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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Classical composition’ Category


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3982 Post No. : 15069

In some cases, it is the voice – some people will impress you, attract you with their voice. Girish Karnad’s voice has one of the most relaxing sound quality that I have heard. And his presence, his demeanor, his being in a scene, on screen or on stage, always had the same expression of comfort and relaxation as his voice. Seeing him, listening to him, one could never imagine if this person could be moved to a hasty or an impatient action.

He passed away, the day before. The news said that he was 82. I was surprised, it couldn’t be. Over the years since I had first seen him live in a drama in Delhi – almost a millennium ago, and then through films and media images, he always seemed to be the same, never changing, nor ageing. Be it the memories and images from the 60s, 70s, or even recent. He always appeared to be the same.

So when I read this one line in a media news item, I was very taken aback. Sure, I had not seen him active for the past few years, but the thought process probably had never projected far enough to make believe that he was past his 80th. In fact, as I reviewed his filmography in preparation for this article, I find that 5 of his upcoming films are slated for released through the rest of 2019.

Mid 1960s to 70s was an era for the theatre in India. One sees an upsurge in the quality of drama, the subject matter handling by the playwrights and the abilities of the dramatists. If it was Badal Sircar in Bangla (east), it was Vijay Tendulkar in Matathi (west); if it was Mohan Rakesh in Hindi (north), it was Girish Karnad in Kannada (south). These playwrights brought in some very incisive, some very timeless creations, that brought a completely fresh air, breaking new grounds in understanding the human psyche – how the humans interact, with each other and within themselves, how the social influences mould the individual behaviors, and in reverse, how the human expressions manipulate the social conduct. And together, how they shape the movement of history.

Girish K broke out a very crisp and a surprisingly innovative line of enquiry, with his very first play – ‘Yayati’. Most of the readers will be familiar with this episode from the epic, Mahabharat. Yayati is a king in the lineage of the Chandravansh, the lineage of Chandra, the Moon God. He is portrayed as an irresponsible king, consumed by his obsession with young age and the pleasures to be derived from it. He is afraid of getting old. His wife is Devyani, daughter of Rishi Shukracharya. Sharmishtha is the name of one of the ladies in waiting of Devyani. Actually a princess herself from another kingdom, Sharmishtha becomes a bounden server to Devyani due to certain events. As the events unfold furhter, Yayati has an extra marital affair with Sharmishtha, who bears three sons for him. Devyani too has three children, one daughter and two sons. Devyani complains to her father, who is the purohit (high priest) of the demon clan. Incensed by the behavior of his son-in-law, he curses him to a premature and a prolonged old age.

Yayati is shattered. He goes to Shukracharya, begs for forgiveness and removal of the curse. Shukracharaya tells him that his curse cannot be reversed, but it can be transferred to a person willing to take on such a curse. Yayati is overjoyed, but the joy is short-lived as he finds out that no one is ready to accept his curse. Finally, one of his sons, Puru, agrees to take on the curse of his father, wanting to bring peace to his father. Yayati enjoys another one thousand years of youth, donated by his son Puru.

This is a well known tale, and it has its own share of interpretations, analysis and philosophical discourse in literary critique over the ages. Girish K stepped in and asked a question that was never asked for many a millennia. What about Chitralekha?

It is not clear whether this character by this name exists in the annals of Mahabharat. Girish K is alluding to, and enquiring about Puru’s wife. A man goes ahead and takes on the curse of old age for a thousand years. There is name and fame, for this sacrifice. But no one ever asked, what about his wife? What happened to her life and her time, and whether and how did she endure this abnormally changed circumstance foisted upon her. With certain modifications to the original plot, Girish K is the first scholar to ask this question.

This play came about during Girish K’s journey to England by ship in 1960. The version of Mahabharat by C Rajagopalachari was published in 1951. This version of the epic influenced Girish K, and he went on to create two great plays based on themes from this epic. By his own account, ‘Yayati’ came so naturally to him, almost as if someone was dictating and he was just transcribing. The writing of this play was completed on this sea voyage of three weeks. He was traveling to London, having been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship at the Oxford University. During his stay and studies, he completed a triple MA, simultaneously in philosophy, politics and economics. The second play, that was born out of the influence of Mahabharat, sat in his mind for almost three decades, and then was born as ‘Fire and Rain’, which was staged first time in 1995.

His other most celebrated theatrical creation is another view into the history of India. Titled ‘Tuglaq’, this play took the theatre world, the audiences and the socio-political commentators by storm when it was first staged in 1966. In 1972, this play was enacted by the National School of Drama, directed by Ebrahim Elkazi, and presented on the ramparts of the Old Fort (Purana Qila) in Delhi. Using the ruins of the Old Fort as the backdrop, the play was enacted, to a very critical acclaim. Personally, that was my first introduction to Girish K. Quite enchanted by the theatre scene in Delhi, I have seen this enactment of the play while I still was in school.

The play covers the last 5 years of the reign of Mohammed Bin Tuglaq. The protagonist, is portrayed as having great ideas and a grand vision, but his reign was an abject failure. He started his rule with great ideals of a unified India, but his kingdom degenerated into anarchy. His proclamation to move his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, resulted in a massive exodus that brought misery and sorrow to a huge population. This was seen by the commentators as an allegory to the Partition of the country in 1947, and mass movement of people from both sides of the border.

In his later discussions, Girish K has revealed that the play was not originally written with an intent to comment on the then current political scenario in the country. Writing about the commentary on his play, Girish K has stated – “I did not consciously write about the Nehru era, I am always flattered when people tell me that it was about the Nehru era and equally applies to development of politics since then. But, I think, that is a compliment that any playwright would be thrilled to get, but it was not intended to be a contemporary play about a contemporary situation.”

Girish K started his theatre career in Madras, with a drama group called the Madras Players. Starting with ‘Yayati’ we see the development of a multi-faceted career that has lasted for almost six decades – author, teacher, playwright, director, stage actor, film actor, director of FTII Pune, chairman of the Sangeet Natak Academy – there is so much in his career to write and tell about.

His association with the cinema begins with ‘Samskaara’ (1970) and ‘Vamsh Vriksh’ (1972), both in Kannada, and both well recognized and well awarded films. Girish K was also the co-director of ‘Vamsh Vriksh’. The storylines for both films are a very strong statement on the evolving nature of human relationships, as each individual passes through his or her own pleasures, travails, dreams and anguish. The stories tell of compelling human emotions that drive human beings, to behave in manners that are quite out of the ordinary expectations. In ‘Samskaara’, Praneshcharaya (role played by Girish K), a devout Brahmin, is so convinced of moksha being the ultimate goal of life, and being so focused to achieve it, marries an invalid, so he can remain a celibate all his life. His antithesis is life is Narayanappa, a Brahmin who has given up the traditions – he eats meat and lives with Chandri, a lady of lower standing in the society. As the events unfold, Narayanappa passes away. His final rites become a controversy – a non-Brahmin cannot perform his rites, and no Brahmin in the village is ready to perform the rites for one who has fallen from the tradition. In the midst of all this, Praneshcharya one night wakes up in the lap of Chandri. Unable to reconcile with his own actions, he leaves the village in despair. Chandri secretly performs the last rites of Narayanappa and leaves the village too. In the last scene, Praneshcharya is seen returning to the village. Did he confess and atone for his actions? – the question remains unanswered.

‘Vamsh Vriskh’ is a complex narrative of the progression in a family, the interrelationships, the hidden connects and the invisible knowns. The protagonist, Srinivasa Shrotri, goes through many a tribulation in life, and tries to keep his mental peace intact. Having lost or settled all his affairs, he finally renounces householder’s life to become a sanyaasi.

In 1974, Girish K appeared in a children’s film ‘Jaadu Ka Shankh’. Not much more information about this film is locatable.

In the next three years, we see Girish K in three films that are outstanding statements of the new-wave cinema. In 1975, we see him in ‘Nishaant’ as the timid but principled schoolmaster, whose wife is abducted by the brothers of the landlord. The film has a kind of idealist ending, with the schoolmaster fatally attacking the landlord during a religious celebration and the entire village rising up against the landlord and lynching him and his entire family. In 1976 came ‘Manthan’ – the story of the white revolution in India. Girish K has played the role of Dr Rao, a chemist assigned in the rural areas, to help villagers determine the quality of their milk and to help free them from the clutches of the milk contractors by establishing co-operative societies. In 1977, we see Girish K in ‘Swami’, assaying the role of Ghamshyam, an upright and principled eldest son in the family, after passing away of his father, handling the family matters and his own personal life very maturely and with wisdom, in the presence of a hostile step mother.

In the next four decades , Girish K has appeared in almost 100 films, in Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malyalam and Assamese. I remember seeing him in ‘Man Pasand’ (1980), playing the role of Kashinath, a close friend of Pratap, the protagonist (role played by Dev Anand). Later, I have seen him in ‘Aasha’ (1980), ‘Ek Baar Chale Aao’ (1983), ‘Tarang’ (1984), till the waning interest in newer films kept me away. Ah yes, he was part of the dear ‘Malgudi Days’ series on the television, playing the role of Swami’s father. In his other directorial outings, he has directed ‘Godhuli’ (1977) and ‘Utsav’ (1984), films that have earned a lot of critical acclaim. He has also made a number of documentaries, like one on the Kannada poet DR Bendre (1972), ‘Kanaka-Purandara’ (English, 1988) on two medieval Bhakti poets of Karnataka, Kanaka Das and Purandara Das, and ‘The Lamp in the Niche’ (English, 1989) on Sufism and the Bhakti movement in India. Many of his films and documentaries have won several national and international awards.

Girish K’s accomplishment as an actor is simply his complete comfort with being the character he is playing. Watching him on the screen, one has this confidence that he knows all the ins and outs of the character he plays, and that in some incarnation he has lived that role himself. The authenticity of portrayal is simply magnificent.

In 1985, he appeared in the role of Pandit Shiv Shankar Shastri in the film ‘Sur Sangam’. The film, and his portrayal of the senior patriarchic exponent of classical music, are my all time favorite. I have written about this film in an earlier article with the song “Aaye Sur Ke Panchhi Aaye”. The film revolves around classical music and the story of Pt Shiv Shankar Shastri, one of the greatest living exponents of this art form. The story line brings in Tulsi (role played by Jayaprada), who is musically inclined and who reveres Shastri ji. The turn of events brings a certain unexplainable element – Tulsi is sexually assaulted, and the man responsible also throws down the portrait of Shastri ji. In a fit of violent anger, Tulsi slays the man with a shard of glass from broken portrait, runs off into the night, and boards a train departing from the local station. As destiny would have it, she barges into a first class coupe whose sole occupant is Shastri ji, who is traveling for participating in an out of town program. The two travel together, and return. Tulsi starts living in the same house as Shastri ji. He is a widower and has a girl child. Slowly, Tulsi becomes a part of the household. Being inclined for classical music, she also starts to practice while staying at Shastri ji’s home. One night, there is a special celebration at the temple of Lord Shiv. Shastri ji is to perform. Tulsi accompanies him, as usual. With the performance about to begin, Shastri ji motions Tulsi to pick up and play the taanpura in accompaniment. At this, all his participating disciples become incensed and leave the stage one by one. Tulsi rushes back home (and then leaves the household for good), the audience leaves and Shastri ji is the sole person left in the temple. In the absence of any accompaniment and musical support, he resolves to make his musical presentation regardless, to the Lord. And he presents this song, alone in a deserted temple, to Lord Shiv.

I picked this song specially, to highlight one aspect of Girish K’s artistic expressions, which was probably hidden until then. An accomplished performer, he has performed the dance steps as part of this song. Every review of the film at that time, commented on the dancer in Girish K. He revealed in an interview that he had taken on special dance training to prepare for this song. You can see the performance for yourself. It is no less than an accomplished and well trained dancer, presenting these steps in unison with the music.

This one song, in my humble opinion, is the best artistic performance that I have seen from Girish K. See the manner in which he starts his dialogue with the Lord. His singing, his facial expressions, his gestures and movements, all coalesce into a fluid expression of a conversation with Lord Shiv. No one else is present so this is a very private conversation, in which Shastri ji is telling the Lord to listen to His own sound coming from inside him. This entire clip is a one wonderful performance by Girish K that probably has not been surpassed.

It is a sad goodbye that we bid today. The person, the artist, and a scholar – it is truly a great loss to the cultural landscape of this sub continent that may never be made up.

One commentator has written about Girish K’s creations, that “. . . Girish Karnad allowed his characters to ask the questions, to struggle with the inconclusive, and hence his stories truly never ended.” Yes, that is the legacy of this multi-faceted artist – his creations, his stories, his characters – all still have a lot be explored for. That “struggle with the inconclusive” is so appropriate a passage dealing with the complex realities and relationships in the course of a human life. His stories have not really ended. And neither has his legacy.

