Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Classical composition’ Category


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4199 Post No. : 15383

Hullo Atuldom

Happy festival at the outset.

A festival that goes by various names :- Makara Sankranti (AP, Karnataka, Kerala, Goa, Maharashtra), Pongal (TN & Pondicherry), Lohri (Punjab, Haryana, Delhi), Sakraat & Makraat (Bihar, UP, Uttarakhand), Uttarayan (Gujarat, Diu, Daman), Suggi (in parts of Karnataka), Magh Saaji (HP), Ghughuti – (Kumaon), Makara Chaula (Odhisha), Kicheri (Poorvanchal, East UP), Pousha Sankranti (Bengal and North East), Magh Bihu (Assam), Shishur Sankraat (Kashmir ), etc etc. Outside of the country, in some neighbouring Asian countries to be exact, it is celebrated as Maaghe Sankrast – Nepal, Tirmoori – Sindh Pakistan, Songkran -Thailand , Pi Ms. Lao – Laos, Thingyan – Myanmar, Mohan Songkran – Cambodia etc. Basically we are all celebrating the transition of the Sun across the Equator, on it’s journey from the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere.

Each region of India have their own ways of celebrating the event but as I have come to understand there are a few things common to all –Jaggery, til (also called gingelly, or sesame seeds), sugarcane, and freshly harvested ears of corn, wheat or even turmeric (in South India). Then of course the children enjoy themselves with kite flying which takes on the form of competition at times. So let us say Happy Festival. Tamil Nadu has its festivities spread over 3-4 days culminating in what is called Mattu Pongal – celebrated the next day of Sankrant with races with cattle involved. (PETA has tried to bring some order to the extent to which the animals can be made use of, and the conditions in which the races take place).

Last weekend, I was lucky to be asked to join my Chacha and Chachi, to an evening full of OPN songs by a newly formed music group. The members of the group were out to entertain themselves and showcase their talent among their close friends and relatives. The closest anyone of the group had come to anything Bollywood was when the hostess’s father had his ardent fan moment when he came face to face with OP Nayyar sometime in the 70s or 80s. That man was a self taught Harmonica player and encouraged his children and wife to sing along. And the wife and daughter of the (now) deceased man were at the forefront of the group which had female and male singers who sang in their own voices without aping any of the originals and that was a welcome change. The group presented medleys of songs with similar beats- the trade mark tonga-beat songs, and songs dipped in Punjabi folk tunes. The evening began with the song from ‘Sambandh’ – “Chal Akela Chal Akela” and then one song followed the next. The evening climaxed with songs that fell in tune with “Sar Pe Topi Laal Haath Mein Resham Ka Roomal”. In between there was an instrumental rendition of songs from ‘Kashmir ki Kali’, ‘Ek Musafir Ek Haseena’, ‘Kismat’ and ‘Phir Wohi Dil Laaya Hoon’ using the saxophone by Shri Shyam Raj ji who (if I heard right) had been a saxophone player for many of OPN’s songs.

Let me add that we were invited to the evening because my cousin’s husband has taken up singing and joined this group post his retirement. It was a revelation that he sang so well. The first song he sang that evening was “Piya Piya Piya Mora Jiya Pukaare” and “Surma Mera Niraala” was his next. And I must say he “yodels” almost like the Kishore Kumar whose fan he is.

As is my habit (ever since I associated with this blog) the first thing I did on returning home was to look up the anniversary page of our blog and see what was the date of OPN’s anniversaries. Next I checked what songs of OPN are yet to make their appearance on the blog. I found many movies of the 50s & 60s with two or three songs left to attain yyiippeeeehood. Then I began looking up for associated videos on YouTube, these songs are not yet available on YouTube too. In fact only the audio of some songs are available and not the whole movie. So that makes reaching videos difficult. But we cannot let the occasion of remembering OPN go by without a song.

So here it is. A song from the film ‘Raagini’ of 1958. The film is produced by Ashok Kumar, jointly with TS Ganesh, and is directed by Rakhan. This movie had a song which was enacted on screen by Kishore Kumar and playback was by Mohd Rafi. Now I discovered another song, as I was hunting songs for this post, which is again classical raaga based and Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan and Fateh Ali Khan are the playback singers. On screen we have Padmini performing a classical dance and Kishore Kumar sitting on stage in a classical gaayaki mode and lip-syncing. A very uncharacteristic Kishore and a very uncharacteristic Omkar Prasad Nayyar who was popular as OP Nayyar. The song ends with Padmini matching steps to the brilliant tabla accompaniment.

As I was writing this post I recollected a post by Atul ji where he has mentioned about movies with names of popular actresses of the time but the actresses were not part of the cast of that particular movie, e.g. ‘Kalpana’ (1960) didn’t have Kalpana as heroine. An this film, ‘Raagini’ has Padmini as the heroine; Raagini the actress was her sister.

Let us enjoy this rare presentation, Kishore Kumar lip syncing a classical song in the voice of Bade Fateh Ali Khan.


Song – Chhed Diye Mere Dil Ke Taar Kyun (Raagini) (1958) Singers – Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan, Bade Fateh Ali Khan, Lyricist – Jaanisar Akhtar, MD – O P Nayyar
Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan + Fateh Ali Khan

aaaaaaa aaaaaaa
aaaa aaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa

chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
baaj rahi paayal madmaati
baaj rahi paayal madmaati
chaal chale pag pag lehraati
chaal chale pag pag lehraati
jhoom raha jiya baar baar yoon
jhoom raha jiya baar baar yoon
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun

(sargam)
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
(sargam)
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
aaaaaaaa aaaaaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun
aaaaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun

 


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4168 Post No. : 15342 Movie Count :

4229

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 12
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Kshudhit Pashan’ (‘The Hungry Stones’ 1960, Bangla film) was based on a short story of the same name by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore. It is said that Gurudev wrote this unusual ghost story towards of end of 19th century based on his visit to Ahmedabad where his elder brother, Satyendranath Tagore ICS, was posted as a District Magistrate. At that time, he had stayed in Shahi Mahal Palace built by Shah Jahan in 1620, situated at the banks of river Sabarmati, a part of which was converted in to residential quarters for civil servants by the British Government. Since during the day time, his brother would go for work as a District Magistrate leaving Gurudev alone in large rooms, the palace gave him a feeling of a haunted house. However, in the story, the names of the place and the river were changed.

The film belonged to the ghost/mystery genre which was directed by Tapan Sinha. The main cast included Soumitra Chatterjee, Arundhati Devi (wife of Tapan Sinha), Chhabi Biswas, Radhamohan Bhattacharya, Dilip Roy, Padma Devi etc. The film is available for viewing (albeit in 10 parts) on a video sharing platform with English sub-titles. However, I feel that it is an edited version of the original film to suit the maker of DVD as sometime the story link is broken. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

A tax collector (Soumitra Chatterjee) is posted in a small town where he decides to stay at an old palace constructed during Mughal period. He is warned by his servant, the local post master and others that the palace is haunted and he should avoid staying there. When his servant, Karim Khan was showing him the palace, he hears an unknown voice shouting in Hindi ‘bhaag jaao, bhaag jaao. Ye sab jhoot hai’. Karim Khan says that it was the voice of a mad man who had become the victim of the ghost.

Karim Khan explains as to why this palace has become haunted. About 250 years back, this palace was built by a Nawab for his merry making and leisure. Beautiful girls from Iran, Iraq, Arab and also from all over India were brought here who became the victims of his lust. There used to be musical and dance performances to entertain Nawab. Now the palace has become haunted because of thousands of tortured women’s spirits are moving there. So, whoever stays there in the night became their victim. Even thieves would not venture in the palace after dark. There are as many stories of crime and atrocities as the number of stones used in building the palace. Instead of getting terrified, the tax collector becomes more determine to stay in this haunted palace despite the fact that no servant would stay in the palace during the night.

In the very first night, the tax collector (no name has been given to Soumitra Chatterjee’s role) gets the first-hand experience of the weird sounds of anklets, the musical instruments and a Tarana (sung by Ustad Amir Khan), the kind of dance and music that would have been performed in a court of Nawab. He also gets to see a beautiful noble woman named Mumtaz from the Mughal era (enacted by Arundhati Devi), who turns out to be a ghost from that time. She was one of the victims of Nawab’s lust who had been kidnapped from one of the Arab countries and thus gets separated from her beloved. Eventually she dies without meeting her beloved. The tax collector is attracted by Mumtaz and has conversations with her even though she remains quiet. Now onward, he waits for her every night. She appears but remains quiet without answering his queries. (The reasons could be that either she does not understand the language spoken by the tax collector or she is a ghost). He feels that he was her beloved in his earlier birth. In one of the nights, he witnesses well-choreographed Kathak dance when she appears by his side. But the next moment, she is missing and found watching the dancers in the court and then she vanishes. (This is one of the best kathak dances I have seen in the films. The way the kathak dancer synchronises notes by notes of the Sarod player is mind boggling).

Whether the tax collector is imagining the scenes as per the story told by his servant or he is getting dreams or he is hallucinating is not clear. Probably, Tapan Sinha, the director has left to the imagination of the viewers. But in either case, the tax collector is caught in a time warp where his past and present is divided between nights and days respectively. There is a scene in the film where he tells his post master friend that he feels as if he is living in the Arabian nights.

The tax collector’s confused state of mind makes him ill and he is not able to concentrate on his office work for which he was posted. His servant advises him to shift to to a new place for stay and avoid visiting the palace which he agrees. But the attachment to Mumtaz is so strong that he visits the palace. He is so obsessed with Mumtaz that he takes on rent the Mughal attire to match with that of Mumtaz. His illness becomes severe and he is advised to go back to his home town. The film ends with his servant arranging a horse cart to take him to the railway station.

In the original story by Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore, the English translation of which is available here, there is no end as the narrator of the story to the protagonist, a railway co-passenger waiting for the train to arrive on the platform, suddenly picks up his luggage to join an Englishman in the first class compartment without completing the story.

The cinematic treatment given to the story in the film is interesting. Tapan Sinha has used dream and fantasy to make it interesting for the viewers. He has transformed the original ghost story to a romantic haunted story. There are not many dialogues in the film. Even among the limited dialogues, most of dialogues involving the servant, Karm Khan and with Mumtaz are in Hindi. The highlight of the film is the beautiful background music given by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan (who was also the music director for the film). I think, it is for the first time that for creating a haunting atmosphere, solo Sarod recitals by Ustad Ali Akbar Khan and the solo Sitar recitals by Pandit Nikhil Banerjee have been effectively used.

The film won a National Award for the second-best feature film in 1960 and an award in the Ireland Cork Festival in 1960. After about 30 years from the release of the film, Gulzar made the Hindi version film ‘Lekin’ (`1991) with his adaptation of Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore’s ‘Kshudhita Pashan’.

There are 5 songs in ‘Kshudhita Pashan’ (1960) which have been used as background songs. Three of them in Hindi are rendered by Ustad Amir Khan. All these three classical songs are of different genres and have also been used for the background score which are played on the Sarod/Sitar. ‘dhimta dhimta dhimta’ is rendered as Taraana, ‘piya ke aavan ki’ as Dadra and ‘kaise katey rajani ab sajani’ as Chhota Khayal. Incidentally, Ustad Amir Khan never sang semi-classical genre – Thumri, Dadra, Ghazal etc. in concerts. Nor did he record the song in these genres. The only exceptions were that he sang a ghazal for a Film Division’s documentary film ‘Mirza Ghalib’ and a Dadra in ‘Khudhito Pashan’ (1960).

I am presenting a traditional bandish ‘kaise katey rajani ab sajani’ rendered in Raag Bageshree as Chhota Khayal by Ustad Amir Khan and Pratima Banerjee. On screen, it is a background song when Soumitra Chatterjee (the tax collector) and Arundhati Devi (Mumtaz) meets for the first time in the palace in the night. The rendition gives an aura of the bygone Mughal era court where classical singings, dancing and poetry recitation were common. The bandish is also symbolic for Soumtra Chatterjee for his state of mind as also to Arundhati Devi as the ghost of Mumtaz who had been separated from her beloved. This bandish has been often played in the film as short renditions as well as the background score on musical instruments.

