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Today (14 July 2020) is the 101st birth anniversary of Sagat Singh (14 july 1919- 26 September 2001). He had nothing to do with HFM, but I am discussing him today. why ? Because I think that he deserves to be known to all of us. His name should occupy a pride of place Among the great sons of India.

Sagat Singh started his military career in pre independence era as a JCO (Naik) with Bikaner Ganga Risala (army of the riyasat of Bikaner). Later he was promoted as Naib Sebedar and then as second lieutenant.

On amalgamation of the State Forces into Indian Army in 1950 after independence, he joined Third Gorkha Rifles of Indian Army. He commanded the Second and Third Battalions of the Third Gorkha Rifles.

In September 1961, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier and he was posted as the brigade commander of India’s only parachute brigade, the 50th Parachute Brigade. Most army officers would scoff at joining Parachute brigade, but Sagat Singh joined it enthusiastically and became a paratrooper himself.

Goa liberation war 1961
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The first memorable event in Sagat Singh’s career came in december 1961 which was liberation of Goa. Though India had become independent on 15 August 1947, Goa continued to be under Portugal occupation. Portugal refused to leave Goa, claiming that was Goa was not a colony but part of metropolitan Portugal and hence its transfer to India was non-negotiable, and that India had no rights to this territory because the Republic of India did not exist at the time when Goa came under Portuguese rule.

The public opinion in Goa was to join India, but these movements were being forciobly suppressed by Portuguese authorities. The relations between Goa and India became tense. On 24 November 1961, Sabarmati, a passenger boat passing between the Indian port of Kochi and the Portuguese-held island of Anjidiv, was fired upon by Portuguese ground troops, resulting in the death of a passenger and injuries to the chief engineer. The action was precipitated by Portuguese fears that the boat carried a military landing party intent on storming the island. The incidents lent themselves to fostering widespread public support in India for military action in Goa.

On receiving the go-ahead for military action and a mandate for the capture of all occupied territories for the Indian government, Lieutenant-General Chaudhari of the Indian Army’s Southern Command fielded the 17th Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth and the 50th Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh.

The operation for the liberation of Goa, code named ‘Vijay’, was planned for 14 December, 1961. In order to prevent international intervention, and reinforcements from Portugal reaching Goa, it was essential that the operation was quick, and decisive. After a quick appreciation, Chaudhury decided to mount a two pronged attack. The main force, comprising 17 Infantry Division, was to move into Goa from the East, while 50 Parachute Brigade, under Brigadier Sagat Singh, was to mount a subsidiary thrust from the North. Major General K.P. Candeth, GOC 17 Infantry Division, was placed in overall command of the task force.

It was decided during meeting in Delhi that 2 Para battalion of 50 para brigade would be air dropped by Air force in Goa. But arforce backed off and this plan had to be abandoned. This 2 para moved to Belgaum where it was met by 1 para of 50 para brigade. 2 Sikh Light infantry (based at Madras) also joined them. They along with 7th cavalry and 8th cavalty were also put under the command of Sagat Singh.So in summary, Sagat Singh commanded 50th Para Brigade, which had as its units 1st para battalion, 2nd Para battalion, 2 Sikh Light Infantry battalion, 7 Light cavalry and 8th light cavalry.

The brigade moved to Savantvadi on 13 December, and thence to its assembly area East of Dodamarg on the 16th. Meanwhile, 17 Infantry Division had also commenced its move from Ambala on 2 December, and had concentrated in Belgaum by 12 December. A tactical headquarters was established by HQ Southern Command at Belgaum on 13 December, and the Army Commander with his staff began to function from here. D Day for the operation was initially decided as 14 December, but was later postponed, due to political reasons, in an attempt to avert the conflict, and resolve the problem by diplomatic means. It was finally decided that the operation would commence on the night of 18 December.

Three days before D Day, the COAS, General P.N. Thapar, accompanied by Lieut General P.P. Kumaramangalam, the Adjutant General, and Lieut General J.N. Chaudhury, the Army Commander, visited the brigade, and Sagat presented his plan for the operation. At the end of the presentation, the Army Commander expressed the view that Sagat’s timings were too optimistic, and had reservations about them being adhered to. Sagat then gave the timings in writing, and the party left, after wishing the brigade good luck. On return to his tactical HQ, The Army Commander conveyed his doubts to his staff. However, Air Vice Marshal Pinto, and the Chief of Staff, Major General P.O. Dunn, as well as Mr. G.N. Handoo, of the IB, who knew Sagat well, supported him, and he was allowed to proceed according to his plan. As it happened, Sagat had already kept a reserve of four hours, and was able to remain well ahead of the estimated timings, when the operations took place.

50 Parachute Brigade had been given a subsidiary task, of advancing from the North, primarily to tie down the Portuguese troops in that area. However, Sagat was not the type to be shackled by rigid orders, and had already visualised a larger role for himself. He had decided to move on a wide front on two axes, with a vehicle mounted battalion group on each, supported by armour and artillery. He reasoned that if he was held up on one axis, he would continue the advance on the other, and using the reserve battalion, advance deeper into Goa, either through Bicholim-Mapuca-Panjim Creek, or via Sanquelim-Usgaon-Ponda-Velha Goa, on to Panjim. 2 Sikh Light Infantry group, supported by a squadron of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8 Cavalry, was tasked to advance on the Bicholim axis. 2 Para, supported by rest of 7th Cavalry and a troop ex 8th Cavalry, was assigned the Sanquelim axis. 1 Para was kept in reserve.

Though the operation was to commence on the night of 18 December, Sagat had decided to launch fighting patrols the previous night, to overcome the border outposts, in order to facilitate the entry of the main column across the border the following morning. Accordingly, Sagat had tasked 1 Para to capture two border outposts, and 2 Para to proceed along the ‘smugglers route’ and capture the single span 110 feet long bridge over the Sanquelim river, on the previous night. As these preliminary operations were going on, All India Radio gave the game away, by announcing shortly after midnight, that Indian troops were crossing into Goa. This alerted the Portuguese, and the element of surprise, so important in such operations, was lost. One company of 2 Para, after a swift night approach, had reached within 200 yards of the bridge, when barking dogs alerted the defending troops, who quickly fired the demolitions and fled. The Portuguese Governor General and C-in-C, Major General Vassalo De Silva, was from the Corps of Engineers, and had got demolition chambers made in all the bridges, with explosives attached, for rapid demolitions. However, the company of 2 Para found a crossing place, and secured the home bank, enabling the tanks, guns and vehicles to cross the river. The Portuguese had not been able to fire all the demolition charges, and only those at the two ends had exploded. The single span had fallen down but was undamaged. Using marine jacks, the span was lifted, and with the addition of abutments at both ends, the bridge was soon re-commissioned. 1 Para also managed to capture the villages of Ibrampur, Maulinguem and Doromaoga, by first light of 18 December, though it suffered some casualties.

The main force, viz 17 Infantry Division commenced from its assembly area South of Belgaum, at dawn on 18 December, with 63 Infantry Brigade in the lead. It was planned to advance up to Ponda, by way of Mollem. 48 Infantry Brigade, which was following, was to pass through at Ponda, and go for Panjim, which was the final objective. Due to the advance on foot and abnormally large bridging column which was following the leading brigade, 48 Infantry Brigade could not keep up its advance, and when it reached River Candepar in evening, it found it was already occupied by paratroopers. Two battalions of 50 Parachute Brigade, 2 Para and 2 Sikh LI, had also commenced their advance at first light, on 18 December. Moving on converging axes, they did not let the blown up bridges deter them and simply swam across. The absence of heavy equipment, and light opposition from the enemy, coupled with initiative of the leaders, made this possible. As a result, the para troopers made excellent progress, and achieved more than what was expected from them. By 8.30 a.m. 2 Sikh LI had taken Bicholim and by 10.30 a.m. 2 Para reached Sanquelim, and by 5.30 p.m., occupied Ponda. This was done in spite of two major obstacles, in the form of the rivers Usgaon and Candepar, which were crossed by means of improvised rafts and fording.

After the crossing of the wide Usgaon river, Sagat felt that there was now no need to hold 1 Para in reserve, and he ordered them to head straight for Banasterim, after crossing the ferry at Piligao. According to his initial plan, on reaching Panjim, 2 Para was to establish a firm base close to the city, and 1 Para would be tasked to clear the expected resistance in the built up area. The lack of enemy resistance, and speed of advance had altered the situation. Another development took place at tactical HQ of Southern Command, at Belgaum. A wireless intercept indicated that the Portuguese Governor General had called for a meeting next morning at 8 a.m., to consider surrender. The Army Commander, when informed of this, realised that the Portuguese had lost the battle. Seeing the slow progress of 17 Infantry Division, and the rapid advance of 50 Para Brigade, he decided to change the plan. The task of capturing Panjim, which had been earlier assigned to 17 Division, was now given to the paratroopers, who were asked resume advance during the night. Due to break down in signal communications, this order could not be passed to HQ 17 Infantry Division, which had ordered 50 Para Brigade to firm in at Ponda, and tasked 48 Brigade to capture Panjim. However, Lieut-General Chaudhury personally spoke to the Brigade Major of 50 Para Brigade, and passed these instructions, since Sagat was away from his headquarters, visiting 2 Para, at that time. Incidentally, 50 Para Brigade was able to maintain contact with Belgaum throughout the operation, thanks to a radio relay detachment, which Sagat had managed to get from Major General R.N. Batra, the Signal Officer-in-Chief, on the ‘old boy’ net.

The advance of 2 Sikh LI was initially slow, even though it was led by the squadron of 7 Cavalry, and a troop of AMX tanks. Sagat felt that they had a tendency to hug the ground, and this accounted for their slow progress. He had to personally push them hard, before they speeded up their advance, and reached the Betim ferry, on the Panjim Creek, by last light. By this time, 1 Para had reached the outskirts of Panjim. With two battalions around Panjim by the evening of 18 December, 50 Para Brigade was now poised to capture the town, from the East as well as the North. However, it was almost dark, and Sagat did not want to enter the built up area of Panjim by night. He ordered 1 Para and 2 Sikh LI to halt, and establish harbours, for the night.

On the morning of 19 December, using the Betim ferry, some troops of 2 Sikh LI crossed the Panjim Creek, and arrived in Panjim at 8 am. Shortly afterwards, 1 Para also reached Panjim. Except for some firing from the customs house, there was no effective resistance, and the city was in Indian hands by 9 a.m. By a remarkable coincidence, the COs of both battalions had the same name. 1 Para was being commanded by Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh, VrC, MC, while the CO of 2 Sikh LI was Lieut Colonel Sucha Singh. It was the latter who won the race by an hour, and had the honour of accepting the surrender of the Portuguese troops, who had assembled in the officers mess. Major General Vassalo De’ Silva, the Governor General and C-in-C, escaped to Marmagao, and surrendered later. The Navy had already taken Anjidiv island the previous day, and also sunk the Portuguese frigate ‘Albuquerque’. At 11 a.m., Lieut-General Chaudhury, accompanied by Air Vice Marshal Pinto arrived in a helicopter, and got the tri-colour hoisted on the Secretariat building. Goa had been liberated, in an operation which lasted a little over 24 hours.

So, one can say that Goa was supposed to be liberated by 17th Infantry Division commanded by Major-General K. P. Candeth, with 50th Parachute Brigade commanded by Brigadier Sagat Singh supposed to play a supporting role. But it was the other way round. Sagat Singh’s 50th Parachute Brigade reached Panjim and accepted surrender of Goan C in C, while 17th Infantry Division was still struggling to reach Panjim.