Girish K – Rest in Peace. . . Enduring Peace

 

Song – Hey Shiv Shankar, Hey Karunakar  (Sur Sangam) (1985) Singer – Rajan-Sajan Misra, Lyrics – Vasant Dev, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

hey..ey..ey shiv shankar
hey..ey..ey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
sun lo tum apna ye swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
yog raag ko hi maana
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
mere tan mann ko paawan kar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

rudra been jhankar tumhaari
rudra been jhankar tumhaari
shudra janon se rahi ansuni
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
apne mukh se sun apna swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar [

nabh chaaya ghan ghor bijuriya damke jhamke
adharon ki muskaan tumhaari cham cham chamke
aaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaa
ghir ghir aaye megh bhayankar garaj garajte
goonja nupur naad tumhaara thirak thirkate
jhuk gaya matha ki tum ne haan kaha jis pal umapati
sheesh ki ganga dharaa par utar aayi chhal-chhalaati
ga ga re ni re ga ma
dha ni re ga re sa
geet ki har lehar par tum jhoom kar naacho nateshwar
aaj is anand varsha mein nahaao tum maheshwar
aaa aaaaaa aaaaaaj is anand varsha mein
nahaa..aavoo tum maheshwar
shiv shankar
maheshwar
shiv shankar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हे॰॰ए॰॰ए शिव शंकर
हे॰॰ए॰॰ए करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
सुन लो तुम अपना ये स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
योग राग को ही माना
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
मेरे तन मन को पावन कर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
शूद्र जनों से रही अनसुनी
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
अपने मुख से सुन अपना स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

घन छाया घनघोर बिजुरिया दमके झमके
अधरों की मुस्कान तुम्हारी चम चम चमके
आsss आssss आssss आsssss आsssss
घिर घिर आए मेघ भयंकर गरज गरजते
गूँजा नूपुर नाद तुम्हारा थिरक थिरकते
झुक गया माथा कि तुमने हाँ कहा जिस पल उमापति
शीश कि गंगा धरा पर उतार आई छल-छलाती
ग ग रे नि रे ग म
ध नि रे ग रे स
गीत की हर लहर पर तुम झूम कर नाचो नटेश्वर
आज इस आनंद वर्षा में नहाओ तुम महेश्वर
आ आ आ॰॰आज इस आनंद वर्षा में
नहा॰॰आवो तुम महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
आsss आssss आssssss

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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3965 Post No. : 15047

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

One of the most iconic songs of Saigal Sb. A song that is a definitive representation of Hindi film music of the 1930s. That incomparable rendition by Saigal Sb under the music direction of RC Boral was recorded live for the film ‘Street Singer’ (1938). Recorded more than eight decades ago, this remains a signature piece for time immemorial. The vision of Saigal Sb, leaving his home, just carrying his harmonium with him, walking with a slow measured pace, and singing this thumri – it is one of the lasting images of Hindi cinema. That version of the thumri from the ‘Street Singer’ can be viewed here – “Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye“.

Anecdotes around that live recording and shooting tell of a microphone hidden in the harmonium, of the slow pace of walking so as to complete the singing and the visual shot keeping within the range of the camera. Playback singing had already been invented (1935) and was in progressive use in the industry. And yet, this song was recorded live. The performance can only be called – unprecedented, incomparable and peerless. Nothing more fascinates the diehard fans of Saigal Sb, than this one song by him. Many singers have sung this, but the Saigal version remains untouched, unsurpassed.

In the film, this song spans an extended sequence of scenes. And small parts of this song are also rendered by Kanan Devi. There is a sequence where Kanan Devi attempts to sing this song in the theatre. Later, Bhola (KLS) departs from their shared home, upset that Manju (Kanan Devi) is enamored by Amar Babu (Jagdish Sethi), and wants to move in with him. But after just one day away from Bhola, Manju returns home searching for him. And finds that he has left. She makes a phone call to Amar Babu, requesting him to bring his car. They start to drive towards the road that leads to Bhola and Manju’s home village. In the meantime, the scene shifts between Manju searching for Bhola, and Bhola walking away with the harmonium. The song is reprised here three or four times, sometimes just the mukhda, sometimes just the antaraa.

Amar Babu is driving the car with dismay in his heart. A windstorm arrives. There is lot of dust in the air, and visibility is not good. Manju alights from the car, and starts following the path on foot – the path that Bhola would have taken returning to his village. Tired and overcome by storm, Bhola falls down by the roadside. Manju sees someone lying on the road and rushes to him. The tryst happens again. Amar Babu watches them from a distance. And then with a wry smile on his face, he returns to his car, to start the lonely journey back to his home. Bhola and Manju start their foot journey back to their village. Once again the song is heard in the voice of Kanan Devi, as the visual shows the two mates, in a silhouette against a darkening sky. The hearts have met, they are returning home, and the lady’s voice is telling – “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

Thirty five years later, in 1973, this classical thumri is now included in the film ‘Aavishkaar’, starring Sharmila Tagore and Rajesh Khanna. This time, the music composition is by Kanu Roy, who transformed it into a duet, with the participating voices of Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh. This time, in the picturization, this is presented as a background song, as the visual action on screen is mostly silent – and yet very expressive.

‘Aavishkaar’ presents a scenario of a brief hiatus in the lives of two people very much in love. In love they are, and they get married, and they start to live together. Maybe, just love is never enough. What love is – it needs to be examined, re examined and re invented often. And then it becomes love, more love and more meaningful. Else, just the drudgery of the consistent proximity, which used to be like heaven to start with, turns into stagnant boredom. Expectations still riding high, the lull now breeds contempt – a contempt that is actually screaming for and seeking a rejuvenated level of understanding and sharing. That is what ‘Aavishkaar’ is about.

The film starts on a day when it is the wedding anniversary of the protagonist couple. Amar (Rajesh Khanna) is aware, but still, broodingly ignores. He works late in office, he goes to see a film with a female co-worker, giving the audience the impression that he is seeking extra marital happiness. On his way back at night, he finally musters enough thought and courage, and buys a bouquet of Rajnigandha flowers. Arriving home, a certain scene transpires before he enters the house, and on an impulse, he places the bouquet in a flower pot next to the door, and enters the house, pretending that he does not remember the anniversary. A long night passes. There are flashbacks, there are arguments, there is even physical violence – highlighting the drift that has occurred in the relationship. Basu Bhattacharya has handled the conflict and the interactions very deftly. In my mind, this is the best handling of the situation of a very loving relationship gone sour. Many other films come to mind – ‘Arth’, ‘Dooriyaan’, ‘Anubhav’, ‘Aandhi’, ‘Grih Pravesh’, ‘Aap Ki Kasam’, the comical ‘Pati, Patni Aur Who’, ‘Abhimaan’ . . . and more. In ‘Aavishkaar’, the director portrays the conflict, the pain, and the reconciliation, at a very psychological level.

So, after a distraught and a tension filled hostile night, mostly sleepless and lot of exchanges and memories, the new day dawns. The rigmarole of the daily routine beckons. Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) gets up early and opens the front door to pick up the milk delivery. And then she sees. . . the bouquet standing in the flower pot. She picks it up. And the voice of Jagjit Singh drifts in from the background. She finds Amar standing behind her. . . and there is an embrace. A lot changed and a lot settled in that night of strife.

The two stanzas play out slowly. The first one as the couple are embracing and then they move back into the home. The second stanza is an external shot, mixing flashback again possibly, as we see the couple on the beach, in a mood of frolic, as the singer croons yet once again to say. . . “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

The two instances that we are so familiar with, of the use of this song in Hindi films, both seem to have happy conclusion. But that was not the original thought when Wajid Ali Shah wrote and composed this thumri, way back in 1856. The British had played a game of deception with the Nawab of Awadh. In a bloodless coup, Wajid Ali Shah was dethroned and sent to Calcutta, and the British annexed Lucknow and the kingdom of Awadh. The Nawab was completely heartbroken, on leaving his beloved city, and his cultural roots. That is the time when this timeless poem was conceived.

Yes, the interpretations works both ways. There is this indication of a newlywed bride, going to her new matrimonial home. There is sadness on leaving the parent’s home, but there is also an eagerness and joyful elation of being with the one, with whom a new bond of love will be explored. And, there is the gloomy and poignant interpretation. Looking at the sad dilemma that was faced by Wajid Ali Shah – he was sentenced to leave behind his beloved city, his happy pastimes, and the people who made up his life that far. The discussions in literature talk about the passing passage of life into afterlife. That too, is a leaving behind of the home that one thinks to be their own, and then embark on a journey to meet the Maker. This jusxtaposition is captured so beautifully and so splendidly in this brief two verse thumri – “Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

In the context of this series, I bring on this song today to highlight another dimension of reuse that we see so often in Hindi films – the reuse of traditional poetry and folk music. This particular thumri is so simply a dear favorite of singers, that gathering the number of different renditions by different artists would be a big exercise in itself. Just to give you an idea, this thumri has been sung by the following singers – the list goes all the way from Bade Ghulam Ali Khan to Alisha Chinoy. The names, in no particular order are – Ustad Faiyaz Khan, Gauhar Jaan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Siddheswari Devi, Begum Akhtar, Rasoolan Bai, Naina Devi, Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Mushtaq Hussain Khan, Malka Jaan, KL Saigal, Jagmohan Sursagar, Kannan Devi, Ustad Khadim Husain Khan, Girija Devi, Shobha Gurtu, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Pandit Jitendra Abhisheki, Kishori Amonkar, Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, Jagjit Singh (solo), Rajan-Sajan Mishra, Alisha Chinoy, Mahendra Chopra. . . and I am sure, many more artists of repute.

If I talk about Hindi films, then besides the two instances already covered in the write up above, this thumri appears in two more films. In 1954, Manna Dey has sung this for the film ‘Mahatama Kabir’ – a really wonderful rendition. Then later in 1964, Lata Mangeshkar has sung this for the Bhojpuri film ‘Naihar Chhutal Jaaye’.
[Ed Note: Dear Arun ji adds two more instances of this song being used in Hindi films, both from early 1930s. This song has been rendered by Durga Khote in the 1931 film ‘Trapped’ aka ‘Farebi Jaal’. Then again in 1934, this thumri appears in the list of songs for the film ‘Naachwaali’ – no information available regarding singer or music director.]

Such reuse that involves traditional poetry and folk songs, is really very simple, because this material is beyond the intellectual property disputes. For that matter, we have seen many such other creations being used in films across the decades. On the devotional side, the poems of Meerabai, Kabir Das, and Soordas are very popular and are used quite freely by the producers. Then we have the adabi poets, once again a traditional treasure that does not have any copyright issues attached. Ghazals of Ghalib are quite popular and have been used in many films across the decades. As I scanned the songs in HFGK I find that the ghazal “Dil e Nadaan Tujhe Hua Kya Hai” appears in 9 films from 1931 to 1980. The ghazal “Nuktacheen Hai Gham e Dil” appears in four films, “Ye Na Thee Hamaari Qismat” appears three times, “Phir Mujhe Deeda e Tar Yaad Aaya” also appears in three films, and so on.

Checking for Meerabai’s bhajans, one finds the popular ones like “Mere To Girdhar Gopal”, “Main To Gidhar Ke Ghar Jaaun”, “Tum Jo Todo Piya” etc., being used in many films. Not a precise search, but my estimate is that Meerabai’s bhajans appear in Hindi films more than 100 times. The search cannot be precise because there are many instances where the traditional bhajans or ghazals have been used without giving credit to the original poet. Additional note – Amir Khusro’s poetry appears in Hindi films no less than 10 times, of which at least 4 are occurrences of “Kaahe Ko Byaahi Bides. . .”.

The more difficult proposition would be to trace the folk songs reuse across Hindi films. With so much variations, and without acknowledgement to the original folk source, it is difficult to make an estimate of folk music reuse in films. But I will surely add that this segment would be more voluminous than the bhajans and ghazals. The song, or variations thereof, of “Jhumka Gira Re. . .” has been used in no less than four films.

Coming to the film ‘Aavishkaar’. The film is produced under the banner of Aarohi Film Makers and is directed by Basu Bhattacharya. The songs of this film are written by Gyandev Agnihotri and Kapil Kumar. And yes, this traditional thumri originally created by Wajid Ali Shah. The cast of actors is listed as Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Deena Gandhi, Denis Klement, Satyendra Kappu, Monika Jasnani, Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, Mahesh Sharma, and Minna Johar etc.

Interesting side note – this film is the 2nd in the now famous trilogy by Basu Bhattacharya, on the topic of marital discord, the first one being ‘Anubahv’ (1971) and the 3rd being ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1977).

More interesting side notes. As we talk about reuse, I must mention the other interesting reuse in this film. Probably this is the only film where we can hear Sharmila Tagore singing. At one place in the film, the iconic Manna Dey song “Hansne Ki Chaah Ne. . .” is being sung by Sharmila. Then, at another place in the film, the song from ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) – “Duniya Banaane Waale, Kya Tere Mann Mein Samaai” is playing on the radio, and we can also hear Sharmila singing along with it.

So much for today. In the next episode, we shall explore another very interesting aspect of re-use of songs.