Video Clip (Partial):

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaise kate rajni ab sajni (Kshudhita Pashan)(1960) Singers-Ustad Amir Khan, Pratima Banerjee, MD-Ustaad Ali Akbar Khan
Both

Lyrics(Based on Audio Clip)

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaa aaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa aa
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani
piya bin mose raho na jaaye
kaise katey rajani
ab sajani

ghadi pal chin mohe jug si beetat hai
ghadi pal chin mohe jug si beetat hai
un bin jiya atu hi akulaaye
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
sajani ee ee ee
saja….ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
sajani eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
saja…aa..ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaa sa…..ja…..ni ee ee ee
kaise katey rajani
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
naina more daras ke pyaase
naina more daras ke pyaase
asha jhute det dilaase
asha jhute det dilaase
mann ka panchhi rowat tarpat
mann ka panchhi rowat tarpat
maanat naahi manaa aa aa aa aa ye
kaise katey rajani ab sajani
kaise katey rajani ee ee ee ee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4161 Post No. : 15329 Movie Count :

4223

Today’s song is from film Mera Imaan-1934.

I have been writing on old films and songs since 2012. Most of my posts are for films of the 30s and the 40s. However, I have also done innumerable posts on songs and films of period 1951 upto as latest as 2018. That is because, I believe, good music and good films exist in all eras. Only their percentage differs. Additionally, one’s likings generally decide what is ‘Good music’, based on his taste. Taste develops depending on one’s exposure. If I don’t listen to a song of 2019, how am I to conclude if it is good or bad ? Without analysing these factors, people are in a hurry to brand films and songs as good or bad.

Older generations like old films and old songs, mainly due to Nostalgia. Their memories are attached to these films/songs. It is said that old songs have a longer shelf life. But are not older people keeping old music alive ? As the times elapse, decade by decade, the older songs will be forgotten decade wise.

As on today, how many people enjoy songs of the 30’s ? To like these songs, the person has to be of the age of 90 to 100 years. Naturally, 30’s songs are out of favour now. To like songs of the 40’s, the person has to be in the age group of 70 to 85 or so. Hence today some songs of 40s are still popular. In another 10-15 years, songs of 30s and 40s may not be in circulation to that extent, because people who remembered and enjoyed them will be one.

This is Life. As Lord Tennyson said, “The old order changeth yielding place to New….”. Does that mean old films and songs have to be dumped now ? Absolutely not. On the contrary, they must be discussed elaborately, using information to make it available to the coming Generations. Towards this end, this Blog is playing an Yeoman’s role in preserving old and very old songs at one place. I am sure that History will thank Atul ji, for his Blog and for making old songs and highly credible information available to the coming Generations.

I have observed one thing here. During the period 2012 to 2016, for every old song of 30s and 40s, there used to be many comments from the readers and healthy discussions took place, emanating newer information about older films and songs. However, for the last 3 or 4 years, the comments have dried up so much that sometimes I start feeling if these posts are read by anyone at all ? Should I stop writing ?

Then I realise that the posts are written not for getting Claps and Bouquets, but to record History to preserve information and above all, with a noble intention to share knowledge, before it goes to Dust with the writer ! With this philosophy, I continue writing more enthusiastically.

Today’s film Mera Imaan-34 was a Stunt film, directed by Nagendra Majumdar. The songs were written by Dr. Dhaniram Prem. The name of the Music Director is not mentioned in HFGK. The cast of the film was Madhav Kale, Gauhar Karnataki, N.Majumdar, Athavale, Baburao Apte (brother of Shanta Apte), Madhukar Gupte, Miss Amirjaan etc etc.

Film’s director, who had also acted in it, was Nagendra Majumdar. He was the father of Music Director Ninu (Niranjan) Majumdar. Nagendra was born in a happy family in the year 1894 in Bombay. After his father died, “Pearl Dairy” established by his father ran very well doing good business. Suddenly, Nagendra’s wife fell seriously ill and despite taking her full care, she expired. Due to neglect of the Dairy in this period, Dairy also closed down.

Her shifted to Baroda and worked as a State Police Inspector. Later he worked as Watch and Ward Inspector in Baroda Railways. He left the job and started working as a hero in dramas of famous dramatist R.V.Desai. Heeralal, the owner of Laxmi Film Company, Bombay was impressed with his personality and took him to Bombay in 1926 to act in his silent films. Thus started his film career. In those days Silent films used to be completed within a month. He worked as a Hero in films of Laxmi, Jagdish and Imperial film companies.

In the same year, he directed a film ‘Paani mein aag’-1926, made by Royal Arts. Then came two more films made by Kaiser E Hind films. He also directed films of other companies. In all he directed 15 Silent films by 1932. By then, the Talkie had arrived. In the next 14 years he directed 12 Talkie films like – Ras Vilas-32, Sassi Punnu-32, Patit Pawan-33, mirza Sahibaan-33, Mera Imaan-34, Kala Wagh-34, Rangila nawab-35, Kimiyagar-36, Aaj ka Alladin aka Alladin II-36, Lehri lutera-37, Talwarwala-46 and Swadesh Sewa-46. When K L Saigal came to Bombay, Nagendra wanted to work with him. In film Tansen-43, he did the role of Tansen’s (Saigal’s) father and he was very happy.

His last 2 films came in 1946, but his health was not cooperating for quite few years. He gave up work and took rest. However, he suffered from paralysis and died on 22-8-1951. His son Ninu Majumdar worked in Bombay A.I.R. as head of Gujarati programmes, since 1937. By the time Nagendra died, Ninu had already started working as a Music Director.

As a Director, Nagendra had worked with the best of his times like, Master Vithal, Zubeida, Jillo, Billimorea brothers, Madhuri, Navinchandra, Durga Khote Jairaj, Sultana, Noorjehan sr and such luminaries of those days. He had worked for Ranjit, Imperial, Sharda, Jayant Desai films, Yadnik films etc etc.

Now let us know something about Dr. Dhaniram Prem – a Medical Doctor, who came into films like a Meteor for few years in the 30’s period. Dr.DHANIRAM “Prem” (Born 26 September 1904 – Died 10 November 1979) Lyricist, Story and Dialogue Writer in Hindi Films, an extraordinary person, was born on 26-9-1904 at Dariyapur, Aligadh, UP. He completed his MBBS from Bombay and then he went to UK for further studies under assistance from a charitable institution.
He came back, started his practice and repaid all loans first. From childhood he was fond of writing. He wrote several books and articles in National papers. From 1932 to 1936 he wrote Stories, dialogues and Lyrics for 14 films. In the first 2 years he wrote for only Ranjit studio films. Later he was a freelancer and wrote for others too. Gol Nishan aka Mark of Zoro-36 was the last film for which he wrote the Story and some songs..

Then he went to UK and practiced there, engaging himself in social causes. He was highly respected by the British. In 1964 he declared that he would contest the U.K. Prime Minister elections. A special pediatric ward was named after him in his honour while he was alive. He got several awards in U.K. for his excellent work. Indian government gave him Padmashree.

On 29-10-1979 he came to India and stayed in Delhi, but in two day’s time he met with a scooter accident and he died on 10-11-1979. His specialty was that in every film lyric, he used the word ‘Prem’ as a signature word. This trait was picked up later by some more Lyricists in Hindi films.

The hero of this film was Madhav Kale. Madhav Kale was born in Nashik in 1903. After his school education at Nashik, he joined Deccan college at Poona and passed Intermediate course. He was interested in playing in dramas, which was opposed by his mother. But he used to take part in dramas while in college. He was a good singer too. Wanting to join films, he sent applications to many companies. Saroj and sharda companies responded. He acted in several silent films like Mukti sangram, kanak kesari etc. He entered the Talkie films with Vikram Charitra-32, Mera Imaan-34 and Vishnu Bhakti-34. During this period, he got married in 1934.

He acted in 21 films. His last film was Gokul ka chor-59. He even directed one film, Sacha Sapna-42. He sang 13 songs in 7 films till 1942.
There is no information about him after this.

After writing this bio of Madhav kale, I came to know that after the films, Madhav went back to Nashik, where he was active in local politics. He became a Municipal Councillor, but lost Assembly elections, which he was very hopeful of. He died somewhere in 1980.

Today’s film Mera imaan-34 was based on a Marathi drama – Amche imaan (आमचे ईमान ), staged by Lalit Natak Samaj.

(I have collated information for this post from various sources like Listener’s Bulletins No. 40 of Feb-80 and No.145 of July 2010, HFGK, Sapnon ke Saudagar by Vithal Pandya, Silent films by Dr.Verma, Lost Treasures by kamlakar P. and my notes.)


Song-Sab kaliyaan khile aaj (Mera Imaan)(1934) Singer-Gauhar Karnataki, Lyricist-Dr. Dhaniram Prem, MD- Not known

Lyrics

Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
??
??
soonghat ras ki daali
soonghat ras ki daali
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
Sab kaliyaan khile aaj
man aur sugandh basey man mhaare
sugandh basey man mhaare

man aur sugandh base ae
aa aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
man aur sugandh basey man mhaare
sugandh
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
man aur sugandh basey man mhaare
??
??
??
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
man aur sugandh basey man mhaare
sugandh basey chaaron
chaaron ?? kunj ??
chaaron ?? kunj ??
chhaayi rahi hariyaali
chhaayi rahi hariyaali
??
??
sab kaliyaan khile aaj
sab kaliyaan khile aaj
sab kaliyaan
aa aa aa
sab kaliyaan khile aaj
sab kaliyaan
sab kaliyaan
sab kaliyaan khile aaj
sab kaliyaan


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4156 Post No. : 15325 Movie Count :

4222

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 10
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Saheb Bibi Golam’ (1956, Bangla film) was based on a story by the same title, written by Bangla novelist, Bimal Mitra. The film was directed by Kartik Chattopadhyay. The main star cast of the film was Uttam Kumar, Sumitra Devi, Anubha Gupta, Chhabi Biswas, Chhaya Devi, Nitin Mukherjee and Padma Devi. The story of the film relates to the time when the aristocracy of feudal lords was on the decline under the British rule by the end of 19th Century. The story revolves around the platonic relationship between the feudal lord’s neglected wife (Sumitra Devi) and a clerk (Uttam Kumar). The film was not only critically acclaimed, it was also a box office success.

The Hindi version of the film titled ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) was produced by Guru Dutt and directed by Guru Dutt’s right hand man, Abrar Alvi. Although the Hindi version of the film was released 6 years after the release of the Bangla version of the film, the idea to produce the Hindi version of the film was put forward to Guru Dutt by SD Burman as early as 1956 when he saw the shooting of the Bangla version  on his visit to Calcutta (now Kolkata) where Guru Dutt was already doing location hunting for his film ‘Pyaasa’ (1957). Guru Dutt had a meeting with novelist Bimal Mitra in SD Burman’s house in Calcutta, after which he decided to produce and direct the film with SD Burman as the Music Director.

When Guru Dutt  heard the story, he had decided that it had to be Meena Kumari who would be performing the role of Chhoti Bahu, the central character in the film. However, Kamal Amrohi, Meena Kumari’s husband declined the offer saying that she did not have dates. So, after failing to find any alternative actress for the role, the film was put in the back burner. It was only after the box office success of ‘Chaudhvin Ka Chaand’ (1960), Guru Dutt decided to revive ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). This time, after a lot of hard bargaining, Kamal Amrohi agreed with a raise in her fees and also giving bulk dates of 45 days at a stretch from January 1, 1962. He also put a condition that she would not travel to Calcutta to shoot in the haveli. So, the sets of Chhoti Bahu’s rooms in the haveli had to be created in a Mumbai studio.

Biswajit was identified for the role of Bhootnath, the clerk. But he did not agree for a condition of the exclusive contract with Guru Dutt Films. Shashi Kapoor was approached for the role which fell through as he came considerably late to discuss the role by which time Guru Dutt had decided to act in the film for the role of Bhootnath.

