Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Pahadi Sanyal Song’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4792 Post No. : 16551 Movie Count :

4506

The name of Chimanlal Trivedi, the producer-director may not ring bell in the minds of most of the admirers of old Hindi films. In Mumbai, he was the contemporary of well-known producer-directors like Chandulal Shah, A R Kardar, Mehboob Khan, V Shantaram etc in the 1940s.

After working as a writer in Sagar Movietone, in 1937, he set up a film production company, CIRCO (Cine Industries and Recording Company Ltd.) with the help of some Bombay-based shareholders as a public limited company in association with New Theatres. He became the Managing Director of CIRCO. The arrangement was that films would be produced by New Theatres’ in Kolkata with their artists and the financing/marketing of the films would be done by CIRCO in Mumbai. Both of them would share the profit. In 1939, CIRCO took upon itself the production of films in Mumbai with ‘Laxmi’ (1940).

Sometime in 1940, Chimanlal Trivedi was under cloud as there was a court case against him for mismanagement of funds of CIRCO. He had resiged as Managing Director of CIRCO in April 1941. I felt that perhaps this court case may have something to do with Chimanlal Trivedi leaving CIRCO to set up a new film production company, Laxmi Productions. After intense searches on the internet, I got a reference to CIRCO court case in indiankanoon. It was an 8-page judgement delivered on November 24, 1941 by Bombay High Court. The gist of the court case is as under:

A shareholder of CIRCO filed a petition in Bombay High Court against Chimanlal Trivedi, the managing director for the mismanagement of funds and to wind up CIRCO as insolvent based on its financial statements for the year ended March 1940. The court did not find any evidence against Chimanlal Trivedi of mismanagement of fund of CIRCO. As regards declaring the CIRCO insolvent, the Company put the arguments that there were 3 films under productions – ‘Apna Ghar’ (1942, directed by Debki Bose), ‘Nai Duniya’ (1942, directed by A R Kardar) and ’Mahatma Vidur’ (1943, directed by P Y Altekar). As per the estimates, CIRCO was expected to earn a profit of Rs. 11 lakhs after the release of these three films taking into account the star value of the main actors and the eminent directors. The petitioner argued that these three films can as well run into losses.

The court held the view that it cannot declare a company insolvent merely based on the speculation that there could be losses after the release of the films. None of the creditors of the CIRCO and a majority of the shareholders have supported the petition for winding up. The court dismissed the petition with cost.

One of the interesting example of the mismanagement of funds of CIRCO was that Shanta Apte was paid Rs,90000/- for working as heroine in a single film which, according to the petitioner, was unreasonably high. The film was not even completed when the matter was under discussion in the court. CIRCO responded by revealing that the amount was paid to Shanta Apte as ‘waiting salary’ for the unexpired period of her contract with Prabhat Film Company. If the CIRCO had not done so, several film producers would have grabbed the opportunity to secure her services for their future film productions.

Another bone of contention between the petitioner and the company was the way the profit was measured in the film industry. CIRCO had drawn the profit and loss account with realizable revenue from film distributors and expected revenue from the films under production for which distribution rights had been contracted. The petitioner found this practice not in keeping with the good accounting principles as this accounting system hides the true financial position of the company.

On the other hand, CIRCO maintained that it followed the convention among the film production companies in drawing its profit and loss account. More often, there were long gap between making of a film and releasing it. During the making of the films, a good amount of money was spent while the income from films would accrue only after their releases and that too, over a period of time. During the intervening period, the company will have to show losses in its profit and loss account. Hence an estimate of revenue of the company was made for the films under production based on the commitment by the film distributors and also the likely response from the film audience based on the star value.

If all the film production companies of that time drew their profit and loss account based on the estimated future profit, it amounts to masking their true financial position. Probably, this type of ‘accounting jugglery’ made some of the producers to float multiple film production companies after closing the earlier ones. Chimanlal Trivedi was no exception as after 1951, he had floated film production companies in different names.