Song – Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye  (Aavishkaar) (1973) Singers – Jagjit Singh, Chitra Singh, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Kanu Roy
Jagjit Singh + Chitra Singh

Lyrics

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

baabul mora. . .
baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

chaar kahaar mil mori
doliyaan sajaaye re
mora apna begaana
chhuto jaaye. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

[dialogue – Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila]

angnaa to parbat bhaya
deori bhai bides
le babul ghar aapno
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

चार कहार मिल मोरी
डोलियाँ सजाये रे
मोरा अपना बेगाना
छूटो जाये॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

[संवाद – राजेश खन्ना, शर्मिला टागोर]

अंगना तो परबत भया॰ ॰ ॰
डेयोड़ी भई बिदेस
ले बाबुल घर आपनो
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

 


This article is written by Nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3963 Post No. : 15041

It is human nature that on every important occasion and event in life, we recall all the people who had ever crossed our lives and made a difference to it. I had a similar experience during the last year. I felt like I wanted to get in touch with people from way back as far as my childhood. I met people who were our neighbours when my daughter was born. I wanted to invite all those who knew her when she was very little and had showered prayers on her when she was not even aware of those blessings. Sometimes we lose touch with people as they move away or we move away. People who were neighbours and our kids used to play together. All of them had touched our lives, affected us in a good or bad way. Mostly in the essential goodness of human nature it was well intentioned.

For us working women, there is this space in the heart for those who looked after our children when we are away at work. Some such people, neighbour and acquaintances, I was able to contact and invite for the wedding. One of such who were neighbour of my parents and distantly related to my father, attended my daughter’s wedding with her extended family. Sometimes the bonds of shared memories and events in life transcend all constraints of time and distance. When that aunty came on stage to meet the bride and groom, that moment the day of my daughter’s birth flashed in my eyes.

Early in the morning that day the aunty was there to see us off when I was leaving for the hospital. Later on my daughter was born in caesarean section. That evening she came to see us in the hospital. I remembered talking to her about my daughter and the scary experience when the doctor told us that she cannot find the baby’s heartbeat which resulted in caesarean section. I started crying and she also started crying and comforting me. I also remember telling her that all I want from the Almighty now is that “mere bachche ka naseeb achha ho”.

A few weeks after the delivery I had high fever and suffered an epileptic fit. My daughter was a few weeks old, and my mother who had not seen anything like this thought I was dead. She says she kept looking at me and my daughter and wailing. Thankfully, I survived the fit with the timely help of doctors in the neighbourhood and basic first aid given by neighbours. Even during this time this aunty and her family was there on hand to lend a helping hand any which way.

Actually, the above memories had a trigger. I had a five day training schedule in the second week of April. During the training we were made to listen to all the same routine work procedure, rules and regulations, which we have been finding, using and following since day one 🙂 . Actually these procedures are all basically based on common sense and logic, I feel. Difficulty comes when something out of the ordinary crops up then we have the facility of looking up in the proper book and finding the instructions to deal with the situation in the appropriate manner.

During the training one day, a fellow participant suffered an epileptic fit, while the session was going on. A friend of her said that it happens to her from time to time. With the first aid, which thankfully some ladies knew, she was all right after a while. But all this reminded me to my experience of which I personally have no recollection. I know only what I was told afterwards. Seeing it happening to another person is actually more scaring.

The training got over on Friday just in time to enable me and my husband to leave for the trip to Rajasthan as planned on the Saturday. Since this was a first time for us, we had a lot to cover, see and enjoy in one week. It was not enough certainly with so many placed to see. We managed to see quite enough to want do the touristy thing again sometime and see the rest of the places. With so many historical places, forts, palaces and museums etc. it really is the tourists delight as Avinash ji has said in his post – “Mhaare Rajasthan Maa. . .“. I was really delighted to see the various red stone carved palaces and embellishments and some of those inlay work in ‘Sang-e-marmar’ is also visible in places. I have not seen too many such historical places so far, but I was able to detect some superimposition inside the monuments and outside the museum or palace areas. Sadly that is modernity or commercialisation for you. There is an influx of shops and touristy restaurants too, which might be commercial necessity for all I know.

You see the historical monuments are not humans and have no sense of self preservation. From what I learnt most of those places are private property and the owners are free to utilise them. The most well preserved buildings have been converted to star hotels. Good for them as they become commercially viable and will survive longer. At least the superbly carved Mehrangad Fort is a World Heritage site and deservedly.

In a palace shop in Rajasthan I saw a bottled ‘Mitti Ki Khushboo’ fragrance. ‘Mitti ki khusbhboo’ bottled and patented:) . I heard a guide saying that ‘when the first rain drops fall on the earth, this is that mehek”. Indeed…. we should get ‘Shameem’ also in the bottle one day I hope. After all hopes and aspirations are totally free of cost.

Since the day this trip was planned and looked like it will finally happen, I have been remembering the song – “Nainon Mein Badra Chhaaye“.

Without actually going to Udaipur it is possible to visualise it through these songs. I came back from the place humming this song. The panorama surrounding the lake still looks exactly the same as is seen in the song. That is something at least. Since than I have found another song from ‘Mera Saaya’ (1966) – “Nainon Waali Ne Haaye Mera Dil Loota” featuring the scenes of Lake Pichchola of Udaipur. This is no exaggeration, the lakes and surrounding Aravali range is real beautiful site.

I found a song which is like revisiting the places /forts and music and sounds of Rajasthan in the film ‘Ham Dil De Chuke Sanam’ (1999). The majestic Mehrangadh fort is visible in some frames in the song. This amalgamation of folk and classical music is composed by Ismail Darbar and lyricists is Mehboob. The singers are Ustad Sultan Khan, Shankar Mahadevan and Kavita Krishnamoorthy. Quite a ‘bhaari bharkam’ trio what with the heavy voices and names :). In the video of the extended song many members of the cast are seen, notably the late Zohra Sehgal. Vikram Gokhle, Salman Khan and Aishwarya are singing it on screen.

Last word: What I brought back from Rajasthan is the sights and sounds of the locals talent and motivated enough in preserving the originality of the folk music and songs. I want to write more about Rajasthan, but this post is quite long now, so will keep the rest of my thoughts for some other post.


Song – Albelaa Sajan Aayo Ree (Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam) (1999) Singers – Ustad Sultan Khan, Kavita Krishnamurthy, Shankar Mahadevan , Lyrics – Mehboob Kotwal, Music Director – Ismail Darbar
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Kavita Krishnamurthy
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Shankar Mahadevan
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Kavita Krishnamurthy + Shankar Mahadevan
Chorus

Lyrics

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
mora hathwar sookh paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa aa
albelaa aa
albelaa aa aaaaa
albelaa aa aaaaa
albelaa aa
albelaa aa
dhi ga ma pa pa
pa pa na dha nee dha
dhi ga ma pa pa
pa pa na dha nee dha
ma ga re sa nee ra sa
ga ma pa re sa
ma ga re sa nee ra sa
ga ma pa re sa
albelaa sajan aayo ri

albelaa sajan aayo ri
dheera nanna nanna
dheera aanna
dheera nanna nanna
dheera aanna

chokh puraao mangal gaavo
tana na tana na
nanna na nanna
chokh puraao mangal gaavo
man rang nitta paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa

chokh puraao mangal gaavo
chokh puraao mangal gaavo
man rang nitta paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

tana na nana na
tana na naana na aa aao
aaaa aaaaaao
dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna nanna
nanna aaoo
na na na na na naaooo
aa aa aa aa aa aaaaaoo

tana na nana na
tana na nana na
tana na nana na
tana na nana na

albelaa sajan aaayeeoooo
ri. . .

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
mora hathwar sookh paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna
dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

aa aa aa aa aa aaaa

ta ta ta ni re ra tara te
ta ta ta ta ta

sa sa sa sa
sa ri ga sa sa sa
sa ri ga pa dha ni sa 

re ga ta ta sa ga re ga
re ga sa ga re ga
ta ta sa ri ga sa sa sa
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
aa aa aa aa aa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa sajan
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

——————————————-
Devnagri script Lyrics (Provided by Nahm)
——————————————-
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
मोरा हथ्वर सूख पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ……..
अलबेला आ आ……..
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ
धी ग म प प
प प न ध नि ध
धी ग म प प
प प न ध नि ध

म ग र स नि र स
ग म प र स
म ग र स नि र स
ग म प र स

अलबेला सजन आयो री

अलबेला सजन आयो री
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
ताना न ताना ननना
ननना ना ननना

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
मन रंग नित्ता पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
मन रंग नित्ता पायो री

अलबेला सजन आयो री

ताना न ननना
ननना ना ननना न आ आओ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना ननना ना

ननना न आ आओ
ना ना ना ना ना न आ आओ
आ आ आ आ आओ

ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना

अलबेला सजन आयीऊ
री. . .

अल बेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
मोरा हथ्वर सूख पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना

अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

त त त त त नि रे रा तारा ते
त त त त त

स स स स
स री ग 
स स

स र ग प ध नि सा

र ग त त स ग र ग
र ग स ग र ग
त त स र ग स स

अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला सजन 
अलबेला

अलबेला
अलबेला
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ


This article is written jointly by Atul and Sudhir. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This is the 15000th song post in the blog.

Blog Day :

3929 Post No. : 15000

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 10
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Writeup by Atul
————————–

This writeup marks a very special occasion for the blog. It is the 15000th writeup for the blog !

5000th and 10000th posts in the blog were major landmarks for us. The preparations, celebrations and enthusiasm for those posts were quite grand and memorable.

For instance, preparation for the 5000th post had begun in right earnest some more than 150 posts prior to the big event. The song was identified well in advance. That was a legendary song, created by rather unknown artists. So that post was meant to honour lesser known HFM artists.

When the song was identified, I thought that the lesser known music director of the song should also get appreciation. So it was planned to make this 5000th post of the blog to coincide with 100th post of the music director. That was not easy because the music director only had 20 odd of his songs in the blog at that time. So lots and lots of his compositions were covered in the blog during the run up to the 5000th post in the blog.

And that 5000th writeup was a joint collaboration of three of us viz. Raja, followed by me and then Sudhir ji. It was such a long article that a few of our regulars gave up reading the article midway. 🙂 It was over 8000 words long article (including lyrics) !

The date was 13 november 2011. It was a sunday and the post was published at 12:29 PM. It was the sixth and final song posted on that day in the blog.

I was based at Nagpur, Maharashtra, at that time. Amazingly, the journey from post number 4001 to post number 5000 took only five months and one day (153 days) at a strike rate of 6.5 songs every day !

The 10000th post in the blog should have appeared earlier that it finally did. Going by the then strike rate of one century every 16 days (give or take a few days), the 10000th post should have come up by April or may 2014. But I found myself getting busy in other matters. My guess is that my family (wife , daughter, three pets) had joined me- (I was at Bilaspur then), and so I was finding it difficult to post at the usual rate. There were several dot days after post number 9990. There were as many as six dot days. Even on the days when I posted articles, I only managed to post one or two articles in a day. So finally, I decided (and some other regulars also arrived at the same view), that the 10000th post needed to be coincided by the blog birthday which fell on 19 july 2014 .

The idea of how to celebrate the event was thought about when I and Sudhir Ji had visited AK ji (of songsofyore)in his office in Delhi. While discussing lots and lots of HFM related matters, we discussed the forthcoming 10000th post in the blog. AK ji suggested that every regular needed to write an article and a brief introduction of that regular needed to be given. We expanded the idea and decided that the introduction of the regular would be a full fledged and separate article and would precede the guest article.

The run up to the big event began on 7 july 2014. It was planned that all regular contributors would be introduced by another regular familiar with the person being introduced. That article would be followed by an article penned by the person who was introduced in the earlier article. So, we had nearly 30 regulars “formally” introduced by other regulars.

The idea was a great hit and it was well received and appreciated. Regulars introducing other regulars- it was made possible because many of us had already forged friendships with each other not only through online interactions but also through personal visits. We all got to know lots and lots of interesting details about the regulars of the blog. For instance, we came to know that our seniormost (in age) contributor was 80 plus, whereas the youngest contributor (regarded as an expert in vintage songs of 1930s and 1940s) was only 15 at the time when he first contributed his articles in the blog !

Some very interesting details were revealed about our regulars. For instance, we had someone who used to write a columm in a local newspaper when he was a school kid ! That the ladies among the regulars were all amazingly versatile. One was “thhodi padhi likhi” (means she was BSc in maths), while another had a “cosmopolically interesting” background, another with an accidental filmy parentage was a voracious reader of books, among several passions. We had someone who aspired to be a lyricist in Film industry, but finally realised that studying well and doing his own business was a better idea. 🙂 I found that the world was a small place. AKji turned out to be my senior from the same alma mater !

It also turned out that we had struck friendships with some HFM related individuals as well- for instance Ms Manju Das, Daughter of K Amarnath.

The 10000th song finally got posted one day late than was planned. It was posted on 20 july 2014 in the evening. It was a sunday. It was the eighth post of the day. Every time a post would appear, eager regulars would comment something like- “post number 9995th done, five more to go”. During those pre whatsapp days, lots of e mail messages were doing the rounds among regulars wondering when the 10000th post would appear and what song would be discussed as the 10000th song. THat song of course rewrote history. It was believed till then that the oldest HF song was from 1932. The 10000th song that was covered in the blog was a song of 1931, the very first year for Hindi movies.

The first 5000 songs in the blog took 1213 days viz three years and four months at a rate of 4.4 songs per day. Next 5000 songs took only 980 days viz two years and eight months at a rate of 5.1 songs per day. This third set of 5000 songs has taken 1735 day , about four years and nine months! A rather sedate rate of 2.9 songs per day !

Lots of things have changed between 2014 and 2019. Whatsapp was a new concept at that time and only very few savvy ones among us knew what it was. Now even the less mobile savvy among us too have smart phones and now we have a whatsapp group. People who were clueless about smartphones in 2014 are now the most active participants.

Five years have passed. One of the youngest regulars has since acquired a job as well as a spouse. Son of another regular, had once hijacked his mother’s computer when she was not looking and posted comments like-this song is not good, it is boring. 🙂 . Imagine the kid making such comments about a Rafi song, when his mom is a diehard Rafi fan. 🙂 He has grown up and he is now a medical college student.

Today, I am based in another -Pur. This post appears while I am based at Gorakhpur, UP. Like the 5000th post and 10000th post, this 15000th post too is being posted on a sunday !

There are other similarities (or near similarities) as well. When I had gone to Delhi and met Sudhir Ji and AK ji there in may 2014 and discussed plans of 10000sup celebrations, Indian Parliamentary elections were going on. Five years later, we are in the midst of Parliament elections once again.:)

There are differences as well. Six songs were covered in a day while discussing 5000th song. Eight songs were covered in a day while covering 10000th song. Today, when 15000th song is being covered, it is the only the second song of the day. So the blog is living upto its name- song a day, while earlier it used to be songs a day. 🙂

Some times, I am asked about statistics related to the blog. For instance, Sudhir Ji, while preparing a “blog ten year challenge” post noticed that as many as 12 songs were covered in one day viz. on 10 march 2009. Sudhir Ji asked me whether it was the record for the highest number of songs in a day. I did not have a readymade reply to that. Today I have. I can put it on record that the record for the blog is 13 songs in a day. This feat was achieved twice- on 25 october 2011 and on 6 september 2012. Today, when we struggle to post one or two songs in a day, I wonder how I was able to achieve such a feat ! It is not that those two days were isolated cases. Posting big number of songs in a day used to be fairly common those days. For instance, the blog had seen 12 songs in a day on six occasions, once in 2009 and 2012, and four times in 2011. Eleven posts in one day was achieved once (16 august 2012) whereas there have been 18 occasions when ten songs were posted in one day. Nine songs in a day were acjieved on 42 occasions. Eight songs in a day were covered on 133 occasions, the last such occasions being in 2016.

Now a days, we are going at such slow pace that even six songs a day, which was a routine affair in the past has become uncommon. In the year 2019, there has been only one day when six songs were covered. In contrast 2009 saw as many as 166 days when 6 songs were covered in one day.

Another statistics that I was asked recently was regarding the number of visitors in a day. It has been mentioned in an earlier article that the blog clocked 1000 plus visitors in a day for the first time on 23 january 2009. Here are these first time details

Number of visitors per day First time date in the blog (visitors that day)
1000 23 january 2009 (1145)
2000 29 august 2009 (2071)
3000 15 july 2011 (3060)
4000 15 august 2011 (4184)
5000 7 october 2011 (5379)
6000 9 october 2011 (6082)
7000 10 october 2011 (7561)
9000 12 october 2011 (9824)
10000 19 october 2011 (10630)

As one can see from above, october 2011 was a breakthrough month for the blog. From an average visit of 3000 plus visitors till then, we suddenly found the average shooting up to stratosphere. One can notice that after 7000 plus visits, we directly jumped to 9000 plus visits in a day, bypassing 8000 plus visits mark. ! As many as 10630 visitors visited on 19 october 2011, which remains a record till this date. More than 8000 visitors per day arrived at the blog on 13 days of october 2011 !

So one can notice that the blog was at its peak, number of daily posts wise as well as number of daily visitors wise during second half of 2011, and it continued till end of 2012.

By now, we have settled back to a more relaxed 3500 visits per day routine.

Now, in 2019, I really wonder how I used to be able to post so many songs in one day. I cannot say that I had too much of time at my disposal then and that I am too busy now a days. That is hardly the case. In fact it should be the other way round. Those days, I would often find myself having to go on meetings or other official works quite frequently. I can only conclude that I was highly passionate and motivated during those days. Of course I was younger and more energetic those days. 🙂

In an earlier writeup, Mr Sadanand Kamath has arrived at the right conclusion that background work has increased a great deal, now that we have amassed such a goldmine of information about HFM. I actually find myself devoting more time in such background work than in writing articles. And these data, when properly analysed often reveal hitherto unknown and unnoticed bits of information that actually may have been missed by music lovers.

To cite an example of background work, our beloved Khyati Bhatt once analysed all movies of 1960s and their songs and prepared an excel sheet. That served as a homework for Sudhir Jee. He used this excel sheet to post songs from more than one hundred movies of 1960s that were not represented in the blog till then. Then our two senior contributors, Mr Arunkumar Deshmukh and Mr Sadanand Kamath have been doing the same for movies from 1930s and 1940s. Personally even I have introduced several movies from 1940s and 1950s into the blog.

As a result of these exercises, which need considerable research and background work, we are at a stage when over 4200 movies (4206 at last count) were represented in the blog. Less than 75 movies of 1960s and just over 100 movies of 1950s remain to be covered in the blog. Just over 200 movies of 1940s remain to be covered. Most of these remaining movies are rare movies and their songs are not easy to locate. So naturally this exercise takes considerable time and effort.

Another much cherished exercise, viz YIPPEE exercise has slowed down, but still we have managed to YIPPEE as many as 1167 movies (adding upto around 8000 songs) which is no mean feat.

Bit by bit, we are building up complete and accurate filmography of several artists. I often like to use these filmographies whenever these artists reach their important milestones (typically centuries of their songs in the blog).

It must be said that the blog has become an integral part of not only my life, but also for several regulars. We all have grown as a result. Speaking for myself, I know that I have grown and learnt a lot, not just about HFM, but about life in general. It has helped me become a more “mature” person. 🙂

The contents of some of these posts over the years gave me considerable satisfaction. Some of the articles that I am proud of deal with myriad subjects like transfers, road travel, pets, fellow human beings, economics, theory of music etc.

For instance, writing about a pet, that turned out to be a wolf, is an article that gave me great satisfaction. The comments on this article were equally heart warming and this appreciation meant a lot to me.

I have some other fields of interest that I may not have touched till now. 🙂

Unlike the songs to be posted as 5000th and 10000th song, I am in the dark about the 15000th song. 🙂 . Sudhir Jee has taken it upon himself to upload a rare (not yet available online) rare song for this occasion. So the song link as well as lyrics of the song, plus introduction of the song will be by him. He had wanted it to be a writeup by me, but seeing that it is he who is uploading this special song and is providing necessary details on the song and the artist, it is only fair that this writeup should be considered a joint write up, just like what was the case during 5000th and 10000th writeups.

Writeup by Sudhir
————————–

As usual, the wait is intensely anticipatory, and the delay appears to be customary. Of course, as last time, the final moment has been hanging on account of yours truly – 🙂 . And the reason is that we have had a difficult time getting to zero in on the song we would like to place at this important milestone today.

Completing 15 centuries (and that too, without a plan) is superlative indeed. Atul ji and I have been in communication to finalize which song to present at this juncture. We checked many different options and criteria, but somehow all of them seemed to be weighing lesser in comparison to the importance of this milestone. The historic discovery that was showcased at the 10K milestone, actually set a benchmark, which is near impossible to match, even though we now have access to a lot more material at hand. But no, this song at 15K surely does not match the spectacular-ity of its 10K counterpart.

We had tried many things again this time. We tried to search for historically important unpublished songs. We tried to trace the significant wanted songs of key artists. We tried our hand at getting multiple combinations together. We had shortlisted some films and songs, which are unheard of. As in, there is no mention of these films in GK or in other similar compilations, but these films, unreleased of course, were actually under production and their songs were recorded. Some of these songs have survived and are available with collectors, albeit not in public domain as yet. That would make them rare, very rare quality. But then we also argued that just because an unreleased film is unknown in public domain, how does that add to its historical significance. So this option was also pulled down in priority. I have access to some of these songs and will bring them out shortly.

For a longest time, both Atul ji and I were in a mood of despair, as we were not able to decide on the song for this occasion. The email exchange then turned towards artists, and the idea of showcasing the creation of a significant historical figure in the Hindi film music arena started to gain strength. The idea developed was to bring into limelight, an important artist whose contributions to Hindi film music has so far gone unsung. As we thought more about it, the idea seemed to get better. We would highlight an artist whom the people have heard about, but probably not much ‘information about’ is not in circulation.

We exchanged notes about some such names, and then we agreed to bring on board, the doyen of Hindi film music directors – Ustad Jhande Khan, as the artist to highlight at this important junction.

Ustad Jhande Khan – the artist whom the other famous luminaries of Hindi film music like Naushad, Ghulam Mohammed, Anil Biswas, Begum Akhtar, Hemant Kumar, Shyam Sunder, Master Nisar – have acknowledged to be their teacher and guru. This teacher of other reputed music directors and singers is himself now a forgotten name. Very little, if any, biographical information is available with any source. As I tried to search for information, I could finally locate only two bio sketches – a filmographic detail available in ‘Dhunon Ki Yatra’ by Pankaj Raag, and a brief biography compiled by our friend Javed Hamid, as a chapter in his book on Hindi film music directors – ‘Hindi Filmon Ke Sadabahaar Sangeetkar’. As per Javed Bhai, he was able to procure an article in Urdu on this artist, from a friend in Pakistan. The article appeared in a certain film magazine there, many decades ago.

Not much is known about Ustad Sb’s family background and his early years. He was born in Gujranwala (now in Pakistan). The circumstances by which he came to Bombay are not known. But it is known that he came to Bombay at a young age. He was already exposed to classical music and was adept at playing many instruments like saarangi and harmonium. In Bombay, he learnt more and polished his skills at the feet of masters like Ustad Chhajju Khan, Naazir Khan and Khadim Hussain Khan Sahib.

His first foray into creating music was theatre. He was associated with Agha Hashr Kashmiri for a long time. In days prior to talkie films, theatre was a popular and a powerful medium. The major theatre establishments would employ full time music directors and musicians for creating and performing music for stage dramas. That music has been such an important ingredient of the life and culture of this subcontinent, can be gauged from this fact that the popular theatre movements across the nation mostly depended on musicals and song enriched dramas. Ustad Sb was associated with Jubilee Theatre, Alfred Theatre and Parsi Alfred Theatre. It was a time when the dialogues and songs of stage dramas were released on gramophone records. Quite a few such record sets are still available with collectors. Special mention to be made of the stage drama ‘Mahabharat’. The dialogue and song record set of this drama became very popular. The music was composed by Ustad Sb. Then, in the famous stage play ‘Dilfarosh’, a song composed by Ustad Sb – “Dil e Nadaan Ko Hum Samjhaaye Jaayenge” became very popular with the theatre going public. And here, we are not yet in the era of talkie films.

With the advent of talkies, Ustad Sb made a natural transition to films and film music. He joined Ranjeet Studios, and became their premier music director. The 1931 film ‘Devi Devyani’ was the first film for which Ustad Sb composed 17 songs. In 1932, Ranjeet produced a very successful comedy film ‘Chaar Chakram’, starring E Billimoria, Ishwar Lal, Keki Adajania, Miss Shanta, Miss Kamla and the comedy team of Ghori and Dixit. Ustad Sb composed 7 songs for this film, which all became very popular.

Ustad Sb composed music for about fourteen films for Ranjeet Studios between 1931 and 1936. In 1935, he also started working independently for other production houses like Ajanta Cinetone, Daryani Productions, Amrit Films etc. His complete body of work would be less than 25 films. Sadly, majority of his creations are lost or are untraceable at present.

His most famous and popular film is considered to be Kedar Sharma’s ‘Chitralekha’ from 1941. Based on the novel by Bhagwati Charan Verma, the film has 10 songs. The song “Tum Jaao Bade Bhagwan Baney, Insan Bano To Jaanen” became very popular in its time. When Kedar Sharma recreated this film in 1964, this song served as the inspiration for the popular Lata song “Sansaar Se Bhaage Phirte Ho Bhagwaan Ko Tum Kyaa Paaoge”. A very interesting small anecdote about the music of this 1941 film. after completing the composition of all the songs, one day in the morning, Ustad Sb went to see his friend ZA Bukhari, who was a director at All India Radio, Bombay at that time. Excited and nervous like a small child, he conveyed to his friend – that a peculiar thing has inadvertently happened, and that he has not done it on purpose, and did not realize that it was so. His friend inquired as to what has happened. Ustad Sb sheepishly confessed that all the songs of the film have gotten composed in a single Raag; and requested ZA Bukhari to accompany him to the studio. Together they came to the studio and Ustad Sb played the different songs for his friend. It was a wonder that all the songs had become amenable to composition in Raag Bhairavi.

Ustad Sb continued to work into the mid 1940s. In 1943 came the film ‘Shahenshah Akbar’ for which he had composed 14 songs. In the same period he also composed 12 songs for a film titled ‘Jeevan Ka Saaz’. Unfortunately this latter film remained incomplete.

When the partition of India occurred in 1947, Ustad Sb made a choice to migrate to Pakistan, against the advise of his colleagues and friends in the industry. He went back and settled down in his home town – Gujranwala. He would travel often to Lahore to meet the industry people and friends. He also tried to get associated with the radio service in Pakistan, but that did not work out too well. Not a very long time after his migration, he passed away in Gujranwala, on 7th January, 1952.