Though the result of the operations in Goa was along expected lines, the speed of the Indian advance surprised many observers. The credit for this goes to Sagat, and his troops, who exceeded their brief, and managed to reach Panjim, which they had not been asked to do. The fact that 17 Infantry Division, in spite of the vastly superior resources at their disposal, and almost no opposition from the enemy, could make little headway, goes to show that the going was not easy. If the paratroopers succeeded, it was because of better fighting spirit, morale and leadership. The ability to take risks, and seize fleeting opportunities is the hall mark of a successful military leader, and Sagat proved beyond doubt that he had these qualities in ample measure.

Bangladesh Liberation War 1971
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In 1971 war, time was of essence. As soon as Pakistan started the war, on 3 December 1971 (by carrying out what they thought was an Israeli style bombing on Indian airfields), India retaliated and Pakistan ran to the UN on 4 December 1971 (in a very un Israel like manner), requesting UN to intervene and order ceasefire. Pakistan was supported by USA and China, while USSR vetoed the proposal, Britain and France abstained. So, India had limited time in which to achieve their task before Pakistan could manage to get ceasefire, like how they had managed to force India, then on the verge of defeating Pakistan soundly, into ceasefire in 1965, thanks to Chinese aggression at Sikkim.

In 1971, The task of liberating Bangla Desh, then called East Pakistan, was given to Lieut General Jagjit Singh Aurora, GOC-in-C Eastern Command. Under him, he had four corps under him, namely- 2 Corps, commanded by Lieut General (later General) T.N. Raina; 33 Corps, commanded by Lieut General M.L. Thapan; 4 Corps, commanded by Lieut General Sagat Singh; and 101 Communication Zone Area, commanded by Major General G.S. Gill.

East Pakistan had three major rivers and that divided it into four major territories. Each of the corps was given the task of capturing one part each. The part south of river Padma (that is known as Ganga in India) was to be captured by Corps II, advancing from West (viz from West Bengal). The part between Padma (Ganga in India) and Jamuna (known as Brahmputra in India) was to be captured by Corps 33, advancing from North west. Another major river is river Meghna (combination of Barak river and Kushtia river, both originating in Assam), which flows south west and joins Padma (which is already merged with Jamuna by then. The mighty river that thus forms is called Meghna and it flows into bay of Bengal. Sagat Singh’s corps 4 was given the task of capturing the territory east of River Meghna, attacking from east. The fourth territory, viz the northern territory between Jamuna and Meghna rivers was to be captured by 101 Communication Zone Area, attacking from north.

Bangladesh is a territory full of rivers. Crossing them is tough because there are very few bridges on them.

Pakistan had three infantry divisions, comprising about 42 battalions of regular troops, and five squadrons of armour, for the defence of the region, and more than 2000 kilometres of border. Lieut General A.A.K. Niazi, who was commanding the Eastern Command of the Pakistan Army, had appreciated that the Indian advance would have to be along the major road axes, and had deployed his troops accordingly. Strong points had been created along the likely axes, and it was visualised that unless these were cleared, the advancing enemy could make little headway.

Lt General Niazi’s hunch was correct as far as corps II, corps XXXIII and 101 communication zone were concerned. They advanced in the conventional way along the predicted route where Pakistani forces awaited them. Fighting them and defeating them consumed precious time. As a result, these corps fell way behind schedule in achieving their targets. Time was important because the longer the war prolonged, more was the possibility that UN would force a ceasefire and like in 1965, it would end up in a stalemate, with nothing to show for India.

Just when it looked gloomy for Indian forces, Sagat Singh employed some unconventional strategies that no military strategist had ever thought of. Realising that time was important and using the same conventional method of advancing on land was time consuming, he decided to air drop his troops across river Meghna. He had antique helicopters which were not meant for this purpose, but he made them fly hundreds of sorties, and in each sortie 17 troops were carried (about 5 more than the carrying capacity). It was a risky gamble, and these helicopters were shot at by Pakistani troops. On one occasion, one helicopter was hit by these shots. The bullets hit the pilot and grazed past Sagat Singh, also flying in the helicopter. Sagat Singh was playing for broke, and his gamble paid off big time.

When his Corps had reached the Meghna River and he was trying to cross the river to advance to Dacca, Aurora tried to restrain him. Sagat told him that he was surprised at his reluctance when he was not only fulfilling the task given to him but achieving task plus. Hesuccessfully conducted an ad hoc and impromptu river crossing operation across one of the widest rivers of the world.

The air lift began on the afternoon of December 9, and continued for the next 36 hours. A total of 110 sorties were flown, from a stadium, and crossed the Meghna, which was 4,000 yards wide, to land at helipads which had been marked by torches, with their reflectors removed. During day, the troops were landed in paddy fields, with helicopters hovering low above the ground. The first battalion of 311 Mountain Brigade, 4 Guards, was landed in Raipura. while 9 Punjab crossed the river using country boats.

Next day, the troops were landed directly at Narsingdi. Meanwhile, 73 Brigade had started to cross, using boats, which had been rounded up. The ferrying of artillery and tanks was a serious problem, and required considerable ingenuity on the part of the Engineers. By 11 December, both 311 and 73 Mountain Brigade had crossed the Meghna, and were ordered to advance to Dacca, on different axes. Using all modes of transport, including bullock carts and cycle rickshaws, both brigades advanced rapidly, and on December 14, the first artillery shell was fired on Dacca. Meanwhile, 101 communication zone too advanced towards Dacca from north. This, as well as other units that began arriving towards Dhaka were put under the command of Sagat Singh on 15 December. Shelling commenced and the message for Pakistan was clear, surrender or perish. One way or the other, Dacca was bound to fall to Indian forces on 16 December 1971.

Niazi surrendered on 16 december 1971. Unlike in 1965, when Pakistan avoided a humiliating defeat, this time, Pakistan could not save face. On 12 December, with Pakistan facing imminent defeat, the United States requested that the Security Council be reconvened. Pakistan’s Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was rushed to New York City to make the case for a resolution on the cease fire. The council continued deliberations for four days. By the time proposals were finalised, Pakistan’s forces in the East had surrendered and the war had ended, making the measures merely academic. Bhutto, frustrated by the failure of the resolution and the inaction of the United Nations, ripped up his speech and left the council. 🙂

So, Sagat Singh’s unconventional tactics bamboozled Pakistani army and Pakistani rulers alike. Pakistan was forced to surrender several days before than they had expected. Some “experts” thought that Niazi should have deferred his decision by another one day. But these experts forget that Niazi had no choice. There was no way he would have left Dacca alive without Indian forces protection. Even if there was ceasefire, Indian troops would have just handed him over to Mukti Bahini. So surrendering before Indian army was an offer that Niazi could not refuse. 🙂

Here is that famous surrender photo. Sagat Singh is seen standing immediately behind Niazi.

So, one can see that Sagat Singh caused liberation of Goa on 19 december 1971 and liberation of Bangaldesh on 16 december 1971. It was almost a “ten year liberation challenge” (dec 1961-dec 1971) as far as he was concerned ! 🙂

But, neither of these two feats were the biggest achievements of his career, in my opinion. His biggest achievement, that had far reaching implications for India, and therefore world affairs, came about in 1967 and ironically, very few people know about that and even talk about that. and that was :-

1967 Indo China War
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I have mentioned it earlier that India was winning against Pakistan decisively in 1965 when China, in a bid to save Pakistan, pened a front at Sikkim, and accused India of provocation and made some unreasonable demands on India. Indian government got nervous and declared ceasefire when on the verge of victory. This saved Pakistan big time. On the negotiating table, Pakistan got back everything that it had lost in the war. India not only surrendered all the gains of the war, even its PM Lalbahadur Shashtri died mysteriously at Tashkant, where this meeting was taking place. So to many Indians it felt like India was stabbed in the back by the entire world for the misdeed of Pakistan and Pakistan got away scotfree.

Among the threats made by China while opening the Sikkim front with India, was the unreasonable demand that India vacated the two passes that were under Indian occupation, claiming that they were Chinese territories. These passes were Nathu La pass and Jelep La pass.

Nathu La was under mountain division 17 (headed by its Division Commander Major General Sagat Singh) while Jelep La was under mountain division 27 (headed by another Major General ). Both were under Lt Gen G G Bewoor, Corps commander of corps XXXIII.

In order to help Pakistan during the 1965 War, the Chinese served an ultimatum, and demanded that the Indians withdraw their posts at Nathu La and Jelep La. Nathu La was under mountain division 17 (headed by its Division Commander Major General Sagat Singh) while Jelep La was under mountain division 27.

In the opinion of Corps Commander Lt Gen Bewoor, the main defences of 17 Mountain Division were at Changgu, while Nathu La was only an observation post. Likewise In the adjoining sector, manned by 27 Mountain Division, Jelep La was also considered an observation post, with the main defences located at Lungthu. In case of hostilities, the divisional commanders had been given the authority to vacate the posts, and fall back on the main defences. Accordingly, orders were issued by Corps HQ to both divisions to vacate Nathu La and Jelep La.

Sagat did not agree with the views of the Corps HQ. Nathu La and Jelep La were passes, on the watershed, which was the natural boundary. The MacMahon Line, which India claimed as the International Border, followed the water shed principle, and India and China had gone to war over this issue, three years earlier. Vacating the passes on the watershed would give the Chinese the tactical advantage of observation and fire, into India, while denying the same to our own troops. Nathu La and Jelep La were also important because they were on the trade routes between India and Tibet, and provided the only means of ingress through the Chumbi Valley. Handing it over to the enemy on a platter was not Sagat’s idea of sound military strategy. Sagat also reasoned that the discretion to vacate the posts lay with the divisional commander, and he was not obliged to do so, based on instructions from Corps HQ.

As a result of orders issued by Corps HQ, 27 Mountain Division vacated Jelep La, which the Chinese promptly occupied. However, Sagat refused to vacate Nathu La, and when the Chinese became belligerent, and opened fire, he also opened up with guns and mortars, though there was a restriction imposed by Corps on the use of artillery. Lieut-General (later General) G.G. Bewoor, the Corps Commander, was extremely annoyed, and tried to speak to Sagat, to ask him to explain his actions. But Sagat was not in his HQ, and was with the forward troops. So it was his GSO 1, Lieut Colonel Lakhpat Singh, who bore the brunt of the Corps Commander’s wrath.

The Chinese had installed loudspeakers at Nathu La, and warned the Indians that they would suffer as they did in 1962, if they did not withdraw. However, Sagat had carried out a detailed appreciation of the situation, and reached the conclusion that the Chinese were bluffing. They made threatening postures, such as advancing in large numbers, but on reaching the border, always stopped, turned about and withdrew. They also did not use any artillery, for covering fire, which they would have certainly done if they were serious about capturing any Indian positions. Indian defences at Nathu La were strong. Sagat had put artillery observation posts on adjoining high features called Camel’s Back and Sebu La, which overlooked into the Yatung valley for several kilometres, and could bring down accurate fire on the enemy, an advantage that the Chinese did not have. It would be a tactical blunder to vacate Nathu La, and gift it to the Chinese.

During the crisis, the Chinese had occupied Jelep La, but had gained nothing in the sector under Sagat’s division. This was galling for them, and they continued their pressure on the Indians, and making threatening gestures. In December 1965, the Chinese fired on a patrol of 17 Assam Rifles, in North Sikkim, at a height of 16,000 feet, killing two men. The patrol was in Indian territory, but the Chinese claimed that it had crossed over to their side. They made regular broadcasts from loudspeakers at Nathu La, pointing out to Indian troops the pathetic conditions in which they lived, their low salaries and lack of amenities, comparing these to that of officers. It was a form of psychological warfare in which the Chinese were adept, and had to be countered. Sagat had similar loud speakers installed on our own side, and tape recorded messages, in Chinese language, were broadcast every day. However, he was not satisfied with this, and kept looking for a chance to avenge the death of the Indian soldiers who had fallen to Chinese bullets. Throughout 1966, and early 1967, Chinese propaganda, intimidation and attempted incursions into Indian territory continued. The border was not marked, and there were several vantage points on the crest line which both sides thought belonged to them. Patrols which walked along the border often clashed, resulting in tension, and sometimes even casualties.

In 1967, Sagat discussed the problem with the new Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora. He suggested that the border at Nathu La should be clearly marked, to prevent such incidents, and offered to walk along the crest line, to test the Chinese resolve. If they did not object, the line along which he walked could be taken to be acceptable to them. This was agreed to, and Sagat, accompanied by an escort, began walking along the crest. The Chinese commander also walked alongside, accompanied by a photographer, who kept taking pictures. However, there was no confrontation, and the ‘walk’ ended peacefully.

Sagat then obtained the concurrence of the Corps Commander to mark the crest line, along which he had walked. He ordered a double wire fence to be erected, from Nathu La towards the North and South Shoulders. However, as soon as work began on the fence, on 20 August 1967, the Chinese became agitated, and asked the Indians to stop. One strand of wire was laid that day, and two more were added over the next two days. On 6 September, a patrol of 2 Grenadiers, the battalion which was holding defences at Nathula, was going towards the South Shoulder, when it was surrounded by about seventy Chinese, and threatened. The next day, the Chinese physically tried to interfere with the construction of the fence, and there was a scuffle. However, work continued on the next two days, and was almost completed on the 10th.

Since the Chinese appeared determined to prevent completion of the fence, it was decided to start early on 11th, and finish the job before first light. All available manpower, including a platoon of Engineers and another of Pioneers, was deployed for the task. A company of 18 Rajput was also brought in, to reinforce the position, and protect the men who were to construct the fence. As soon as work commenced, the Chinese came upto the fence, and tried to stop the work. There was a heated discussion between the Chinese commander, who was accompanied by the political commissar, and Lieut Colonel Rai Singh, CO 2 Grenadiers. Sagat had foreseen this eventuality, and told Lieut Colonel Rai Singh not to expose himself, and remain in his bunker, where the Brigade Commander, Brigadier M.M.S. Bakshi, was also present. But this was not heeded, and the CO, with an escort, came out in the open, to stand face to face with the Chinese officers. As the arguments became more heated, tempers rose, but both sides stood their ground. Suddenly, the Chinese opened fire, causing several casualties among the troops working on the wire fence. Lieut Colonel Rai Singh was hit by a Chinese bullet, and fell down.

Seeing their CO fall, the Grenadiers became mad with rage. In a fit of fury, they came out of their trenches, and attacked the Chinese post, led by Captain P.S. Dagar. The company of 18 Rajput, under Major Harbhajan Singh, and the Engineers working on the fence had been caught in the open, and suffered a few casualties from the Chinese firing. Realising that the only way to neutralise the Chinese fire was a physical assault, Harbhajan shouted to his men, and led them in a charge on the Chinese position. Several of the Indian troops were mowed down, by Chinese machine guns, but those who reached the Chinese bunkers used their bayonets, and accounted for many of the enemy. Both Harbhajan and Dagar lost their lives in the action, which developed into a full scale battle, lasting three days. Sagat had asked for some medium guns, and these were moved up to Kyangnosa La, at a height of over 10,000 ft.

Those day, authority to use artillary was only with Army Chief. Sagat Singh asked for permission to use artillary. His commanding officer sent the request to Delhi where the request went tthrough various channels in a proper bureaucratic manner. Seeing that it would be too late if he kept waiting for the orders from Delhi, Sagat Singh ordered firing of artillary on his own.

The artillery observation posts, which Sagat had sited earlier, proved their worth in bringing down effective fire on the Chinese. Because of lack of visibility, and the steep incline West of Nathu La, most Chinese shells fell behind the forward defences, and did not harm the Indians. Indian artillary shelling caused heavy damage on Chinese. Based on their observation of meek Indian behaviour so far, Chinese forces had never expecte such a furious response.

The Indian casualties in the action were just over two hundred – 65 dead and 145 wounded. The Chinese are estimated to have suffered about three hundred casualties. Though the action taken by Sagat, in marking the border with a wire fence, had the approval of higher authorities, the large number of casualties suffered by both sides created a furore. The casualties to Indian troops would not have occurred if they had remained in their defences, and not exposed themselves by coming out of their trenches and rushing at the Chinese post. This happened in the heat of the moment, because seeing their CO fall, the troops lost their cool, and rushed forward under the orders of a young officer, who lost his life in the action.

The Corps Commander, Lieut General J.S. Aurora, visited Nathu La, to assess the situation. Sagat was advised to prevent further escalation of hostilities, and avoid casualties to Indian troops.

The Chinese had already announced that it was the Indians who started the conflict, and the large number of Indian bodies, and wounded Indian soldiers, in their possession, seemed to support their claim. However, Sagat was not perturbed. For the last two years, the Chinese had been instigating him, and had killed several Indian soldiers. The specter of Chinese attack, of 1962, still haunted the military and political leadership in India and had prevented them from taking effective action against them. This was the first time the Chinese got a bloody nose, and the myth of their invincibility was broken.

This was not the end of the face-off with the Chinese. They had suffered more than 300 casualties and seemed unwilling to let the watershed cool down. On 1 Oct, a confrontation ensued between the Chinese and 7/11 GR at Chola, a pass west of Nathu La and under the responsibility of 63 Brigade. The Gorkhas had that very day taken over the post at Pt 15450 from 10 J&K Rifles. A scuffle ensued between the JCO post commander and his Chinese counterpart over a boulder which was on the watershed. The Chinese bayoneted the JCO and his men retaliated with the deadly use of the kukhri. A fierce hand to hand struggle ensued and a neighbouring post came under attack. The Gorkhas were unwilling to start their tenure with a defeat and got clearance from the Brigade Commander to raise the stakes. Pt 15450, which had been taken by the Chinese, was vigorously attacked with close quarter kukhri work and the Chinese were evicted.26 This was a clear signal to them that the Indians would not surrender an inch of territory and the area around the watershed stabilised, ultimately being designated as the Line of Actual Control.

These two incidents were so unexpected and demoralising for the Chinese that there has been no firing on the LAC from that time in 1967 till today (2020). They kept threatening Indian even later, but the mental scars left on them in 1967 have not healed. That has acted as a brake on Chinese aggression.

Had India surrendered Nathu La under pressure of China then China would have had a free passage to Sikkim (then an Indian protectorate). China would have occupied Sikkim in no time. From Sikkim, cutting off Indian North East through Siliguri Corridor (aka Chicken neck) would have been a piece of cake for China. Occupying Sikkim would have enabled them to occupy the entire North East part of India. And all that before 1970. So there would have been no Bangladesh war and no win for India in that war. All this was avoided just because India had the right man at the right time as the icharge of protecting the borders at Nathu La during 1965 to 1967. And he took a decision in national interest that was at variance with the ecision of his superior. Obeying that wrong decision cost India Jelep La pass, but Sagat Singh ensured that he would not surrender Nathu La. And two years later, he gave China a bloody nose, once again, by taking a decision that was against rules but in national interest.

His feat at Nathu La has been downplayed and its long term significance in ensuring the morale of Indian armed forces, and also in ensuring the unity and integrity of the nation, has not been fully appreciated.

During 1971 war, China did not interfere by opening another front, unlike what they had done in 1965. For that India must be thankful to Sagat Singh. The bloody nose that Chinese had received in 1967 was only too fresh in Chinese minds, so they stayed out of this conflict.

One army officer, who has followed his career closely rightly obseves that Sagat Singh was one of the greatest army commanders of all times. He is comparable to German Army commander Rommel and US army commander George Patten. Like Patten, Sagat Singh too found his war expoits being overlooked by his superiors, but Sagat Singh would not let that stop him from giving his best for the nation.

Just as this episode of Indian forces giving China a bloody nose in 1967 has been carefully shoved under the carpet, even Hindi movies have not covered this glorious chapter of Indian Army. Or so I thought. I came to know a few months back that a movie “Paltan”(2018) has been made on this event. But unlike other war movies, few moviegoers seem to have watched it. The movie seemingly flopped, which is a great pity.

The movie is available on zee5, and I especially subscribed to zee5 to watch this movie. The movie was directed by J P Datta. It had Jackie Shroff, Arjun Rampal, Sonu Sood, Harshvardhan Rane, Esha Gupta, Sonal Chauhan etc in it. Jackie Shroff plays Sagat Singh in the movie.

Here is a song from “Paltan” (2018) in honour of Late Lt Gen (Retd)Sagat Singh, the hero of Goa Liberation war, Bangladesh liberation war and the person who gave Indians the belief that Chinese armymen were not invincible, unlike what we were told since 1962.

The song is sung by Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II and Divya Kumar. Jawed Akhtar is the lyricist. Anu Malik is the music director. Knowing Anu Malik’s reputaion, it should come as no surprise if his tunes turn out to be “inspired” tunes. Here it is lifted from the theme music of “The bridge on the river Kwai”.

The picturisation of the song is just two minutes long. The audio version is six minutes long.

Video

Audio full


Song-Paltan o paltan (Paltan)(2018) Singers-Khuda Baksh, Irfan I, Adarsh II, Divya Kumar, Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-Anu Malik

Lyrics

chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
chale jo apni paltan to parwat hatt jaayein
dariya rasta chhodein chattanein kat jaayein
ik saathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
ik sathi hai daayein
ik sathi hai baayein
hatein na hum jo kisi morche par datt jaayein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

tez nigaahein tez dhadkanein tez kadam hain
hilta hai aakaash bhi jab yoon chalte hum hain
pairon ko chhoone aati hain khud hi raahein
har manzil hai milti humse khole baahein
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tann-mann
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande mataram
vande mataram
vande ae mataram
vande ae mataram

aangaaron ki baarish ho ya aag ke saagar
hum badhhte hi jaate hain in sab ko o bujhaa kar
josh bhi hai aur hosh bhi hai aur taakat bhi hai
har dushman se takraane ki himmat bhi hai
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
tere liye hum laaye hain tan mann
o sathi o
o sathi o
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
hum bhi kahen
tum bhi kaho
vande maataram
vande maataram
paltan o paltan
paltan o paltan
vande ae maataram
vandee ae maataram


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4350 Post No. : 15663 Movie Count :

4314

Today’s song is from film Masoom-41, the first among the three same title films made later in 1960 and 1996. I was tempted but I am not counting the funny title ” Masoom Chudail” made in 2000 !

Masoom-41 was a Muslim Social film made by Fazli Brothers in Calcutta. Like many other myths in Hindi film industry, one myth is that Mehboob Khan was the pioneer in making Muslim social films in India. This probably originated because the first film of Mehboob’s own company Mehboob Productions was ” Najma”-43, a Muslim social film starring Ashok kumar, Veena, Stara, Kumar, Yaqub etc. But the fact is different.

Although historical and costume films with Muslim backgrounds were commonly made from the beginning of films, films depicting the social life of Muslims were not being made frequently. The first Muslim social film was ” Rashida”-35, made by Madon Theatres, Calcutta, featuring Kajjan, Effendi and others. It was directed by a Jew-Izra Mir. The name of the film indicated that it was about a Muslim girl. Somehow, I find a lot of Muslim social films made had titles of girl’s names, Like Zeenat, Ameena, Najma, Shama, Heena, Zubeida, Salma, Ismat etc etc.

The beginning of serious Muslim social films was done by Fazli Brothers- Hasnain and Sibtain Fazli. They first made a Muslim social film Qaidi-1940, featuring Ramola,Mehtab, B.Nandrekar, Wasti etc. This was a period of struggle for Indian Independence. The fundamentalists in Muslims were active and due to the fear of their reaction, film makers were wary of producing such films. Even Fazli brothers were also afraid that there would be obstruction from these people to their film, so they decided to make the film in Calcutta. Their first Muslim Social film Qaidi-40 was very successful. Encouraged, they made two more such films (Masoom-41 and Chauranghee-42) in Calcutta. For film Chauranghee-42, the Fazli Brothers roped in famous Bangla poet (who later on became the National Poet of Bangladesh) Kazi Nazrul Islam- the creator of Nazrul geeti, as a Lyricist and MD for the film.