The film’s shooting started on January 1, 1961, exactly one year before Meena Kumari’s shooting schedule was to start. Probably, ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) was the first film from the stable of Guru Dutt Films which was ready in the cans in the record time except Meena Kumari’s part and the picturization of the songs which had to be postponed as the music director, SD Burman was ill during the first half of 1961. When he had recovered from his illness, he was selected by the Government of India to be part of the cultural delegation to the then USSR and other European countries. Guru Dutt lost his patience with SD Burman and entrusted the music direction to Hemant Kumar.

When SD Burman returned from his foreign trip, he was dismayed to find that he was no longer the music director of ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962). Instead Hemant Kumar was roped in his place. SD Burman was very much upset as he felt that it was Hemant Kumar who had maneuvered to take over the music direction during his absence. He was so much involved with the film that he had already composed tunes for some songs with dummy lyrics without waiting for a formal contract. After this incidence, the relations between SD Burman and Hemant Kumar got affected. This explains as to why Na Tum Hamen Jaano Na Hum Tumhen Jaane from ‘Baat Ek Raat Ki’ (1962) was the last song Hemant Kumar sang for SD Burman.

[Note: Information in this article about what went behind the making of ‘Saheb Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) is mainly based on (1) ‘Ten Years with Guru Dutt – Abrar Alvi’s Journey’ (2008) by Sathya Saran, (2) ‘Meena Kumari – The Classical Biography’ (2013) by Vinod Mehta and (3) ‘S D Burman – The Prince Musician’ (2018) by Anirudha Bhattacharjee & Balaji Vittal.]

The Hindi version of the film was not a frame by frame remake of its Bangla version film. Instead, the screen-play/dialogue writer and director Abrar Alvi and Bimal Mitra had a month-long sittings to finalise the screen-play and dialogues in tune with the taste of Hindi film audience without diluting the basic theme of the story. As a result, the visualization of scenes in Hindi version is quite different from the Bangla version. Let me give an example of the scene in which Bhootnath meets Chhoti Bahu for the first time.

In Bangla version, Bhootnath visits Chhoti Bahu’s (Sumitra Devi) room when she was about to complete her daily puja with her back to the camera. And then she looks back and tells  Bhootnath to sit down on the chair. Bhootnath introduces himself to Chhoti Bahu. There is not much movements in camera angles. In Hindi version, Chhoti Bahu calls him to sit as soon as he enters her room. The camera is focused on her feet the first time Bhootnath sees her. Even when she walks to her chair, the camera is still focused on her feet. But Bhootnath instead of sitting on the chair, he sits on the floor with his his dropping eyes. When he introduces himself as Bhootnath, the camera suddenly focuses on Chhoti Bahu’s  face and she tells him that it is a lovely name. It is at this point, Bhootnath who was speaking to her with eyes down looks up to see her face and is surprised that she was not amused by his name as it has been his experience with others. On the contrary, she says it is one of many names of the God. Also, there is a  empty bed shown while both of them are conversing symbolising the state of her marital life.

The Bangla version of the film kept the end as per the original story, that is Bhootnath (Uttam Kumar) does not get to marry Jaba (Anubha Gupta). But in Hindi version, there is an indirect hint by way of a dialogue and the last scene in which Bhootnath (Guru Dutt) travels with Jaba (Waheeda Rehman) in a horse cart. Since story has been told in the film in the flash back mode, it was possible in Hindi version of the film to change some sequences in the narration of the story.

The Bangla version of the film had 5 songs of which 2 songs were semi-classical songs in Hindi. Hindi version of the film had 7 songs. The background song in the Bangla version was in Hindi  using a part of a traditional dadra, ‘Ab Ke Saawan Ghar Aaja’ whereas in Hindi version, it was a haunting song, Koi Door Se Aawaaz De Chale Aao.

I am presenting another Hindi song from a Bangla film – ‘Saheb Bibi Golam’ (1956), ‘Kankar Mohe Laage Paniya Bharan Kaise Jaaun’ which has been rendered by Sandhya Mukherjee in dadra style. Lyrics are traditional which have been set to music by Robin Chatterjee. In the film, it has been picturised as mujra song. The equivalent song picturised in Hindi version of the film is Saaqiyaa Aaj Mujhe Neend Nahin Aayegi.

Song – Paniya Bharan Kaise Jaaun, Kankar Mohey Laage  (Saheb Bibi Golam) (1956) Singer – Sandhya Mukherjee, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Robin Chatterjee

Lyrics

aa aaa aaaaaa aaa aaaa
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
aa aa aa aa
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage  
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
paniya bharan kaise jaaun  
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
 
natkhat roke
meri dagariya aa

natkhat roke
meri dagariya aa

laakh bachaa ke chalun najariya
laakh bachaa ke
laakh bachaa ke chalun nazariya
gher let hai bairi saanwariyaa aa
gher let hai bairi saanwariyaa
kaise paanv badhaaun
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
 
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
paniya bharan kaise jaaun
haaye ram
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage

kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laage
kankar mohe laaaaa…..ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 
kankar mohe laaaa……ge ae 

————————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
————————————————————

आ आss आsssss आss आsss
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
आ आ आ आ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

नटखट रोके
मेरी डगरीया॰॰आ
नटखट रोके
मेरी डगरीया॰॰आ
लाख बचा के चलूँ नजरिया
लाख बचा के
लाख बचा के चलूँ नजरिया
घेर लेत है बैरी साँवरिया॰॰आ
घेर लेत है बैरी साँवरिया
कैसे पाँव बढ़ाऊँ
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
पनिया भरन कैसे जाऊँ
हाय राम
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे

कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे लागे
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰
कंकर मोहे ला॰॰गे॰॰


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4150 Post No. : 15316 Movie Count :

4220

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 9
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘Shaap Mochan’ (1955, Bangla film) was based on a story of the same name written by the Bengali novelist Falguni Mukhopadhyay. The film was directed by Sudhir Mukherjee. The main actors in the film were Uttam Kumar, Suchitra Sen and Pahadi Sanyal. The film is available on-line for viewing without English sub-titles.

The film is about a musical family in which one of the forefathers had been cursed by a Guru that any one in his family who takes up singing would die prematurely or become invalid for insulting him for non-acceptance as Guru. Devendra (Pahadi Sanyal) became blind while taking up the singing as the career forcing him to give up the singing. Because of the curse, he gets the assurance from his younger brother, Mahendra (Uttam Kumar) that he would also not practice singing.

In order to sustain the family, Devendra sends his brother Mahendra to Kolkata to his friend for getting him a job. Mahendra stays with him who has a daughter, Madhuri (Suchitra Sen). During the course of their inter-action, Madhuri comes to know that Mahendra is a talented singer. She encourages him to become a singer. He reveals to her as to why he can not take up singing. However, Madhuri does not believe in the superstition.

It so happens that Mahendra remains unemployed which forces him to become a singer for earning. Over a period of time, he becomes a famous singer and earns good money in his profession. Madhuri and Mahendra fall in love. However, the curse falls on Mahendra and he becomes seriously ill. Madhuri tends him and gets him to fully recover from his serious illness. With this, the family’s superstitious belief in curse is broken. The film has a happy ending.

The film has 6 songs of which one song is in Hindi. That song is a bandish, ‘kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan’ which is rendered by Pandit D V Paluskar in Raag Bahar as Chhota Khayal. The bandish was written by Kiniwaale Ram. Although Hemant Kumar has been accredited as the music director for all the six songs in the film, it is apparent that Pandit D V Paluskar had a say in the composition of the tune in Raag Bahar.

Earlier, I was under the impression that Pandit D V Paluskar sang as a playback singer in only one film – Baiju Baawra’ (1952). His jugalbandi song, aaj gaawat man mero jhoom ke, rendered with Ustad Amir Khan is par excellence among the Hindustani classical raag-based Hindi film songs. It was G N Joshi of HMV who had suggested to Naushad saab to take Ustad Amir Khan and Pandit D V Paluskar for this jugalbandi song. Naushad first approached Ustad Amir Khan who agreed to sing provided Pandit D V Paluskar was his ‘opponent’ and he would not mind losing in the jugalbandi to him. This showed the respect Pandit D V Paluskar commanded from his equally illustrious classical vocalist. Incidentally, both Ustad Amir Khan and Pandit D V Paluskar never sang this jugalbandi in their respective public concerts despite the demand from the audience.

Pandit D V Paluskar (28/05/1921 – 25/10/1955), the Hindustani classical vocalist rendered mostly khayal and tarana in his own style without attaching himself to the orthodox Gharanas. But experts in Hindustani classical music believe that his singing style was close to Gwalior Gharana. In the short span of 34 years of his life, he had become one of the foremost among the Hindistani classical vocalist. Those who had witnessed his concerts had observed that he was a classical vocalist with a difference – he sang for the common man blending the classical renditions with popular appeal. He also sang bhajans in Hindustani classical raags.

G N Joshi of HMV who was also an illustrious Hindustani classical vocalist and the music director had mentioned in one of his articles that Pandit D V Paluskar had a rare quality of recording any Hindustani classical raag within the disc space of about 3:25 minutes in 78 RPM gramophone records incorporating all the ‘alankars’ (ornamentations) that generally go with the Khayal type of renditions. Pandit D V Paluskar was also known for his exquisite aalaaps and taans which are evident in the bandish under discussion.

The bandish describes the spring season during which bees are flirting with new flower buds. Gardens are in full bloom. Peacocks are calling and koels are singing. Trees, laden with blossoms are waving in the breeze. Women are out in groups with buckets to bring water from the river. Overall, the scenarios gladden the heart of everyone.

I am not sure whether I have captured all the sargam in lyrics for the second half of the chhota khayal as Pandit ji’s rendition of sargam taan is very fast.

A more elaborate rendition ( nearly 15 minutes) of this bandish in Raag Bahar by Pandit D V Paluskar is now available on-line here which he had performed on All India Radio’s National Programme of Music sometime in early 1950s.

Video Clip:

Audio Clip:

Song-Kaliyan sang karta rang raliyaan(Shaap Mochan)(1955) Singer-Pt D V Paluskar, Lyrics-Kiniwaale Ram, MD-Hemant Kumar

Lyrics (Based on Video Clip)

aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa

kaliyan sang karta rang raliyaan
kaliyan sang karta rang raliyaan
bhanwar gunjaare phooli phulwaare
chahoon oar mor bole
koyal ki kook suni hook uthhi
kaliyan sang karta rang raliyaan
kaliyan sang karta
kaliyan sang karta
lehrat leharaata
sab birachhan mori
le naar gadhwaa bharan aayi
aaj baag mein pukaare
‘Kiniwaale Ram’ bole
har baar baar
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan

[dialogues in Bengali]

aaaaaaa aaa aaaaaaaaaa
aa aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaaaaaa aaa aaaaaaaaa
aaaaa aa aaaaaaa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
aa aaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaa aa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
ae ae ae ae
kali……sang……
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
kali eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ee ee ee…yan
kaliyan ee ee…yan….sang………..karata rang raliyaan
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
kaliyan sang karata rang
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aa
kaliyan
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaa aa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
kaliyan sang karata
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
kaliyan
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
kaliyan sang
ga ma pa ni sa
ni dha sa ni dha ni sa ni s ani sa
kaliyan sang karata
ga ma pa ni sa ni dha
sa ri ga ri ri s ani ga ri sa
sa ni sa ma pa ga ma sa ni pa
ga ma pa ni sa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
ga ma pa ni sa sa sa dha
sa ri sa pa ni sa ma pa ni pa ga
ma ni pa ga ma pa ni sa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaan
kaliyan aa
kaliyan aa
kaliyan sang karata rang raliyaaaaaa…..aan


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4128 Post No. : 15285 Movie Count :

4208

Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 5
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

What is the common between the Hindi film song, “Jaa Tose Naahin Boloon Kanhaiyya from ‘Parivaar’ (1956) and a devotional song in Sanskrit,  “Vatapi Ganapatim Bhaje”?  The answer is that they are based on Carnatic Raag Hamsadhwani (also written as Hansadhwani).

