed by SS Vasan. There was a team of 3 composers – M.D.Parthasarathy, Balkrishna Kalla and E.Sankar Sastry. Sometimes I wondered how a man like Sankar, who was an Internationally famous and honoured Instrumental (Veena) musician worked in a studio as a composer. But then I realised that in his first half of career he was in films, but the second half was more into Veena Vadan.

Emani Sankar Sastry was a very famous and renowned Veena player of International recognition. Born on 23-9-1922 in a small village of Andhra, he hailed from a family of celebrated classical musicians. He was trained in traditional Veena by several experts. He did independent concerts all over India.

He joined Gemini Studios in 1948 and stayed for 10 years as MD. During this period he was involved in the Music Direction of Hindi films like, Mangala, Sansar, Bahut din huye, Mr. Sampat, Krishna Kanhaiya and Do Dulhe, as well as the English version of Chandralekha-48.

He joined A.I.R Madras in 1959 and rose to become Director and Chief Producer of Music. He won several awards including Academy award, Kala Parishat Award and Padma Shri. He played Veena in the Rome Festival and at UNESCO in New York.

E.Sankar Sastry died in 1987.

In the cast of the film Mangala-50 one finds the name of Bhanumathi. Outside South India, most people are unaware of the greatness of some artistes from South. Here is a short Bio of Bhanumathi, but it brings out her greatness only partly.

P. Bhanumathi Ramakrishna (7 September 1925 – 24 December 2005) was an actress, director, music director, singer, producer, novelist and lyricist. Widely known as the first female super star of Telugu cinema, Bhanumathi appeared in over 100 films predominantly in Telugu and Tamil languages. She was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 2001 for her contribution to the Indian cinema. She was honored among “women in cinema” at the 30th International Film Festival of India.
Bhanumathi was born on 7 September 1925 in Doddavaram village of Prakasam district, near Ongole, Andhra Pradesh. She is the third child to Saraswatamma and Bommaraju Venkata Subbaiah. She grew up watching her father perform in various stage shows. Her father, Venkata Subbiah, was a lover of classical music and trained her in music from an early age.

Bhanumathi entered the film industry in 1939, and acted in over 100 films in Telugu and Tamil. She was also called Ashtavadhani by the film industry people as she was a writer, actor, director, producer, singer, music director, editor and studio owner. She also had a good knowledge of astrology and philosophy. She is regarded as the first female super star of Telugu cinema.

She made her debut in Telugu cinema in 1939 as Kalindi (a 13 years old girl who is forced to marry an old man and ended her life by committing suicide) in Vara Vikrayam (Telugu), directed by C. Pullaiah. Her first film in Tamil was Ratnakumar in the year 1949 along with the famous hero of those days P. U. Chinnappa. This film was directed by Krishnan–Panju. Her first Hindi film was Nishan-1949. In 1953, she made her directorial debut with Chandirani (made simultaneously in Tamil, Telugu and Hindi).

Her last film was made in 1998, entitled Pelli Kanuka. C. N. Annadurai gave her a title “Nadippukku Ilakkanam” (Grammar for acting) that suits her aptly. She was revered by many actors she had worked with like N.T.Rama Rao, Sivaji Ganesan, M. G. Ramachandran, Akkineni Nageswara Rao, Nagarjuna, Balakrishna, ChiranJeevi, Pawan Kalyan, Venkatesh for her bold and prolific versatility. One of her memorable movies in Tamil was Annai, in the year 1962 directed by Krishnan–Panju, where her acting was appreciated by all and also got the National Award for the film and for also performances in movies Anthasthulu and Palnati Yudham (1964) she received National Awards (Rashtrapati Award). She is the last recipient of Rashtrapati Award.

Due to her rift with Aluri Chakrapani, she left her role in Missamma movie (Initially Bhanumathi was shot for some scenes in the movie before being replaced by savitri ) but after the release of the movie she watched and commented that “she lost a wonderful role but industry gained a talented actress like savitri” which showed her sportiveness and encouragement towards new actors. Due to clash with Aluri Chakrapani, she produced a satirical movie on him titled Chakrapani which was a huge hit and became a classic in Tollywood for this movie she also worked as Music Director.

She acted in 8 Hindi films namely, Nishan-49, Mangala-49, Rani-52, Shamsheer-53, Chandirani-53, Hamen bhi jeene do-62, Nai Roshni-67 and Itni Jaldi kya hai-86. She directed 2 Hindi films – Chandirani-53 and Itni Jaldi kya hai-86. She also sang 12 songs in 4 Hindi films – Mangala, Rani, Shamsheer and Chandirani.