Ustad Sb was a very reserved personality, so much so that he avoided even being photographed in company of his friends and co-workers. No images of this person have survived, except one photograph that I am able to acquire with the help from my friend, Javed Hamid. This is the photo that I have used in creating the online video file for this song.

Now, coming to this song. This song has two very peculiar and interesting characteristics. Based so far on the information that I have, this song is written by, and composed by and sung by Ustad Jhande Khan himself. Geet Kosh does not have the singer information. I got the name of the singer from another dear friend, Shri KL Pandey, who has done the monumental work of analyzing the classical raag basis of Hindi film songs. However, there is a little doubt, and another name has also been suggested by my other friend who provided me with the mp3 file of this song. I am awaiting confirmation from two other sources. Meanwhile, in this post I am using the singer name as suggested by KL Pandey ji. If there is a different update confirmed, I will inform the readers and make amends to this post.

Update 22Apr2019: Yes, we do have amendments as far as singer name is concerned. I have inputs from three different collectors. All have informed that the name of the singer is Krishna Rao Chonkar. Now this singer is supposed to have sung other songs in this film also. I specifically asked, and was informed that the name of the singer is not no the gramophone record. So the information is from a different source. That three people concur on this can also mean that all of them are possibly referring to the same source.

The second very interesting thing about this song is also informed by Shri KL Pandey. Of the 17,000+ Hindi film songs that he has analyzed, he has discovered only two songs which are based on Raag Deepak. Raag Deepak is a classical composition that is considered very difficult to render. The interesting thing that Pandey ji has shared is that the so called ‘deepak‘ songs in the the films ‘Tansen’ (1943) – “Diya Jalaao Jagmag Jagmag“, and ‘Sangeet Samrat Tansen’ (1962) – “Deepak Jalaao Jyoti Jagaao“, both these songs are NOT based on Raag Deepak, but are based on Raag Bhoopali.

Update 22Apr2019: The second Hindi film song based on Deepak Raag is “Deepak Kathan Karat. . .” from the film ‘Gaj Gaamini’ from 2000. The song is written by Maya Govind,  music composition is Bhupen Hazaarika, and the singer is Shankar Mahadevan.

So this song being presented today is one of the only two songs so far discovered, which are based on pure Raag Deepak. Listening to this song I am sure you will be able to appreciate the level of difficulty in the rendering of this creation.

And well, yes, Congratulations are due to all, for making to this momentous milestone. I will be following up with another post sharing more about that.

Happy listening and happy journey to all readers and friends on this blog. 🙂

[Ed Note: There a some words that have not been correctly deciphered in the singing. I request other readers and friends to suggest updates to the lyrics. And yes, also to the extended sargam, where I may have made an error in recording it correctly.]

 

Song – Deepak Jo Gaaye So Paaye Gyaan Dhyaan (Shahenshah Akbar) (1943) Singer – Ustad Jhande Khan Krishna Rao Chonkar, Lyrics – Ustad Jhande Khan, MD – Ustad Jhande Khan

Lyrics

deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

sa ga ma pa dha ni sa
sa pa dha pa ga re sa

sa ga pa ma ga ma dha pa
dha pa ma ga ma pa sa
dha pa ma ga ma pa sa
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

jaanat hain re sagre log
deepak hai raag ?? ka
jaanat hain re sagre log
deepak hai raag ?? ka
deepak na gaaye sab duniya naa
ye kaam nahin
hai sab ka
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

anginati ko ginati jaan
ginati
aa ginati maane na bhed bhaav
bhed na jaane
agyaan bhajta
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

jaane ?? anjaane ??
vaani ?? vaa se paaye
bhed aarohan avrohan deepak ka
jaane ?? anjaane ??
vaani ?? vaa se paaye
bhed aarohan avrohan deepak ka
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

sa sa sa ni re sa
sa ga sa ga ma pa dha ma pa dha
ma pa ga ma pa dha
sa dha re ni sa
sa dha dha ga re sa
pa dha pa ga ma pa
ga ma pa sa
dha pa ma ma ga ga sa ma dha pa
dha pa ma ga ga
dha ma pa ga re
sa ga ga ma ga re sa dha pa
dha pa ma ga ga ma ma ga re sa
sa ga ma pa dha
sa ga ga ma ga re sa dha pa
dha pa ma ga ga ma ma ga re sa
sa ga ma pa dha
pa pa pa pa ma ma ga ga
dha ma pa ma ga
dha ma pa pa
sa pa pa
dha ma ma
ma ga ga
ga re sa
sa pa pa
dha ma ma
ma ga ga
ga re sa

sa ga ma pa
deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed suran ka

deepak jo gaaye
so paaye
gyaan dhyaan sab bhed . . .
bhed suran ka paaye
deepak gaaye
deepak jo gaaye
bhed suran ka paaye
deepak gaaye
bhed suran ka paaye
deepak gaaye
deep. . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
———————————————————-

दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

स ग म प ध नि स
स प ध प ग रे स

स ग प न ग म ध प
ध प म ग म प स
ध प म ग म प स
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

जानत हैं रे सगरे लोक
दीपक है राग ?? का
जानत हैं रे सगरे लोक
दीपक है राग ?? का
दीपक न गाये सब दुनिया ना
ये काम नहीं
है सब का
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

अनगिनत को गिनती(??) जान
गिनती(??)
आ गिनती माने ना भेद भाव
भेद ना जाने
अज्ञान भजता
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

जाने ?? अंजाने ??
वाणी ?? वा से पाये
भेद आरोहण अवरोहण दीपक का
जाने ?? अंजाने ??
वाणी ?? वा से पाये
भेद आरोहण अवरोहण दीपक का
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

स स स नि रे स
स ग स ग म प ध म प ध
म प ग म प ध
स ध रे नि स
प ध प ग म प
ग म प स
ध प म म ग ग स म ध प
ध प म ग ग
ध म प ग रे
स ग ग म ग रे स ध प
ध प म ग ग म म ग रे स
स ग म प ध
स ग ग म ग रे स ध प
ध प म ग ग म म ग रे स
स ग म प ध
प प प प म म ग ग
ध म प म ग
ध म प प
स प प
ध म म
म ग ग
ग रे स
स प प
ध म म
म ग ग
ग रे स

स ग म प
दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद सुरन का

दीपक जो गाये
सो पाये
ज्ञान ध्यान सब भेद॰ ॰ ॰
भेद सुरन का पाये
दीपक गाये
भेद सुरन का पाये
दीपक गाये
दीप॰ ॰ ॰


This article is written by Ava Suri, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3925 Post No. : 14992 Movie Count :

4102

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Atul Song-A-Day 15K Song Milestone Celebrations – 4
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

It is that time of the year again. Time to celebrate another landmark of this beloved blog by all the members who contribute to it. Congratulations to the blog, its members and readers for hitting the 15K landmark.

I tend to ‘wake up’ only during the celebrations, though I like to keep afoot of the blog, not as much as I used to. Time was when I was tethered to a chair and computer for eight hours a day when I was working. There were many hours to be whiled away at times and it was easy to read the blog more often. Now that I am retired and a new member of Grandparents Club, I find less time to sit at the laptop. I often read posts on my mobile and find it hard to post comments from there. Nevertheless, it is still my number two most visited blog. Number one is my own blog, sorry, heh heh.

From something that was once Atul ji’s hobby, posting a song a day, this blog has burgeoned into a treasure trove of information. Various contributors keep the blog humming and it now has two fathers, Atul ji has been joined by Sudhir ji. This makes it easier for the blog to keep growing. There are a number of regular contributors, Arunkumar ji Deshmukh is the Bhishm Pitamah of the blog. Nalini ji is passionate about the blog, commenting and writing posts. Sadanandji, Avinash ji, Nahm ji, Mahesh ji, Satyajit ji, Gajendraji, Satishji are some of the other stalwarts. Raja is a personal friend of mine as well as the co-mentor of the blog. Forgive me if I have forgotten the names of other contributors – my memory is shaky post-retirement. 🙂

What do I love most about this blog? Number one reason is the sheer amount of information I gather by being here. Number two is the consistency of high standards in keeping the posts original and error free. Number three is the liveliness of the blog, the constant refreshment of content.

Hindi film music is a vast ocean, no, it is more like the skies that are endless. Luckily for the lovers of this blog, there will always be new songs and new posts to keep us occupied.

Now about this song. When new movies are promoted on television, they are accompanied by one or two big songs from the film. It becomes the signature song for the movie. Hence we get to know the popular songs from each movie and hum it more often. Yet there are often hidden gems within the songs of each movie, less popular but more beautiful. We do not hear them unless we watch the movie and are struck by it or listen to the complete playlist. ‘Haasil’ has a signature song too, “Ankhen Bhi Hoti Hain Dil Ki Zubaan”. But I am struck more by this song – “Ab Ghar Aa Ja”, a classical number which plays in the background during a poignant passage in the film.

‘Haasil’ (2003) was directed by Tigamanshu Dhulia and featured Jimmy Shergill, Irfan Khan and Hrishita Bhatt. College politics and gang war in Allahabad form the backdrop in which Jimmy and Hrishita meet and fall in love. Unfortunately, Jimmy becomes involved in the gang wars between two student leaders and is forced to flee to Mumbai. But soon he realises that he cannot keep hiding and lose his girlfriend in the bargain. He decides to return to Allahabad and face the consequences.

This song plays when the hero is traveling back to Allahabad from Mumbai in a train. The picturisation is very apt, the hero is pensive as he misses his girl, also because he knows he is soon going face danger. His mood is reflected in this slow classical number.

This song will debut the movie ‘Haasil’ on the blog. If I am not mistaken, singer Javed Ali debuts on the blog too. I hope you will like the song as much as I do.

Video

Audio

Song – Ab Ghar Aa Ja, Piya Morey Aa Ja (Haasil) (2003) Singer – Javed Ali, Lyrics – Satyaprakash, MD – Jatin Lalit

Lyrics
(Based on Video Version)

piya morey aa ja

tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
ab ghar aa ja

kaahe aiso nithur
bhayo bataa de
ho
kaahe aiso nithur
bhayo bataa de
ho
tum bin saawan jiyaara jalaave
ab… ghar aa ja

hum se chhal na kariyo
piya morey
hum se chhal na kariyo
piya morey
hamri preet hai
tumhri pooja
hamri preet hai
tumhri pooja
ab… ghar aa ja
ghar aa ja
ghar aa ja
ghar aa..aa ja

(Based on Audio Version)

ab.. ghar aa ja
piya morey aa ja

ab ghar aa ja
piya morey aa ja 
ab ghar aa ja
piya morey aa ja 
tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
ab ghar aa ja
piya more aa ja
tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
ab ghar aa ja…

kaahe aiso nithur
bhayo bataa de
ho
kaahe aiso nithur…
nithur…
kaahe aiso nithur
bhayo bata de
ho
tum bin saawan
jiyara jalaave
ab ghar aa ja
piya morey aa ja
ab ghar aa ja

hum se chhal naa kariyo
piya morey
ham se chhal naa kariyo… piya…
piya…
piya…
piya…
hum se chhal naa kariyo
piya morey
hamaree preet hai
tumhri puja
hamaree preet hai
tumahri puja

ab ghar aa ja
piya morey aa ja
tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
tum bin kaun
mora dukh jaane
ab ghar aaja…
ghar aa ja…
ghar aa..aa ja…

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir Kapur)
———————————————————-

(विडियो पर आधारित)

पिया मोरे आ जा

तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
अब घर आ जा

काहे अइसो निठुर
भयो बता दे
हो
काहे अइसो निठुर
भयो बता दे
हो
तुम बिन सावन
जियरा जलावे
अब॰ ॰ ॰ घर आ जा

हमसे छल ना करियो
पिया मोरे
हमसे छल ना करियो
पिया मोरे
हमरी प्रीत है
तुम्हरी पूजा
हमरी प्रीत है
तुम्हरी पूजा
अब॰ ॰ ॰ घर आ जा
घर आ जा
घर आ जा
घर आ॰॰आ जा

(औडियो पर आधारित)

अब॰ ॰ ॰ घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा

अब घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा
अब घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा
तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
अब घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा
तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
अब घर आ जा॰ ॰ ॰

काहे अइसो निठुर
भयो बता दे
हो
काहे अइसो निठुर॰ ॰ ॰
निठुर॰ ॰ ॰
काहे अइसो निठुर
भयो बता दे
हो
तुम बिन सावन
जियरा जलावे
अब घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा
अब घर आ जा

हमसे छल ना करियो
पिया मोरे
हमसे छल ना
करियो॰ ॰ ॰ पिया॰ ॰ ॰
पिया॰ ॰ ॰
पिया॰ ॰ ॰
पिया॰ ॰ ॰
हमसे छल ना करियो
पिया मोरे
हमरी प्रीत है
तुम्हरी पूजा
हमरी प्रीत है
तुम्हरी पूजा

अब घर आ जा
पिया मोरे आ जा
तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
तुम बिन कौन
मोरा दुख जाने
अब घर आ जा॰ ॰ ॰

घर आ जा॰ ॰ ॰

घर आ॰॰आ जा॰ ॰ ॰


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3881 Post No. : 14905

I wish all our readers a very Happy and cosmic MAHASHIVRATRI, to be celebrated today, i.e. 4th March 2019.