Raag Hamsadhwani is said to have been invented by Carnatic composer Ramaswami Dikshitar (1735-1817). His son, poet-composer, Muthuswami Dikshitar wrote and composed one of the most popular Sanskrit devotional song mentioned above in Raag Hamsadhwani. The credit for bringing this raag to Hindustani classical music goes to Ustad Aman Ali Khan (1888-1953) of Bhendi Bazar Gharana who had also learnt Carnatic music under a court musician of the Mysore State. He created and composed a bandish, “Laagi Lagan Pati Sakhi Sang” in Raag Hamsadhwani.

Ustad Amir Khan, on a visit to Mumbai, met Ustad Aman Ali Khan and heard this bandish. He was so mesmerised by the bandish in Hamsadhwani that he started singing in his concerts both in Khayal and Taraana style which made it popular among the Hindustani classical vocalists and instrumentalists. Subsequently, many stalwarts among Hindustani classical vocalists such as Ustad Rashid Khan of Rampur-Sahaswan Gharana, Vidushi Kishori Amonkar of Jaipur-Atruali Gharana, Pandit AT Kanan from Kirana Gharana, Pandit Ajoy Chakraborty, his daughter and son-in-law, Kaushiki Chakraborty-Desikan and Parthasarathi Desikan – all from Patiala Gharana, Begum Parveen Sultana of Patiala Gharana etc. have rendered Raag Hamsadhwani in their concerts.

Despite the popularity of Raag Hamsadhwani among the Hindustani classical vocalists and instrumentalists, Hindi film music directors have rarely used this raag in composing the songs. Probably, Salil Chowdhury may be the first Hindi film music director to compose a full-fledged song in this raag for the film ’Parivaar’ (1956) as mentioned above. C Ramchandra did use some shades of Raag Hamsadhwani in the song, “O Chaand Jahaan Wo Jaayen in ‘Sharada’ (1957). I feel that Shankar-Ehsan-Loy has also used some shades of this raag in his fusion song, “Tere Naina Hans Diye in ‘Chaandni Chowk to China’ (2009).

A few days back, Partha Chanda ji, in one of his comments in our Blog, has pointed out that there is a great classical piece in Ritwik Ghatak’s Bangla film ‘Meghe Dhaka Tara’ (Cloud Capped Star), 1960.  I found out that there is not one but two classical Hindi songs in this film sung by Pandit AT Kanan and both are set in Raag Hamsadhwani. I have picked up one of the songs which is the bandish originally created by Ustad Aman Ali Khan.

I was not familiar with the name of Pandit AT Kanan. Since he was one of the ’Gurus’ at ITC Sangeet Research Academy, Kolkata since its inception in 1977, a brief profile of him was available on ITCSRA website. The following information about Pandit AT Kanan is mainly based on this source.

Pandit AT Kanan (18/06/1922 – 02/09/2004) was born in Chennai as Arkut Kannabhiran. As a teenager, singing became his hobby whereas cricket was his passion. At the age of 18, he joined Railways and played cricket for them. In early 1940s, Kanan visited Mumbai for a scheduled cricket match. After the match, he visited All India Radio, Mumbai to check the suitability of his voice for singing over the radio. When the AIR official heard his voice, they immediately offered him a program to be broadcast. This was the beginning of his tryst with Hindustani classical music.

On his transfer to Hyderabad, AT Kanan took the guidance for vocal training from Pandit Lahanu Babu Rao. He was once again transferred to Kolkata where he resumed training under Pandit Girija Shankar Chakraborty. In 1943, he gave his debut performance at All Bengal Music Conference. After about two years of his stay in Kolkata, Pandit Kanan was under orders of transfer. By this time, he had already established himself in Kolkata as a Hindustani classical vocalist of repute. His admirers persuaded him to leave the railway job and stay in Kolkata. Thus, he became a full time Hindustani classical vocalist.

Sometime in the 1950s, Pandit Kanan along with other musicians, established Kolkata Music Circle. Those days, Kolkata was one of the main centres of Hindustani classical music. Some of the Hindustani classical vocalists and instrumentalists used to regularly give their performance in the city. Pandit Kanan got opportunity to inter-act with Ustad Amir Khan, Pandit Ravi Shankar, Ustad Akbar Ali Khan, Vidushi Hirabai Barodekar etc.

Pandit Kanan’s renditions of the Raag ‘Hamsadhwani’, ‘Rageshri’, and ‘Jog’, among others, made him an extremely popular Khayal singer not only in Kolkata but also throughout the country. A top grade AIR artist, Pandit Kanan performed in all the important music conferences in the country, including National Programmes and Radio Sangeet Sammelans. He was also a playback singer in the Bengali films such as ‘Jadu Bhatta’ (1954), ‘Basanta Bahar’ (1957), ‘Megh Malhar’ (1958), ‘Meghe Dhaka Tara’ (1960), etc. He was bestowed with Sangeet Natak Academy Award in 1995.

In 1958, he married Malbika Roy (later known as Malbika Kanan) who was also a Hindustani classical vocalist.

Although, Pandit Kanan developed his own style of Khayal singing, some Hindustani classical vocalists believe that later on, he was influenced by the Khayal singing style of Ustad Amir Khan with whom he used to regularly exchange notes. I guess, this may be the reason that on the ITCSRA website, Pandit Kanan has been shown under Kirana Gharana. Of course, Ustad Amir Khan had also improvised the style of Kirana Gharana which his disciples named as the Indore Gharana style.

‘Meghe Dhaka Tara’ (1960), is the first of the trilogy of Ritwik Ghatak’s films on the aftermath of the partition of Bengal. Anil Chatterjee is a part of a family who has migrated from East Pakistan after the partition and are staying in the outskirt of Kolkata. He is the eldest son who is dreaming of becoming a Hindustani classical vocalist. He does not earn money for the family. Instead he is a wanderer. His sister (Supriya Devi) takes care of the family by earning but her efforts are not appreciated by any one in the family. In this process, she sacrifices her personal life (her fiancé is more interested in her sister than her) and her health for the betterment of the family. At the end, her serious illness becomes the burden on the family. And she still wants to live.

As mentioned earlier, Pandit Kanan’s Khayal rendition in Raag Hamsadhwani was regarded as the one of his most popular renditions those days. So, it was natural that he lips syncs for Anil Chatterjee for the bandish “Laagi Lagan Pati Sakhi Sang” in Raag Hamsadhwani in the film ‘Meghe Dhaka Tara’ (1960).

The bandish has been rendered as a ‘chhota khayal’. Although the music director for the film was Anil Chandra Sengupta, credit should go to Ustad Aman Ali Khan who had originally composed the bandish.

I did not find the record version of the bandish used in the film on the websites. Probably, it may not have been issued in the record version. Hence, I have provided the link of an audio clip of the longer version of the same bandish rendered by Pandit AT Kanan.

Video

Audio (Longer Version)

Song – Laagi Lagan Pati Sakhi-san  (Meghe Dhaka Tara) (1960) Singer – Pt AT Kanan, Lyrics – Ustad Aman Ali Khan, MD – Ustad Aman Ali Khan

Lyrics (Based on Video Clip)

laaa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laaa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
parama sukh aa
ati anandana aa
parama sukh aa
ati anandana aa
laa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laa..aagi lagan pa

laa aa aaaaaaaaaaa aa
laaaaaa..gi
laaaaaaaaaa. . .
laaaaaaaaa..gi
laaaaaaaaaaaaa aa
laaaaaaaaaaaaa aa aa…gi
laagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laaa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laaa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
 
[Dialogues]
 
ang sugandhan chandan maathe ti..lak dhare
ang sugandhan chandan maathe ti..lak dhare
drigan-nayanan anjana fabnatey
amar ho nit pati kaaje sadan
laaa..aagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laaa..aagi lagan
laaa..aagi lagan
laagi lagan pati sakhi-san
laagi lagan pati sakhi-san
la..gi lagan
la..gi lagan
laagi lagan aaa


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4066 Post No. : 15201 Movie Count :

4178

Today, September 5th is 24th Remembrance Day of Salil Chowdhury (19/11/1925 – 05/09/1995), the legendary music director who was the pioneer in fusion music – blending Indian melodies with the orchestration of western classical music. As he himself admitted during an interview on All India Radio, Salil Da was greatly influenced by the music of Beethoven and Mozart because his father used to play gramophone records of their music which he had listened during his childhood.

Salil Da’s musical legacy has been carried forward by the likes of RD Burman, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. I will come back later the organic connection of Ilaiyaraaja and A R Rahman with the music of Salil Da.  It is the irony of fate that while the followers of his musical legacy have attained the top slots in the film industry, Salil Da could not get such recognition in Hindi film industry. Perhaps, he was quite ahead of time and those who mattered in the Hindi film industry (producers and distributors) failed to realise his potentials.

Salil Da has to be a genius person in the making if I go by his various activities during his childhood and younger days. At the age of 6, he learns piano. As a student, he writes and compose songs for the school’s plays. As a teenager, he gets actively associated in the Peasants Movements in his village. In the midst of such activities, he completes his high school and later graduation from Kolkata University. He becomes a member of Communist Party of India and gets actively involved with Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA) while he is simultaneously doing his post-graduation studies. He is a playwright, song writer, composer and sometime actor in IPTA plays. Salil Da participates in the peasants’ uprising and goes underground for a couple of years. During this period, he writes and composes ‘chetonaar gaan’ (songs of awakening). He learns almost all the important musical instruments like piano, flute, esraj, sarod, sitar, guitar, percussion which is in most cases self-thought. He is the first to set up Bombay Youth Choir and later Calcutta Choir Group which he personally conducts in the 1950s. He is a poet, story writer, lyricist and music director.

With so much of his multifarious activities in around Kolkata, how did Salil Da get involved with Hindi film music in Mumbai? I quote below, in his own words during an  interviews on All India Radio:

I came to Bombay by stroke of luck. I was writing script (of my story ‘Rickshawaala’) for a Bengali film.  When Hrishikesh Mukherjee heard the story, he liked it. He said that he would narrate the story to Bimalda (Bimal Roy) who was expected to come to Kolkata from Mumbai. So, I took the appointment of Bimlada and read out the entire script to him. Bimlda did not show any reaction to the story but advised me to meet him the next morning.

When I went to meet him the next morning, I was told that he had left for Mumbai by the morning flight on some urgent work. Within a week, I got the telegram from Bimalda that he had decided to make a Hindi film based on my story and I should come to Mumbai with the script. That’s how I landed in Mumbai for ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953).

After the success of ‘Do Beegha Zameen’ (1953), Salil Da was employed in Bimal Roy Productions as a music director. He did many films for the banner like ‘Biraj Bahu’ (1954), ‘Naukari’ (1954), ‘Amaanat’ (1955), ‘Parivaar’ (1956), ‘Aparadhi Kaun’ (1957), ‘Madhumati’ (1958), ‘Usne Kaha Thaa’ (1960), ‘ Parakh’ (1960).‘Kabuliwaala’ (1961), and  ‘Prem Patra’ (1962). During this period, he also did many other films outside the banner of Bimal Roy Productions. Song compositions in almost all these films are outstanding. Some of the songs from Bimal Roy’s  films are evergreen and they are still remembered. For instance “Aaha Rimjhim Ke Ye Pyaare Pyaare Geet Liye” (from ‘Usne Kaha Tha’) and “O Sajnaa Barkha Bahaar Aayi” (from ‘Parakh’).

In ‘non-Bimal Roy’ films, Salil Da composed excellent songs in films like ‘Jaagte Raho’ (1956), ‘Aawaaz’ (1956), ‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’ (1957), ‘Honeymoon’ (1960), ‘Chhaaya’ (1961),  ‘Maaya’ (1961) etc. The songs like “Zindagi Khwaab Hai” (‘Jagte Raho’, Mukesh’s first song under Salida), “Dhitang Dhitang Bole” (‘Awaaz’), “Raat Ne Kya Kya Khwaab Dikhaaye” (‘Ek Gaon Ki Kahaani’), “Mere Khwaabon Mein Khayaalon Mein” (‘Honeymoon’),  “Koi Sone Ke Dilwaala” (‘Maaya’), and “Itna Na Mujhse Tu Pyaar Badha” (‘Chhaaya’)  are some of my favourites of Salil Da.