She is the first south Indian actress to receive Padma Awards. Apart from being a fine actress, she was also a talented musician. She was adept in both Carnatic and Hindustani music. She gave voice to her songs despite it being the norm to use playback singers for actors. Some of her songs are still popular.

During her later years, she served on various movie related organizations. She was a Member of the State Film Awards Committee for two years. She was also a Visiting Professor at the Film Institute for one year. She was a Member of Children Film Society for 5 years, from 1965 to 1970.

In India, she was the first and the only woman to have owned a film studio, first actress to act in a dual role and the first woman to have directed a movie simultaneously in three languages.

Bhanumati was also a talented writer with a number of short stories to her credit. Her autobiography Nalo Nenu was published in Telugu and later, released in English as Musings. Andhra Pradesh Sahitya Academy awarded her as the best short story writer for her popular short stories “Attagari Kathalu”. She was a Member of Lalit Kala Academy for 5 years, and Sahitya Academy, Andhra Pradesh for 10 years. She served as Director and Principal of the Tamil Nadu Government Music College,

During the shooting of the film Krishna Prema, she met P. S. Ramakrishna Rao, an assistant director for that film. He was a film producer, director and editor of Telugu and Tamil Films. The couple married on 8 August 1943 and have one son, Bharani. Later they launched a popular production company, Bharani Pictures on their son’s name. She died at the age of 81 years.( Thanks to wikipedia, Cinerang by Isak Mujawar, Ateet ke sitare, HFGK, muVyz and my notes ).

Today’s song is sung by Bhanumathi. many of the songs of this film are copies of songs by Carmen Miranda. Enjoy….


Song-Meherbaan main hoon tumhaari(Mangala)(1950) Singer- P Bhanumathi, Lyricist-Pt. Indra, MD- E Sankar Sastry

Lyrics

mamamamama
mamamami
mamamami
meharbaan main hoon tumhaari
tanananana
tanananana
tanananana
nanana
mamamamamami
mamamani
kadardaan tum ho hamaare
tanananana
tanananana
tanananana
nananana


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4701 Post No. : 16403

‘Chanda Ki Chandni’ (1948) was directed by Dwarka Khosla for IA Patel Productions, Bombay. It was a social movie. It had Rehana, Jairaj, Veera, Bilimoria, Shanta, Neelkanth Tiwari, Moni Chatterjee, Pandey, Keshri, Ameer Banu and others.

This movie has nine songs penned by DN Madhok and music was composed by Gyan Dutt. So far, the following five songs from this movie  have been posted on the blog.

Sr.No. Song Title Posted on
01 Chanda ki chaandni hai mauj hai bahaar hai 07.02.2014
02 Ulfat ke dard ka kabhi mazaa lo 11.03.2014
03 Ham ko bhoolaa diya to kya 16.03.2016
04 Jab teri yaad aati hai dil mera bhar bhar aaye 18.10.2017
05 O jaadugar kaahe tihaar gali aaye 16.07.2020

Today we are presenting sixth song from the above movie which is sung by Geeta Roy (later Geeta Dutt) and music is composed by Gyan Dutt. Lyrics are by DN Madhok as mentioned above.

I came across this song long back when I had shared one song each sung by Sulochana Kadam and Geeta Dutt. The today’s song was noted then but it had remained unposted so far.

Let us now enjoy today’s song …

Song – Jab Kaali Kaali Raatein Hongi (Chanda Ki Chaandni) (1948) Singer – Geeta Roy, Lyrics – DN Madhok, MD – Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab aam ki daali dolegi
aur door koyaliya bolegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
jab kaali kaali raatein hongi
dil se dil ki baatein hongi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

jab tum hum ko yaad karoge
jab tum hum ko yaad karoge
bhoole se ek aah bharoge
bhoole se ek aah bharoge
jab jhilmil jhilmil taare honge
jab jhilmil jhilmil taare honge
chanda se shokh ishaare honge
chanda se shokh ishaare honge
jab dhak se chhati dhadkegi
aur aankh hamaari phadkegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi
aur yaad tumhaari aayegi

————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
————————————————

जब काली काली रातें होंगी
जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब आम की डाली डोलेगी
और दूर कोयलिया बोलेगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
जब काली काली रातें होंगी
दिल से दिल की बातें होंगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

जब तुम हम को याद करोगे
जब तुम हम को याद करोगे
भूले से इक आह भरोगे
भूले से इक आह भरोगे
जब झिलमिल झिलमिल तारे होंगे
जब झिलमिल झिलमिल तारे होंगे
चंदा से शोख इशारे होंगे
चंदा से शोख इशारे होंगे
जब धक से छाती धड़केगी
और आँख तुम्हारी फड़केगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी
और याद तुम्हारी आएगी

 


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2021) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Movies with all their songs covered =1270
Total Number of movies covered =4463

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