This is the one day in the entire year (barring Shravan Somvars) on which I become more religious and engage in pooja, listening to Shiv Bhajans and also do fasting. Our family was very religious. My father was a Sanskrit Scholar and had spent some time in Banares, giving religious sermons in the Kashi Vishveshar Temple during 1948-49. This was the time when he had gone underground to avoid arrest, as most Hindu Mahasabha leaders were arrested along with Savarkar, after Gandhi ji’s death. He was finally arrested and freed by the court “ba-izzat“. We came down to Hyderabad and he started practicing as a Lawyer as he was BA LLB.

Very soon we moved into our spacious bungalow, adjacent (within our compound) to which he constructed a Mahadev Mandir. It was open to public also. Every Shrawan Somvar and Mahashivaratri, there used to be big celebrations, a pooja by 101 bramhins and playing of Shiv Bhajans throughout the day. All this has been etched deep on my mind and I too became a Shiv Bhakta. Now also I do poojas on these days, but I miss all those days’ enjoyment as a growing teenager.

I have read the Shiv Puraan completely (and also other Puraans). The marriage of Shiv-Parvati has been described very minutely in this Puraan. They are believed to have married on the midnight of Mahashivratri. During the period upto early 70s, I never missed any Hindi/ Marathi/ Telugu/ Kannada Shiva film. I have also seen this film – ‘Shankar Parvati’ (1943).

‘SHANKAR PARVATI’ was quite a successful movie in those days, as it appealed to the religious minded Indians, who have grown up listening to mythological stories. I remember seeing this movie in its second run, as there was an attraction of trick scenes in this movie. The story is about how Sati (Sadhona Bose) the daughter of King Daksha, goes to attend Yagnya by Daksha, uninvited and gets insulted for her husband – Shankar (played by Arun Kumar Ahuja- father of actor Govinda). She jumps into the fire and dies and on hearing this, Shankar is very angry and does the Tandav Nritya. Sati is reborn as Parvati, who, to regain her love back, dances and wins Shankar. Their elder son Kartikeya ,destroys Tarakasur etc.

Sadhana Bose was an internationally acclaimed dancer and acted in some Hindi and several Bengali movies in the 1940s and 1950s.
Her most famous film was ‘RAJNARTAKI’ (1941), opposite Prithviraj Kapoor and it was made in Hindi, English and Bengali at the same time. Though a box office failure, it had fabulous dances by her.

There are few songs sung by Sadhana Bose in ‘Shankar Parvati’ and ‘Paigham’ (1942). According to Timir Baran, these are not sung by her, but by Suprabha Ghosh. However, famous music Historian Kamalakar Pasupuleti says that Sadhana Bose was an accomplished dancer and singer too. In her all time favourite ‘ALIBABA’ in Bengali she, as Marjina, and her director husband Madhu Bose, as Abdulla in the film, sang many duets which are popular even today in Bengal.

Arun Mukherji, Music Director of ‘Parineeta’ (1953), had literally translated one song from ‘Alibaba’ in Hindi “Aye Baandi, Tum Begum Bani….’ sung by Kishore and Asha in ‘Parineeta’ (1953).

The film was directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi. During the early era of talkie films, till the 1960s, there was a horde of Gujarati directors and producers. Bhatts, Trivedi, Thakur, Shahs, Desais, Pancholi, Doshi, Daves were some names frequently found directing various genres. Usually they specialised in certain class and type of films. The Bhatts (Shankar and Vijay) liked to do Mythological films, Ramnik Shah handled stunt, action, fantasy films, Jayant Desai was social film oriented etc.

Chaturbhuj Doshi (1894–1969) was a Hindi and Gujarati writer-director of Indian cinema. He was one of the top Gujarati screenplay writers, who helped script stories for the Punatar productions. He is stated to be one of the leading figures who launched the Gujarati film industry with work on notable films like ‘Gunsundari’ (1948) and ‘Nanand Bhojai’ (1948). He was ‘well known’ for his family socials and had become ‘a celebrity in his own right’. He made a name for himself as a journalist initially and was referred to as the ‘famous journalist’ & publicist by Baburao Patel, editor of Filmindia.

His debut film as a director was ‘Gorakh Aya’ (1938), produced by Ranjit Movietone, though he joined Ranjit in 1929, as a scriptwriter. In 1938, he directed another film for Ranjit, a social comedy, ‘The Secretary’, and both films were box-office successes for Doshi. His forte was socials, regularly adapting stories and novels for films. He worked initially on comedies like ‘Secretary’ and ‘Musafir’ (1940), but then ‘shifted to more significant films’.

Chaturbhuj Anandji Doshi was born in 1894 in Kathiawad, Gujarat, British India. He was educated at the University of Bombay, after graduation he started work as a journalist for a daily, Hindustan (1926), working for editor Indulal Yagnik. His entry into films was working as a scenarist in the silent era for directors like Jayant Desai, Nandlal Jaswantlal & Nanubhai Vakil. He joined Ranjit Movietone in 1929, and wrote stories and screenplay for several of Ranjit films.

Film ‘Gorakh Aya’ (Gorakh has come) in 1938, was the first film directed by Doshi. It was produced by Ranjit Movietone with screenplay by Gunvantrai Acharya & dialogues by PL Santoshi. The music, termed ‘good’ was composed by Gyan Dutt. ‘The Secretary’ (1938), was a “riotous comedy”, starring Madhuri, Trilok Kapoor. Charlie. The music was composed by Gyan Dutt, became a regular in most of the films directed by Doshi. Musafir in 1940 was a comedy costume drama, which had Charlie playing a prince.

‘Bhakta Surdas’, a devotional film directed by Doshi in 1942, is stated to be the “most famous” of the several versions made. It starred KL Saigal and Khursheed “the singing idol(s) of millions”, winning “unprecedented popularity” everywhere.

‘Mehemaan’ (1942) starred Madhuri, Ishwarlal, Shamim and Mubarak. Music director Bulo C. Rani had come to Bombay in 1942, and joined Ranjit Studios assisting Khemchand Prakash in music direction.

Doshi helped enormously in the development of the Gujarati cinema. During 1948-49 he directed three successful Gujarati films which “brought immense success to the industry”. The success of the Gujarati film ‘Kariyavar’ in 1948, directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi from a story by Shaida, called Vanzari Vaav, helped establish the Gujarati film industry along with other films like ‘Vadilo Ne Vanke’ (1948) by Ram Chandra Thakur and ‘Gadono Bel’ (1950) by Ratibhai Punatar. His next Gujarati film was ‘Jesal Toral’ (1948) based on folk-lore, which proved a big box-office success. In 1949, Doshi directed another Gujarati film, ‘Vevishal’, an adaptation of Meghani’s novel of the same name.

He also wrote stories, and one of his stories ‘Pati Bhakti’ was used in the Tamil film ‘En Kanawar’ (1948) produced by Ajit Pictures, which starred the Veena maestro, Sundaram Balachander, who was also the debut director and music composer for the film. In all he directed 24 Hindi films. His last Hindi film was ‘Sanskar’ (1958). He had also written few songs in film ‘Maya Bazaar’ (1932).

Chaturbhuj Doshi died on 21 January 1969 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India. Filmography

1932: Narasinh Mehta (Writer), 1934: Sitamgarh (Writer), 1938: Gorakh Aya, Secretary, 1939: Adhuri Kahani, 1940: Musafir, 1941:Pardesi, Sasural, 1942: Bhakta Surdas, Dhiraj, Mehmaan, 1943: Chhoti Maa, Shankar Parvati (Director, Writer), 1944: Bhartrahari, 1945:Murti, 1946: Phulwari, 1947: Bela, Kaun Hamara, 1948: Jesal Toral, Kariyavar (Director, Writer), Sati Sone, 1949: Bhakta Puran, Vevishal, 1950: Akhand Saubhagya, Kisi Ki Yaad, Ramtaram, 1954: Aurat Teri Yahi Kahani, 1956: Aabroo, Dashera, Dassehra, 1957: Khuda Ka Banda, Shesh Naag, 1958: Sanskar, 1960: Mehndi Rang Lagyo (Writer, Lyricist).

The cast of the film was Sadhona Bose, Arun Ahuja, Mahipal, Rewa Shankar, Narbada Shankar etc. The MD was Gyan Dutt. Today’s song is sung by Rewa Shankar Marwadi. This is only the second song of Rewa Shankar on this blog. About 3 years ago, our Sadanand Kamath ji had given a complete biography of the actress dancer Sadhona Bose, while discussing the song – “Ganga Kinaare Mohe Bagiyaa Lagaa Do Sainyya“, of this film, hence I will not repeat it.

Sadhana Bose was responsible for the names of at least 2 actresses in Bombay. Actress Sadhana Shivdasani’s mother was very much impressed with the dancing skills of Sadhana Bose. She was her fan and saw her films repeatedly. When she was carrying for Sadhana, she had decided that if she gets a girl, her name would be Sadhana only. Thus Bombay Sadhana got the Calcutta Sadhana’s name.
Secondly, actress/dancer Kumkum’s real name was Zebunnisa. When she was selected by director Shahid Lateef, for his film ‘Sheesha’ (1952), first time for debut, there was already an actress Zebunnisa existing. What’s more, this Zebunnisa was also in the same film, so Shahid was thinking for a new name for the newcomer. He remembered that his favourite Sadhana Bose had acted in a film by the name ‘Kumkum-the Dancer’ (1940), so he selected the name Kumkum for this new dancer and Kumkum got her name.
After Sadhna stopped her dance films as a heroine, she resumed her work as a choreographer. In the early 50s, she choreographed in films like ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951), ‘Nandkishore’ (1951), ‘Shinshinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952). She used to do bit roles too in these films to earn money. It is very sad that she died in penury and neglect, but artistes in the 40s and 50s-many of them- had similar stories.

I tried very hard to get some information about today’s singer Rewa Shankar Marwadi, who was an actor, lyricist, singer and also music director  in the 1930s and 1940s. However I could not get anything concrete. Anyway I found a note on this multi talented artist of the early era, written by Shri Dhananjay Naniwadekar aka Nani, on the old RMIM forum, some 15 years ago and adapted by me for this article.

Some of Ranjit Movietone’s earliest talkie films had music by Ustad Jhande Khan. Next came the trio of Banne Khan, Ganga Prasad Pathak and Rewa Shankar Marwari. None of that music was ever released on 78 rpm records. From 1938-39, the great duo of Jnan Dutt and Khemchand Prakash took over the charge of Ranjit’s music, later to be joined by Bulo C Rani. It was only around 1938 that Ranjit started releasing its film music on 78-rpm records.

Rewa Shankar Marwari’s association with Ranjit Films and films produced or directed by ex-Ranjit hand Jayant Desai continued in the
1940s. While it is a pleasant surprise that imdb.com has a page for an obscure name like ‘Rewashankar Marwadi’ at all, it is not surprising
that his filmography has been put together for the site by people who are far from competent at that sort of thing. He acted in 27 films, till 1955, sang 12 songs in 9 films and gave music to 21 films from ‘Veer Babruwahan’ (1934) to ‘Matrubhoomi’ (1949).

Rewa Shankar sang a beautiful classical composition ‘Jai Jai Shankar’ in the film ‘Shankar Parvati’ for composer Jnan Dutt. It is available with only few collectors, and is a rare instance of film music using Raag Shree.

Song – Jai Jai Shankar Gangadhar Shiv Sukhkaari  (Shankar Parvati) (1943) Singer – Rewa Shankar, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari

jai indu bhaal ur vyaal maal hitkari
jai indu bhaal ur vyaal maal hitkari
jai ashutosh har dosh rog tripurari
jai ashutosh har dosh rog tripurari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी

जय इन्दु भाल उर व्याल माल हितकारी
जय इन्दु भाल उर व्याल माल हितकारी
जय आशुतोष हर दोष रोग त्रिपुरारी
जय आशुतोष हर दोष रोग त्रिपुरारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3827 Post No. : 14831 Movie Count :

4055

Missing Films of 1960s – 90
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

What a wonderful gem of a song this one is. The memory banks hold this from the radio listening days. Such a beautiful semi-classical creation, and also very popular in its time – I am amazed it has waited so long in the wings to make its place here on our blog.

The film is ‘Harishchandra Taramati’ from 1970. It is produced under the banner of Kala Mandal, Bombay and is directed by BK Adarsh. Star cast of this film is listed as Pradeep Kumar, Jaimala, Boby, BM Vyas, Jeevan, Shyama, Madan Puri, Tiwari, Bela Bose, Bipin Gupta, Helen, Madhumati, Jaishri Talpade, Tuntun, Sapru, Manorama, and Mehmood (Junior) etc.

The seven songs of this film are all written by Virendra Mishra and the music is created by Hridaynath Mangeshkar. The singing voice in this song is Lata ji, supported by chorus.

As I am checking the films from 1970, I came across this film, but it did not ring any bells at first. The mind is more familiar with the other film of same name from 1963, whose songs are penned by Kavi Pradeep. But then, as I checked the list of songs in this film, the mind sat up with a jerk when I read the title line of this song. All I could think of then was – WOW.

This song is such an exquisite creation, and such a pleasurable experience to listen. The opening verses simply capture the heart,

rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa
naram garam hui saram
jhuke nainwa

For reference purposes, I checked the Raag-o-Pedia compiled by Shri KL Pandey. The listing informs us that this song is composed using three Raags – Bhairavi, Khamaaj and Malkauns.

As I started this post day before yesterday, I did not have access to the video of this song. Keen to know on whom this song is picturized, I started searching for this film. It turned out that although this film is more recent vintage than similar named films from 1952 and 1963, yet this one is more rare in terms of availability. After some messages exchanged with my other collector friends, I was able to secure the video clip of this song from one of them. The clip is not of good quality; it appears that it has been extracted from a VHS tape that has been over used. I have now uploaded this clip. Despite the poor quality, one can make out that this dance song is filmed on Helen, and a group of supporting dancers, and that Pradeep Kumar is the sole audience of this performance.

In the film, Pradeep Kumar plays the lead role of Raja Harishchandra. Sage Vishwamitra, who is jealous of his fame of truthfulness and righteousness, resolves to test the limits of Harishchandra’s good attributes. As the first step, he sends Menaka, the apsara from swarg lok to woo and enchant Harishchandra. Regulars will recall that Menaka is the same apsara whom Indra, the king of swarg lok, had sent to disturb the penance and meditation of Vishwamitra. In that episode, Vishwamitra had lost the battle, and was swayed by Menaka’s enchanting beauty. Now, he sends the very same apsara to sway the sensibility of Harishchandra. In the film, this episode is presented as a dream sequence.

Just listen to this song, as it makes its way through multiple ragas, all coming together for such a perfect listening experience. A wonderful re-discovery.

(Audio)

(Video)

Song – Rimim Jhimimwa, Suno Balamwa  (Harishchandra Taramati) (1970) Singer – Lata Mangeshkar, Lyrics – Virendra Misra, MD – Hridaynath Mangeshkar
Chorus

Lyrics

ho oo oo oo
rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa
naram garam hui saram
jhuke nainwa
naram garam hui saram
naram garam hui saram
jhuke nainwa
tum jo miley
mujhse tum jo miley
arre haan tum jo miley
to main kisi
pyaar bhare gaaon mein pahunch gayi
jhuke nainwa..aa..aa
rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

dhadhkan ka phool khila
ho khila
ho khila
manwa
manwa
manwa ke taal mein
hansti hai jal ki pari
ho pari
ho pari

machhuye ho machhuye ke jaal mein
he he ri haiyya ho ho ri
he he ri haiyya ri
ho ho ri haiyya haiyya ri
aaa aaa aaaaaaaa
ek lehar
uthi jo ek lehar
arre haan ek lehar
tair tair main tumhaari naao mein pahunch gayi
jhuke nainwa..aa..aa
rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

ma dha ni dha
sa ga ma ga ma ga sa ga ni dha

mann mo..ora doley hai
mann mo..ora doley hai
un bole naam se
mann mora mora doley hai
un bole naam se..ey..ey
pehli pehchaan hai
satrangi shaam se..ey..ey..ey..ey
daiyya ri daiyyaa
ma ga ma dha ni sa
dha ni sa
ni sa ni ni dha dha ma ma ga
ga sa
dha ma ga sa
ni dha ma ga sa
ta ni dha ma ga sa
dha ma ni dha ma ga
ga ga ma ga ma dha
ma dha ni sa
dha ni sa
dha ni sa
main kya karoon
kaho ji main kya karoon
arey haan main kya karoon
aayi preet paayaliya paaon mein pahunch gayi
jhuke nainwa..aa..aa
rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

parbat pe gaaon mera
ho mera
ho mera
ghaati
ghaati
ghaati mein chhanv hai
chhaaya mein hai nadi
ho nadi
ho nadi
nadiya mein
nadiya mein naav hai
chhammak chhaiyya chhamam ri
chhammak chhaiyya ri
chhammak chhaiyya chhamam ri
aaaa aaaa aaaaaa
bin chaley hi
dagari bin chaley hi
arre haan bin chaley hi
bin chaley hi
main madhur padaav mein pahunch gayi
jhuke nainwa..aa..aa
rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

rimim jhimimwa
suno balamwa

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

हो ओ ओ
रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा

रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा
नरम गरम हुई सरम
झुके नयनवा
नरम गरम हुई सरम
नरम गरम हुई सरम
झुके नयनवा
तुम जो मिले
मुझसे तुम जो मिले
अरे हाँ तुम जो मिले
तो मैं किसी
प्यार भरे गाँव में पहुँच गई
झुके नयनवा॰॰आ॰॰आ
रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा

धड़कन का फूल खिला
हो खिला
हो खिला
मनवा
मनवा
मनवा के ताल में
हँसती है जल की परी
ओ परी
मछुए हो मछुए के जाल में
हे हे री हइय्या हो हो री
हे हे री हइय्या री
हो हो री हइय्या हइय्या री
आs आs आssss
एक लहर
उठी जो एक लहर
अरे हाँ एक लहर
तैर तैर मैं तुम्हारी नाव में पहुँच गई
झुके नयनवा॰॰आ॰॰आ
रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा

म ध नी ध
स ग म ग म ग स ग नी ध

मन मो॰॰रा डोले है
मन मो॰॰रा डोले है
अनबोले नाम से
मन मोरा मोरा डोले है
अनबोले नाम से॰॰ए॰॰ए
पहली पहचान है
सतरंगी शाम से॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
दइय्या री दइय्या
म ग म ध नी स
ध नी स
नी सा नी नी ध ध म म ग
ग स
ध म ग स
नी ध म ग स
त नी ध म ग स
ध म ग नी ध म ग
ग ग म ग म ध
म ध नी स
ध नी स
ध नी स
मैं क्या करूँ
कहो जी मैं क्या करूँ
अरे हाँ मैं क्या करूँ
आई प्रीत पायलिया पाँव में पहुँच गई
झुके नयनवा॰॰आ॰॰आ
रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा

परबत पे गाँव मेरा
हो मेरा
हो मेरा
घाटी
घाटी
घाटी में छाँव है
छाया में है नदी
हो नदी
हो नदी
नदिया में
नदिया में नाव है
छम्मक छईय्या छम्मम री
छम्मक छईय्या री
छम्मक छईय्या छम्मम री
आss आss आsssss
बिन चले ही
डगरी बिन चले ही
अरे हाँ बिन चले ही
बिन चले ही
मैं मधुर पड़ाव में पहुँच गई
झुके नयनवा॰॰आ॰॰आ
रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा

रीमिम झिमिमवा
सुनो बलमवा


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3755 Post No. : 14720 Movie Count :

4022

Welcome all to this article which comes after my last post on 13th October in Remembrance of Kishore Kumar. In between I was supposed to send couple of articles which I could not do because of the project work now in full swing at site and we have to sometimes work for extended hours too. I was also trying to finish two of my earlier posts which got stuck up due to the same reason and then even though they were in my mind I was trying to get back to the rhythm to re-start and complete them.

Our Peevesie’s Mom generally mentions about the anniversaries of the artists and she also tries to keep sending posts for such occasions and simultaneously she also tries to combine anniversaries of various artists and anniversaries of our team members too. 🙂 Her last post on the blog was for celebrating our beloved Raja Saab’s birthday and of Raveena Tandon too.

Well the reason for today’s post is also a birth anniversary occasion which we missed and which even I was not aware till yesterday.

It so happened that after leaving the site (office) on Saturday afternoon me and my colleagues had to visit a nearby town around 40 kms from here to do some minor shopping and have a coffee at the only mall in the town. While travelling our drivers generally listen to the songs in local language here. And that triggers our mood too to listen Hindi songs. I keep my two pen drives full of HFM every time with me. After listening to many albums or Pancham we switched over to the nineties and to the songs of the movie ‘Maya Memsaab’ (1993). If anybody has listened to them might be aware that this movie had all good songs penned by Gulzar Saab. Lata Mangeshkar has sung four solo songs in this movie and all of them are very very nice compositions. And poetry of Gulzar Saab as usual is at his best in the songs of this movie.

The music for this movie is composed by Hridaynath Mangeshkar. I had been listening to his compositions and many of his albums in Marathi are just pure classics and then in Hindi we had ‘Dhanwan’ (1981), ‘Mashaal’ (1984), ‘Lekin’ (1991). ‘Lekin’ is also one of my most favourite albums and I had sent a few of its songs to Atul ji when I was a newcomer on the blog, which are yet to be posted on the blog. 🙂

Well, it just piqued my interest to read about Pandit Hridaynath Mangeshkar since I immensely like his compositions – Marathi as well as Hindi and Non-filmy. As I for information about him I noticed that 26th October (26-10-1937) was his birth anniversary too.

I remember that our beloved Kamath Sir had written an article on him in details in 2012 on his birth anniversary with the song from the movie ‘Lekin’ – “Suniye Ji Araj Mhaaro“.

Later on, on Hridyanath ji’s birth anniversary in 2014, Atul ji has posted the song “O Baawri Re“, from the 1969 film ‘Prarthana’, shared by Prakash ji.

On the blog so far, we have the following songs of Pandit Hridaynath Mangeshkar represented as Composer/Singer;

 

Movie Name

Year No of Songs as Composer

No of Songs as Singer

Baiju Baawra

1952

1

Deewaana

1952

1

Baabla

1953

1

Prarthana

1969

1

Dhanwaan

1981

3

Subah

1982

2

Mashaal

1984

2

Lekin

1990

1

NFS

2

Going by the details available on the internet sources, about his filmography I list the following movies where he has composed music, remaining yet to be represented on the blog,

‘Harishchandra Taramati’ (1970), ‘Chaani’ (1977), ‘Chakra’ (1980), ‘Ram Ki Ganga’ (1984), ‘Pyaari Bhabhi’ (1986), ‘Maya Memsaab’ (1993), ‘Laal Salaam’ (2002).

Today I present a song from the 1993 movie ‘Maya Memsaab’, which makes its debut on our blog. The film is produced and directed by Ketan Mehta. It has Shah Rukh Khan, Deepa Sahi, Raj Babbar, Farooq Shaikh, Paresh Rawal, Raghuveer Yadav and many others.

This movie had seven songs (including one multiple version song) penned by Gulzar. Music for this movie is composed by Hridaynath Mangeshkar, and Hridaynath Mangeshkar, Kumar Sanu and Lata Mangeshkar have given their voices to the songs in this movie. As mentioned above all songs in this movie are very nice and I like them very much. I had watched this movie then when it was released in 1993.

Today’ song is sung by Pandit Hridaynath Mangeshkar. A female voice accompanies him in this song. Although not credited, I think the voice is of S. Janaki. I request other listeners to please comment on this guess.

Incidentally, I was thinking to introduce this movie for Gulzar Saab’s birth anniversary in August (with the multiple version song) but could not do so. Later, when I was going through the HFGK Vol-IV (1961-1970), I came across the movie titled ‘Harishchandra Taramati’ (1970), I thought to do a post presenting this movie as I was doing earlier whenever I go through a HFGK Volume for first time and find something interesting. However, I could not write and share the posts then.

Now, though late by couple of days, I do not want to miss this opportunity of presenting this movie on the occasion of ‘birth anniversary’ of Pandit Hridaynath Mangeshkar. Hence, belatedly though wishing Pandit ji a ‘very Happy Birthday’ and a ‘healthy-peaceful-musical’ life ahead I wish to present this song sung by him.