Despite scoring beautiful songs in the films of early 50s, Salil Da was still regarded as a flop music director in the eyes of film distributors.  The box office success of‘ ‘Madhumati’ (1958) and the high popularity of its songs enabled Salil Da to shed the tag of ‘flop music director’. I remember that not a single day will pass without one or two songs from ‘Madhumati’ (1958) being played on the radio after the release of the film. Salil Da got his first Filmfare Award for the best music director for this film.

It is difficult to pin point the best song from ‘Madhumati’ as all the songs were outstanding. Because I am a trekker, I may be biased in my liking for “Suhaana Safar Aur Ye Mausam Haseen“. The sound of chirping of the birds in the prelude creates a natural atmosphere in the scene for the song. Incidentally, adding in the prelude the chirping sounds of the birds was suggested by SD Burman. Salil Da used folk-based melody from Bengal, Assam, Nepal and also from Poland for almost all the songs in the film. He requisitioned the services of Dattaram for playing dholak in all the songs (as revealed by Dattaram in his TV interview). One can hear Dattaram ‘thekas’ prominently in the song “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke“.

With the tremendous success of ‘Madhumati’ (1958), Salil Da got more film assignments such as ‘Chhaaya’ (1961), ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965), ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965), ‘Pinjre Ke Panchhi’ (1966) (which he also directed), among many others.

During his second phase of the musical career, he did some notable films like ‘Mere Apne’ (1971), ‘Anand’ (1971), ‘Annadaata (1972), ‘Rajanigandha’ (1974), ‘Chhoti Si Baat’ (1976), ‘Anand Mahal’ (1977) etc. Some of the popular as well notable songs of Salil Da of this period are “Zindagi Kaisi Hai Paheli Haaye” (‘Anand’), (note the choir singing in the interludes), “Raaton Ke Saaye Ghane” (‘Annadaata’) (song may not have become popular but it is an intricate composition which only Lata could do justice), “Kai Baar Yoon Bhi Dekha Hai” (‘Rajnigandha’) (my favourite and whenever I wish to listen to this song, I prefer to watch on the video clip) and “Na Jaane Kyun Hota Hai Ye Zindagi Ke Saath” (‘Chhoti Si Baat’) (again, I prefer to listen to the song by watching the video clip of the song).

I know, I have missed some more of popular songs composed by Salil Da . I will end with  one more song from the stable of Salil Da which did not become as popular as it should have been. The song is  “Koi Hota Jisko Apna” from ‘Mere Apne’ (1971).  It is a complex composition which Kishore Kumar has ably rendered. The mukhda tune was inspired from the background score of ‘Anand’(1970).

After about 1975, his Hindi film assignments came down that too was limited to small banners. On the other hand, his assignments in Bengali and South Indian films were on the rise. Also, he had shifted his base to Kolkata in mid 1970s as he had planned for setting up of a modern recording studio in Kolkata. During about 25 years of his active association with Mumbai, he composed about 300 songs in about 65 Hindi films.

Discussion on Salil Chowdhury’s musical career in films will not be complete unless we take into account his sojourn to South Indian films especially the Malayalam films. He was introduced to Malayalam films  by Ramu Khairat, the Malayalam film director who was a part of IPTA delegation along with Salil Da to an East European country in 1960. Their IPTA background and the common interest in films made them friends. When Ramu Khairat finalised the making of Malayalam film, ‘Chemmeen’ (1965), he selected Salil Da as the music director. The film received tremendous response from the cinegoers. This film is regarded as the first successful ‘arty’ film in South India.

The highlight of the film was the popularity of its four songs. The extra-ordinary success of the songs changed the complexion of the South Indian film music. Salil Da set his firm footing in the South Indian film industries. He did 25 Malayalam films and 10 films in Tamil, Telugu and Kannada. In addition, he was also associated with about 40 Bengali films as a lyricist and music director.

One of the innovative ideas Salil Da experimented with his music was that he composed new songs based on his earlier songs as well as from the background score by giving a different structure to the new songs. For instance, in an interview, Salil Da gave an interesting example of his song “Aaja Re Pardesi Main To Kab Se Khadi Iss Paar”  from ‘Madhumati’ (1958). The mukhda tune was based on the melodic background music of ‘Jaagte Raho’(1956). This background music is played whenever Raj Kapoor is about to drink water to quench his thirst but the circumstances makes him to run away from the scene without drinking water. In the same song, Salil Da has used the mukhda tune of “Ghadi Ghadi Mora Dil Dhadke” as the interlude music.

Another example I had noted many years back and worth mentioning is the comparison of the song “Baag Mein Kali Khili Bagiya Mehki” from ‘Chaand Aur Sooraj’ (1965) with “Saathi Re Tujh Bin Jiya Udaas” from ‘Poonam Ki Raat’ (1965). Salil Da has used more or less the same tune for the antaras of both the songs. Salil Da’s different melodic and orchestration structures makes these two songs sounding different. Hence, first song sounds like that for a growing up girl waiting for her fiance and the other one as a haunting song. Also note in the latter song how the mukhda tune of the former song converted into the interlude music and gets merges with the antara tune.

I had mentioned earlier that there is some organic connection between Salil Da, Ilaiyaraaja and AR Rahman. During his assignments in the South Indian films, especially in Malayalam films as a music director, Salil Da had in his orchestra, Ilaiyaraaja as a lead guitarist and RK Sekhar (father of AR Rahman) as his Assistant and Arranger. AR Rahman joined Ilaiyaraaja’s troup as Keyboard player. Incidentally, Salil Da had predicted that one day Ilaiyaraaja would become the top most music director of India. His prophecy has come true.

A music analyst in his article in The Hindu has opined that in his early years of music direction, Ilaiyaraaja seemed to have been influenced by Salil Da in using fusion music which he improvised a lot in his later years. The same music analyst also felt that Salil Da was influenced by the music of Ilaiyaraaja in composing Bengali songs in his later years.

On the occasion of 24th Remembrance Day of the legendary music director, Salil Da, I have chosen a rarely heard Sanskrit song  ‘tava virahe vanamaali’ from the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The music for the song has been composed by Salil Da in a classical raaga, Yaman. The song is written by the famous Sanskrit poet of the 12th century AD – Jaidev. It is rendered by Kavita Krishnamurthy. It is a classical dance song which is picturised on Shobna (Pillai), a well-known Malayalam and Tamil film  actress and a Bharatnatyam dancer. She is the niece of Padmini and Ragini.

I took the song’s lyrics from Geet Govind. English translation of the lyrics is embedded on the audio clip of the song. This is the song I liked best out of 8 songs in the film.

There is long history about the film ‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994). The film was directed by GV Iyer  a khadi-clad barefoot Gandhian who has been known for  making films based on spiritual themes. He was the first to make a feature film in Sanskrit, ‘Adi Shankaracharya’ (1983) which won 4 National Film Awards including the award for the Best Film. This was followed by ‘Madhvacharya’ (1986) in Kannada, ‘Ramanujacharya’ (1989) in Tamil, ‘Bhagvad Geeta – The Song of the Lord’ (1993) in Sanskrit.  In addition, he has acted in and directed many Kannada films since 1954.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was GV Iyer’s first foray into Hindi film which also falls under the spiritual theme.  The film was produced by T Subbarami Reddy, a parliamentarian and a well-known Telugu and Bollywood film producer. The main characters in the film, Swami Vivekanand was played by Sarvadaman Banerjee and that of Ramkrishan Paramhans by Mithun Chakraborty. Tanuja, Pradeep Kumar, Debashree Roy were some of the other actors in the film. Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor, Hema Malini, Rakhee, Jaya Prada, Manmooty, Meenakshi Seshadari and Anupam Kher did some minor roles as guest actors.

The film took about 5 years to complete and further about 3 years to get released for public viewing. Naseeruddin Shah who was selected to play the role of Ramkrishna Paramhans had to be dropped due to pressure from right-wing activists. The role went to Mithun Chakraborty despite having an image of disco dancer at that time. There were many objections from various quarters including Ramkrishna Mission. When issues were being addressed by the director, someone filed a suit in the high court which after sometime, cleared the film with about 20 cuts. The film was premiered on National Channel of Doordarshan on August 15, 1998 and thereafter it was released in the theatres. The film was a disaster at the box office.

‘Swami Vivekanand’ (1994) was  Salil Da’s last Hindi film. Salil Da was regarded as an expert in background music but this was the only his Hindi film for which he could not give background music due to his sudden death on September 5, 1995.

Audio

Video

 

Song – Tava Virahe Vanamaali Sakhi Seedati  (Swami Vivekanand) (1994) Singer – Kavita Krishnamurthy, Lyrics – Jaidev (Traditional), MD – Salil Chaudhry

Lyrics

tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
dahati shishir-mayookhe
maranam-anukaroti
patati madan-vishikhe
vilapati vikalataroti
vikalataroti
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
 
aa aa aaa aa
aa aa aaa aa
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati
dhvanati madhupa-samoohe
shravanam-api dadhaati
manasi valit-virahe
nishi nishi rujam-upyaati

vasati vipin-vitaane

tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam
vasati vipin-vitaane
tyajati lalitdhaam
luth’ti dharani-shayane
bahu vilapati tava naam aa
tava naam
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virahe vanamaali
sakhi seedati
tava virah..ae
vanamaali..ee

———————————-
Devnagari script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

[Ed Note: The complete text of the original song (song no. 10 in the book) consists of 8 verses, which appear in the 5th chapter of this epic poem, placed between the 34th and the 35th shloks in the book. For the purpose of the film, only the first four have been adapted. There is a lead in verse which is a part of this song. It reads as,
वहति मलयसमीरे मदनमुपनिधाय ।
स्फुटति कुसुमनिकरे विरहिहृदयदलनाय ॥  ]

तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति ॥ १॥
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति ।
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति ॥ २॥
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ आ
दहति शिशिरमयूखे मरणमनुकरोति
पतति मदनविशिखे विलपति विकलतरोऽति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति ।
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति ॥ ३॥
ध्वनति मधुपसमूहे श्रवणमपि दधाति
मनसि वलितविरहे निशि निशि रुजमुपयाति

वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम ।
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम ॥ ४॥
वसति विपिनविताने त्यजति ललितधाम
लुठति धरणिशयने बहु विलपति तव नाम
तव नाम
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे वनमाली सखि सीदति
तव विरहे॰॰ए
वनमाली॰॰ई

 


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3982 Post No. : 15069

In some cases, it is the voice – some people will impress you, attract you with their voice. Girish Karnad’s voice has one of the most relaxing sound quality that I have heard. And his presence, his demeanor, his being in a scene, on screen or on stage, always had the same expression of comfort and relaxation as his voice. Seeing him, listening to him, one could never imagine if this person could be moved to a hasty or an impatient action.

He passed away, the day before. The news said that he was 82. I was surprised, it couldn’t be. Over the years since I had first seen him live in a drama in Delhi – almost a millennium ago, and then through films and media images, he always seemed to be the same, never changing, nor ageing. Be it the memories and images from the 60s, 70s, or even recent. He always appeared to be the same.

So when I read this one line in a media news item, I was very taken aback. Sure, I had not seen him active for the past few years, but the thought process probably had never projected far enough to make believe that he was past his 80th. In fact, as I reviewed his filmography in preparation for this article, I find that 5 of his upcoming films are slated for released through the rest of 2019.