After 1942, Fazli Brothers shifted their activities to Bombay and made many Muslim social films like Fashion-43,Ismat-44, Dil-46 and Mehendi 47. So, in true sense, it is the Fazli Brothers who were the pioneers of Muslim Social films in India.

Film Masoom was directed by the elder brother-Hasnain Fazli. The music was by one time Music Director Munshi Mubarak Hussain. Actually, ” Munshi” is a prefix solely used for writers. How this Munshi gave music, is a wonder to me. Out of the 9 songs, only 2 songs are credited with the lyricist’s name. Otherwise the film has no Lyricist name in HFGK. Also none of the singer’s names are mentioned. The cast of the film was Ramola, Amjad, Mazhar khan, Mehtab, Anis, Nazir Kashmiri etc etc. In their first film Qaidi-40 also Ramola was the heroine. Here she was repeated. Hero Amjad in this film was repeated in the next film but these two artistes did not feature in any Fazli films later on. Though Ramola was very active, Amjad disappeared totally. Ramola had already become famous and popular in India due to her role in Pancholi’s film at Lahore- ” Khazanchi”-41.

Actress Ramola (real name- Rachel Cohen) was born in a Jew family on 5-7-1917, at Bombay. Her father Hayam Cohem was a school Teacher. Her initial education was done in Bombay. Later they shifted to Calcutta where she completed her matriculation and joined films. Her first film was ‘ Graher fer’-38,a Bangla film. She did a few small roles and then came ‘Khazanchi’-41 from Pancholi of Lahore. This changed her career and she became a popular actress. She did films like Masoom,Khamoshi manchali.etc etc.

Initially,Ramola was a small actress. First she acted on stage along with her two sisters. Then she got a Bangla film. It was Jagdish Sethi who introduced her to director/lyricist/dialogue writer Kidar Sharma. According to Kidar Sharma,
“She was smart and a charming young lady. Her only drawback was her height. She was not tall, just about 5 feet, but she had lofty ambitions. One day she came to see me and I promised I would personally take her to the director of her choice. She said, “I would like to be introduced to Mr. Nitin Bose, and no one else.” I took her to Mr. Bose, and was sure that her charm and talent would impress him.

Mr. Bose scanned her, from top to toe, while I praised her talent and her choice of a director, like Nitin Bose. After a long silence, Mr. Bose addressed me and said, “When you brought her to me, why did you forget to bring some bricks for her to stand on?” Poor Romola was hurt and heart-broken by this great director’s caustic remark. She quietly said, “Goodbye” and walked away from his office.

I followed her and found that she was in tears. ‘I was moved by the plight of a struggling youngster having high hopes, being ridiculed for something which nature was responsible for. I knew what it felt like to be ridiculed. I had experienced it often enough. I escorted her to the tram junction and there she bid me goodbye. To encourage her, I said, “Please, Romola, don’t be heart-broken. One day, when I become a director, you will be my first heroine, and we will prove to Mr. Bose and the world, what a great star you are.” Romola laughed and said,- “Poor Mr. Kidarnath, the dialogue-writer will never be a director and I will never be a heroine.” So saying, she jumped into the tram.”

However, Kidar Sharma kept his promise and cast her in his first film as director Aulad / Dil Hi To Hai (1939). Aulad/Dil Hi To hai was a down-to-earth story of a middle-class father, who had sacrificed all his life to educate his son and his darling daughter, hoping that they would be worthy children to the society and to the family. Little did the old man know that the generation gap would present a different, horrifying reality, which would destroy him completely. The modern college Miss, who destroys the dreams of her old father, the aged struggling middle class man, was played by Ramola.

After the success of the film, Ramola got romantically involved with R.C. Talwar, Kidar Sharma’s assistant who later became a director in his own right. According to Kidar Sharma, “R.C. Talwar was a classmate and friend so I ignored his relationship with Ramola.”

Later Ramola appeared in many films including Qaidi, Khazanchi, Khamoshi, Swan Aya Re, Rim Jhim etc. When she acted in Pancholi’s famous film Khazanchi-41, she became famous all over India and film offers started pouring on her. She looked so cute in her Punjabi dress- Salwar and Kurta- in that film, that this dress became famous and popular as Khazanchi dress amongst the women in India.

She acted in 23 films in Hindi and 5 films in Bangla. She even sang 14 songs in 4 Hindi films. After the arrival of new heroines including Madhubala, Nargis, Meena Kumari etc, Ramola’s career got eclipsed and she bid farewell to her film career. Her last 3 films Actor, Jawani Ki Aag and Stage were released in 1951. However her actual last film was the Bangla film, Anurag-51

Ramola was married twice. Her second husband, Leslie Rondeau, was a Captain in the British Air Force, who helped to train Indian pilots in the IAF post Indian Independence. Her son, Sam, from her first husband, migrated to Israel in the 1950s. She had two daughters, Dena and Linda, from her second marriage. Dena, based in London today, even acted in a film, GP Sippy’s Ahsaas (1979), and works in the fashion industry while Linda, a resident of Bombay, was an air-hostess with Air India. With her generous and large hearted spirit, Ramola also ‘adopted’ and looked after another 14 families, helping them move ahead in life. Ramola passed away in Bombay on 10-12-1988.

Here is some information on Fazli Brothers. The producers Fazli brothers, were the sons of Khan Bahadur S M Fazal Rabb of Beharaich- about 125 kms from Lucknow in U.P. The elder brother was Hasnain and the younger brother was Sibtain ( born on 9-7-1916). Hasnain Fazli was born on 12-1-1912 in the United Province (today’s U.P.). Their family belonged to the noble Sayyads of Allahabad. Hasnain was a graduate of Allahabad University. Though his father was a Khan Bahadur, a Government Jahagirdar and lifetime Magistrate, Hasnain refused to do any service and did not complete his I.C.S. studies, as expected by the family.

He had a creative mind. He joined the film line. He was very keen on making a film on Muslim Society. In those days it was considered outrageous to produce a film on Muslim society for fear of the ire of the fundamentalists. However Hasnain broke the barrier and the first Muslim Social film Qaidi-40 was produced and directed by him under the banner of Film Corporation of India, Calcutta. Very cleverly, the film was made at Calcutta, ( though the film depicted life in Lucknow ), and not at Bombay to avoid any disruption in the making of the film. The film was made so well that it was received very well by all strata of the population, including the Muslims and became a hit film. After this Hasnain made more Muslim social films like Masoom-41, Chowranghee-42, Fashion-43 and Ismat-44. These films discussed Muslim family life and problems etc.

His first directorial film was at his 23rd year- Triya Charitra-35. Then came Sajiv Murti-35, in which the Handsome Vijay Kumar from Himachal Pradesh was the Hero. Fazli brothers also made Dil-46, Mehendi-47, Duniya-49 and Khoobsurat-52. Hasnain was so talented that he himself wrote the film stories, screenplays and dialogues usually. Sibtain Fazli directed 3 films-Chowranghee-42, Ismat-44 and Mehendi-47.

After the Partition, Fazli brothers migrated to Pakistan. Sibtain remained in Pakistan and Hasnain returned to India to make 2 more films. Later Hasnain too relocated to Lahore and died there on 16-7-1957. His brother Sibtain ( 9-7-1916 to 25-7-1985) who had directed 3 films in India, made 4 films in Pakistan, including the most popular Urdu film of Madam Noor Jehan – Dupatta-52.

Film Masoom-41 was released on 30-5-1942, at Imperial Theatre, Bombay. The story of the film is…..Noor Ali (Mazhar khan) becomes a widower. He has a small child-Masoom. So he remarries a widow(Mehtab), with a child Jameel. Both Jameel and Masoom grow up together. Masoom falls in love with his childhood friend Rehana (Ramola) and Jameel loves a modern, educated girl-Shahida (Anis). After many twists and turns, all becomes well and they get married happily.

Today’s song is a typical Bangla type song. I mean a Hindi song sung in Bangla tune and style. Though the singer is not mentioned, Sadanand Kamath ji, who uploaded this song, on my request promptly, feels that the singer is Jagmohan Sursagar. I tend to agree with him. Since the film was made completely in Calcutta, it is very much possible. With this song, film Masoom-41 makes it’s Debut on the Blog.

(Ack: information used herein is culled from books “Forgottem movies on Muslim Culture” by Kamlakar P. and ” Muslim Cinema” by Isak Mujawar, Film India magazine, my thanks to them and Film Directory-46 also)


Song-Maasoom nazar ka bholaapan lalcha ke lubhaana kya jaane (Maasoom)(1941) Singer- Unknown Male, Lyricist – Arzoo Lucknowi, MD- Munshi Mubarak Hussain

Lyrics

Maasoom nazar ka bholaapan
lalcha ke lubhaana kya jaane
Masoom nazar ka bholaapan
lalcha ke lubhaana kya jaane
dil aap nishaana banta hai
wo teer chalaana kya jaane
dil aap nishaana banta hai
wo teer chalaana kya jaane

chatki jo kali koyal kooki
ulfat ki kahaani khatm huyi
ulfat ki kahaani khatm huyi
kya kisne kahi aur kisne suni
ye baat zamaana kya jaane
kya kisne kahi aur kisne suni
ye baat zamaana kya jaane

hum aarzoo aaye baithhe hain
aur wo sharmaaye baithhe hain
aur wo sharmaaye baithhe hain
mushtaaq nazar gustaakh nahin
parda sarkaana kya jaane
mushtaaq nazar gustaakh nahin
parda sarkaana kya jaane
Maasoom nazar ka bholaapan
lalcha ke lubhaana kya jaane
dil aap nishaana banta hai
wo teer chalaana kya jaane


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day: 4330 Post No.: 15623

Today’s song is from film Aagey Kadam-43. This is an obscure movie, in the sense that no information about its story etc is available anywhere on the Net or Film India magazine issues. However, from the lyrics of its various songs, one can say that the film is about a love story set amidst Patriotic atmosphere. Of course, being British times, such films had to be careful, lest their raw material quota of Raw Film would get into problem, during the wartime controls. Further the tablet of patriotism has to be sugar coated, so as not to get into legal tangle like perhaps”Kismet” of Bombay Talkies !

Among the wartime films, from 1939 to 1945, I feel that the year 1943 was quite significant as many musical, noteworthy and successful films came up during this year. Taking a look at the films of 1943, we find that a total of 105 Hindi films were made in this year. For the 7 year period of 39 to 45, this was the highest number – the lowest being 1945 with just 74 films.

Films like Aabroo, Bhakta Raj, Hamaari baat, Hospital, Hunterwali ki beti, Ishara, Kanoon, Kashinath, Kismet, Mahatma Vidur, Manchali, Mazaq, Nadaan, Nagad Narayan (a remake of Marathi film-‘ पैसा बोलतो आहे ), Nai Kahani (one of the best songs of Hindi film history-” neend hamari, khwaab tumhare ” was from this film), Najma (first film of Mehboob productions), Namaste,, Pagli, Panghat (film Chitchor-76 had the same story), Paapi, Paraya Dhan (The only song by Deena Sanghvi Pathak), Poonji, Prithvi Vallabh (debut in a Bombay film by Meena Shorey), Ram Rajya (super duper Hit film), Sanjog (Suraiya’s playback to Mehtab), Shahenshah Akbar, Shakuntala (First film of Rajkamal Kalamandir of V Shantaram), Tansen (last film of Nagendra Majumdar-father of Ninu Majumdar,MD), Vishwas, Wapas, and Zamin (debut of Khurshid Jr.), made 1943 an year full of content, Music, Acting and entertainment.

Amongst these films, a movie like Aagey kadam-43 was nowhere to be noticed or remembered. The film was made by Acharya Art Production, owned by its director, N R Acharya. This is what Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about Acharya….N R Acharya,Hindi director (1909-1993) born in Karachi. Was a government contractor when he joined East India film Company in Calcutta (1934). Later worked as production manager at Bombay Talkies, where he directed the first examples of S. Mukherjee’s new regime, e.g. Bandhan and the Abbas script Naya Sansar. Became producer with KISHORE SAHU’s Kunwara Baap (1942). Continued producing under the Acharya Arts Prod. banner until 1950. Also made Gujarati films, e.g. Lagna Mandap.

FILMOGRAPHY-1940: Bandhan; Azad; 1941: Naya Sansar; 1942: Uljhan; 1943: Aage Kadam; 1949: Parivartan; Shohrat (with K. Amarnath); 1950: Lagna Mandap; 1956: Dhola Maru.

There were two MDs for this film- old timer Madholal Damodar Master and Ramchandra Pal- who was in Bombay Talkies, with Acharya. The cast of the film was Motilal, Anjali Devi, Mubarak, Rajkumari Shukla, Leela Pawar, Narbada Shankar and others. There were 8 songs, but in the absence of individual credit we do not know which song was composed by whom. Lyricist was Kailash Matwala. Out of these 8 songs, I have heard 7 songs and find them good songs with tune and rendition. One song of Motilal is already on the Blog.

The name Anjali Devi, which appears in the cast is not of the famous south actress Anjali Devi ( 8-12-1927 to 13-1-2014 ), who acted in films like Ek the Raja-51( dubbed film), Shuk Rambha-53,Ladki-53, Devta-56, Suvarn Sundari-57 etc etc. This Anjali Devi of the 40s was different. As usual, I find that the filmography of south Anjali devi includes films done by Anjali Devi of the 40s. This is what I call Same Name Confusion.

Miss Anjali Devi’s real name was Durgesh Kumari. She was born at Benaras in 1926 in a respectable Brahmin family. Her education was not much but she was fluent in Hindi, Urdu, English and Sanskrit. At the age of 14 years, she came to Bombay, to fulfil her desire of becoming an actress.

She joined Ranjit Films and worked in film Pardesi in the year 1940. The film was released in 1941. She was credited as Durgesh in this film. She was called to Bombay Talkies to work in film ‘ Punarmilan’-40, directed by Najam Naqvi. When a section of artistes, led by S.Mukherjee, left Bombay Talkies to start Filmistan in 42, one of the BT directors N.R.Acharya also left and started his own company Acharya Art Productions. Anjali Devi also left to join Acharya.

She acted in 3 films of Acharya, Kunwara Baap-42, Uljhan-42 and Aage Kadam-43. She later on acted in Paristan-44, and Parivartan-49. She then got married to N.R.Acharya and settled as a Housewife.

There is one more name-Rajkumari Shukla. There is scant information available on the net about her. Recently, I got her more information from an Urdu book ” Filmi Titlian” 1945, written by Bijli Jampuri from Hyderabad Deccan (that is my hometown). So here is her latest information for our readers…

Raj Kumari Shukla, She was born in a well-known Brahmin family in Calcutta in 1903. Her own life has been quite tragic. She had to join the film industry not so much because of personal choice, but due to tragic personal circumstances. Like most young girls from Indian families, this virtuous lady, well-versed in household chores, got married. But her family life after marriage proved to be extremely unhappy — so much so that one day her husband gave her a brutal beating and drove her from his house.

Finding no refuge anywhere, she went to Jagannath Puri (in Orissa) and lived there in an ashram. Gradually, her family history and marital problems became known to one of the priests there, and he informed her parents. Her elder sister then brought her back to her house.

One theatre actor known locally as Gujarati Baba used to live nearby. Sometimes, she would get some theatre passes from him and go to local theatres to see some plays. This not only helped her to forget her unhappy past but also kindled in her young heart the desire to act in plays. The Gujarati Baba then persuaded her to adopt acting as a profession. Accordingly, in 1933, she joined Maadan Theatre and began her career as a leading lady, Film-goers of those days can still recall her “hilaali abroo, tez aankhen, kushaada peshaani aur siaah zulfen”. She excelled in emotional roles.

Starting her career in silent films, she came into her own with the advent of “Talkies”. Apart from Maadan Theatre, she worked for other film companies too. Her memorable films included “Intezaar”, “Zevar”, “Jagat Mohini”, “Far’yaad”, “Chaandni”, “Sharda”, “Panghat”, Tulsi”, “Swami, “Ek Raat”, “Man Ki Jeet”, “School Master”, Dulhan”, “Badalti Duniya”, “Aankh Micholi”, “Raj Nartaki”, “Jhoola” and “Najma”. She now acted more as a character artiste and vamp. Her realistic emoting in such negative roles makes the audiences shiver in revulsion. Her roles in films like “Ek Raat”, “Swami”, “Jhoola”, “Far’yaad” and “Dulhan” have been specially appreciated by film-goers.

She was only an actor and not a singer. She acted in 31 Talkie films. She also worked in few Gujarati and Bangla films. Her last recorded Hindi film was Nai Maa-46. She did sing just one song in her career. That was in film Panghat-43. It was a duet with Baby Tara. At her times, the other more famous actress-singer Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali was also very active. In few films both acted, but the songs were only by Rajkumari Dubey Banaraswali. There were two more Rajkumaris also. One was Rajkumari Calcuttewali and another was from south, T.R.Rajkumari. Their details have been described earlier and also in my book” Forgotten artists….”. (Information for the above has been taken from Urdu book,”Filmi Titlian”published in 1945, and Film Directory, with thanks.)

Today’s song is a duet by Anjali Devi and Motilal, with Chorus. This is also a sort of Patriotic song, exhorting friends to be ready for a sacrifice for the country.


Song-Aage kadam badhaana hoga (Aage Kadam)(1943) Singers- Motilal, Anjali Devi (Durgesh Kumari), Lyricist- Kailash Matwala, MDs- Master Madholal and Ramchandra Pal
Both

Lyrics

Doston
naya sabak sikhlaana hoga
naya sabak sikhlaana hoga
dhang zamaane ka badla hai
dhang zamaane ka badla hai
kuchh kar ke
kuchh kar ke dikhlaana hoga
haahaakaar uthha hai jag mein
haahaakaar uthha hai jag mein
peena hai to aaj
peena hai to aaj jagat mein
peena hai to aaj

aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage

baadhaaon ko door hataana hoga
soyon ko phir aaj jagaana hoga
apne ko apnaanaa hoga
phoolon ko samjhaana hoga
?? nahin hai
?? nahin hai
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga

aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage

aafaten jo sar pe aayen
unse na daro
shaan se jiyo
shaan se maro
aafaten jo sar pe aayen
unse na daro
shaan se jiyo
shaan se maro
yahi sandesa ?? chali hai
yahi sandesa ?? chali hai
aaj hamen pahunchaana hoga
aaj hamen pahunchaana hoga
aao

aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage
aage
aage kadam badhaana hoga
aage
aage
aage
aage


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4285 Post No. : 15532

“Maa”(1952) was produced by Ashok Kumar and Sawak Vacha and directed by Bimal Roy for Bombay Talkies. This movie had Leela Chitnis, Bharat Bhushan,Shyama, Nazir Hussain,Asit Sen, Manju, B.M.Vyas, Achla Sachdev, Bikram Kapoor, Krishnakant, Samar Chatterjee, Bharata Vyas(uncredited) etc in it.

This movie, which was based on a Bangla story by Swaraj Bannerjee had six songs in it. Four songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the fifth song from “Maa” (1952) to appear in the blog. This song is sung by Manna Dey. Bharat Vyas is the lyricist. Music is composed by S K Pal. The lyrics for this song have been contributed by Avinash ji.

Only the audio of this “ode to mother” song is available. I request our knowledgeable readers to throw light on the picturisation of this song.


Song-Wo aankhen kya aankhen(Maa)(1952) Singer-Manna Dey, Lyrics-Bharat Vyas, MD-SK Pal

Lyrics  (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

wo aankhen kya aankhen aen jin mein
aansu ki dhaar nahin een een een
wo dil patthar hai
jis dil mein maata ka pyaar nahin

wo aankhen kya aankhen jin mein
aansu ki dhaar nahin
wo dil patthar hai
jis dil mein maata ka pyaar nahin

dharti si dheeraj waali
aur aakaash si nirmal maa
ganga si paawan man-bhaawan
jamuna si nischchhal maa
bhagwaan bhagwaan
bhagwaan banaayi hai toone duniya mein kaisi maa
jo sab kuchch de
aur kuchh bhi na le ae ae
jo sab kuchch de
aur kuchh bhi na le
bas ek hai aisi maa
duniya mein hazaaron naate
duniya mein hazaaron naate
par maata do chaar nahin
wo dil patthar hai
jis dil mein maata ka pyaar nahin
wo aankhen kya aankhen

bachpan ki pyaar bhari godi ke
meethhe meethhe jhoole
haaye meethhe meethhe jhoole
lori ka aa
lori ka wo sangeet madhur
koi kab kaise bhoole
maata ka ye nirmal naata aa aa aa
maata ka ye nirmal naata
toote na koi tode
insaan nahin
haiwaan hai wo o o
jo maa se bhi munh mode ae
insaan nahin haiwaan hai wo
jo maa se bhi munh mode
wo jeevan kya jeevan
wo jeevan kya jeevan
jismein mamta ka taar nahin
wo dil patthar hai
jis dil mein maata ka pyaar nahin
wo aankhen kya aankhen


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4272 Post No. : 15503 Movie Count :

4273

Hullo Atuldom

Ideally this post should have come last year, when this veteran of about a few hundred movies, turned 80. But then that has not happened.
I have decided that we shall not let the occasion go unnoticed. And in south India, the celebration for a person turning 80 is normally on completing 81, as the system of calculating the auspicious date to celebrate says that the person should have witnessed a 1000 full moons in his life, with the life being said to have started after the 1st birthday. Etc. Etc. Etc.

Whatever be the logic, the celebration called “Sadabhishekam” is after the person crosses 81 and our celebrity is turning 81 today. So here we are wishing this veteran a Happy 81st birthday.

He was born Syed Ishtiaq Ahmed Jafri on 29th March 1939 in Amritsar. He made his first screen appearance at the young age of 11 or 12. B.R.Chopra’s “Afsana” was the starting point followed by “Ab Dilli Door Nahin”, “Hum Panchi ek Daal ke”, “Do Bigha Zameen”, “Aar Paar” etc. AVM’s “Bhabhi” saw him in his first role of a grownup. And then there was no looking back and we have seen him in movies till 2017- a really long career. He played a leading man in a few movies before finding his comic timing in “Brahmachari”.

He has had many famous songs filmed on him -“Paas baitho tabiyat bahal jayegi”, “In pyar ki raahon mein”, we have seen him shaking a leg when Shamshad Begum sang, for Kumkum’s debut in movies, “kabhi aar kabhi paar”. This post introduces us to the person whose 81st birthday it is today.

Yes we are wishing “Soorma Bhopali” of Sholay a.k.a father of Jaaved and Naaved Jaafri of ‘Booogie Boogie’ fame. Simply put we are celebrating comedian Jagdeep’s birthday.

He may have done around 100 movies prior to “Sholay” but when Salim-Javed wrote the character of ‘Soorma Bhopali’ it changed Jagdeep’s fortunes forever. He was seen in many movies after “Sholay” too but very few remember him as the sidekick of Gopi (Mithun Chakravarty) ‘Kabari” in Surakksha”” (1979); ‘Chandu alias James Bond’ in the 1977 release “Agent Vinod”; he had a tiny-blink-n-miss role in Feroz Khan’s “Qurbani”. Jagdeep was forever requested to reappraise his Soorma Bhopali, atleast once, in many subsequent movies. He himself wrote and directed a movie with the title “Soorma Bhopali” in 1988. I don’t know much about that movie other than the fact that it had a whole lot of Jagdeep’s co-actors from “Sholay” making guest and special appearances in that movie. IMDB.com gives the list of actors as Agha, Amitabh Bachchan, Master Bhagwan, Birbal, Brahmachari, Danny, Dharmendra; Aruna Irani appears to be the sole female in the starcast.

I have chosen a song from this 1988 movie to accompany this post. The music directors were Dilip Sen- Sameer Sen and songs were written by Asad Bhopali, Jaan Nissar Akhtar and Jagdeep himself has written a song. It was a difficult task selecting a song from this movie as Jagdeep has also sung a few songs in the movie. But I finally decided that we will have a song that accompanies the movie’s credits that is what I have deduced from the available clip. This song is sung by Mohd Aziz and Jagdeep and Asad Bhopali is the lyricist. As I was writing the lyrics I caught the names of lot more actors than those that I have mentioned who were common to Sholay and this movie.

Here is wishing our very own Soorma Bhopali, who had a one-liner to his character in Sholay that said “Soorma Bhopali aise nahin hai”, A very Healthy and happy Birthday.


Song-Main hoon Soorma Bhopali (Soorma Bhopali)(1988) Singer-Md Aziz , Lyrics-Asad Bhopali, MD-Dilip Sen Samir Sen
Jagdeep

Lyrics

assalaam vaalekkum
aadaab arz hai
namaste
aao hanste hanste
aur jaao hanste hanste
paan khaalo
aur issi baat pe bajaao taali

ke main hoon soorma bhopali
arre haan soorma bhopali
ke main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali
main na rahoon Bhopal mein
toh sheher lage hai khaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali

yeh mera bhopal hai
jo pyaar se maalaamaal hai
bairagadh se T T Nagar tak
jo hai yahaan khush-haal hai
moti masjid jaama masjid
Taj ul Masjid dekh kar
jo bhi dekhe birla mandir
chamak uthhe hai uski nazar
kamlapati raani ka mahal hai
beech mein donon taalon ke
jaise meri naak hai pyaare
beech mein donon gaalon ke
meri chaal anokhi sabse
meri chaal anokhi sabse
meri ada hai niraali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali

meri cycle meri dulhan hai
isko saja ke rakhta hoon
ise akela jab bhi chhodoon
taala laga ke rakhta hoon
logon meri soorat pe na jaao
dil hai mera aaine jaisa
mujhse meri ammi ne kahaa thha
beta haath ka mail hai paisa

paise ki parwaah na karna
bhale kaam mein rehna aage
uske karam par rakhna bharosa
woh jab chaahe kismat jaage
ooparwaala
ooparwaala kadam kadam par
kare teri rakhwaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
arre haan soorma bhopali
main na rahoon bhopal mein
toh sheher lage hai khaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4257 Post No. : 15477

———————————————–——————————-
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2010-2020) – Song No. 10
——————————————————————————

Welcome all to the today’s post where I am presenting a song from the movie ‘Saudaagar-1991’. This is one of the two movies falling under ‘Blog Ten-Year challenge’ today. Another movie is ‘Sunahri Naagin-1963’.

Only two songs (better strike rate than the current ‘one song per day’😊) were posted on the blog on this day ten years back i.e. on 14.03.2010;

Song Movie title-Year Remarks
Ilu Ilu Saudaagar-1991 02 of 06 songs posted
Tu hi tu hai main dekhaa karoon Sunahri Naagin-1963 05 of 08 songs posted

‘Saudaagar-1991’ is one of the many movies that I watched during my stay at Kota. I remember I watched this movie twice during its initial release. Later I have always enjoyed it in ‘parts’ whenever it was on TV channels. The main reason for watching the movie was that it was directed by Subhash Ghai (he was the producer as well) and secondly its ‘music’.
I am big fan of Subhash Ghai , not only for his direction but for the music of his movies as well.

Music has always been a ‘highlight’ of the movies directed by him and also the picturization of the song sequences in his movies which are choreographed in ‘style’.

I still remember watching ‘Ram Lakhan-1989’, ‘Saudaagar-1991’ and ‘Khalnayak-1993’ to packed houses in Kota and the audience breaking into cheers and dancing to the tunes of ‘My name is Lakhan’, ‘Ilu Ilu’, ‘Imli ka boota beri ka ped’, and other songs in ‘Ram Lakhan-1989’ and ‘Saudaagar-1991’.

Also, I cannot forget the ‘mesmerising silence’ watching the ‘artistically choreographed’ ‘Choli ke peechhe kya hai’ and the ‘picturesque beauty’ in the song ‘Paalki mein ho ke sawaar chali re’… from ‘Khalnaayak-1993’.

His collaboration with the music-duo Laxmikant-Pyarelal started with the ‘1979’ movie ‘Gautam Govinda’ and lasted till ‘Khalnayak-1993’.
Let us have a look on the list of movies where Laxmikant-Pyarelal scored the music for the movies directed by Subhash Ghai;

SNo Movie Title Year
01 Gautam Govinda 1979
02 Karz 1980
03 Krodhi 1981
04 Hero 1983
06 Meri Jung 1985
07 Karma 1986
08 Ram Lakhan 1989
09 Saudaagar 1991
10 Khalnaayak 1993

Today’s song from ‘1991’ movie ‘Saudaagar’ is picturized on the then debutant pair Manisha Koirala and Vivek Mushran. Also present in the picturization of the song is Anupam Kher who played a ‘pivotal’ role in the movie.

The song is sung by Kavita Krishnamurthy, Manhar Udhas and Sukhvinder Singh. Lyrics are by Anand Bakshi and music is composed by Laxmikant-Pyarelal.

Two songs from ‘Saudaagar-1991’ posted on the blog earlier are as follows;

Song Posted On
Ilu Ilu 14.03.2010
Imli ka boota beri ka ped 11.12.2013

Let us now enjoy today’s song …

Video
(video)
Audio

Song-Saudaagar saudaa kar (Saudaagar)(1991) Singers-Kavita Krishnamurthy, Manhar Udhas, Sukhvinder Singh, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal

Lyrics(Based on audio link)

tu panchhi
pardesi
tu jogi hai ki jaadugar

inme se koyi bhi nahin
main sapnon ka saudaagr

Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Saudaagar hmm hmm hmm
Saudaa kar hmm hmm hmm
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar

Haath kisi ka wo pakde
O o o o o o o
Haath kisi ka wo pakde
Jo chhode jag saara aa
Tu oonche mehlon waali
Main beghar banjaara
Ik dooje ke dil mein rahenge
Kya karna hai ghar
Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar

Tere saath main kaise
Pyaar ka saudaa kar loon oon
Tere saath main kaise
Pyaar ka saudaa kar loon oon
Aisa koi waada kar
Main jispe bharosa kar loon
Jo chaahe likhwaa le mujhse
Kore kaagaz par
Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar

Hmm hmm hmm
Hmm hmm hmm

Aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa
Aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa aa
Aa aa aa aa aa

Dil to hai ae
Par dil ke
Par dil ke
Armaan kahaan se laaun
Doli sehra kangan sab
Saamaan kahaan se laaun
Doli sehra kangan sab
Saamaan kahaan se laaun

Thhodaasa sindoor kahin se le aa
Bas jaa kar
Saudaagar hmm hmm hmm
Saudaa kar hmm hmm hmm
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar

Soch samajh le
Baad mein naa pachhtaana
Ye kah kar
Saudaagar saudaa kar
Dil le le ae
Le le ae
Dil de kar
De kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Dil le le ae
Dil de kar

Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar
Saudaagar saudaa kar r r
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar
O dil le le ae
Dil de kar

——————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————
तू पंछी
परदेसी
तू जोगी है कि जादूगर

इनमे से कोई भी नहीं
मैं सपनों का सौदागर

सौदागर सौदा कर र र
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
सौदागर सौदा कर र र
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
सौदागर ह्म ह्म ह्म
सौदा कर ह्म ह्म ह्म
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर

हाथ किसी का वो पकडे
ओ ओ ओ ओ ओ ओ ओ
हाथ किसी का वो पकडे
जो छोड़े जग सारा आ
तू ऊंचे महलों वाली
मैं बेघर बंजारा
इक दूजे के दिल में रहेंगे
क्या करना है घर
सौदागर सौदा कर र र
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर

तेरे साथ मैं कैसे
प्यार का सौदा कर लूं ऊँ
तेरे साथ मैं कैसे
प्यार का सौदा कर लूं ऊँ
ऐसा कोई वादा कर
मैं जिसपे भरोसा कर लूं
जो चाहे लिखवा ले मुझसे
कोरे कागज़ पर
सौदागर सौदा कर र र
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर

ह्म ह्म ह्म
ह्म ह्म ह्म

आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ

दिल तो है ए
पर दिल के
पर दिल के
अरमान कहाँ से लाऊं
डोली सेहरा कंगन सब
सामान कहाँ से लाऊं
डोली सेहरा कंगन सब
सामान कहाँ से लाऊं

थोडासा सिन्दूर कहीं से ले आ
बस जा कर
सौदागर ह्म ह्म ह्म
सौदा कर ह्म ह्म ह्म
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर

सोच समझ ले
बाद में ना पछताना
ये कह कर
सौदागर सौदा कर
दिल ले ले ए
ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर

सौदागर सौदा कर र र
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
सौदागर सौदा कर र र
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर
ओ दिल ले ले ए
दिल दे कर


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4251 Post No. : 15471

Back here on the blog after a fairly long break.
I daresay it would’ve been even longer if it were not a very special occasion today.

From today, we start the centenary celebrations of Sahir Ludhianvi’s birth.
Since he was born on 8th March 1921, today happens to be his 99th birth anniversary.

So yes, it is a very special occasion for Urdu poetry and classic HFM lovers. As a massive Sahir fan, I thought I owed it to him to write a post for the occasion. I’ve written so often about him here, on practically every birth and death anniversary, and have nothing new to say anymore – and yet it feels like a betrayal of sorts to let this day go by, without paying tribute to him.

So when Avinashji, an even bigger Sahir fan than myself, requested me to write a post for Sahir on this occasion, I could not, but agree. 🙂

But I must also admit that for the first time I told Avinashji that I don’t think I’d be in the right mental frame to be able to do this. For me, writing a post here is an investment of emotion – and right now, to be honest, I feel quite empty within. If it were not for Sahir, I don’t think I’d be able to pull myself together for this post.

To Avinashji’s credit, as always, he provided me with a list of songs and lyrics that I could choose from. And left it to me to see whether I could come up with a post. I owe this post to him too.

Ok, enough about myself and my “mental frame” – this post is about Sahir, not about me. 🙂

What can I say about Sahir that I haven’t said before?
Actually nothing.

But since it’s Sahir, whatever I’ve said before can hopefully be repeated, without sounding boring. 🙂
Just like whatever Sahir wrote as social messages, not once but repeatedly in different ways, was never boring, and only meant as a reminder to society, to show people a mirror.

For me, as for many others, Sahir was much more than just a poet or lyricist. Yes, he was a lyricist par excellence. But I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t have had this level of regard for him if he’d limited himself to just writing lyrics or poetry on mundane matters, however beautifully worded.

Sahir’s greatness, in my mind, has a lot to do with the topics he chose to express his views on. And the manner of such expression.

Sure, he could write about romance – “abhi na jao chhod kar” will always be one of my all-time favourite romantic songs.