Though the court verdict came in favour of Chimanlal Trivedi and the Company, this was short-lived as CIRCO went into liquidation in 1942. So, the apprehension of a shareholder who had filed the petition in the court about the mismanagement of funds turned out to be correct even though the Bombay High Court had dismissed his petition. It is interesting to note that Chimanlal Trivedil had hired A R Kardar to direct ‘Swami’ (1941) and ‘Nai Duniya’ (1942) under CIRCO banner. After the liquidation of CIRCO, it was A R Kardar who bought CIRCO’s studio at Parel for Kardar Productions.

Chimanlal Trivedi seems to have departed from the usual practice of hiring the actors and crew as per the studio system. It is said that he would first plan the film project and then hire the actors and crew as per the requirements of the new film. Often, he would select the most popular lead actors and directors as per their box office success and pay them in lumpsum for the film which would often work out much higher than what actors would have got under the studio system. It was reported in Filmindia magazine that Chimanlal Trivedi’s ‘highjacking’ of star actors and directors from some of the well known film production companies of that time affected their shooting schedules for the films under productions.

For ‘Tamanna’ (1942), the maiden film under Laxmi Productions, Chimanlal Trivedi hired Leela Desai, one of the successful actresses of New Theatres along with Jairaj with 7 crew members from Bengal which included Phani Majumdar as director, K C Dey as actor-music director, Bibhuti Laha as Cinematographer and Robin Chatterjee as Sound Recordist. It was Leela Desai’s maiden film in Mumbai. It is said that his financial offer to Leela Desai was so attractive vis-à-vis her salary in New Theatre that she accepted the offer.

Chimanlal Trivedi produced around 45 films during 1940-1960. Surprisingly, even with high-end star actors and eminent directors, especially in 1940s when he produced 28 films, there was not a single film which can be tagged as an outstadning film under his banners. In the 1950s, most of his films he produced were of ‘B’ Grade.

‘Sharaafat’ (1943) was third film with Leela Desai-Chimanlal Trivedi combination as actor and producer, respectively under the banner of Laxmi Productions. The star cast included Leela Desai, Pahadi Sanyal, Jagdish Sethi, Agha, Moti, Ghulam Rasool, S L Puri etc. The film had 9 songs which were set to music by Ashok Ghosh. Lyricist for all the songs is unknown.

I am presenting the first song, ‘aayi aayi re maalan singapur se’ from the film to appear on the Blog. HFGK is silent on the singers of the song. But it is apparent that the voices in the song are that of Amirbai Karnataki and Pahadi Sanyal with an unknown female voice in between. At the outset, the song appears to be ‘sales pitch’ but after the completion of the song, a long musical orchestration gives an impression of a stage song.

With this song, ‘Sharaafat’ (1943) makes its debut on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Aayi aayi re maalan Singapur se (Sharaafat)(1943) Singers-Amirbai Karnataki, Pahadi Sanyal, Unknown female voice, MD-Ashok Ghosh
Amirbai Karnataki + Pahadi Sanyal

Lyrics

aayi aayi re
haan aayi aayi re
aayi re maalan Singapur se
haan Singapur se
haan haan Singapur se
oh
aaya aaya re
haan haan aaya aaya re
aaya re maali
haan Rangoon se
haan haan Rangoon se
haan haan Rangoon se

rang birange phool hamaare
rang birange phool hamaare
rang birange gehane
bhaagonwaala le jaayega
bhaagonwaali pehne

gori pehanegi
haan gori pehanegi
dil ke hain naina jaa ke teer se
haan haan jaa ke teer se
haan haan jaa ke teer se

aayi re maalan Singapur se

phoolon se mehka do
more tan ko aaj saja do
phoolon se meha do
more tan ko aaj saja do
bas jaaun aa ke nainon mein
aisa jaal bichhaa do

aao aao ree
haan haan
aao aao ree
raah takoon mein teri der se
haan teri der se
haan haan teri der se

aayi re maalan Singapur se

raat ki raani kaa gajra
champe ki kaliyon kaa jhoomar
kyun deke phoolon ki maala
nargis ke gunchhon ki jhaanjhar
nikhra waah waah roop tihaara
joban dhoom machaaye
nikhra waah waah roop tihaara
joban dhoom macchaaye
nayi jawaani chhaayi raani
jo dekhe lalchaaye

aao aao ri
haan haan aao aao ri
raah takoon mein teri der se
haan teri der se
haan haan teri der se

aayi re maalan Singapur se


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4713 Post No. : 16419

Today’s song is from the film Adhikar-1938. Made at Calcutta by New Theatres, the film was directed by P C Barua, who also acted in the film’s both versions-Bangla and Hindi. The film title was the same in both. While the Bangla version released on 12-1-1939, the Hindi version was delayed and released on 21-10-1939.