Mid 1960s to 70s was an era for the theatre in India. One sees an upsurge in the quality of drama, the subject matter handling by the playwrights and the abilities of the dramatists. If it was Badal Sircar in Bangla (east), it was Vijay Tendulkar in Matathi (west); if it was Mohan Rakesh in Hindi (north), it was Girish Karnad in Kannada (south). These playwrights brought in some very incisive, some very timeless creations, that brought a completely fresh air, breaking new grounds in understanding the human psyche – how the humans interact, with each other and within themselves, how the social influences mould the individual behaviors, and in reverse, how the human expressions manipulate the social conduct. And together, how they shape the movement of history.

Girish K broke out a very crisp and a surprisingly innovative line of enquiry, with his very first play – ‘Yayati’. Most of the readers will be familiar with this episode from the epic, Mahabharat. Yayati is a king in the lineage of the Chandravansh, the lineage of Chandra, the Moon God. He is portrayed as an irresponsible king, consumed by his obsession with young age and the pleasures to be derived from it. He is afraid of getting old. His wife is Devyani, daughter of Rishi Shukracharya. Sharmishtha is the name of one of the ladies in waiting of Devyani. Actually a princess herself from another kingdom, Sharmishtha becomes a bounden server to Devyani due to certain events. As the events unfold furhter, Yayati has an extra marital affair with Sharmishtha, who bears three sons for him. Devyani too has three children, one daughter and two sons. Devyani complains to her father, who is the purohit (high priest) of the demon clan. Incensed by the behavior of his son-in-law, he curses him to a premature and a prolonged old age.

Yayati is shattered. He goes to Shukracharya, begs for forgiveness and removal of the curse. Shukracharaya tells him that his curse cannot be reversed, but it can be transferred to a person willing to take on such a curse. Yayati is overjoyed, but the joy is short-lived as he finds out that no one is ready to accept his curse. Finally, one of his sons, Puru, agrees to take on the curse of his father, wanting to bring peace to his father. Yayati enjoys another one thousand years of youth, donated by his son Puru.

This is a well known tale, and it has its own share of interpretations, analysis and philosophical discourse in literary critique over the ages. Girish K stepped in and asked a question that was never asked for many a millennia. What about Chitralekha?

It is not clear whether this character by this name exists in the annals of Mahabharat. Girish K is alluding to, and enquiring about Puru’s wife. A man goes ahead and takes on the curse of old age for a thousand years. There is name and fame, for this sacrifice. But no one ever asked, what about his wife? What happened to her life and her time, and whether and how did she endure this abnormally changed circumstance foisted upon her. With certain modifications to the original plot, Girish K is the first scholar to ask this question.

This play came about during Girish K’s journey to England by ship in 1960. The version of Mahabharat by C Rajagopalachari was published in 1951. This version of the epic influenced Girish K, and he went on to create two great plays based on themes from this epic. By his own account, ‘Yayati’ came so naturally to him, almost as if someone was dictating and he was just transcribing. The writing of this play was completed on this sea voyage of three weeks. He was traveling to London, having been awarded the Rhodes Scholarship at the Oxford University. During his stay and studies, he completed a triple MA, simultaneously in philosophy, politics and economics. The second play, that was born out of the influence of Mahabharat, sat in his mind for almost three decades, and then was born as ‘Fire and Rain’, which was staged first time in 1995.

His other most celebrated theatrical creation is another view into the history of India. Titled ‘Tuglaq’, this play took the theatre world, the audiences and the socio-political commentators by storm when it was first staged in 1966. In 1972, this play was enacted by the National School of Drama, directed by Ebrahim Elkazi, and presented on the ramparts of the Old Fort (Purana Qila) in Delhi. Using the ruins of the Old Fort as the backdrop, the play was enacted, to a very critical acclaim. Personally, that was my first introduction to Girish K. Quite enchanted by the theatre scene in Delhi, I have seen this enactment of the play while I still was in school.

The play covers the last 5 years of the reign of Mohammed Bin Tuglaq. The protagonist, is portrayed as having great ideas and a grand vision, but his reign was an abject failure. He started his rule with great ideals of a unified India, but his kingdom degenerated into anarchy. His proclamation to move his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad, resulted in a massive exodus that brought misery and sorrow to a huge population. This was seen by the commentators as an allegory to the Partition of the country in 1947, and mass movement of people from both sides of the border.

In his later discussions, Girish K has revealed that the play was not originally written with an intent to comment on the then current political scenario in the country. Writing about the commentary on his play, Girish K has stated – “I did not consciously write about the Nehru era, I am always flattered when people tell me that it was about the Nehru era and equally applies to development of politics since then. But, I think, that is a compliment that any playwright would be thrilled to get, but it was not intended to be a contemporary play about a contemporary situation.”

Girish K started his theatre career in Madras, with a drama group called the Madras Players. Starting with ‘Yayati’ we see the development of a multi-faceted career that has lasted for almost six decades – author, teacher, playwright, director, stage actor, film actor, director of FTII Pune, chairman of the Sangeet Natak Academy – there is so much in his career to write and tell about.

His association with the cinema begins with ‘Samskaara’ (1970) and ‘Vamsh Vriksh’ (1972), both in Kannada, and both well recognized and well awarded films. Girish K was also the co-director of ‘Vamsh Vriksh’. The storylines for both films are a very strong statement on the evolving nature of human relationships, as each individual passes through his or her own pleasures, travails, dreams and anguish. The stories tell of compelling human emotions that drive human beings, to behave in manners that are quite out of the ordinary expectations. In ‘Samskaara’, Praneshcharaya (role played by Girish K), a devout Brahmin, is so convinced of moksha being the ultimate goal of life, and being so focused to achieve it, marries an invalid, so he can remain a celibate all his life. His antithesis is life is Narayanappa, a Brahmin who has given up the traditions – he eats meat and lives with Chandri, a lady of lower standing in the society. As the events unfold, Narayanappa passes away. His final rites become a controversy – a non-Brahmin cannot perform his rites, and no Brahmin in the village is ready to perform the rites for one who has fallen from the tradition. In the midst of all this, Praneshcharya one night wakes up in the lap of Chandri. Unable to reconcile with his own actions, he leaves the village in despair. Chandri secretly performs the last rites of Narayanappa and leaves the village too. In the last scene, Praneshcharya is seen returning to the village. Did he confess and atone for his actions? – the question remains unanswered.

‘Vamsh Vriskh’ is a complex narrative of the progression in a family, the interrelationships, the hidden connects and the invisible knowns. The protagonist, Srinivasa Shrotri, goes through many a tribulation in life, and tries to keep his mental peace intact. Having lost or settled all his affairs, he finally renounces householder’s life to become a sanyaasi.

In 1974, Girish K appeared in a children’s film ‘Jaadu Ka Shankh’. Not much more information about this film is locatable.

In the next three years, we see Girish K in three films that are outstanding statements of the new-wave cinema. In 1975, we see him in ‘Nishaant’ as the timid but principled schoolmaster, whose wife is abducted by the brothers of the landlord. The film has a kind of idealist ending, with the schoolmaster fatally attacking the landlord during a religious celebration and the entire village rising up against the landlord and lynching him and his entire family. In 1976 came ‘Manthan’ – the story of the white revolution in India. Girish K has played the role of Dr Rao, a chemist assigned in the rural areas, to help villagers determine the quality of their milk and to help free them from the clutches of the milk contractors by establishing co-operative societies. In 1977, we see Girish K in ‘Swami’, assaying the role of Ghamshyam, an upright and principled eldest son in the family, after passing away of his father, handling the family matters and his own personal life very maturely and with wisdom, in the presence of a hostile step mother.

In the next four decades , Girish K has appeared in almost 100 films, in Hindi, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Malyalam and Assamese. I remember seeing him in ‘Man Pasand’ (1980), playing the role of Kashinath, a close friend of Pratap, the protagonist (role played by Dev Anand). Later, I have seen him in ‘Aasha’ (1980), ‘Ek Baar Chale Aao’ (1983), ‘Tarang’ (1984), till the waning interest in newer films kept me away. Ah yes, he was part of the dear ‘Malgudi Days’ series on the television, playing the role of Swami’s father. In his other directorial outings, he has directed ‘Godhuli’ (1977) and ‘Utsav’ (1984), films that have earned a lot of critical acclaim. He has also made a number of documentaries, like one on the Kannada poet DR Bendre (1972), ‘Kanaka-Purandara’ (English, 1988) on two medieval Bhakti poets of Karnataka, Kanaka Das and Purandara Das, and ‘The Lamp in the Niche’ (English, 1989) on Sufism and the Bhakti movement in India. Many of his films and documentaries have won several national and international awards.

Girish K’s accomplishment as an actor is simply his complete comfort with being the character he is playing. Watching him on the screen, one has this confidence that he knows all the ins and outs of the character he plays, and that in some incarnation he has lived that role himself. The authenticity of portrayal is simply magnificent.

In 1985, he appeared in the role of Pandit Shiv Shankar Shastri in the film ‘Sur Sangam’. The film, and his portrayal of the senior patriarchic exponent of classical music, are my all time favorite. I have written about this film in an earlier article with the song “Aaye Sur Ke Panchhi Aaye”. The film revolves around classical music and the story of Pt Shiv Shankar Shastri, one of the greatest living exponents of this art form. The story line brings in Tulsi (role played by Jayaprada), who is musically inclined and who reveres Shastri ji. The turn of events brings a certain unexplainable element – Tulsi is sexually assaulted, and the man responsible also throws down the portrait of Shastri ji. In a fit of violent anger, Tulsi slays the man with a shard of glass from broken portrait, runs off into the night, and boards a train departing from the local station. As destiny would have it, she barges into a first class coupe whose sole occupant is Shastri ji, who is traveling for participating in an out of town program. The two travel together, and return. Tulsi starts living in the same house as Shastri ji. He is a widower and has a girl child. Slowly, Tulsi becomes a part of the household. Being inclined for classical music, she also starts to practice while staying at Shastri ji’s home. One night, there is a special celebration at the temple of Lord Shiv. Shastri ji is to perform. Tulsi accompanies him, as usual. With the performance about to begin, Shastri ji motions Tulsi to pick up and play the taanpura in accompaniment. At this, all his participating disciples become incensed and leave the stage one by one. Tulsi rushes back home (and then leaves the household for good), the audience leaves and Shastri ji is the sole person left in the temple. In the absence of any accompaniment and musical support, he resolves to make his musical presentation regardless, to the Lord. And he presents this song, alone in a deserted temple, to Lord Shiv.

I picked this song specially, to highlight one aspect of Girish K’s artistic expressions, which was probably hidden until then. An accomplished performer, he has performed the dance steps as part of this song. Every review of the film at that time, commented on the dancer in Girish K. He revealed in an interview that he had taken on special dance training to prepare for this song. You can see the performance for yourself. It is no less than an accomplished and well trained dancer, presenting these steps in unison with the music.

This one song, in my humble opinion, is the best artistic performance that I have seen from Girish K. See the manner in which he starts his dialogue with the Lord. His singing, his facial expressions, his gestures and movements, all coalesce into a fluid expression of a conversation with Lord Shiv. No one else is present so this is a very private conversation, in which Shastri ji is telling the Lord to listen to His own sound coming from inside him. This entire clip is a one wonderful performance by Girish K that probably has not been surpassed.

It is a sad goodbye that we bid today. The person, the artist, and a scholar – it is truly a great loss to the cultural landscape of this sub continent that may never be made up.

One commentator has written about Girish K’s creations, that “. . . Girish Karnad allowed his characters to ask the questions, to struggle with the inconclusive, and hence his stories truly never ended.” Yes, that is the legacy of this multi-faceted artist – his creations, his stories, his characters – all still have a lot be explored for. That “struggle with the inconclusive” is so appropriate a passage dealing with the complex realities and relationships in the course of a human life. His stories have not really ended. And neither has his legacy.