Sure, he could write about heartbreak too – “jaane wo kaise log the jinke pyaar ko pyaar milaa”, another favourite.

Sure, he could write about love in its multitude of shades – is there a more exquisite ode to love than “ye ishq ishq hai ishq ishq”?

Sure, he could write bhajans with consummate ease – “tora mann darpan kehlaaye” and “aan milo aan milo shyam saanwre” are just two examples.

Sure, he could write light-hearted, fun songs too – the first song that comes to mind in this category is an all-time favourite “sar jo tera chakraaye”.

Sure, he could write, and wrote quite often, on a mother’s love for her child – “tu mere pyar ka phool hai”, “tere bachpan ko jawaani ki dua deti hoon” and “tu mere saath rahega munne” come to mind.

And yet, Sahir rises, no, TOWERS, above all others when it comes to writing on social issues.

No one, NO ONE, showed a mirror to society as earnestly as Sahir. It was as if he truly came into his own on these occasions.

Whether he was writing about injustice towards the oppressed, society’s shocking treatment of women, casteism, communalism, labor exploitation, or the futility of war, Sahir’s words were like cries of anguish, straight from the heart. You could feel the raw sincerity in them, even if they were often laced with cynicism, sarcasm or anger. Or, occasionally, even hope.

So many songs come to mind.

“Tu Hindu banega na musalmaan banega” – where Sahir calls out communalism in all its ugliness
“Cheen-o-arab hamara” – where Sahir sarcastically exposes India’s hypocrisy over wealth disparity
“Jinhe naaz hai Hind par wo kahaan hain” – Sahir at his cynical best, showing society a mirror of its ugly reality
“Khuda-e-bartar teri zameen par” – where Sahir busts the myth about the glory of war, pointing out that there are no winners in war, only bloodshed
“Ponchh kar ashq” – where Sahir exhorts the oppressed to rise and demand their rights from the oppressor, pointing out that colour, religion, caste, race can never be above humanity
“Aurat ne janam diya mardon ko” – Sahir’s famous lament about society’s treatment of women
“Wo subah kabhi to aayegi”– where Sahir, in one of his less frequent refrains, chooses hope over despair

and many more.

Every single time asking questions of society, pointing out its flaws, exhorting it to reform.

That each of his songs is STILL relevant more than 50 years after he wrote them, is truly sad, and a reflection of Indian society – but no one can ever fault Sahir for not doing his utmost to put his writing ability to good use. If society is still languishing in darkness, it certainly isn’t Sahir’s fault.

And it is for this particular trait of Sahir’s that he has a very special place in my heart.

Yes, he’d have had his own place in my heart anyway for lyrics like “wo afsaana jise anjaam tak laana na ho mumkin, use ek khoobsoorat mod dekar chhodna achha”.

But his attempt at social awareness, and his speaking truth to power, takes my regard for him to a different level altogether.

If I may say so, and no disrespect meant to any lyricists who have come since, but no one comes close to Sahir’s intensity in this one matter.

Or maybe times have changed too.

Now, coming to the song for today.

Avinashji gave me a few options – of the lot, I picked the title song of “Samaj Ko Badal Daalo” (1970). Lyrics have been provided by Avinashji, of course. 🙂

It’s a lament, not uncharacteristic of Sahir, where he lets loose on society itself, blaming it for its own ills. That it tolerates corruption and crime is the biggest reason society suffers these, in the first place. Reform cannot start unless society decides to step up, and adopt a zero tolerance policy towards these. Hence “samaj ko badal daalo”.

I honestly don’t think it’s a bad assessment of why we are the way we are.

Without coming across as too preachy, let me share a few thoughts quickly.

We Indians love to blame our politicians for everything. We blame them for corruption, for the poor state of our roads, education and healthcare, for dividing society along communal lines – basically everything.

And yes, since they are our leaders, and have power, it’s not unfair to place responsibility and accountability on them.

And yet, where do these politicians come from?

They don’t fall from the skies, they come from amongst US.

So if we’re complaining about corruption and bigotry in our politicians, we first need to acknowledge that we, as a society, are ourselves guilty of these very shortcomings in our character. We carry a lot of baggage historically, and don’t have a particularly high moral compass ourselves. Our politicians then just exploit our weaknesses.

For example, politicians pander to our base instincts, dividing us based on identity, or other group characteristic. And we fall for it. Every single time.

Then again, when it comes to governance, they manage to get away with promises because we don’t make a serious enough effort to hold them accountable anyway. We behave like slaves – and get treated as such. So our leaders end up with power, but no accountability.

This is OUR fault. If we didn’t allow them to exploit us like this, if we raised the bar and held them accountable to us, things would be very different.

So when Sahir writes “samaj ko badal daalo”, it does resonate a lot with me. And hopefully with others too.

End of “preaching”. 🙂

The song itself is sung by Rafisaab, at the start of the film, as credits roll. I remember seeing this film as a young boy – what I remember most about it from that time is that the hero (Parikshat Sahni, who was then still Ajay Sahni) gets stabbed midway in the film and dies. I’d never seen a film till then where the hero dies midway :-), so I couldn’t reconcile easily to this at all.

A few years ago, I watched this film again, just out of curiosity. I wouldn’t call it a bad film as such (I’ve seen worse), but the last 30 minutes or so, are very dark and depressing. After watching this film, it might linger in your mind – and you’re likely to feel sad for a while.

Considering people usually look towards cinema for escapist fare, and don’t want to be reminded of daily miseries of life, this film is definitely not one you should watch if you want a feel-good feeling from the film. Don’t get misled by the fun “tum apni saheli ko” song, picturised on Prem Chopra.

But none of this takes away from Sahir, who is the reason for this post. Rafisaab singing Sahir’s lines are always a joy for me – even if it’s a sad song.

I hope you will also listen to it – and possibly agree that what we need most is for society itself to reform, otherwise we will continue bad practice of the past, and only regress.

In my opinion, the greatest danger to a society is not economic bankruptcy (which, however hard, CAN be corrected through appropriate economic policy), but moral bankruptcy (which eats away at the very fabric of society, and is therefore far more difficult to correct).

Thank you for reading.

Audio
(audio) (lyrics noted are as per this link)
Video

Song-Samaaj ko badal daalo (Samaaj Ko Badal Daalo)(1970) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Sahir Ludhianvi, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

(Ye ek katha jo laakhon logon ke ae
Jeevan ka darpan hai
Desh pita ke charnon mein
Ham sab ki ore se arpan hai)

***

Samaaj ko badal daalo o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo o o o
Samaaj ko badal daalo
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ghar hai jinme aaj raushni nahin
Kitne ae tan-badan hai jinme zindagi ee nahin
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo o
Mulq aur kaum ke mizaaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o

Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley
Sainkdo ki mehnaton par
Ek kyun paley ae
Oonch neech se bharaa
Nizaam kyun chale ae
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo o
Aaj hai yahi to
Aise aaj ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo o
Zulm aur loot ke rivaaz ko badal daalo
Samaaj ko badal daalo

————————————
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————-

समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो ओ ओ ओ
समाज को बदल डालो
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो

कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने घर है जिनमे आज रौशनी नहीं
कितने ए तन-बदन है जिनमे ज़िन्दगी ई नहीं
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो ओ
मुल्क और कौम के मिज़ाज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ

सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले
सैंकड़ो की मेहनतों पर
एक क्यूँ पले ए
उंच नीच से भरा
निजाम क्यूँ चले ए
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो ओ
आज है यही तो
ऐसे आज को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ
ज़ुल्म और लूट के रिवाज़ को बदल डालो
समाज को बदल डालो ओ


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4205 Post No. : 15395

Memories that are pure gold – the mention of his name brings to mind a limited set of memories. Ah but these memories are pure gold.

Remembering Vijay Anand today, on his birth anniversary. He would have been 86 today.

Without any doubts, the best and the most remarkable sense of visualization of music. Not just thinking of films with Navketan – ‘Nau Do Gyaarah’ (1957), ‘Kaala Bazaar’ (1960), ‘Tere Ghar Ke Saamne’ (1963), ‘Guide’ (1965), ‘Jewel Thief’ (1967), ‘Johnny Mera Naam’ (1970) and more, his films outside of Navketan are also as memorable for their songs. ‘Teesri Manzil’ (1966) being the most popular and loved film for its songs, and their presentation. Of course, no one counters the wholesome effect of “O Haseena Zulfon Waali”. But then, see “O Mere Sona Re Sona Re Sona Re”. The superb performances in this song by both Shammi Kapoor and Asha Parekh are the handiwork of a most capable director, who knows how to bring out the maximum impact of everything that goes into presenting a song – the ambience, the words, the music, the facial expressions, the body language, crafting the merger of actions with music, the give and take between the two protagonists – everything brought together to convey this latent feeling in the heart, bringing it to the lips, and then expressing it with an un-tethered exuberance on the part of the lady, and a coy displeasure (to start with) on part of the gentleman. The end result – as Atul ji has often pointed out – after three stanzas, all is well and the lovers are seen walking hand in hand.

Take ‘Black Mail’ (1973) and the wonderfully soft rendition of a surreal presence of the loved one – felt through the written word, the voice of lover echoing through the letters, and the presence is so real that the lady wakes up with a start having felt the reality of a kiss on her forehead. Yes, the song is “Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas, Tum Rehti Ho”. I am never tired of replaying this song, the video I mean. Just the song itself is great, but its presentation on screen has enhanced its beauty and impact many folds.

Vijay Anand has also appeared in a handful of films. In some of the films that he directed himself, and he is not in the list of actors, one can catch a glimpse of him in very brief cameo appearances. However, he has appeared in bigger roles, and also as a hero. The first film in which he made his debut in a meaty role is ‘Joru Ka Bhai’ from 1955, a comedy film in which the lead pair was Balraj Sahni and Sheela Ramani.

His next major appearance is as the hero of the 1957 film ‘Agra Road’, a cops and robbers type of story. Next we see him on screen along with his two elder brothers, Chetan and Dev, in the 1960 film ‘Kala Bazaar’ which he also directed. In this film he plays the role of the ex-boyfriend of Waheeda Rehman, who has gone for higher studies to France, and returns with his amorous loyalties shifted elsewhere.

After a gap of four years, he is seen once again in a supporting role in ‘Haqeeqat’ (1964), a film that had a large ensemble of main line stars. The next gap is much longer – 7 years. And he makes his screen appearance once again in the 1971 film ‘Tere Mere Sapne’, a film that he has directed himself. His role in this film as Dr. Jagannath Kothari, a famous gynecologist (in film), is very impressive and effective.

The next film is ‘Chhupa Rustom’ in 1973. Dev and himself, are police agents who go undercover to capture a gang of smugglers. Once again, this film is directed by him. His role, masquerading as a shady, brash, small time, two-timing con man brings out the comedian in him – in my opinion one of his best screen appearances. This film is an Indianized version of the famous novel by Alistair MacLean – ‘Fear Is The Key’.

Parallel to ‘Chhupa Rustam’ in 1973, he also appeared in the film ‘Double Cross’. In this, he appears in a double role as the hero and his twin brother who is on the wrong side of the law. He was not yet 40, but he looked quite overage for this twin brothers roles. He appears to be trying very hard to be the role, but was not convincing. The con-man role in ‘Chhupa Rustam’ was a great act, but in ‘Double Cross’ he did not quiet click. It is interesting to note that in the role of the brother on the right side of the law, Vijay is a professional photographer. That rang a bell in my mind and I checked. Very much so, the film ‘Heera Panna’ in which Dev Anand plays the role of a professional photographer also, was released in 1973 itself. As one compares the two performances, they are quite similar in mannerism, attire and body language. Now who was copying from whom? 🙂

In 1973 came another good film, produced and directed by his elder brother Chetan – ‘Hindustan Ki Kasam’. He played the role of a fighter pilot, coming from a family of soldiers and pilots. There is a brief but a great monologue by him in this film – “Saathiyo, Dosto, Hum Hi To Aaj Ke Arjun Hain. . .”. (It can be viewed at 39:40 on the timeline at the link for the film ‘Hindustan Ki Kasam‘.) He presents this monologue, takes to the skies and then does not return. A short role, albeit an impressive one.