I hope you will like and enjoy this song …

Song – Chaaya Jaagi. . . Chhaaya Jaagi. . . (Maya Memsaab) (1993) Singer – Hridyanath Mangeshkar, Unidentified Female Voice, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Hridyanath Mangeshkar

Lyrics

chhaaya jaagi..ee..ee
chhaaya jaagi
chhaaya jaa..aagi..ee
chhaaya jaagi
jaagi
aa aa aa
chhaaya jaagi
jaagi
aa aa aa
chhaaya jaagi
jaagi
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa aa

chhaaya jaagi..ee..ee
aa aa aa
chhaaya jaagi
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa aa

chanchal chanchal
komal chanchal
chanchal
aa aa aa aa
chanchal komal
komal chanhcal
chanchal
kaayaa maangi..ee..ee
aa aa aa
kaayaa maangi
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa
kaayaa maa..aagi
kaayaa maangi..ee
kaayaa maangi
aa aa aa aa aa aa aa aa aa

saj ke solah singaar
chali sapnon ke sapnon ke paar
hmm hmm
sajke solah singaar
hmm hmm
chali sapnon ke sapnon ke paar
maayaa laagi..ee..ee
maayaa laagi..ee
maayaa laagi
ha ha aa
maayaa laagi
maayaa laa..aagi
maayaa laagi
aa aa aa aa
laagi
maayaa laagi
aa aa aa aa
laagi
maayaa laagi
aa aa aa
laagi
aa aa aa aa aa aa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————

छाया जागी॰॰ई॰॰ई
छाया जागी
छाया जा॰॰आ॰॰गी॰॰ई
छाया जागी
जागी
आ आ आ
छाया जागी
जागी
आ आ आ
छाया जागी
जागी
आ आ आ आ आ आ आ आ

छाया जागी॰॰ई॰॰ई
आ आ आ
छाया जागी
आ आ आ आ आ आ आ आ

चंचल चंचल
कोमल चंचल
चंचल
आ आ आ आ
चंचल कोमल
कोमल चंचल
चंचल
काया मांगी॰॰ई॰॰ई
आ आ आ
काया मांगी
आ आ आ आ आ आ आ
काया मां॰॰आ॰॰गी
काया मांगी॰॰ई
काया मांगी
आ आ आ आ आ आ आ आ आ

सजके सोलह सिंगार
चली सपनों के सपनों के पार
हम्म हम्म
सजके सोलह सिंगार
हम्म हम्म
चली सपनों के सपनों के पार
माया लागी॰॰ई॰॰ई
माया लागी॰॰ई
माया लागी
हा हा आ
माया लागी
माया ला॰॰आ॰॰गी
माया लागी
आ आ आ आ
लागी
माया लागी
आ आ आ आ
लागी
माया लागी
आ आ आ
लागी
आ आ आ आ आ आ


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3491 Post No. : 14023

There was a time when the films made in Hindi could be classified easily as A grade, B grade and C grade films. A grade films were those made by big and famous banners with top class actors and leading music directors. B grade films were those made with second rung of actors, director and music directors. C grade films were those films which were made by not so famous banners, almost unknown actors directors and composers. Usually C grade films used to be action/stunt films, made on shoestring budgets, having a fixed story line resembling Tarzan, Hercules or Hollywood action films of Robin Hood, with the background of a jungle, tribe people, king-queen-wicked wazir and similar stories.

C grade films were always quickies, made on  shoe-string budgets. During the late 1930s and 40s, Master Bhagwan action films used to be completed in about Rs. 50,000 only – including studio rent, sets, artist fees and other expenses. C grade films had a captive audience comprising of factory workers, daily wagers, low income earners and students. However, such films used to rake in big profits to the film makers. Therefore, even top class banners sometimes made C grade films, to make up their losses in big film flops.

There were certain production houses which specialized and thrived on such films – like Paramount Films, Jagriti Films, Mohan Pictures, Wadia Movietone etc. Since studio system was in vogue, the film studios usually had fixed actors and directors in their employment. Music directors were of no consequence, so anybody would do. Well known composers like C Ramchandra used to take another name while composing music for C grade action films. Music assistants of famous composers used to give music to such films. Well known composers fallen on bad days also gave music to such films. C grade films rarely released commercial gramophone records for their film songs, so such songs are a real rarity even with big collectors.

Some common and regular names one finds in such grade C action/stunt films are Nadia, Boman Irani, Sayani, Bilimoria brothers, Cooper sisters, Zohra Khatoon, Ameena Khatoon, Khatoon Bai, Prakash, Adjania, Noorjehan (sr.), Moosa Pehelwan, Vasantrao Pehelwan, Baburao Pehelwan, Marutirao Pehelwan, Azim Bhai, Basheer, Ali, Bachha, Chandra Rao, Harishchandra Rao, Shankar Rao, Master Bhagwan, Mirajkar, Jamshed, John Cawas, Lalita Pawar, Navin Chandra. . . and many more such names.

Barring a few names like Lalita Pawar, Bhagwan, Nadia etc, all the other action film actors remained relatively less known. No one knows anything about them. Actors like Baburao Pehelwan, Marutirao Pehelwan (he was the hero in the first Gujarati talkie film ‘Narsi Mehta’), Chandra Rao, Sayani etc. were quite famous in their times, but except their Filmography (thanks to HFGK), nothing more is known about them. All of them ended only with mere names !

Today, I am writing about one such action film hero of 7 silent and 12 talkie films of the 1930s and 40s, whom I stumbled upon recently. His name is so obscure and unknown that even I was stunned, but he has acted with heroines like Rajkumari (Dubey), Sarojini, Vatsala Kumthekar, Gauhar Karnataki and had acted in films made by well known production houses like Paramount and Mohan Pictures.

On 2nd January 2015, I got a message on my Facebook page from an unknown person called ‘Tejas Vazare’. Since I try to avoid unknown people as my Fb friends, I ignored that message. Three years later, this January, I saw the message again. This time it attracted my attention by what he wrote. He mentioned that his grandfather was a Hindi film hero of the 1930s and 40s. Out of curiosity, I wrote to him asking him to sent information about himself and his grandfather. He informed me that Master Shankar Rao Vazare was a hero in few films in 1930s and 40s. This was a name new to me. He also sent me film posters, photos, newspaper articles etc. about him. On reading all this, I strongly felt that here was a man who needs to be brought before today’s world. We exchanged lot many mails. I checked all film names with my books and prepared a list of films having evidence.

Tejas and me have planned to meet in March, in Bombay. May be his father (son of Shankar Rao) and aunt (daughter of Shankar Rao) will accompany him. That time I will complete my interview with them and prepare a detailed article with photos, posters etc for publishing on line. But till then, I wish to present his short biography on this blog first. This blog has the right to have such things first here before anywhere else. I owe it this much. So, here we go.

Master Shankar Rao Vazare was born on 1-1-1916 in the Bhabhanagar area of Nashik (Maharashtra), in a peasant family. His father Trimbak Rao Vazare was the Patil of Nashik. (Patil used to be the overall head of the village / town) and his uncle was the chairman of the Municipality. Shankar Rao was very keen on films. Dadasaheb Phalke was also from Nashik. Taking inspiration from him, Shankar Rao developed attraction for films. He used to see English films in the tent theatre of Nashik.

He reached Bombay. He was very handsome, tall and had a good physique. He got roles in the silent films made by Mahavir Photoplays. From 1929 to 1931, he worked in 7 silent films. There could be more also, but initially he was uncredited. Problem with the silent films was that they generally had 2 or 3 titles and alias names. Additionally as per the local language the title used to change also. So, it is very difficult to trace silent films by titles in the various lists published.

The list of his silent films that has been identified so far is –  ‘Father’s Love’ (1929), ‘Ideal Woman’ (1930), ‘Prince Of The People’ (1930), ‘Avarice’ (1930), ‘Niradhar Niru’ (1931), ‘Jungle Ka Jawan’ (1931) and ‘Saroj Kumari’ (1931).

His first talkie film was ‘Toofani Tamancha’ aka ‘Hands Up’ (1935), made by Paramount Film company. In this film, his heroine was Gul Bano. He acted in 7 films made by Paramount Film Co., 3 by India Liberty Co., and 1 each made by Mohan Pictures and Allied Films. Here is the list of his talkie films,

 

Film Title Year Production Company Director

Heroine / Co worker

1. Toofani Tamancha
aka Hands Up
1935 Paramount RN Vaidya Gul Bano / Miss Pukhraj
2. Farz e Adaa
aka Loyalty
1936 Indian Liberty AM Khan Shehzadi (sister of Zubeida (of Alam Aara)) / Vidya
3. Bansari Balaa
aka Fairy Of The Flute
1936 Paramount AM Khan Gauhar Karnataki / Kamla
4. Burkhawali
aka Bombay Mail
1936 Indian Liberty (Unknown) Gauhar Karnataki / Miss Pearl
5. Madhraat Ka Mehmaan
aka Midnight Man
1938 Indian Liberty Kikubhai Desai Miss Moti / Miss Pokhraj
6. Jungle Ka Jawan 1938 Mohan Pictures Chunilal Parekh Rajkumari / Kamla
7. Madhu Bansari 1939 Paramount Nanubhai Vakil Sarojini (sister of Indurani, mother of Azra, wife of Nanubhai Vakil) / Vatsala Kumthekar
8 Son of Alladin
aka Alladin ka Beta
1939 Paramount Nanubhai Vakil Sarojini / Ranibala
9. Reshami Saari 1939 Paramount GP Pawar (husband of Lalita Pawar) Kanta Kumari / Miss Moti
10. Aflatoon Aurat
aka Veerangana
aka Amazon
1940 Paramount Kikubhai Desai Miss Moti / Kanta Kumari
11. Mere Raja 1941 Paramount TS Mani Miss Moti / Kanta Kumari
12. Jungle Ki Pukar
aka Call Of The Jungle
1946 Allied Films Ramji Arya Ameena Khatoon / Usha

After 1941, he found it difficult to get films. He returned to his hometown Nashik to look after his family, farming and also started a business dealing in cucles. In 1946, he got his last film and after that, he again returned to Nashik. Master Shankar Rao Vazare died on 21-1-1949, at a very young age of only 33 years.

Shankar Rao Vazare was the favourite hero of director Kikubhai Desai (father of Manmohan Desai) for silent and talkie films. Fearless Nadia, Ashok Kumar and Kishore Kumar were his fans. Ashok Kumar used to like seeing his films. In one interview, Kishore Kumar has said – “Despite being a hero, my brother Ashok Kumar never did a fight scene on the screen. I considered Master Shankar Vazare a better hero than him ! ”

His hometown Nashik was very proud of him. During the centenary celebrations of Nashik Municipality, they published his photo and a short Biography in their souvenir. There were articles and photos published in local newspapers. His wife expired about 4 years ago and his sons continue to live in Nashik. They are proud of him.

To get a song from his films was a great problem since nothing is available on YouTube. I sent out request letters to some famous record collectors and our own Sudhir ji. All collectors replied negatively, but only Sudhir ji had just one song from the film ‘Madhu Bansari’ (1939). He sent me the song promptly. Thank you Sudhir ji for your kind help. On finding this song, Tejas Vazare and his family were overjoyed and have thanked our Sudhir ji wholeheartedly.

This song is sung by Vatsala Kumthekar, under the baton of Damodar Sharma. The film was directed by Nanubhai Vakil. The cast of the film was Master Vazare, Sarojini (sister of actress Indurani, mother of actress Azra and wife of Nanubhai Vakil ), Vatsala Kumthekar, Ganpat, Basheer, Ali etc. There were 14 songs in the film.

Acknowledgements :

–  Inputs from Tejas Vazare (grandson of Master Shankar Rao Vazare)
–  Article in newspaper ‘Lokmat’
–  Centenary book of Nashik Municipality
–  Advertisements in Times of India and Film India magazine
–  HFGK compiled by Shri Harmandir Singh ‘Hamraaz’
–  ‘Silent Filmography’ by Dr RK Verma
–  Sudhir ji
–  And my notes 🙂


Song – Rang Rasiya Aao Re (Madhu Bansari) (1939) Singer – Vatsala Kumethkar, Lyrics – [Unattributed], Music – Damodar Sharma

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
jeevan ki
prem jyot ko jagaawo
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
jeevan ki
prem jyot ko jagaawo
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re
rang rasiya..aa..aa
aawo re

lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aa..aa..re
aaa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaa aaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa
aaaaaa aaaaaaaa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aa..aa..re..e..e
oo oo aa..aa..aa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaare
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaa..aare..e..e
oo oo oo
aa aa aaaaaaa aaaaa
aaa aaa aaaa aaa aa
lagan lagi tumhre sang pyaare
mann mein bas ke tum kahaan sidhaare
mann mein bas ke tum kahaan sidhaare
aawo
aawo preetam pyaare
aawo
aawo preetam pyaare

rang rasiya
rang rasiya aawo re
rang rasiya aawo re
jeevan ki prem jyot kojagaawo
rang rasiya. . .

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
जीवन की
प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
जीवन की
प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे
रंग रसिया॰॰आ॰॰आ
आवो रे

लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰रे
आss आss आssss आssss
आs आss आss आssss
आssssss आsssss आsss आsss
आsss आsss
आsssss आsssssssss
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
ओ ओ आ॰॰आ॰॰आ
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्यारे
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्या॰॰आरे॰॰ए॰॰ए
ओ ओ ओ
आ आ आssssss आssss
आs आs आsss आss आs
लगन लगी तुम्हरे संग प्यारे
मन में बस के तुम कहाँ सिधारे
मन में बस के तुम कहाँ सिधारे
आवो
आवो प्रीतम प्यारे
आवो
आवो प्रीतम प्यारे

रंग रसिया
रंग रसिया आवो रे
रंग रसिया आवो रे
जीवन की प्रेम ज्योत को जगावों
रंग रसिया॰ ॰ ॰


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, 21st June is designated as the World Music Day. The reminders checked in quite late in the afternoon today. The historical details about this event are available on the internet, and our dear Arun ji has also summarized them in a brief post on the Whatsapp group.

As I set down thinking about this event, and to search out an appropriate song for today, my mind almost immediately went to the 1985 film ‘Sur Sangam’.  In my mind, this is probably the best film on the theme of classical music, in the recent decades. Times are past that classical music and the legends of this art form used to be the central themes of many a film, especially from the historical perspective, in the decades that coincide with the golden era of Hindi film music. Historical persona such as Tansen and Baiju, Narsi Mehta and Meerabai, Kalidas and Soordas, Kabir and Rani Roopmati have been central themes and central characters of many a film till the decade of 1970s. Beyond that, I cannot easily recall a film whose theme and storyline is based primarily on classical music.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15070

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Movies with all their songs covered =1171
Total Number of movies covered =4135

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