Girish K – Rest in Peace. . . Enduring Peace

 

Song – Hey Shiv Shankar, Hey Karunakar  (Sur Sangam) (1985) Singer – Rajan-Sajan Misra, Lyrics – Vasant Dev, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics (Provided by Prakashchandra)

hey..ey..ey shiv shankar
hey..ey..ey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
mere bheetar tum gaate ho
sun lo tum apna ye swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
maun gaan ka dhyaan jamaaya
yog raag ko hi maana
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
tum hi baney ho taan praan ki
mere tan mann ko paawan kar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar

rudra been jhankar tumhaari
rudra been jhankar tumhaari
shudra janon se rahi ansuni
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
dhanya tumhi ho jaavo sureshwar
apne mukh se sun apna swar
hey shiv shankar
hey karunakar
parmanand maheshwar [

nabh chaaya ghan ghor bijuriya damke jhamke
adharon ki muskaan tumhaari cham cham chamke
aaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaa
ghir ghir aaye megh bhayankar garaj garajte
goonja nupur naad tumhaara thirak thirkate
jhuk gaya matha ki tum ne haan kaha jis pal umapati
sheesh ki ganga dharaa par utar aayi chhal-chhalaati
ga ga re ni re ga ma
dha ni re ga re sa
geet ki har lehar par tum jhoom kar naacho nateshwar
aaj is anand varsha mein nahaao tum maheshwar
aaa aaaaaa aaaaaaj is anand varsha mein
nahaa..aavoo tum maheshwar
shiv shankar
maheshwar
shiv shankar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

हे॰॰ए॰॰ए शिव शंकर
हे॰॰ए॰॰ए करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
मेरे भीतर तुम गाते हो
सुन लो तुम अपना ये स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
मौन गान का ध्यान जमाया
योग राग को ही माना
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
तुम ही बने हो तान प्राण की
मेरे तन मन को पावन कर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
रुद्र बीन झंकार तुम्हारी
शूद्र जनों से रही अनसुनी
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
धन्य तुम्हीं हो जावो सुरेश्वर
अपने मुख से सुन अपना स्वर
हे शिव शंकर
हे करुणाकर
परमानन्द महेश्वर

घन छाया घनघोर बिजुरिया दमके झमके
अधरों की मुस्कान तुम्हारी चम चम चमके
आsss आssss आssss आsssss आsssss
घिर घिर आए मेघ भयंकर गरज गरजते
गूँजा नूपुर नाद तुम्हारा थिरक थिरकते
झुक गया माथा कि तुमने हाँ कहा जिस पल उमापति
शीश कि गंगा धरा पर उतार आई छल-छलाती
ग ग रे नि रे ग म
ध नि रे ग रे स
गीत की हर लहर पर तुम झूम कर नाचो नटेश्वर
आज इस आनंद वर्षा में नहाओ तुम महेश्वर
आ आ आ॰॰आज इस आनंद वर्षा में
नहा॰॰आवो तुम महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
महेश्वर
शिव शंकर
आsss आssss आssssss


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3965 Post No. : 15047

Songs Repeated in Hindi Films – 2
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

One of the most iconic songs of Saigal Sb. A song that is a definitive representation of Hindi film music of the 1930s. That incomparable rendition by Saigal Sb under the music direction of RC Boral was recorded live for the film ‘Street Singer’ (1938). Recorded more than eight decades ago, this remains a signature piece for time immemorial. The vision of Saigal Sb, leaving his home, just carrying his harmonium with him, walking with a slow measured pace, and singing this thumri – it is one of the lasting images of Hindi cinema. That version of the thumri from the ‘Street Singer’ can be viewed here – “Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye“.

Anecdotes around that live recording and shooting tell of a microphone hidden in the harmonium, of the slow pace of walking so as to complete the singing and the visual shot keeping within the range of the camera. Playback singing had already been invented (1935) and was in progressive use in the industry. And yet, this song was recorded live. The performance can only be called – unprecedented, incomparable and peerless. Nothing more fascinates the diehard fans of Saigal Sb, than this one song by him. Many singers have sung this, but the Saigal version remains untouched, unsurpassed.

In the film, this song spans an extended sequence of scenes. And small parts of this song are also rendered by Kanan Devi. There is a sequence where Kanan Devi attempts to sing this song in the theatre. Later, Bhola (KLS) departs from their shared home, upset that Manju (Kanan Devi) is enamored by Amar Babu (Jagdish Sethi), and wants to move in with him. But after just one day away from Bhola, Manju returns home searching for him. And finds that he has left. She makes a phone call to Amar Babu, requesting him to bring his car. They start to drive towards the road that leads to Bhola and Manju’s home village. In the meantime, the scene shifts between Manju searching for Bhola, and Bhola walking away with the harmonium. The song is reprised here three or four times, sometimes just the mukhda, sometimes just the antaraa.

Amar Babu is driving the car with dismay in his heart. A windstorm arrives. There is lot of dust in the air, and visibility is not good. Manju alights from the car, and starts following the path on foot – the path that Bhola would have taken returning to his village. Tired and overcome by storm, Bhola falls down by the roadside. Manju sees someone lying on the road and rushes to him. The tryst happens again. Amar Babu watches them from a distance. And then with a wry smile on his face, he returns to his car, to start the lonely journey back to his home. Bhola and Manju start their foot journey back to their village. Once again the song is heard in the voice of Kanan Devi, as the visual shows the two mates, in a silhouette against a darkening sky. The hearts have met, they are returning home, and the lady’s voice is telling – “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

Thirty five years later, in 1973, this classical thumri is now included in the film ‘Aavishkaar’, starring Sharmila Tagore and Rajesh Khanna. This time, the music composition is by Kanu Roy, who transformed it into a duet, with the participating voices of Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh. This time, in the picturization, this is presented as a background song, as the visual action on screen is mostly silent – and yet very expressive.

‘Aavishkaar’ presents a scenario of a brief hiatus in the lives of two people very much in love. In love they are, and they get married, and they start to live together. Maybe, just love is never enough. What love is – it needs to be examined, re examined and re invented often. And then it becomes love, more love and more meaningful. Else, just the drudgery of the consistent proximity, which used to be like heaven to start with, turns into stagnant boredom. Expectations still riding high, the lull now breeds contempt – a contempt that is actually screaming for and seeking a rejuvenated level of understanding and sharing. That is what ‘Aavishkaar’ is about.

The film starts on a day when it is the wedding anniversary of the protagonist couple. Amar (Rajesh Khanna) is aware, but still, broodingly ignores. He works late in office, he goes to see a film with a female co-worker, giving the audience the impression that he is seeking extra marital happiness. On his way back at night, he finally musters enough thought and courage, and buys a bouquet of Rajnigandha flowers. Arriving home, a certain scene transpires before he enters the house, and on an impulse, he places the bouquet in a flower pot next to the door, and enters the house, pretending that he does not remember the anniversary. A long night passes. There are flashbacks, there are arguments, there is even physical violence – highlighting the drift that has occurred in the relationship. Basu Bhattacharya has handled the conflict and the interactions very deftly. In my mind, this is the best handling of the situation of a very loving relationship gone sour. Many other films come to mind – ‘Arth’, ‘Dooriyaan’, ‘Anubhav’, ‘Aandhi’, ‘Grih Pravesh’, ‘Aap Ki Kasam’, the comical ‘Pati, Patni Aur Who’, ‘Abhimaan’ . . . and more. In ‘Aavishkaar’, the director portrays the conflict, the pain, and the reconciliation, at a very psychological level.

So, after a distraught and a tension filled hostile night, mostly sleepless and lot of exchanges and memories, the new day dawns. The rigmarole of the daily routine beckons. Mansi (Sharmila Tagore) gets up early and opens the front door to pick up the milk delivery. And then she sees. . . the bouquet standing in the flower pot. She picks it up. And the voice of Jagjit Singh drifts in from the background. She finds Amar standing behind her. . . and there is an embrace. A lot changed and a lot settled in that night of strife.

The two stanzas play out slowly. The first one as the couple are embracing and then they move back into the home. The second stanza is an external shot, mixing flashback again possibly, as we see the couple on the beach, in a mood of frolic, as the singer croons yet once again to say. . . “Le Babul Ghar Aapno, Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

The two instances that we are so familiar with, of the use of this song in Hindi films, both seem to have happy conclusion. But that was not the original thought when Wajid Ali Shah wrote and composed this thumri, way back in 1856. The British had played a game of deception with the Nawab of Awadh. In a bloodless coup, Wajid Ali Shah was dethroned and sent to Calcutta, and the British annexed Lucknow and the kingdom of Awadh. The Nawab was completely heartbroken, on leaving his beloved city, and his cultural roots. That is the time when this timeless poem was conceived.

Yes, the interpretations works both ways. There is this indication of a newlywed bride, going to her new matrimonial home. There is sadness on leaving the parent’s home, but there is also an eagerness and joyful elation of being with the one, with whom a new bond of love will be explored. And, there is the gloomy and poignant interpretation. Looking at the sad dilemma that was faced by Wajid Ali Shah – he was sentenced to leave behind his beloved city, his happy pastimes, and the people who made up his life that far. The discussions in literature talk about the passing passage of life into afterlife. That too, is a leaving behind of the home that one thinks to be their own, and then embark on a journey to meet the Maker. This jusxtaposition is captured so beautifully and so splendidly in this brief two verse thumri – “Main Chali Piya Ke Des. . .”.

In the context of this series, I bring on this song today to highlight another dimension of reuse that we see so often in Hindi films – the reuse of traditional poetry and folk music. This particular thumri is so simply a dear favorite of singers, that gathering the number of different renditions by different artists would be a big exercise in itself. Just to give you an idea, this thumri has been sung by the following singers – the list goes all the way from Bade Ghulam Ali Khan to Alisha Chinoy. The names, in no particular order are – Ustad Faiyaz Khan, Gauhar Jaan, Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, Siddheswari Devi, Begum Akhtar, Rasoolan Bai, Naina Devi, Kesarbai Kerkar, Ustad Mushtaq Hussain Khan, Malka Jaan, KL Saigal, Jagmohan Sursagar, Kannan Devi, Ustad Khadim Husain Khan, Girija Devi, Shobha Gurtu, Pandit Bhimsen Joshi, Pandit Jitendra Abhisheki, Kishori Amonkar, Jagjit Singh and Chitra Singh, Jagjit Singh (solo), Rajan-Sajan Mishra, Alisha Chinoy, Mahendra Chopra. . . and I am sure, many more artists of repute.

If I talk about Hindi films, then besides the two instances already covered in the write up above, this thumri appears in two more films. In 1954, Manna Dey has sung this for the film ‘Mahatama Kabir’ – a really wonderful rendition. Then later in 1964, Lata Mangeshkar has sung this for the Bhojpuri film ‘Naihar Chhutal Jaaye’.
[Ed Note: Dear Arun ji adds two more instances of this song being used in Hindi films, both from early 1930s. This song has been rendered by Durga Khote in the 1931 film ‘Trapped’ aka ‘Farebi Jaal’. Then again in 1934, this thumri appears in the list of songs for the film ‘Naachwaali’ – no information available regarding singer or music director.]

Such reuse that involves traditional poetry and folk songs, is really very simple, because this material is beyond the intellectual property disputes. For that matter, we have seen many such other creations being used in films across the decades. On the devotional side, the poems of Meerabai, Kabir Das, and Soordas are very popular and are used quite freely by the producers. Then we have the adabi poets, once again a traditional treasure that does not have any copyright issues attached. Ghazals of Ghalib are quite popular and have been used in many films across the decades. As I scanned the songs in HFGK I find that the ghazal “Dil e Nadaan Tujhe Hua Kya Hai” appears in 9 films from 1931 to 1980. The ghazal “Nuktacheen Hai Gham e Dil” appears in four films, “Ye Na Thee Hamaari Qismat” appears three times, “Phir Mujhe Deeda e Tar Yaad Aaya” also appears in three films, and so on.

Checking for Meerabai’s bhajans, one finds the popular ones like “Mere To Girdhar Gopal”, “Main To Gidhar Ke Ghar Jaaun”, “Tum Jo Todo Piya” etc., being used in many films. Not a precise search, but my estimate is that Meerabai’s bhajans appear in Hindi films more than 100 times. The search cannot be precise because there are many instances where the traditional bhajans or ghazals have been used without giving credit to the original poet. Additional note – Amir Khusro’s poetry appears in Hindi films no less than 10 times, of which at least 4 are occurrences of “Kaahe Ko Byaahi Bides. . .”.