A year later he produced the film ‘Chor Chor’ (1974), but did not direct it himself. It is a suspense thriller that did not make it good on the box office, however, it was praised by the critics and reviewers. The film had no songs, and its star cast was very interesting. Vijay had assembled many actors of yesteryears for this film – Trilok Kapoor, Jairaj, and Ranjan. The female lead opposite to Vijay himself is Leena Chandawarkar. I have not seen this film, but it seems interesting enough to merit a view.

In 1974, he appeared in another film, in a very impressive performance once again. The film ‘Kora Kaagaz’, and he is cast with Jaya Bhaduri as the leading pair. The film is about an idealistic romance that transforms into matrimony. And the matrimony cannot withstand the reality of social relations and issues of personal choices – it breaks apart. Alas, there is a happy ending as the estranged spouses meet and make up in railway waiting room. Another very impressive performance.

Then, after a gap of another 4 years, Vijay appeared in another very good role – that of a rich landlord, very well performed. The film is ‘Main Tulsi Tere Aangan Ki’. A gem of a film by Raj Khosla, Vijay is pitted against two seasoned performers – Nutan as his first and legally wedded wife and Asha Parekh as his second companion in life, whom he brings home much to the dislike of the first lady of the house.

In 1981, came the film ‘Ghungroo Ki Awaaz’ – a tale of haunting and intrigues. Once again, Vijay finds himself out of his depth. Is that a reflection of being a very good director and then come to act under the direction of another director who may not be as well capable. Don’t know whether we should draw this comparison. But then this film is not in my list of impressive performances by Vijay.

In 1984, Chetan Anand produced and directed ‘Hum Rahe Na Hum’ in which Vijay and Shabana Azmi played the lead pair. Then in 2001, he produced and directed ‘Jaana Na Dil Se Door’ in which he and brother Dev played senior roles in a film with an impressive star cast that includes Kamini Kaushal, Mohnish Behl, Moushumi Chatterji, Indrani Bannerjee, Dinesh Hingoo and Vikram Gokhale.

Vijay also appeared in a mini series on TV in 1994, titled ‘Tehkikaat’, in the role of Sam D’Silva, an investigator.

Readers would remember that Alfred Hitchcock always made it point to appear in his own films in a fleeting cameo appearance. That was his signature mark in his films, and the audiences would eagerly await to catch his appearance as they viewed his films for the first time. Vijay Anand has also a similar reputation, albeit we are not sure we have tracked down his cameos in all the films that he directed. A brief list of what I have been able to compile.

He appears in ‘Funtoosh’ (1956) as a young out-of-work writer, who meets Funtoosh (Dev Anand) after he is released from the mental hospital. Funtoosh gifts him a pen to write.

Then in ‘Tere Ghar Ke Saamne’ (1963) he appears in the stairwell of Qutab Minar, wearing spectacles, walking down the stairs with two other persons, as Dev and Nutan are busy with their amorous inclinations singing “Dil Ka Bhanwar Karey Pukaar”.

In ‘Guide’ (1965), we hear his voice, as an unknown stranger is asking about Raju guide on the railway platform. Just a very brief dialogue.

In ‘Jewel Thief’ (1967), we hear his voice on the phone, in a brief conversation with Helen.

In ‘Prem Pujari’ (1970) he appears very briefly in the role of a spy, a fleeting cameo.

Again in 1970 ‘Johnny Mera Naam’, we hear his voice very briefly as an officer of Nepal Police greets Iftekhar at the Kathmandu airport, welcoming him to Nepal.

Here is a very interesting on screen appearance trivia. Hollywood producer and director, Mike Judge of the ‘Beavis And Butthead’ fame, was a great fan of Vijay Anand. In fact, in his animated film ‘Beavis And Butthead Do America’, there is a song being played in a casino in Las Vegas. On stage, among the musicians, there is a guitar player accompanying the singer. Mike Judge had based this character on Vijay Anand. The song in that film is ‘Love Roller Coaster’, available on YouTube; just click on the link.

A brief list of shelved films of Vijay Anand.

After ‘Rajput’ (1982) and before ‘Main Tere Liye’ (1988), Vijay Anand launched ‘Dekha Jaayega’ with Anil Kapoor and Jackie Shroff. Anil backed out at last moment. After a brief gap, the film was planned again with Saif Ali in place of Anil, but was later shelved.

In 1988, he planned the film ‘Dosti Ka Taqaaza’ starring Mithun and Govinda. It was later shelved.

He appeared in the film ‘Insha Allaah’ as the hero opposite to Zarina Wahab. The film was later shelved.

He directed ‘Chura Lenge Ankhon Se Kajal’ (1992) with Akshay Kumar and Kareena Karishma Kapoor. This film was also shelved.

In 1997 he starred in and directed the NFDC (National Film Development Corporation) film ‘Nyaymurty Krishnamurty’. This film also did not see the light of the day.

In the 1990s, he also started working on another film ‘Pal Pal Dil Ke Paas’, which could not be completed, probably did not go beyond the planning stage.

OK, so today’s song. It is contributed by Avinash ji. The film is ‘Ghungroo Ki Awaaz’. The story is of a family conspiracy with shades of reminders from the film ‘Mera Saaya’. The protagonist falls in love, the lady dies in confusing circumstances, then she returns as a ghost to haunt the man. The plot finally nails down another family member, who is attempting to get rid of the protagonist, for the sake of inheritance. There are maybe some more films that are based on this scenario.

The music is by RD Burman, the words are from the pen of Vijay Anand himself and Kishore Kumar is the playback voice.

A heartfelt salute to this celluloid artist who donned many a hat in his career, and had left behind a memorable legacy.

 

Video

Audio

Song – Tere Ghungroo Ki Awaaz  (Ghungroo Ki Awaaz) (1981) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Vijay Anand, MD – RD Burman

Lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

sitaaron ne sajaayee thhi dagar
hawaaon ne jhulaaya bhi magar
hmm hmm hmm
sitaaron ne sajaayee thhi dagar
hawaaon ne jhulaaya bhi magar
jalaa daaley
jalaa daaley
pankh naseebon ne
reh gayee hasrat e parwaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

andheron mein chhupi hai kiran
milan hai par ye kaisa milan
hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm
andheron mein chhupi hai kiran
milan hai par ye kaisa milan
adhura hai
adhura hain
geet jeewan ka
aur toota toota saaz
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz

ho o o mere hamraaz
kaisa hai ye raaz
bulaati hai aur kho jaati hain
tere ghunghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghoonghroo ki aawaaz
tere ghoonghroo
ki aawaaz

————————————————————————————-
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
————————————————————————————-

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

सितारों ने सजाई थी डगर
हवाओं ने झुलाया भी मगर
हं हं हं
सितारों ने सजाई थी डगर
हवाओं ने झुलाया भी मगर
जला डाले
जला डाले
पंख नसीबों ने
रह गयी हसरत ए परवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

अंधेरों में छुपी है किरण
मिलन है पर ये कैसा मिलन
हं हं हं
हं हं हं
अंधेरों में छुपी है किरण
मिलन है पर ये कैसा मिलन
अधूरा हैं
अधुरा हैं
गीत जीवन का
और टूटा टूटा साज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़

हो ओ ओ मेरे हमराज़
कैसा है ये राज़
बुलाती है और खो जाती हैं
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू कि आवाज़
तेरे घुँघरू ..
कि आवाज़


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4192 Post No. : 15375 Movie Count :

4238

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) was produced by B R Chopra and directed by Ravi Chopra for B R Films, Bombay. This movie had Raj Babbar, Smita Patil, Nana Patekar, Om Shivpuri, Dheeraj Kumar, Shafi Inamdar, Vijay Arora, Arun Bakshi, Ashalata, Chandrashekhar, Ifthekhar, Alok Nath, Goofi Paintal, Dalip Tahil, Dinesh Thakur, Bashir Khan, Chaandni, Deepak Kaajir, Sonika Gill, Urmila Bhatt, Raksha Chauhan etc in it.

The movie was based on Hollywood blockbuster “Death Wish”(1974).

“Aaj Ki Aawaaz”(1984) had seven songs in it.

Today (9 january 2019) is the 86th birth anniversary of Mahendra Kapoor (9 January 1934 – 27 September 2008). On this occasion, here is the title song of the movie. This song is sung by Mahendra Kapoor. This song plays in the background as the movie begins with credits appearing on the screen.

Hasan Kamaal is the lyricist. He won Filmfare best lyrics award for this song.

Ravi is the music director.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala (long long ago in 2012).

With this song ,”Aaj Ki aawaaz”(1984) makes its debut in the blog.


Song-Aaj ki aawaaz jaag ae insaan (Aaj Ki Aawaaz)(1984) Singer-Mahendra Kapoor, Lyrics-Hasan Kamaal, MD-Ravi

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Aaj ki aawaaz
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Zindagi kitni
Behifaazat hai
Kal bhi aayegaa
Kya jamaanat hai
Din pareshan hai raat hai hairaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dar ke saaye mein
Gar jawaan hongi
Ye nayee naslen kal kahan hongi
Hosh me aa ja ab to aye nadaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Kya nagar hai ye
Kaisi basti hai
Ya to mitti se jaan sasti hai
Zindagi mushkil maut hai aasaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz

Dekh ghar aangan loot nahi jaayen
Pyaar ke rishtey chhut nahi jaayen
Kal bachane ka aaj hi kar dhyaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz jaag aye insaan
Waqt kehta hai waqt ko pehchaan
Aaj ki aawaaz


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4188 Post No. : 15369

“Jhamela”(1953) was produced and directed by Bhagwan dada for Bhagwan arts Productions, Bombay. This comedy movie had Bhagwan, Geet Bali, Badri Prasad, Baby Shakuntala, Bibi bai, Baburao, Leela Gupte, Usha Shukla etc in it.

The movie had eleven songs in it. Four songs have been covered in the past.

Today (5 january 2020) is the 38th remembrance day of C Ramchandra (5 january 1982). On this occasion, here is a song from “Jhamela”(1982). The song is sung by C Ramchandra. Rajinder Krishan is the lyricist. Music is composed by C Ramchandra as well.

Only the audio of the song is available. It is clear that the song, which is the title song of the movie, was picturised on Bhagwan.

Lyrics of this song were sent to me by Peevesie’s mom.


Song-Ye duniya hai ek jhamela (Jhamela)(1953) Singer-C Ramchandra, Lyrics-Rajinder Krishan, MD-C Ramchandra

Lyrics(Provided by Peevesie’s mom)

yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
ho char dinon ka hai mela
ho
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

kanjoos jo makhee choos ho
jode baithke kaudi kaudi
arre jahaan bhi ruk gayi chalte chalte
beta saans ki ghodi
phir saath na jaaye dhela
phir saath na jaaye dhela
ho
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

khel jawaani mastaani ka
yeh powder yeh laali
arre ho jaayengi badle jaisi
ek din zulfen kaali
yeh qamar banegi thela
yeh qamar banegi thela
hoye
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la

hooooo
motor tez chalaanewale
baat yeh meri maan
arre jinke paas nahi hai motor
woh bhi hai insaan
tu dhan daulat mein khela
tu dhan daulat mein khela
hoye
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la
yeh duniya hai ek jhamela
ek jhamela
ooooo
chaar dinon ka hai mela
hai mela
hai me ae ae la


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has over 15700 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

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Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1212
Total Number of movies covered =4329

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