In the early era of film making, right from the Silent films, Bombay was the most active and important film centre. Two local communities in Bombay were predominantly engaged in filmmaking. One was the Gujarati – who were shrewd businessmen who had an eye on the profits. The other local community was Marathis. Marathi people were poor in finance, bereft of business acumen, they were very good performers. So, they were inclined to acting, direction,production, Art direction, story writing, Music directions, singing etc. Everything and anything that did not involve finance or business !

This continued till the Talkie arrived. Then one more player joined in and that was Bengali community from Calcutta. They recognised the need to showcase their films on the All India platform to make their film industry viable. So, making Hindi films for the All India market started. The pioneers in Cinema in Bengal – the Madons had their own network of Cinema Theatres and after a while New Theatres too established their film distribution network in North, West and South India.

Bengalis were hardworking and intelligent in those days and so understood the mechanics of successful films.First thing that they did was to use established novels and stories from the Bengali literature to make films. The Madons had bought the rights of all the novels of Bankimchandra Chatterjee and the New Theatres followed suit by using Sharadchandra Chatterji and the rest of the famous writers. This made their film’s base strong. Secondly, they introduced their favourite and revered Rabindra Sangeet in film songs. To the Bombay audience, who was bored with classical and stage drama music, this was a welcome change. Thus, in the early years of Talkie films i.e. 1933 to almost 1945, Calocutta contributed substantially in making films popular and profitable.

Automatically, many Bangla artistes tried their hand at acting and Music making in Hindi films. Have you ever heard of these names ?
Radhacharan Bhattacharya, Motibabu, N R Bhattacharya, Shoolpani Mukherjee, S P Mukherjee, V V Ganguly, Niren Lahiri, Shivrani Ghosh, A C Biswas, Bhishmadev Chatterjee etc etc .

I am sure none of these names ring any bell in your mind. Simply because they are not famous Bangla names. Let me tell you that these are some names of Bangla Music Directors, who gave music to Hindi films in the 30s and 40s. The contribution of Bangla artistes in various fields of film making, especially Music composition and singing has been sizable. Over a period, with the emergence and strengthening of regional centres, the contribution started reducing and in a period of 20 years,it trickled to the minimum.

In the decade of the 30s Music Directors like R C Boral, Pankaj Mullik, K C Dey, Timir Baran, Anupam Ghatak and Anil Biswas contributed heavily by building the base of Hindi Film music. In the 40s it was Pannalal Ghosh, Kamal Dasgupta, Pt.Ravishankar and Ram Ganguly. In the 50s it was S D Burman, Salil Chaudhary and Hemant Kumar. In the 60s it was Robin Banerjee, in the 70s it was only R D Burman and in the 80s it was only Bappi Lahiri.

Similarly, among Singers too the initial high number came down over a period. To start with it was K C Dey, Anil Biswas, Ashok Kumar, Asit baran, Harimati Dua, Kalyani Das(real name Zareena), Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Parul Ghosh, Maya Banerjee etc. Then came Ashima Banerjee, Geeta Dutt, Hemant Kumar, Jagmohan, Juthika Roy, Manna Dey, Ranu Mukherjee, Sandhya Mukherjee, Sailesh Mukherjee, Shankar Dasgupta, Subir Sen, Utpala Sen etc. In the 70 to 85 period it was mainly Kishore Kumar, Amit kumar, Aarti Mukherjee, Bappi Lahiri, Runa Laila, Kalyani Mitra, Pankaj Mitra, Sapan Chakravarty etc. After 85 the number was reduced to Shreya Ghoshal, Abhijeet, Babul Supriyo etc.
(All names are only indicative and not exhaustive).

Amongst the singers from Bengal, possibly Pahadi Sanyal acted in the maximum number of Hindi films-36. He sang 70 songs in 20 Hindi films, the rest were for only acting. His songs with Uma Shashi, Kanan Devi, Molina Devi and Sehgal were famous. Luku Sanyal-the English news Reader of early Doordarshan News was his daughter. Today’s film Adhikar-38 had music by Timir baran bhattacharya. The cast of the film was P C Barua, Jamuna, Menaka, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Jagdish Sethi, Bikram Kapooretc.etc. From the cast, Menaka Devi was a member of Same Name Confusion, as there was another Menaka-actress and singer- from Bombay in the same time period.

Menaka Devi (Calcutta Wali) was born in Varanasi on 23-1-1921. Her mother was a resident of the holy city although her father was from Bengal. She studied upto Matriculation. She could speak fluent English and Hindi, but not much of Bangla, having been raised in Varanasi. Her interest in music and dance took her to Bombay where she starred in a couple of films like Prince Thaksen (1929), Uttara Abhimanyu, Ishwar Ki Maut and others as a child artiste. When the Talkie started she acted and sang in Bhedi Rajkumar-34, Pyara Dushman-35 and Krishna Shishtai – 35.

Reportedly, she met the legendary film director Debaki Bose of Bengal during a train journey and he was so impressed by her that he decided to cast her in the lead role of his next venture in the Hindi version of the bilingual Sonar Sansar (1936 in Bangla and Sunehra Sansar-36 in Hindi) and thus began the illustrious career of Menaka Devi.

Her devotion to work was such that she learnt Bengali, her mother tongue although she was anything but fluent in it having spent all her life till then outside Bengal, so that she could play the same role (that of Alka) in the Bengali version also. Dhiraj Bhattacharya was her first hero on the screen. P.C.Barua, who was on the lookout for a young and fresh face to play Jharna in his forthcoming production Mukti (1937) selected her for both the versions ( Bangla and Hindi) and a flow started whereby she starred in films like Adhikar (1939), Abhigyan (1938), Bardidi (1939 in Bangla and Badi Didi in Hindi), Rajat Jayanti (1940) and others.

She decided to try her luck in Bombay around 1944 and starred in a few films there and definitely made her presence felt although playing the second lead most of the time. Kishore Sahu procured her services for Hamari Duniya (1952). She was married to Pannalal Shrivastav and had 1 daughter ( Jaya Ganguly). She turned producer also and this proved her undoing. Both her films as producer, Apna na Huye Apne (No information of this film,probably incomplete) and Jeene Do-48, both starring herself with prominent Bombay stars flopped.

She returned to Calcutta a broken woman and found to her dismay that roles were not coming to her. She joined the MG Enterprise, a drama group of Molina Devi and performed on the stage to continue to live as an actress. She even arranged magic shows along with husband Pannalal Srivastava while small roles came pouring in films like Ekti Raat (1956) and others. The feature that strikes even today while seeing her performance is the spontaneous nature of her acting. Why good roles eluded her is a mystery. She was last seen on the screen in Bhombal Sardar (1983). In all, she acted in 60 films-Bangla and Hindi together. She was in 19 Hindi films and sang 8 songs in 4 Hindi films.

Her end came on 22-1- 2004 after a prolonged fight not only against poor health but also poverty. Her death was reported only in one Bengali daily although news of her death received good coverage on television.

Here is a small note on Jagdish Sethi.

Jagdish Sethi was born on 15-1-1903 at Pind Dandan Khan (Campbellpore) in Punjab.

After matriculation in 1920, he graduated from Lahore. He was known as a fighter in college due to his dominating nature. He joined the film line as assitant cameraman in Punjab film company in 1928.

He went to Calcutta to work as an extra in New Theatres, came back to Bombay and worked in Alam Ara-31. He went back to New Theatres in 1933 and worked in films like President,Anath Ashram,Mukti, jawani ki reet,Ghar ki laaj etc.

He worked in about 85 films in his career. In Bombay he was famous as a person with changing moods. He did not have many friends. He worked in films made by Imperial, Amar Movietone, Maiden Films, New Theatres, Laxmi Productions (belonging to L V Prasad), Janak Productions, Filmistan etc etc. He started his own J.S.Productions and produced and directed films like Do Dil-47, Raat ki Rani-49, Jaggu-52 and Pensioner-54.

He amassed huge wealth. He was fond of Racing, Cards and Tennis. He was also a writer and published a book “Hichkiyan”-short stories on Film world.

He died on 12-6-1969.

Today’s song is sung by Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal and Pratap Mukherji. The tune of today’s song is similar to one used in film Forty Days-1959 song of Asha-Manna Dey “Naseeb hoga mera meherbaan kabhi na kabhi”….MD-Bipin-Babul. Enjoy….


Song- Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho (Adhikaar)(1938) Singers- Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal, Pratap Mukherjee, Lyricist-Arzoo Lucknavi, MD- Timir Baran Bhattacharya

Lyrics

Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
zakhm ki tarah hanso
haan zakhm ki tarah hanso
dard ki haalat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
haan haan
haan aan
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sabr kadva hai magar
haan aan aan
sabr kadva hai magar
sabr ka phal meethha aa hai ae
haan aan aan
haan
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

Bhed khulta hai
bharam jaataa hai
hoti hai hansi
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
aa aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
sharm izzat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
gar museebat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4677 Post No. : 16354 Movie Count :

4441

During 1966-72, I used to watch one Hindi film almost every week-end. I had only two main criteria for selecting a film. First, I should be able to procure a ticket without a long queue either in advance or current booking. Second, the film should be from a good banner which meant that ‘B’ and ‘C’ grade films were out of my reckoning.

‘Aradhana’ (1969) was one such films which fitted my criteria. I watchedit in a theatre during the first week of its release. There was no problem in booking the ticket as Rajesh Khanna had not become a ‘phenomenon’ at that time, a term which one of the film magazines had used for him after the success of this film. While I was acquainted with the names of most of the main actors, the actor who had done the role of Sharmila Tagore’s father was a new face for me. His performance as a distressed father whose daughter has become a widow, carrying her fiancé’s child before formally getting married, had remained embedded in my mind with the song, safal hogi teri araadhana playing in the background. It was after a few months that I came to know that the actor in that role was Pahadi Sanyal, a name that I heard for the first time. Now this sounds surprising for me.

It was a sort of paradox that while I was not aware of Pahadi Sanyal as an actor in 1969, I was acquainted with his daughter, Luku Sanyal who was a lecturer in English literature in my college (K C College, Churchgate) during my college days in 1966-69. It was only when she started reading news in English on Doordarshan, Mumbai in 1972 that I came to know that she was the daughter of Pahadi Sanyal.

It took me another four decades to know that Pahadi Sanyal was also a good singer. That was after I joined the Blog sometime in 2011.

Pahadi Sanyal (22/02/1906 – 10/02/1974) and K L Saigal were contemporaries in New Theatres, both of them starting their filmy career almost the same year (1932). Apart from Bengali, Pahadi Sanyal was fluent in Hindi, Urdu and English. This qualified him to work as a singer-actor in most of the bilingual films (Bangla and Hindi) produced by New Theatres during 1933-40. The bilingual films included ‘Rajrani Meera’ (1933), ‘Chandidas’ (1934), Dhoop Chhaaon’ (1935), ‘Devdas’ (1935), ‘Karorepati’ (1936), ‘Vidyapati’ (1937), ‘Adhikar’ (1938), ‘Sapera’ (1939), ‘Haar-Jeet’ (1940). He also acted and rendered songs in ‘Yahudi Ki Ladki’ (1933) and ‘Kaarwaan-E-Hayat’ (1935). In some of these films, Pahari Sanyal worked with K L Saigal and also rendered songs with him.

Despite being a trained musician and singer in Hindustani classical music from the prestigious Marris College of Music, Lucknow, Pahadi Sanyal had to work under the shadow of K L Saigal whose songs were very popular and thus sure shots for the box office success of the films. I have seen many films of Pahadi Sanyal and K L Saigal working together and there is no doubt that K L Saigal was a better singer than Pahadi Sanyal. But when it comes to acting I felt that latter’s acting calibre was higher than that of K L Saigal.

After completing ‘Saugandh’ (1942), Pahadi Sanyal shifted his base to Mumbai in 1942. During his Mumbai stint, he acted in ‘Saheli’ (1942), ‘Sharaafat’ (1943), ‘Inkaar’ (1943), Mohabbat’ (1943), ‘Anban’ (1944), ‘Paristan’ (1944), ‘Kadambari’ (1944), ‘Preet’ (1945), ‘Malan’ (1946), ‘Milan’ (1946) among others. He was a lead actor in many of the films in the 1940s in Mumbai and he sang for himself in all these films.

Some time in the late 1940s, Pahadi Sanyal went back to Kolkata and worked in Bangla films but often visited Mumbai to work in Hindi films in the 1950s and 60s. By early 1950s, Pahadi Sanyal had started doing character roles.

While writing articles under the series ‘Hindi Songs in Bangla Films’ for the Blog, I had occasion to watch many Bangla films and Pahadi Sanyal had acted in some of these films. His role as a Psychiatrist in ‘Deep Jeley Jai’ (1959) was noteworthy for his long monologues with few dialogues delivered in chaste English. I have also seen its Hindi remake, ‘Khamoshi’ (1969) in which Nazir Hussain played the role of Psychiatrist but in my view, he was a shade lower in performance than the one by Pahari Sanyal.

In ‘Uttar Falguni’ (1963) and its Hindi remake, ‘Mamta’ (1966), Pahari Sanyal had a small role of a prosecution lawyer. Here he was pitted against the defence lawyer, Bikash Roy/Ashok Kumar. It was an interesting dual of natural actors in the court room to watch. In ‘Alor Pipasa’ (1959), Pahari Sanyal played the role of a senior doctor who tells the story of a mujra singer to his junior doctor (Asit Baran) who turns out be the mujra singer’s son. The narration of the story in a flash back mode by the senior doctor in tight to medium close-up shots shows the confidence the director of the film on the ability of Pahadi Sanyal to give effective facial expressions along with smooth dialogue delivery. In Bangla cinema, some of the character actors like Pahadi Sanyal and Chhabi Biswas, thanks to their acting prowess, commanded status almost equal to that of the lead actors. There are some more such Bangla films where Pahadi Sanyal has given memorable performance even in small roles.

During the 4 decades of his filmy career, Pahadi Sanyal worked in 56 Hindi films and almost an equal number of Bangla films. In addition, he also worked in an English film, ‘The Householder’ (1963).

As a singer in Hindi films, Pahadi Sanyal was active from 1933 to 1946 during which time, he rendered about 50 songs as an actor-singer. His last Hindi film song appears to be wo kahen aap ki do chaah ka inaam mujhe from ‘Milan’ (1946).

About a week back, I uploaded a rare song from the film ‘Mohabbat’ (1943) ‘tum shyaam badariya main hoon mor’ rendered by Pahadi Sanyal which I am presenting here. The film was directed by Phani Majumdar. Shanta Apte and Pahadi Sanyal were in the lead roles in the film with the supporting cast of Jagdish Sethi, Sunalini Devi, K C Dey, Yashodhara Katjoo, S Nazir etc.

There were 10 songs in the film which were set to music by Hari Prasanna Das. Except for Meera Bai bhajan, the lyricist/s for remaining 9 songs are unattributed.

With this song, ‘Mohabbat’ (1943) makes its debut on the Blog.

Audio Clip:

Song-Tum shyam badariya main hoon mor (Mohabbat)(1943) Singer-Pahadi Sanyal, Lyrics-Unknown, MD-Hari Prasanna Das

Lyrics

tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mo…r
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mo…r
tum shyaam badariyaa
tum chaand kiran ho
tum chaand kiran ho
main hoon chakor
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mor
tum shyaam badariyaa

ek praan hai do hain kaaya
ek praan hai do hain kaaya
bandhi preet ki dor
bandhi preet ki do…..r
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mo….r
tum shyaam badariyaa


aa haa
tum jal ki chanchal dhaara
main uska ek kinaara
tum jal ki chanchal dhaara
main uska ek kinaara
jeewan pathh mein sang sang dolen
jeewan pathh mein sang sang dolen
chale ek hi ore
chale ek hi ore
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mo….r
tum shyaam badariyaa

hum tum donon do panchhi hain aen
hum tum donon do panchhi hain
uden aen gagan ki ore
dekhen kitni door hai
apni iss duniya ka chhor
dekhen kitni door hai
apni iss duniya ka chho..r
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaa
main hoon mo…r
tum shyaam badariyaa
badariyaaaaa


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4285 Post No. : 15533

Divinity remembered today. Divinity – as in the voice of the divine – KL Saigal.

A hundred and sixteen years ago, this day, 11th April in 1904, was born a child who would be a legend within his own lifetime, short as it was, and forever be one. The legend continues to sustain more than a hundred years hence. The sound of the songs rendered by him continue to enchant generation after generation of listeners whose constancy of devotion has not, cannot be influenced by the superfluity of singing voices that have also performed since then. Saigal is Saigal, in his own might, in his own dimension – a voice that has not been matched in its depth, in its sentimental expression, and the effect it has on the minds and hearts of the listeners.

In his obituary, Baburao Patel, the publisher of the iconic ‘Film India’, wrote thus, and I quote a small portion of it,

For a week, after the daily papers flashed the news of Saigal’s death, riots, politics and Pakistan went out of the news and Hindus, the Muslims, the Christians, the Jews, the touchables and the untouchables – one and all reverently discussed the sad and sudden death of Kundan Lal Saigal, the greatest singer the Indian screen has ever produced in its long history of misadventures.

People didn’t merely love Saigal. They revered his glorious voice and called it divine. In his death died the music of millions of souls and it was no wonder to find every person, with a musical ear, a mourner with millions of music lovers all over the country.

Trains, buses, trams, taxis, streets, theatres, parks, race-courses – wherever one happened to be it was the dead Saigal that lived again in the memory of his affectionate fans. Men and women, boys and girls, the young and the old, the rich and the poor – one and all told one another what a great singer Saigal had been an each according to the mould of his mind quoted a different song the greatest memory of the dead artists.

Saigal was the one single person who had given the screen music a rare emotion that soothed the aching souls of people in the travails of modern life.

Millions wept with him when in ‘Devdas’, his unforgettable song ‘Dukh ke din ab beetat nahin’ came from the screen with its agonizing melody and yet in its very agony gave to the millions a rare soothe, for, in Saigal’s rare voice there was pathos and joy, pain and pleasure, a stab and a soothe all at once, wedded to an incomparable melody never before heard on the screen anywhere in the world. Saigal was easily the world’s most emotional male singer.

The one phrase I may take a liberty to add to in this scintillating praise written by Baburao Patel – that it was not only “. . . an incomparable melody never before heard on the screen. . .”, but also “not ever since. . .”.

Back in June of 2017, when I had introduced the song “Nidniya Mori Bairan Oye Hoye Re”, from the film ‘Karwaan e Hayaat’,  (then newly traced film from 1935), I had summarized the story line of the film as follows.

Watching this clip, this film, seems like a journey through time, a journey to another dimension, another world – world that I had not seen ever before. The story of the film is about Parvez, a prince who has a lively and romantic outlook in life. The queen mother arranges for a betrothal for her son, and the prince, fearing the bonds of a matrimonial household and no romance, disappears from the palace and joins a band of gypsies, disguised as one himself, and changes the name to Naazu. This secret is known only to his very close friend and sidekick, Suhail (role played by Bikram Kapoor). There is another side of the story unfolding. The Emir of Tikkim, an adjoining kingdom (role played by Nawab) also fancies the same princess, with whom the queen mother has arranged the alliance for Parvez. He has the princess kidnapped, and as destiny would have it, hides her in the very same camp of gypsies. Parvez encounters the princess in the gypsy camp, and they fall in love. Parvez, who is prone to playful antics and pulling legs of others, does not disclose his true identity, and continues to romance the willing princess. Other complications intervene. The Wazir (prime minister) of the state, traces Parvez to the gypsy camp. The Emir of Tikkim comes to the camp with his soldiers to claim his kidnapped bounty. And Zarina, a beautiful gypsy girl at the camp (role played by Ratan Bai) falls in love with Parvez. All the circumstances rolled together, make for a real fun movie, which is a treat to watch. And the premium icing on the cake of course is KL Saigal, and the songs which were not released on gramophone records.

I bring on board today, another lost song from this film, which was not released in gramophone record. It is another wonderful group song that is presented in the ambiance of the gypsy camp that has been infiltrated by Parvez, masquerading as a commoner. On screen, we see the inimitable Saigal, performing this joie de vivre song of free spirit in the company of the band of gypsies who have arrived to set up another temporary camp in their nomadic travels across the land. Accompanying him on screen are Miss Molina, in the role of Sonia, a gypsy girl, and Pahadi Sanyal in the role of Rahat, a young gypsy man. There is a host of other members of the gypsy clan that join in chorus. In a brief scene, we also see Nemo, in the role of the old gypsy witch, sitting with young girls and reading their palms.

The song tells of the comparison between their life in the forest, and the life of the cities – “Shehron Mein Wo Baat Kahaan Jo Jungle Jungle Aawat Hai”. Listen, view and enjoy this rare original clip from the film, that has been restored to public domain recently.

KL Saigal – the magic continues, the legend sustains.

 

Song – Shehron Mein Wo Baat Kahaan (Karwaan e Hayaat) (1935) Singer – KL Saigal, Molina, Pahadi Sanyal, Lyrics – Hakim Ahmed Shuja Pasha, MD – Mihir Kiran Bhattacharya
Chorus

Lyrics

shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo
jungle jungle aawat hai jo
jungle jungle aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo
jungle jungle aawat hai jo
jungle jungle aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo

baandhe paanv maa painjaniya jab
bhor suhaani aawat hai
baandhe paanv maa painjaniya jab
bhor suhaani aawat hai
har ek chidiya apna gaana
komal sur maa sunaavat hai
har ek chidiya apna gaana
komal sur maa sunaavat hai

mehakat aavat purvaiya
ya mast suhaagan aavat hai
mehakat aavat purvaiya
ya mast suhaagan aavat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo
jungle jungle aawat hai jo
jungle jungle aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo

pachham maa jab suraj sunehri
kiran jaa ke chhipaawat hai
pachham maa jab suraj sunehri
kiran jaa ke chhipaawat hai
saanjh chadariya kaari odhe
saanjh chadariya kaari odhe
dheere dheere aawat hai
aawat hai
shor macha hai jungle maa ke
raat suhaani aawat hai
shor macha hai jungle maa ke
raat suhaani aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo
jungle jungle aawat hai jo
jungle jungle aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo

prem ki bansi rain hamaari
chaaron oar nachaavat hai
prem ki bansi rain hamaari
chaaron oar nachaava hai
chaand aur taaran ke akaash pe
sunder phool khilaawat hai
toot giri jo koi kali wo
toot giri jo koi kali wo
jugnu ban ke aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo
jungle jungle aawat hai jo
jungle jungle aawat hai
shehron maa wo baat kahaan jo

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो

बांधे पाँव में पैंजनीया जब
भोर सुहानी आवत है
बांधे पाँव में पैंजनीया जब
भोर सुहानी आवत है
हर एक चिड़िया अपना गाना
कोमल सुर में सुनावत है
हर एक चिड़िया अपना गाना
कोमल सुर में सुनावत है

महकत आवत पुरवैया
या मस्त सुहागन आवत है
महकत आवत पुरवैया
या मस्त सुहागन आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो

पच्छम मा जब सूरज सुनहरी
किरण जा के छिपावत है
पच्छम मा जब सूरज सुनहरी
किरण जा के छिपावत है
साँझ चदरिया कारी ओढ़े
साँझ चदरिया कारी ओढ़े
धीरे धीरे आवत है
आवत है
शोर मचा है जंगल मा के
रात सुहानी आवत है
शोर मचा है जंगल मा के
रात सुहानी आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो

प्रेम की बंसी रैन हमारी
चारों ओर नचावत है
प्रेम की बंसी रैन हमारी
चारों ओर नचावत है
चाँद और तारन के आकाश पे
सुंदर फूल खिलावत है
टूट गिरी जो कोई काली वो
टूट गिरी जो कोई काली वो
जुगनू बन के आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है जो
जंगल जंगल आवत है
शहरों मा वो बात कहाँ जो


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16500 song posts by now.

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