The more difficult proposition would be to trace the folk songs reuse across Hindi films. With so much variations, and without acknowledgement to the original folk source, it is difficult to make an estimate of folk music reuse in films. But I will surely add that this segment would be more voluminous than the bhajans and ghazals. The song, or variations thereof, of “Jhumka Gira Re. . .” has been used in no less than four films.

Coming to the film ‘Aavishkaar’. The film is produced under the banner of Aarohi Film Makers and is directed by Basu Bhattacharya. The songs of this film are written by Gyandev Agnihotri and Kapil Kumar. And yes, this traditional thumri originally created by Wajid Ali Shah. The cast of actors is listed as Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila Tagore, Deena Gandhi, Denis Klement, Satyendra Kappu, Monika Jasnani, Devendra Khandelwal, Margaret, Mahesh Sharma, and Minna Johar etc.

Interesting side note – this film is the 2nd in the now famous trilogy by Basu Bhattacharya, on the topic of marital discord, the first one being ‘Anubahv’ (1971) and the 3rd being ‘Grih Pravesh’ (1977).

More interesting side notes. As we talk about reuse, I must mention the other interesting reuse in this film. Probably this is the only film where we can hear Sharmila Tagore singing. At one place in the film, the iconic Manna Dey song “Hansne Ki Chaah Ne. . .” is being sung by Sharmila. Then, at another place in the film, the song from ‘Teesri Kasam’ (1966) – “Duniya Banaane Waale, Kya Tere Mann Mein Samaai” is playing on the radio, and we can also hear Sharmila singing along with it.

So much for today. In the next episode, we shall explore another very interesting aspect of re-use of songs.

Song – Baabul Mora, Naihar Chhuto Hi Jaaye  (Aavishkaar) (1973) Singers – Jagjit Singh, Chitra Singh, Lyrics – Traditional, MD – Kanu Roy
Jagjit Singh + Chitra Singh

Lyrics

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

baabul mora. . .
baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

chaar kahaar mil mori
doliyaan sajaaye re
mora apna begaana
chhuto jaaye. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

[dialogue – Rajesh Khanna, Sharmila]

angnaa to parbat bhaya
deori bhai bides
le babul ghar aapno
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des
main chali piya ke des

baabul mora. . .
naihar chhuto hi jaaye

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

चार कहार मिल मोरी
डोलियाँ सजाये रे
मोरा अपना बेगाना
छूटो जाये॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

[संवाद – राजेश खन्ना, शर्मिला टागोर]

अंगना तो परबत भया॰ ॰ ॰
डेयोड़ी भई बिदेस
ले बाबुल घर आपनो
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस
मैं चली पिया के देस

बाबुल मोरा॰ ॰ ॰
नईहर छूटो ही जाये

 


This article is written by Nahm, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3963 Post No. : 15041

It is human nature that on every important occasion and event in life, we recall all the people who had ever crossed our lives and made a difference to it. I had a similar experience during the last year. I felt like I wanted to get in touch with people from way back as far as my childhood. I met people who were our neighbours when my daughter was born. I wanted to invite all those who knew her when she was very little and had showered prayers on her when she was not even aware of those blessings. Sometimes we lose touch with people as they move away or we move away. People who were neighbours and our kids used to play together. All of them had touched our lives, affected us in a good or bad way. Mostly in the essential goodness of human nature it was well intentioned.

For us working women, there is this space in the heart for those who looked after our children when we are away at work. Some such people, neighbour and acquaintances, I was able to contact and invite for the wedding. One of such who were neighbour of my parents and distantly related to my father, attended my daughter’s wedding with her extended family. Sometimes the bonds of shared memories and events in life transcend all constraints of time and distance. When that aunty came on stage to meet the bride and groom, that moment the day of my daughter’s birth flashed in my eyes.

Early in the morning that day the aunty was there to see us off when I was leaving for the hospital. Later on my daughter was born in caesarean section. That evening she came to see us in the hospital. I remembered talking to her about my daughter and the scary experience when the doctor told us that she cannot find the baby’s heartbeat which resulted in caesarean section. I started crying and she also started crying and comforting me. I also remember telling her that all I want from the Almighty now is that “mere bachche ka naseeb achha ho”.

A few weeks after the delivery I had high fever and suffered an epileptic fit. My daughter was a few weeks old, and my mother who had not seen anything like this thought I was dead. She says she kept looking at me and my daughter and wailing. Thankfully, I survived the fit with the timely help of doctors in the neighbourhood and basic first aid given by neighbours. Even during this time this aunty and her family was there on hand to lend a helping hand any which way.

Actually, the above memories had a trigger. I had a five day training schedule in the second week of April. During the training we were made to listen to all the same routine work procedure, rules and regulations, which we have been finding, using and following since day one 🙂 . Actually these procedures are all basically based on common sense and logic, I feel. Difficulty comes when something out of the ordinary crops up then we have the facility of looking up in the proper book and finding the instructions to deal with the situation in the appropriate manner.

During the training one day, a fellow participant suffered an epileptic fit, while the session was going on. A friend of her said that it happens to her from time to time. With the first aid, which thankfully some ladies knew, she was all right after a while. But all this reminded me to my experience of which I personally have no recollection. I know only what I was told afterwards. Seeing it happening to another person is actually more scaring.

The training got over on Friday just in time to enable me and my husband to leave for the trip to Rajasthan as planned on the Saturday. Since this was a first time for us, we had a lot to cover, see and enjoy in one week. It was not enough certainly with so many placed to see. We managed to see quite enough to want do the touristy thing again sometime and see the rest of the places. With so many historical places, forts, palaces and museums etc. it really is the tourists delight as Avinash ji has said in his post – “Mhaare Rajasthan Maa. . .“. I was really delighted to see the various red stone carved palaces and embellishments and some of those inlay work in ‘Sang-e-marmar’ is also visible in places. I have not seen too many such historical places so far, but I was able to detect some superimposition inside the monuments and outside the museum or palace areas. Sadly that is modernity or commercialisation for you. There is an influx of shops and touristy restaurants too, which might be commercial necessity for all I know.

You see the historical monuments are not humans and have no sense of self preservation. From what I learnt most of those places are private property and the owners are free to utilise them. The most well preserved buildings have been converted to star hotels. Good for them as they become commercially viable and will survive longer. At least the superbly carved Mehrangad Fort is a World Heritage site and deservedly.

In a palace shop in Rajasthan I saw a bottled ‘Mitti Ki Khushboo’ fragrance. ‘Mitti ki khusbhboo’ bottled and patented:) . I heard a guide saying that ‘when the first rain drops fall on the earth, this is that mehek”. Indeed…. we should get ‘Shameem’ also in the bottle one day I hope. After all hopes and aspirations are totally free of cost.

Since the day this trip was planned and looked like it will finally happen, I have been remembering the song – “Nainon Mein Badra Chhaaye“.

Without actually going to Udaipur it is possible to visualise it through these songs. I came back from the place humming this song. The panorama surrounding the lake still looks exactly the same as is seen in the song. That is something at least. Since than I have found another song from ‘Mera Saaya’ (1966) – “Nainon Waali Ne Haaye Mera Dil Loota” featuring the scenes of Lake Pichchola of Udaipur. This is no exaggeration, the lakes and surrounding Aravali range is real beautiful site.

I found a song which is like revisiting the places /forts and music and sounds of Rajasthan in the film ‘Ham Dil De Chuke Sanam’ (1999). The majestic Mehrangadh fort is visible in some frames in the song. This amalgamation of folk and classical music is composed by Ismail Darbar and lyricists is Mehboob. The singers are Ustad Sultan Khan, Shankar Mahadevan and Kavita Krishnamoorthy. Quite a ‘bhaari bharkam’ trio what with the heavy voices and names :). In the video of the extended song many members of the cast are seen, notably the late Zohra Sehgal. Vikram Gokhle, Salman Khan and Aishwarya are singing it on screen.

Last word: What I brought back from Rajasthan is the sights and sounds of the locals talent and motivated enough in preserving the originality of the folk music and songs. I want to write more about Rajasthan, but this post is quite long now, so will keep the rest of my thoughts for some other post.


Song – Albelaa Sajan Aayo Ree (Hum Dil De Chuke Sanam) (1999) Singers – Ustad Sultan Khan, Kavita Krishnamurthy, Shankar Mahadevan , Lyrics – Mehboob Kotwal, Music Director – Ismail Darbar
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Kavita Krishnamurthy
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Shankar Mahadevan
Ustaad Sultan Khan + Kavita Krishnamurthy + Shankar Mahadevan
Chorus

Lyrics

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
mora hathwar sookh paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa aa
albelaa aa
albelaa aa aaaaa
albelaa aa aaaaa
albelaa aa
albelaa aa
dhi ga ma pa pa
pa pa na dha nee dha
dhi ga ma pa pa
pa pa na dha nee dha
ma ga re sa nee ra sa
ga ma pa re sa
ma ga re sa nee ra sa
ga ma pa re sa
albelaa sajan aayo ri

albelaa sajan aayo ri
dheera nanna nanna
dheera aanna
dheera nanna nanna
dheera aanna

chokh puraao mangal gaavo
tana na tana na
nanna na nanna
chokh puraao mangal gaavo
man rang nitta paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa
aa aaaa aaa
aaaaa aaaaa

chokh puraao mangal gaavo
chokh puraao mangal gaavo
man rang nitta paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

tana na nana na
tana na naana na aa aao
aaaa aaaaaao
dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna nanna
nanna aaoo
na na na na na naaooo
aa aa aa aa aa aaaaaoo

tana na nana na
tana na nana na
tana na nana na
tana na nana na

albelaa sajan aaayeeoooo
ri. . .

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
mora hathwar sookh paayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna
dheera nanna nanna
dheera nanna

albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri

aa aa aa aa aa aaaa

ta ta ta ni re ra tara te
ta ta ta ta ta

sa sa sa sa
sa ri ga sa sa sa
sa ri ga pa dha ni sa 

re ga ta ta sa ga re ga
re ga sa ga re ga
ta ta sa ri ga sa sa sa
albelaa sajan aayo ri
albelaa sajan aayo ri
aa aa aa aa aa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa sajan
albelaa
albelaa
albelaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

——————————————-
Devnagri script Lyrics (Provided by Nahm)
——————————————-
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
मोरा हथ्वर सूख पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ……..
अलबेला आ आ……..
अलबेला आ आ
अलबेला आ आ
धी ग म प प
प प न ध नि ध
धी ग म प प
प प न ध नि ध

म ग र स नि र स
ग म प र स
म ग र स नि र स
ग म प र स

अलबेला सजन आयो री

अलबेला सजन आयो री
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
ताना न ताना ननना
ननना ना ननना

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
मन रंग नित्ता पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
चोख पुराओ मंगल गाओ
मन रंग नित्ता पायो री

अलबेला सजन आयो री

ताना न ननना
ननना ना ननना न आ आओ
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना ननना ना

ननना न आ आओ
ना ना ना ना ना न आ आओ
आ आ आ आ आओ

ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना
ताना न ननना

अलबेला सजन आयीऊ
री. . .

अल बेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
मोरा हथ्वर सूख पायो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना
धीरा ननना ननना
धीरानना

अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री

आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ

त त त त त नि रे रा तारा ते
त त त त त

स स स स
स री ग 
स स

स र ग प ध नि सा

र ग त त स ग र ग
र ग स ग र ग
त त स र ग स स

अलबेला सजन आयो री
अलबेला सजन आयो री
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला
अलबेला सजन 
अलबेला

अलबेला
अलबेला
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ


Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over ELEVEN years. This blog has more than 15300 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15394

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1180
Total Number of movies covered =4243

Total visits so far

  • 12,921,068 hits

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,819 other followers

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share

Category of songs

Current Visitors

Archives

Stumble

visitors whereabouts

blogcatalog

Music Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory

blogadda

Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

%d bloggers like this: