Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Classical composition’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4746 Post No. : 16473

Sixty-five years have passed since ‘Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje’ (1955) -JJPB for short – was released. I had seen the film in a theatre in South Mumbai either in 1955 or 1956 (this film had run for nearly 2 years in a single theatre in Mumbai). But I had no recollection of much of the film. It was only after I watched some parts of the film on the video sharing platforms over a period of time, I could connect some scenes from the film I saw in my childhood. The film still evokes interest of the cinema lovers especially of those who relish the classical dance/music.

I am now in a better position the appreciate a bold and somewhat adventurous decision Shantaram took to produce and direct JJPB with the classical dance as a theme. If not handled properly, the theme could have turned the film into a documentary rather than a feature film. It was a high budget film in a technicolour extravaganza. Shantaram’s bold and daring decision to make JJPB has be admired in the backdrop of the following handicaps he faced:

(1) The successive failures at the box office of ‘Surang’ (1953) and ‘Subah Ka Taara’ (1954), both directed by V Shantaram had already put a financial strain on his banner, Rajkamal Kala Mandir. Under the circumstances, producing a film with a classical dance theme which Shantaram had never handled in the past, that too in technicolour was fraught with a huge financial risk.

(2) There were examples in the 1940s when Sagar Movietone made ‘Kumkum The Dancer’ (1940) and Wadia Movietone made ‘Court Dancer/Raj Nartaki’ (1941) with classical dance theme. The results were not encouraging. Both these films failed at the box office putting the financial strains on the respective banners. Eventually, Sagar Movietone had to be merged with National Studio and Wadia Movietone got split between Wadia Brothers and the Wadia Studio was sold to V Shantaram.

(3) It was a high budget film but the lead actors in the film were non-stars – a handicap for the box office collections. The lead actor, Gopi Krishna was just emerging as a choreographer in a couple of films while the lead actress, Sandhya had acted in two Hindi films prior to getting the lead role of a dancer in JJPB. Moreover, she was not a trained classical dancer like Vyjayantimala who had already became a star actor-dancer and had the capacity to attract the crowd in the theatres much higher than that of Sandhya.

Despite these handicaps, going ahead with JJPB showed the confidence level of Shantaram as a director and a master craftsman of the cinema medium. Probably, Shantaram may have felt that with his technicolour film, he was in a better postion to present the classical dance theme than what Sagar Movietone and Wadia Movietone had made in 1940-41. He put Sandhya under Gopikrishna for the intensive dance training for over a year which included training during the shooting of the film as well.

Shantaram was very successful in winning over the audience who had rejected his previous two films. He made the Indian classical dances visually appealing to the audience by presenting them in a hybrid choreography, coupled with the lavish settings. The visuals in Technicolour appealed to the audience. The film became Shantaram’s most successful films on the box office front. More than the commercial success of the film, it was personal satisfaction for Shantaram as a producer-director when JJPB won the National Award and the Filmfare Award for the Best Film for 1955.

Since JJPB was all about Indian classical dances, it was apparent that the songs need to be based on the Hindustani classical music. It is said that some well-wishers of Shantaram including Vasant Desai had suggested him to entrust the music direction of the film to Naushad who had emerged as a star music director in the classical genre after the phenomenal success of his songs in ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952). But Shantaram entrusted the music direction to Vasant Desai. It is interesting to note that after ‘Dahej’ (1950), as a music director, Vasant Desai was not associated with Shantaram’s subsequent films, ‘Parchhaain’ (1952), ‘Surang’ (1953), ‘Teen Batti Chaar Raasta’ (1953) and ‘Subah Ka Taara’ (1954).

In his zeal to prove the confidence reposed on him by his mentor, Vasant Desai travelled all over India to pick up the best musicians for his music team for JJPB. In Jammu, he picked up Shiv Kumar Sharma, an upcoming Santoor player who was still in his teen at that time. From Banaras, he picked up Pandit Samta Prasad, the renowned Tabla player. Ustad Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan of Indore played sitar for Vasant Desai. In JJPB, Santoor as a musical instrument was used for the first time which later became a part of many Hindi film songs and background music.

After almost all the songs had been recorded, Vasant Desai had composed the title song in raga ‘Darbari’ for which he persuaded Ustad Amir Khan to sing. Ustad Amir Khan arrived at the recording studio for the final rehearsal and recording. At the last moment, Vasant Desai felt that he should get consent of Shantaram before the recording. So, he invited him to the recording studio to listen to the final rehearsal. Upon listening to the rehearsal, Shantaram was unhappy. He called Vasant Desai to an adjoining room and advised him to cancel the recording and suggested to either change the tune or the singer or both. Somehow Vasant Desai, on some pretext, persuaded Ustad Amir Khan to come for the recording the next day.

A nervous Vasant Desai reached home and sat down quietly. He did not know what was wrong with the composition and could not sleep that night. Early morning, it dawned to him that all the dances in the film had very fast tempo and rhythm whereas his tune was in very slow tempo and so were the aalaaps. Vasant Desai composed the same song in Raga Adana in very fast tempo and aalaaps. He rehearsed the new tune with Ustad Amir Khan in the presence of Shantaram who was pleased with the new composition. [Source of this triva on title song -”Journal of SIRC”, Annual 2012].

I am presenting here the much talked about title song, ‘jhanak jhanak paayal baaje’ rendered by Ustad Amir Khan. The words are of Hasrat Jaipuri and the music composition is of Vasant Desai.

The title song became so popular that Ustad Amir Khan used to get ‘farmaish’ in his public concerts to sing the title song. Later, Ustad Amir Khan started singing a much-elongated version of this song (nearly 9 minutes) in his concerts and the gramophone record for the same was released. Ustad Amir Khan sang live the title song of the film on the occasion of the diamond jubilee (60th week) celebration of the film in the presence of the distinguished guests at the Liberty cinema in Mumbai.

Audio Clip:

Video Clip:

Audio Clip (Concert Verson):

Song-Jhanak jhanak paayal baaje (Jhanak Jhanak Paayal Baaje)(1955) Singer-Ustad Amir Khan, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Vasant Desai

Chorus

Lyrics: (Based on Audio Clip)

jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

paayaliya ki runak jhunak par
paayaliya ki runak jhunak par
chham chham manwa naa..che
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

neel gagan bhi sunkar jhoome
madhur madhur jhanka…ar
madhur madhur jhankaar
soyi dharti jaag uthhi hai
soyi dharti jaag uthhi hai
goonj uthha sansaar
raag rang bhi saa…je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

jhanak jhanak paa…yal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

[sargam]
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje

(aaaaaaaaaaaa)

jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal baa..je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
paayal baa….je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal aaa baa..je ae
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaa
paayal baa…je
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
jhanak jhanak paayal baaje
(aaaaaaaaaaaaaa)
jhanak-jhanak paayal baaje
(aaaaaaaaaaaaaa)
jhanak-jhanak paayal baaje


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4553 Post No. : 16142

“Ram Hanuman Yudhh” (1957) was produced by R N Mandloi and directed by S N Tripathi for Ravikala Chitra Productions. This movie had Durga Khote, Manhar Desai, Nirupa Roy, Prem Adeeb, Babu Raje, Shalini, S. N. Tripathi etc in it.

The movie had seven songs in it. Six songs from this movie have been discussed in the past.

Here are the details of the six songs already covered in the blog:-

Blog post number Song Date of posting Remarks
6548 Suna tu man ki been par (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 30 August 2012
7562 Aaj agar meri laaj gayee (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 26 February 2013
7567 Rakh laaj mere sindoor ki (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 27 February 2013
8603 Bhaj Ram Ram bhaj Ram (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 29 August 2013
9571 Balma o balma chanda hamaare (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 14 March 2014
12869 Door gagan par chamken sitaare (Ram Hanuman Yudhh) 29 January 2017

I had discovered the seventh and final song nearly two years ago. I found this song such a special song that it deserved to be covered on a special. And that special occasion had just passed. So I decided to wait for the next year when the occasion would recur. On the next year too I missed he occasion and I decided to wait for another one year.

What is this occasion ? The occasion is the birth anniversary of Nirupa Roy ((4 January 1931 – 13 October 2004) which falls today (4 January 2020).

To most moviegoers, Nirupa Roy is associated with roles where she played mother of Amitab Bachchan. In quite a few of these movies, she ould get separated fro her family only to reunite in the last reel.

People of earlier generation would tell us that she as a Maa only towards the second half of her movie career. Prior to that she played lead roles. She often played a suffering wife in these movies but that as not all. In quite a few of her early movies she has played happy and assertive roles as well. Many of her earlier movies ere mythological or historical movies where she played a goddess or queen.

Many songs have been picturised on her during her days as a leading lady. Some of them have become iconic songs. The famous song, “o pawan veg se udne aale ghode” was lip synced by her.

The song under discussion is different ! People who have a particular image f Nirupa Roy in their mind will get a culture shock hen the watch the picturisation of this song.

It is a song here Nirupa Roy performs a dance ! Yes indeed. It is a classical dance setting where Nirupa Roy lip syncs in Lata Mangeshkar’s voice. The song also has an unknon male voice that sings katthak bol.

Shailendra is the lyricist. Music is composed by S N Tripathi.

I request our knoledgeable readers to help identify the male singer as well as the actor lip syncing in the male voice.

with this song, all the seven songs of “Ram Hanuman Yudhh” (1957) are covered in the blog. The movie thus joins the list of movies that have been YIPPEED in the blog.


Song-Binti karat mori paayal runjhun (Raam Hanuman Yudhh)(1957) Singer-Lata, Lyrics-Shailendra, MD-S N Tripathi

Lyrics

nagendr haaraay trilochanaay
bhasmaang raagaayah digambaraay
gauri vinaash bhuvanaay maheshwaraay
daaridray dukhdahanaay namah shivaay

binti karat mori paayal run jhun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun
sabki sunat mori sun sun sun sun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun
tatdhim tatdhin
tatdhin
tirkit tathim tatdhim
tirkit tirkit dhum
dhim tatdhim
tatdhim tirkit tatdhim tatdhim
tirkat tirkat dhum
takit takit
takit takit
takit
tirkat tirkat dhum
tirkat dhum
tak takit
tak takit
tak takit
tirkat tirkat dhum
tirkat tirkat dhum
tak takit tak
takit
takit
takit
tirkat tirkat dhoom
tirkat tirkat dhoom
thai
ti
thai
ti thai
ti thai
ta thinak yun
thom

tadapat aaj trikaal hiya mein
rowat peer behaal jiya mein
tadapat aaj trikaal hiya mein
rowat peer behaal jiya mein
dard bhari mori dhun sun sun sun sun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun
sabki sunat mori sun sun sun sun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun

aa aa
aa aa
aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aaa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
na main tujhe rijhaana jaanoon
na patthar pighlaana jaanoon
na main tujhe rijhaana jaanoon
na patthar pighlaana jaanoon
aanchal hi phailaana jaanoon
mujhme nahin koi gun sun sun sun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun
sabki sunat mori sun sun sun sun
binti karat mori paayal run jhun

tattit takanaka jhum
tarikitnaka tha
ri tha
tirkat tirkat dhoom
tatdit
takanaka
tarigidana
dhi ta
tarkit tarkit dhum
dhit takanaka jyon
kritak dha thim
dhina dhom
kritak daka dhik
taka anak jhum
kritak tat jhim
dhina dhum
krikat tak jhim
taka naka jhum tari
naka taka
dhit taka naka
tari gida
naka
thai
thai
thai thai
thai thai
takajhun tak
takadhit takanaka jhum
tari gida naka taka
dhit taka naka
tari gida na
thai thai
thai thai
thai thai
takajhun take


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4548 Post No. : 16128

Today, December 30, 2020 is 7th Remembrance Day of Lakshmi Shankar.

What a musical journey Lakshmi Shankar had in her career spreading over 7 decades! Her journey from a Bharatnataym dancer to Uday Shankar’s ballet dancer, an actress in a Tamil film, a playback singer in Hindi films, a Hindustani classical vocalist and as a catalyst in spreading the Hindustani classical music across the continents is unparalleled. And it is more so for a woman who had to cross the societal barrier. Lakshmi Shankar was really a woman of substance.

In 2009, 83-year-old Lakshmi Shankar received a Grammy Nomination for Best Traditional World Music Album. Although she could not make it to the final list, the Grammy nomination itself was a great event for a woman Hindustani classical vocalist in the Western music dominated award. The irony is that she never got the status of a celebrity in her own country. She did not get any ‘Padma’ awards from Government of India nor any award from Sangeet Academy – whether Central or State levels.

Lakshmi Shankar, was born as Mahalakshmi Sastri (16/06/1926- 30/12/2013) in Jamshedpur where her father Vaidyanath Sastri was employed in Tata Iron and Steel Company as a Chartered Accountant. He was a native of a village in Pudukkottai district. Her mother, Visalaksi was from Palghat (Palakkad) district – both districts being part of the then Madras Presidency. During Vaidyanath Sastri’s stay in Jamshedpur, Mahatma Gandhi made a number of visits to Jamshedpur. The result was that he became attracted to Gandhian ideology. Mahatma Gandhi picked him up to devote time for the upliftment of harijans. He left the job and shifted to Poona (Pune) in 1930 for the assigned work. His other family members, including Lakshmi Shankar, shifted to Madras (Chennai).

At the age of 8, Lakshmi was put under Guru Kandappa Pillai for learning Bharatnataym dance in Chennai. At the age of 11, she performed her arangetram in Bharatnatyam dance. At the age of 13, she joined Uday Shankar’s India Cultural Centre in Almora for training in fusion dances. During her stint in Almora, Lakshmi Shankar got married to Rajendra Shankar, (the next younger brother of Uday Shankar) who was 21 years older than her. Rajendra Shankar, with M.Sc. in Physics and Chemistry was working as a script writer and was handling publicity in Uday Shankar’s Dance Academy. During 1940-43, Lakshmi Shankar travelled across India as one of the dancers with Uday Shankar’s dance troupe. In 1944, Uday Shankar’s India Cultural Centre in Almora was closed down due to financial constraints.

Following the closure of Uday Shankar’s Dance Academy, Lakshmi Shankar with her husband and brother-in-law, Ravi Shankar came to Mumbai. Both the Shankar brothers got associated with Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA). While Rajendra Shankar joined Bombay Talkies (later Filmistan) as story and script writer, Ravi Shankar got his first assignment for scoring music for Chetan Anand’s ‘Neecha Nagar’ (1946) followed by K A Abbas’s ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946). In the first film, Lakshmi Shankar sang for Kamini Kaushal a lullaby so na o nanhi so na. In ‘Dharti Ke Laal’ (1946), she sang beete ho sukh ke din aayee dukh ki ratiyaan.

With these two films, the musical collaboration of Lakshmi Shankar with her brother-in-law, Ravi Shankar started which continued until the latter’s death in December 2012.

Ravi Shankar and his other associates were disillusioned with IPTA as they were not given the freedom in creating the work of their respective fields. Ravi Shankar set up his own artists’ group in which his wife Annapurna Devi, sister-in-law, Lakshmi Shankar and his elder brother, Rajendra Shankar, Zohra Sehgal, Shanti Bardhan etc became the important part of this group.

It was around this time that Jawaharlal’s Nehru’s book ‘The Discovery of India’ (1946) was published and Ravi Shankar felt that this book was a good choice for adapting it as a ballet-cum-opera on the stage. He got the financial backing for the project from Indian National Theatre, the cultural wing of the Indian National Congress. While Ravi Shankar and Annapurna Devi took charge of the music, Rajendra Shankar wrote the script and looked after the production. Lakshmi Shankar and Sachin Shankar became the main dancers to be choreographed by Shanti Bardhan.

The premier of ‘The Discovery of India Ballet-Cum-Opera’ was held in New Delhi in April 1947 in the presence of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. The premier of the ballet-cum-opera was highly successful. Later, it was staged at many prominent cities all over India because of which Lakshmi Shankar became a well-known dancer.

In 1948, while the ballet-cum-opera was still being staged, Lakshmi Shankar fell ill and was diagnosed as suffering from pleurisy affecting her lungs. She was taken back to her house in Chennai for recuperation. The doctor advised her to give up dancing as it would be too hard for her weak lungs. With this, her professional dancing career came to an end.

After a complete recovery from illness, Lakshmi Shankar returned to Mumbai where her husband was already working as a story and screenplay writer in Amiya Chakraborty’s film production company, ‘Mars & Movies’. [Lakshmi Shankar’s younger sister Kamala Sastri was married to Amiya Chakraborty in 1951]. In the absence of dancing, she thought of pursuing the playback singing career in films.

Post-illness, Lakshmi Shankar sang jingles in some advertising films and got a chance to sing a bhajan ‘in Aandhiyaan (1952). It was during her rehearsal of the song recording for the film ‘Mastaana’ (1954) when its music director, Madan Mohan advised her to learn Hindustani classical music as he felt that her voice was most suited for thumri singing. Though Lakshmi Shankar liked Hindustani classical music in instruments, she was not keen to become Hindustani classical vocalist.

It was because of Madan Mohan’s persistence that Lakshmi Shankar agreed to give a try. The next day, Madan Mohan came to her house with Ustad Abdul Rehman Khan of Patiala Gharana and with a harmonium. Madan Mohan played on harmonium and Ustad played on his swarmandal. Ustad’s one line of some bandish mesmerised Lakshmi Shankar so much that she resolved to learn Hindustani classical music as a vocalist from him.

Lakshmi Shankar completed her training in three years’ time. In January 1957, she gave her maiden performance at Entally Music Festival in Kolkata which was very much appreciated. With this success, she was invited to many music festivals all over India. She continued learning Hindustani classical music with Professor B R Deodhar and completed her Bachelor of Music degree under him. In the meanwhile, she occasionally sang for Hindi films as playback singer about 30 songs in 20 films from 1946 to 1974. In the Marathi film ‘Pativrata’ (1959), she had sung 2 thumris with Pandit Bhimsen Joshi.

In 1962-63, she got her first opportunity for a 4-month tour to the USA and Europe as a part of Uday Shankar’s group as a lead vocalist and the music director of the ballet orchestra. In 1968, Ravi Shankar organised the Festival of India in the USA in which she was again a lead vocalist along with many eminent musicians from India. In 1970, she travelled to Italy (Rome, Florence and Venice) and the Shiraz Festival in Iran for her solo performance as a vocalist.

Some of Lakshmi Shankar’s notable works included her cross collaborations with George Harrison in 1974. One of her collaborations with him was a Krishna song in English, ‘I am missing you’ which received good receptions in its live performance throughout the USA. This song made her well-known in the Western countries. The English song was written by Pandit Ravi Shankar. She also sang a couple of soulful bhajans in Attenborough’s Oscar winning film ‘Gandhi’ (1982) for which Ravi Shankar was the music director.

Lakshmi Shankar had been travelling quite often on her musical tours abroad either as a part of Pandit Ravi Shankar’s troupe or as a solo performer. For this reason, Lakshmi Shankar moved to the USA along with her family and took permanent residency near Los Angeles in 1984. She cut many discs in the USA and Europe besides India. Later in her life, she started teaching Hindustani classical music to American-Indians in her house in Simi Valley, California.

With the death of Pandit Ravi Shankar on December 11, 2012, Lakshmi Shankar’s collaborations with him of over 7 decades ended. It had started first as dancers in Uday Shankar’s academy in 1939, as a playback singer under his music direction in 1946, as a dancer in his ballet-cum-opera ‘Discovery of India’ in 1947-48 and both national and international collaboration from 1963 onwards with him. After Ravi Shankar’s death, Lakshmi Shankar’s health started deteriorating. Almost one year after her mentor’s death, Lakshmi Shankar passed away on December 30, 2013.

On the occasion of the 7th Remembrance Day of Lakshmi Shankar, I am presenting one of her popular non-film Krishna bhajans, ehi Muraare kunjavihaare (1979). She has rendered this bhajan in Raag Pahadi. Most of the on-line references have accredited this Sanskrit bhajan to Jayadeva. But a section of the listeners has pointed out that this bhajan is not found in Jayadeva’s Ashtapadi.

Lakshmi Shankar recorded this devotional song in the USA which became a part of a Long-Playing Record, ‘Lakshmi Shankar Sings Devotional Songs’ for ISCKKON Golden Avatar Productions in 1979 under the orchestration of L Subramaniam, a renowned violinist supported by Ustad Zakir Hussain on tabla. I feel that Lakshmi Shankar may have composed the tune herself. Later, sometime in the 1980s, she sang live on All India Radio/Doordarshan as part of the National Programme of Music. I personally like her live version because of the audio quality, the clarity of the words, the excellent tabla rhythm and the elaborations with which Lakshmi Shankar rendered the bhajan.

How could Lakshmi Shankar mesmerise her foreign audience with her bhajans? The answer is that she did with her emotive voice as evident in this bhajan.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Acknowledgements:

1. ‘Poignant Song – The Life and Music of Lakshmi Shankar’ (2019) By Kavita Das.

2. An Interview with Lakshmi Shankar by Shreen Isal, June 2001 published in http://www.associationsargam.com

Audio Clip: (Record version)

Video Clip: (From live concert on AIR/Doordarshan)

Song-Ehi muraare kunjavihaare (Lakhmi Shankar NFS)(1979) Singer-Lakshmi Shankar

Lyrics (Based on record version)
[The equivalent lyrics are written based on the phonetics of Sanskrit stotram].

ehi muraare
ehi mura…are
ehi muraare kunjavihaa…re
ehi praṇata jana bandho
ehi muraare kunjavihaare
ehi praṇata jana bandho
hey Madhava madhumathana vareṇya
Keshava karuṇasindho

raasa nikunje gunjati niyatam
raasa nikunje gunjati niyatam
bhramarashatam kil kaanta aa
ehi nibhṛta pathapaantha..aa
tvamiha yaache darashandaanam
tvamiha yaache darashandaanam
he Madhusoodan shanta
ehi muraare kunjavihaare
ehi praṇata janabandho

nava neeraj dhara shyaamal sundara
nava neeraj dhara shyaamal sundara
chandra kusum ruchivesha
gopigaṇ hṛidayesha..aa
govardhana dhara vṛindaavanachara
govardhana dhara vṛindaavanachara
vanshīdhara paramesha
ehi muraare kunjavihaare
ehi praṇata janabandho

Raadharanjan kansaniṣhoodan
Raadharanjan kansaniṣoodan
praṇatistaavaka charaṇe
nikhila niraashraya sharaṇe
ehi Janaardana pitaambaradhara
ehi Janaardana pitaambaradhara
kunje mantharapavane..ae
ehi muraare
ehi muraare
ehi muraare kunja vihaare
ehi praṇata jana bandh..o
he Madhava madhu mathana vareṇya
Keshava karuṇa sindho

——————————————
English Translation (Source: http://www.kksongs.org )
——————————————

O killer of the demon Mura who roams in the gardens, come near.
O Mādhava, who is the friend of those who bow upon, who destroyed Madhu, who is desirable, who is Keshva and who is the ocean of compassion, come near.

Hundreds of shiny bumble-bees are continuously buzzing in the gardens of [our] transcendental mellows. O You, who beyond the paths of material standards, come near. We all are craving for the sight of You, O Madhusoodana, who is calm.

O You, who holds a new lotus, who is dark in complexion, who is beautiful, who is decorated with chandrakusuma, who rules the heart of group of Gopī, who held Govardhana, who roams in Vrindaavana, who holds a flute, who is the supreme ruler.

O who gives pleasure to Rādhaa, who destroyed Kamsa, who is complete. I am bowing into Your feet which is the shelter of the unsheltered.
O Janaardana, who has yellow robes, come close to me in this garden.


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4419 Post No. : 15827

“Raagini”(1958) was produced by Ashok Kumar and Ganesh and directed by Rakhan for Ashok Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Ashok Kumar, Kishore Kumar, Padmini, Jabeen Jaleel, Balam, Sundar, Nazeer Hussain, Achala Sachdev, Amir Banu, Protima Devi, Rajendra, Master Vinod (Mehra), Baby Leela, Navami, Ifthikhar, Jamal, Mirajkar, Kathana, Bhardwaj, Narbada Shankar, Master Raja etc in it.

This “social” movie was quite an entertaining movie, as can be judged from the songs of the movie. This movie had as many as twelve songs in it. Eleven songs have been covered so far. Here are the details of these songs :-

Blog Post number Song Posted on Singers Remarks
341 Main Bangali chhokra Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhonsle 4 December 2008
2804 Chhotaa sa baalmaa Asha Bhonsle 17 August 2010
5442 Man mora baawra Rafi 12 February 2012 Rafi giving playback for Kishore Kumar
5893 Mujhko baar baar yaad na aa bewafaa Kishore Kumar, Asha Bhonsle 29 April 2012
6326 Hamne raat guzaari taare gin gin ke Asha Bhonsle 29 July 2012
6385 Piya main hoon patang tu dor Asha Bhonsle, Kishore Kumar 6 August 2012
6424 Mud mud hamko dekhta Asha Bhonsle, Kishore Kumar 12 August 2012
11059 Is duniya se niraala hoon main Geeta Dutt, Asha Bhonsle 14 April 2015 Picturised on child artists Vinod Mehra and Jabeen Jaleel
14842 Dil todne waale bata ke jaa Asha Bhonsle 16 Jan 2019
15383 Chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan, Ustaad Fateh Ali Khan 16 Jan 2020 Kishore Kumar and Anand Pal lip syncing in the voices of classical singers
15813 Tujhe dekh ke machal gaya aaj mera mann Asha Bhonsle 16 Jan 2020

The movie had Kishore Kumar and one would expect him to sing for himself. He did that in four songs. In addition, he lip synced a song in Rafi’s voice.

But that is not all. There is another song in the movie which is sung by doyens of Hindustani classical music namely Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan and Ustaad Fateh Ali Khan. This song is lip synced on screen by Kishore Kumar and Anand Pal.

Finding classically trained Naushad using the voices of Ustaads of Hindustani classical music is expected, but O P Nayyar, who was supposedly untrained in Hindustani classical music actually got Ustaads to sing for his movie is something unexpected.

Naushad of course, got Ustaad Amir Khan to sing in “Baiju Baawra”(1952), as also Pt D V Paluskar. In “Mughal e Azam”(1960) he got Ustaad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. We had also witnesed Pt Bhimsen Joshi singing in “Basant Bahaar”(1956).

Come to think of it, the title “Raagini” itself is a derivative of “Raag”. The movie apparently had Kishore Kumar playing a musician.

The movie begins with a classical song sung by Ustaad amir Khan while titles roll in. and that “movie opening” song is the only song from the movie which is not yet covered.

So, here is that twelfth and final song from “Raagini”(1958) to appear in the blog. The song is sung by Ustaad Amir Khan. Lyricist is not known. O P Nayyar is of course credited as the music director.

A comment in youtube suggests that this song is in Raag Lalit, a morning raag.

I have a feeling that “Raagini”(1958) for O P Nayyar must haave been a labour of love, that gave been great creative satisfaction.

With this song, all the songs of “Raagini”(1958) are covered in the blog and the movie gets YIPPEED in the blog.


Song-Jogiya mere ghar aaye (Raagini)(1957) Singer-Ustaad Amir Khan, MD-O P Nayyar

Lyrics

aa aa aa
jogiya mere ghar aaaaye
jogiya mere ghar aaaaye
ghar ghar alakh jagaaaye
jogiya mere ghar aaaaye
kaanan kundal gale bij shail
kanan kundal gale bij shail
ang bhabhoot ramaaye ae
jogiyaaaa
mere
ghar aaaye
jogiya mere ghar aaaaye
jogee ee ee ee ya mere ae
ghar
jogiya mere ghar aaaye ae
jogiya aa aa aa
mere ghar aaaaaaye
jogiya mere ghar
aa aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
jogiya mere ghar aaaaaye


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4356 Post No. : 15678

“One good thing about music, when it hits you, you don’t feel pain”.

Thus spoke Bob Marley (1945-1981), the famous Jamaican singer and songwriter, about the power of music. From the most casual to the most formal, every activity, every endeavor of human existence is in one form or another, quite inextricably linked with music. Music pervades our lives and our beings. In many an instance, music appears quite unexpectedly in our lives.

Back in 1981, the Minister of Culture of France was a gentleman by the name Jack Lang. He appointed Maurice Fleuret as the Director of Music and Dance. One observation Maurice had about the cultural ethos of France – “the music everywhere, the concert nowhere”. He conducted a sample survey of the French population. The survey brought out some very interesting results; the most important one was which established that almost half the population was adept at playing one or another type of musical instrument.

Armed with this result, Maurice dreamt of bringing this talent for music, out in the open. Working with his minister, Maurice set out to design a method which would allow common people to be able to perform for others. From this pursuit was born the concept of ‘Fête de la Musique’ or the ‘Festival of Music’. After preparing and communicating for many weeks, finally the date for this public festival was decided as 21st June. In the year 1982, this event was rolled out across the length and breadth of France.

Ever since, the phenomena has spread to practically everywhere. This festival is now held in more than a thousand cities across 170 countries.

One basic feature of this celebration is that it is free. The artists and musicians perform for free. And also, all performances are free for the viewing public.

When writing about music, I have occasionally fallen back on the 1985 film ‘Sur Sangam’, for a suitable song for the post. Once again today, as I write to celebrate this worldwide event, I bring to the readers another wonderful song that tells about the nature and practice of music. The beginning words of this song lay out such an adept definition,

saadh re mann sur ko saadh re
ek mann ko doosre se baandh re

Yes, a force that brings together and binds the minds and hearts of people. Need I say more – the experience of the regulars of this musical bandwagon will speak for itself.

As I noted in my write up for the song “Aaye Sur Ke Panchhi Aaye”, as far as the memory serves, the film ‘Sur Sangam’ is probably the last film that I can remember, that has music as its central theme. After 1985, I cannot recall any other Hindi film built on the theme of music.

The film is a Hindi remake of the iconic Telegu film ‘Shankarabharnam’. It has been produced by V Ramesh for Vijay Madhavi Pictures, Madras and is directed by K Vishwanath. The eminent star cast of this film includes Girish Karnad, Jayaprada, Sachin, Sadhna Singh, Deven Verma, Bharti Achrekar, Paintal, Tabassum, Asrani, Bhushan Tiwari, Dina Pathak, Mohan Choti, OP Singh, Jeet Mohan, Sulabha Deshpande, SP Dubey, Urmila, Master Akash Singh and Baby Mamta.

The film has a set of very wonderful 11 songs, all written by Vasant Dev, and set to wonderful classical melodies by Lakshmikant Pyaarelal. Five songs of this film are already showcased on our blog. And the sixth makes its appearance today on the occasion of the World Day of Music. The singing voice is that of Rajan Sajan Misra.

May there be delightful music today, and every day in our lives.

Song – Saadh Re Mann Sur Ko Saadh Re (Sur Sangam) (1985) Singer – Rajan Sajan Misra, Lyrics – Vasant Dev, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal

Lyrics

saadh re
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re
mann sur ko saadh re

ek mann ko
doosre se
baandh re
saadh re
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re..ae..ae
mann sur ko saadh re

taa..aa..aan hai suraj kiran
taa..aa..aan hai suraj kiran
alaap neelam ka gagan
alaap neelam ka gagan
ab ugey ankur dhara par
baandh aisa raag re..ae..ae
saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re

ma pa nee nee nee dha
nee. . . sa
ga nee ma pa
pa ga
ma re
re pa

megh se malhaar le tu. . .
megh se malhaar le tu
gandh se gandhaar le tu
gandh se gandhaar le tu
dhol pancham kokila ka
tu bahaa re raag re. . .
saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re

mann yahi tu dhyaan rakh
mann yahi tu dhyaan rakh
sur ki sahi pehchaan rakh
sur ki sahi pehchaan rakh
tu rahe ya na rahe
par sur rahe abaad re..ae
ae..ae

saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re..ae..ae
mann sur ko saadh re
saadh re..ae
mann sur ko saadh re

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

साध रे
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे
मन सुर को साध रे

एक मन को
दूसरे से
बांध रे
साध रे
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे

ता॰॰आ॰॰आन है सूरज किरण
ता॰॰आ॰॰आन है सूरज किरण
आलाप नीलम का गगन
आलाप नीलम का गगन
अब उगे अंकुर धरा पर
बांध ऐसा राग रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे

म प नी नी नी ध
नी॰ ॰ ॰ स
ग नी म प
प ग
म रे
रे प

मेघ से मल्हार ले तू॰ ॰ ॰
मेघ से मल्हार ले तू
गंध से गंधार ले तू
गंध से गंधार ले तू
ढोल पंचम कोकिला का
तू बहा रे राग रे॰ ॰ ॰
साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे

मन यही तू ध्यान रख
मन यही तू ध्यान रख
सुर की सही पहचान रख
तू रहे या ना रहे पर
सुर रहे आबाद रे॰॰ए
॰॰ए॰॰ए

साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे॰॰ए॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे
साध रे॰॰ए
मन सुर को साध रे


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4299 Post No. : 15559

———————————–
Hindi Songs in Bangla Films – 25
———————————–

The personality I am going to persent in this article is one of the greatest exponents of Hindustani classical music. He has been often referred to as the ‘Tansen of the 20th Century’. He is also credited with creating an unique style of rendition with shorter ‘aalaaps’ and ‘vilambit’ (slow), greater emphasis on ‘taans’ and ‘sargams’ much against the likings of purists among the Hindustani classical vocalists. He did these improvisations to make his presentation interesting to his audience. This style of renditions was later to become an integral part of Kasur-Patiala Gharana for the nextgen vocalists. He is none other than Padma Bhushan Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan whose 52nd Remembrance Day falls today, the April 25th.

Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan (02/04/1902 – 25/04/1968) was born in Kasur, Punjab (now in Pakistan) in the family of three generations of singers. I had discussed in detail the profile of Khan Saheb in my article “Prem Jogan Ban Ke”. So, I will skip that part. During the intervening period, I have come across some interesting information especially from the writings of Professor BR Deodhar and GN Joshi, both Hindustani classical singers and musicologists. GN Joshi was also associated with HMV for a long time in popularising the classical and semi-classical music. Both of them were the close friends of Khan Saheb.

Khan Saheb started his training as a vocalist in Khayal singing. But it was his unique way of singing Thumris that enthralled his audience. Thumri as one of the forms of semi-classical singing was on the declining trajectory after the Indian mutiny in 1857 and the consequential decline of aristocracy which used to patronise the Hindustani classical musicians and singers. It was Khan Saheb who revived the Thumri form of semi-classical singing and made popular among the masses by improvising his presentation which sometime defied the traditional form of rendition.

Professor BR Deodhar has described an incident in one of his articles which appeared in 1949. He pointed out to Khan Saheb as to why his recitals left in a state of unfulfillment for purist like him. Without giving him reply to his query, Khan Saheb invited him to attend one of his forthcoming concerts to get the answer. In that concert, Khan Saheb sang Raag Darbari Kanhra in a traditional format. After the end of the concert, Professor Deodhar was very pleased and asked him as to why he was not singing the way he sang in the concert. Khan Saheb’s reply was that not all the audience were musically intelligent like him. A majority of audience who have only the basic knowledge of Hindustani classical music would like some kind of sensation and ‘harkat’ in presentations. Otherwise they would think that I am a sickly person.

The above incidence shows how Khan Saheb was adaptable to the audience’s interest. His singing was always a two-way interaction between him and the audience. That was the reason that when he gave concerts in halls, he would not allow the switching off lights in the area where the audience sit. He felt that by seeing the faces of the audience, he would be inspired to give his best performance.

According to Professor BR Deodhar, Khan Saheb was always immersed in music. He will always have with him his Swarmandal (Indian Harp), be at home or outside because he would get inspirations to sing from anything around him. He quoted an incidence which happened sometime in late 1940s when both of them were coming out of All India Radio, Mumbai. It was a rainy season and they were walking on Marine Drive to reach their homes. The high waves from Arabian Sea were hitting the sea wall of Marine Drive. It soon started raining. Khan Saheb was so much enchanted by the whole atmosphere that he sat on the sea wall and started singing Raag Megh Malhar. Professor Deodhar noted that Khan Saheb’s taans would reach in high octave to synchronise with the noisy rising sea waves hitting the sea wall. he would sing taans in lower octave to synchronise with the less noisy receding waves in the sea. He sang for nearly 45 minutes drenched in heavy rains and in the splash of the waves until his son forcibly took him away to the home.

Khan Saheb was active as a Hindustani classical vocalist from 1936 when he gave his first public performance in Calcutta (now Kolkata) to almost until his death in 1968. However, in terms of discography, very small fractions of his renditions are available in recorded format. The reason was that at the initial stage of his singing career, by and large, he avoided recording of his performances both for All India Radio and for the gramophone record companies. Generally, Khan Saheb would not say ‘no’ for recording of his singing but he would give excuses at the last moment for his inability to record the singing. Sometime in the middle of 1940s, he revealed that he was afraid of recording his singing as he felt that the quality of his voice would be severally affected by the electric wires of the recording equipment.

It was with great patience that music lovers like GN Joshi of HMV could persuade Khan Saheb to record his songs. Hence, in the initial period, his singing was recorded for 78 RPM records of about 3 minutes of duration because Khan Saheb felt that the shorter duration would not affect the quality of his voice. By 1960s, Khan Saheb had completely come out of his misgiving about the recording and had started recording the longer duration of his singing for All India Radio and the gramophone recording companies.

According to Ustad Raza Ali Khan, the grandson of Khan Saheb, contrary to general belief, Khan Saheb was not averse to singing in films. In 1944, Khan Saheb’s younger brother, Ustad Barkat Ali Khan had sung in films ( I checked and found a song in the film ‘Shukriya’,1944). Probably, at that time, Khan Saheb may have also got interested in singing in films. He had shown his desire to sing in the film to RC Boral, the music director for New Theatres. At that time, RC Boral had told Khan Saheb that it was below his dignity to sing in films when he had such a high stature as a Hindustani classical vocalist. This statement made him not to sing for any films in future (Source: The Times of India, April 02, 2020). The only exception he made was when Khan Saheb had to sing two songs in K Asif’s ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960) against his wish. Despite quoting an astronomical fee of Rs.25000/- per song as a way of discouraging him from singing in the film, K Asif accepted his demand.

Since 1948, Khan Saheb had spent most of his life in India by renewing his visa during which time, he was on concert tours mainly to Bombay (now Mumbai), Calcutta (Kolkata), Hyderabad, Lucknow Delhi etc. After getting Indian Citizenship in 1957, Khan Saheb was staying in a Bungalow in Malabar Hill in Mumbai. In 1961, he had a paralysis attack which prevented him from singing for some time. He made a good recovery from paralysis and had started singing in concerts with the vocal supports from his son, Ustad Munawwar Ali Khan. In 1963, he shifted his base to Hyderabad and stayed in Basheer Baug Palace. Khan Saheb left for the heavenly abode on April 25, 1968 after a prolong illness arising out of the paralysis attack in 1961.

As a tribute to Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan on his 52nd Remembrance Day, I have chosen one of his most popular thumris which was first recorded in 1948 though he had started singing this thumri much earlier in his concerts and on All India Radio. I am referring to his thumri “Aaye Na Baalam Ka Karoon Sajni” which he has rendered in Raag Sindh Bhairavi. It is a surprise discovery for me that Khan Saheb had rendered this thumri as a playback singer for the actor Basanta Chowdhury in Bangla film ‘Basanta Bahar’ (1957).

I was under the impression that Khan Saheb has rendered only two film songs in his life time – “Prem Jogan Ban Ke” and “Shubh Din Aayo Raaj Dulaara” in ‘Mughal-E-Azam’ (1960). How come Khan Saheb sang, “Ka Karoon Sajni. . .” in Bangla film, ‘Basanta Bahar’ (1957), that too as a playback singer ? Unfortunately, I did not find the record version of this thumri from the film other than what Khan Saheb recorded it as a non-film thumri sometime in 1948 (Record No. VE.5052), the audio clip of which I have also attached for the sake of comparison.

It is said that the bandish of the thumri under discussion and also another popular thumri, “Yaad Piya Ki Aaye” were written and composed by Khan Saheb after the untimely demise of his wife Ali Jiwai in 1932. These thumris are called the classical thumris of longing. Many stalwart vocalists of Hindustani classical music have rendered beautifully these two thumris – both within the Patiala Gharana as also from other Gharanas. But for me, Khan Saheb still rules in these two thumris.

Video Clip: (Film sound track)

Audio Clip: (Non-film thumri)

Song – Kaa karoon sajni aaye na baalam (Basanta Bahaar) (Bangla )(1957) Singer – Ustaand Bade Ghulam Ali Khan, MD – Pt Jnan Prasad Ghosh

Lyrics: (Based on Video Clip)

aaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaa aaa aaa aaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaye na baalam
ka karoon sajni ee
aaye na baalam
aaye na baalam
baalam
aaye na baalam
tadpat beeti mori
aaa aaa aaaa aa
tadpat beeti mori
un bin ratiyaan aan aan aan
aaye na baalam
baalam

rowat rowat kal naahin aaye ae ae
nis din mohe birahaa sataaye
yaad aawat jab unki batiyaan aan aan aan
aaye na baalam
aaye…na aa aa …baalam
pa
ga ma ga pa
ma dha ma dha pa
pa ga ma pa
sa ni ni da pa ni
ni da pa ma ga pa
ga ma pa ma ga ma ni da sa
aaye na baalam
baa..lam
baa……la…….m
aaye ae ae……naa…baalam re
ae ae ae
baalam re
aaye na baalam
ka karoon sajni
sajni
aaye na baalam
aaaaaaaaaaaa
baalam
aaye na ba..
baa…….la….m…….aa aa aam
aaye na baalam
tadpat
dh re ma sa re ma
ma ga pa
ga ma pa
tadapt beeti mori
un bin ratiyaan aan aan
aaye na baalam
aaye na.. baalam ma aa
baa..la..m
aa aa aa aa
baa..lam
aaye na baa..la..m
ka karoon sajni ee
aaye na baalam re..

——————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————

आssssssssss
आs आs आs आs
आsss आsss आsss आsss
आए ना बालम
का करूँ सजनी॰ ॰ ॰
आए ना बालम
आए ना बालम
बालम
आए ना बालम
तड़पत बीती मोरी
आsss आsss आsss आsss
तड़पत बीती मोरी
उन बिन रतियाँ॰ ॰ ॰
आए ना बालम
बालम

रोवत रोवत कल नहीं आये॰ ॰ ॰
निस दिन मोहे बिरहा सताये
याद आवत॰ ॰ ॰ जब उनकी बतियाँ॰ ॰ ॰
आए ना बालम
आए॰ ॰ ॰  ना॰ ॰ ॰  बालम


ग म ग प
म ध म ध प
प ग म प
स नी नी ध प नी
नी ध प म ग प
ग म प म ग म नी ध स
आए ना बालम
बा॰॰लम
बा॰॰ ॰॰ल॰॰ ॰॰म
आए॰ ॰ ॰ ना॰ ॰ ॰ बालम रे
ए ए ए
बालम रे
आए ना बालम
का करूँ सजनी
सजनी
आए ना
आssssssssss
बालम
आए ना बा॰ ॰ ॰
बा॰॰ ॰॰ल॰॰ ॰॰म॰ ॰ ॰ आ आ आ म
आए ना बालम
तड़पत
ध रे म स रे म
म ग प
ग म प
तड़पत बीती मोरी
उन बिन रतियाँ॰ ॰ ॰
आए ना बालम
आए ना॰ ॰ ॰ बालम॰॰म॰॰म
बा॰॰ल॰॰म
आ आ आ आ
बा॰॰लम
आए ना बा॰॰ल॰॰म
का करूँ सजनी॰ ॰ ॰
आए ना बालम रे

 


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4244 Post No. : 15463

“Umrao Jaan” (1981) was produced and directed by Muzaffar Ali. The movie had Rekha, Farooq Sheikh, Naseruddin Shah, Raj Babbar, Shaukat Kaifi, Bharat Bhushan, Satish Shah, Prema Narayan, Dina Pathak, Leela Mishra, Akbar Rashid, Gajanan Jagirdar, Khan Ghizlai, Rita Rani Kaul etc in it.

The movie had ten songs in it. Six of these songs have been covered in the past.

Here is the seventh song from “Umrao Jaan” (1982) to appear in the blog. this song is a classical song which is sung on traditional lyrics. It is sung by Shahida Khan according to HFGK. But it turns out that the song, as seen in the picturization is sung by Ustaad Ghulam Mustafa Khan. Shahid Khan version was the record version of the song.Khayyam is the music director.


Song-Jhoola kinne daala re(Umraao Jaan)(1981) Singer-Ustaad Ghulam Mustafa Khan/Shahida Khan, MD-Khayyam

Lyrics
Ustaad Ghulam Mustafa Khan version

jhoola kinne daala re amraiyya
jhoole mora sainya loon main balainya
re amraiyya
jhoola kinne daala re amraiyya

ambuva ke pedva pe jhoola jhoolat hai
ambuva ke pedva pe jhoola jhoolat hai
garba lagaaye pakad leenhi bainya
re amraiyya
Jhoola kinne daala re amraiyya
jhoola kinne daala re amraiyya

dar mohe laage jiya mora larje ae
dar mohe laage jiya mora larje
haule haule jhoolna jhulaao more sainya
haule haule bhoolna khiladi more sainya
re amraiyya
jhoola kinne daala re amraiyya
re amraiyya
re amraiyya


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4237 Post No. : 15448 Movie Count :

4254

Hindi Songs from Bangla Films – 18
—————————————–

‘Jhinder Bandi’ (Prisoner of Jhind, 1961, Bangla film)) was based on a Bangla novel of the same name by Saradindu Bandopadhyay and an English novel ‘The Prisoner of Zenda’ written by Anthony Hope on which a Hollywood movie of the same name was made in 1937. The Bangla film was directed by Tapan Sinha. The main star cast included Uttam Kumar (in double role), Arundhati Devi, Soumitra Chatterjee, Tarun Kumar, Radhamohan Bhattacharya, Sandhya Roy, Dilip Roy, Dhiren Mukherjee etc. The film is available with English sub-titles on video sharing platforms. The story of the film is as under:

In the State of Jhind (now in Madhya Pradesh), the King dies. He has two sons – Shankar Singh (Uttam Kumar) and Udit Singh (Tarun Kumar). The elder brother, Shankar Singh is a drunkard, lazy and irresponsible but the people of Jhind love him. Udit Singh on the other hand has an evil personality and people of Jhind hate him.

On the eve of the coronation of the King in waiting, Shankar Singh is found missing. And this has happened for the third time. This time, if he is not found on the day of the coronation, his younger brother, Udit Singh would be coronated as the King of Jhind. The Fauji Sardar (Radhamohan Bhattacharya), the loyalist to Shankar Singh, suspects the role of Udit Singh behind the disappearance of Shankar Singh and is determined to locate him before the day of the coronation.

As part of the search mission, Fauji Sardar reaches Calcutta (Kolkata). In a club, he watches a sword fight in progress. Suspecting one of the sword fighters to be Shankar Singh because of his resemblance to him, Fauji Sardar meets him in his elder brother’s house who introduces the sword fighter as Gauri Shankar Roy (Uttam Kumar). Finding Gauri Shankar Roy has a striking resemblance to Shankar Singh, Fauji Sardar gets an idea to make him to pretend as Shankar Singh on the coronation day. He is also surprised to see in the house a portrait of Kali Shankar Roy, the father of Gauri Shankar Roy.

Fauji Sardar explains to Gauri Shankar Roy the situation in the kingdom of Jhind. He tells him that he had arranged the coronation of the Shankar Singh twice but on both the occasions, Udit Singh has managed to make him disappear. This is the third occasion Shankar Singh has disappeared. If he is not found now, Udit Singh would automatically become the king. He requests Gauri Shankar Roy to impersonate Shankar Singh for coronation as the king of Jhind until the real Shankar Singh is found. While Gauri Shankar Roy is prepared to do this adventure, his elder brother refuses telling him that this is a dangerous pretension. But Gauri Shankar Roy goes ahead and accompanies Fauji Sardar to Jhind.

The first thing Gauri Shankar Roy is to do is to shave off his moustache. The second hurdle is to get examined by the royal physician who is surprised to find ‘Shankar Singh’ hail and hearty and there is no swelling of his liver despite his drinking habit. So, he has passed the test to pretend as Shankar Singh as the royal physician did not have doubt about him. He also regularly rehearses sword fighting.

In the meanwhile, Udit Singh and Mayurvahan (Soumitra Chatterjee), his right-hand man get the wind of the arrival of Fauji Sardar with an unidentified person through his informer, the station master of the railway station, where they alighted for their onward journey to the Jhind. Udit Singh comes to meet Gauri Shankar Roy now pretending to be Shankar Singh in the palace. By looking at him, Udit Singh is shocked to such an extent that he forgets to wish him. He asks him as to who he was. The Fauji Sardar with surprise on his face tells Udit Singh sarcastically that this was an odd question to ask to his brother. Of course, Udit Singh knew that he could not be Shankar Singh because he was in the custody of Mayurvahan. And questioning Fauji Sardar at this stage would expose his wrong doing.

In the meantime, Gauri Shankar Roy is crowned as the King of Jhind. Now onwards, from a pretending king, he has also to pretend as the fiancé of Queen Kasturi Bai (Arundhati Devi), the princes of Zorawar who has been betrothed to him which he was not made aware of when he agreed to be a pretending king. This was a most difficult job.

After the coronation, Queen Kasturi Bai meets Gauri Shankar Roy as the king when she performs a welcome aarti. Her dislike to the king is evident as the king’s conversations remains one sided. However, when she is about to serve him wine, he refuses to drink by saying that he has given up drinking. This changes her expression as until now she has known him to be drunkard and good for nothing prince without much interest in administration of the kingdom. She started liking him with his changed attitudes. Within few days, they start seeing each other.

Gauri Shankar Roy now finds himself in a piquant situation. His pretension as a fiancé of Queen Kasturi Bai cannot go on for long as they have to get married soon. So, he is in a hurry to quit his role as a fake king. However, he cannot go back until the real Shankar Singh is found who is held as a prisoner under the watchful eyes of Mayurvahan. In a way, Gauri Shankar Roy is also like a prisoner in the palace where he has to act as per the direction of Fauji Sardar. The only way for him to go back to Calcutta is to find the real Shankar Singh.

In the meanwhile, knowing that Gauri Shankar Roy has been uncomfortable in faking as a king as well as the fiancé of Kasturi Bai, Fauji Sardar reveals a secret to him that both Shankar Singh and Udit Singh are the sons of Kali Shankar Ray, the Diwan of Jhind to whom the King, who was issue less, had adopted them. So, Gauri Shankar Roy deserves to be the King of Jhind as much as his brothers – Shankar Singh and Udit Singh. This was an interesting revelation to Gauri Shankar Roy.

The pretending king comes to know through the informers that the real Shankar Singh is being held in a fort owned by Udit Singh who plans to murder Shankar Singh once he gets rid of Gauri Shankar Roy. He decides to visit the fort in the night along with a guard and the informer who knows the way to reach the inside of the fort through a secret entrance. On the way, Gouri Shankar Roy is intercepted by Mayurvahan and a fight breaks out in which Gauri Shankar Roy injures Mayurvahan. As he approaches the room, he kills Udit Singh and gains the entry into a room where Shankar Singh has been held prisoner. In the meanwhile, Fauji Sardar with his guards comes to the fort and kills Mayurvahan when he once again confronts Gauri Shankar Roy.

When Gouri Shankar Roy sees the real Shankar Singh for the first time, his thoughts are to get rid of Shankar Singh to become the real King of Jhind but as a good samaritan, he abandons his thoughts. All these actions have been shown without dialogues but with the expressions of both Shankar Singh and Gauri Prasad. He orders Fauji Sardar to take Shankar Singh to the palace as early as possible to ward off the risk to his life. He meets Kasturi Bai for the last time who thanks him for saving the kingdom. As Gouri Shankar Roy is about to leave the fort on his way to Calcutta, Kasturi Bai asks him as to what sins she has committed to shatter her beautiful dream. Gouri Shankar Roy responds by saying that it was just a dream and mounts on the horse to reach the railway station to take the train to Calcutta (Kolkata).

Earlier, I had watched Tapan Sinha’s Bangla films like ‘Kshuidita Pashan’ (1960), ‘Atithi’ (1965), ‘Hatey Bazarey’ (1967) and ‘Harmonium’ (1976) in one sitting each. But for ‘Jhinder Bandi’ (1961), it took me 3 sittings to complete the film viewing. Even though the film had an unusual story, somehow the film did not create in me the eagerness to watch in one go. Probably, the film was heavily edited in its DVD format. This doubt has come to my mind as I find that Soumitra Chatterjee in a villainous role and Sandhya Roy in the role of the love interest of one of the guards (Dilip Roy) have lesser duration than what their respective roles demand.

By the way, Uttam Kumar and Soumitra Chatterjee appear together for the first time in ‘Jhinder Bandi’ (1961). Later on, they have worked together in some more Bangla films until 1980. Another point worth mentioning is that Uttam Kumar and Tarun Kumar who are real brothers, acted in this film as reel brothers as well.

In the DVD of the film, I could get to hear only two songs one of which is the raagmala in three different Hindustani classical raags which I am presenting here. The raagmala is rendered by Pandit Prasun Banerjee, a Hindustani classical vocalist belonging to Patiala Gharana and the disciple of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. The lyrics are traditional.

In between the rendering of raagmala, there are dialogues in Bengali. The first dialogue-break is between Shankar Singh (Uttam Kumar) and his guards for pouring more wine to which the Fauji Sardar tells him that he should not take any more drink as he has to be ready for his coronation (Obhishek). The second dialogue-break is when his younger brother Udit Singh (Tarun Kumar) comes to meet him.

Video Clip:

Song-Jiya Mora ghabraaye (Jhinder Bandi)(Bangla)(1960) Singer-Pt Prasun Bannerji, MD-Ali Akbar Khan

Lyrics

aa aa aa aa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaa
jiya…..aaa moraa ghab….raaye ae ae
kaase kahoon mann kee…eeee batiyaa..an
kachhu na une bina morey
pala….chhina beetat naahi..ee
dukh kee..eeee ee ratiyaan
ratiyaan..aan

[Dialogues in Bangla]

din din de re ghanana
din din de re ghanana
?? ?? ?? ??
din din de re ghanana
?? ?? ?? ??
din din de re
shubh ghadi shubh din sukhad mahurat
shubh ghadi shubh din sukhad mahurat
kalash daroon tere
aan aan aan aan aan
aan aan aan aan aan
din din de re ghanana

[Dialogues in Bangla]

meethe laage tore nain
tore naina
tore naina
meethe laage tore nain
laaj bhare kajara aa aa
kajara aa aa aa
kajara aa aa aa
kajara aa aa re

[Dialogue in Bangla]

wo aa gaye hain hamen
jinka
jinka intzaa….aar thhaa aa
wo aa gaye hain hamen….


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4221 Post No. : 15424 Movie Count :

4251

Hindi songs from Bangla Films – 16
—————————————————-
‘Basanta Bahaar’ (1957) was a Bangla film directed by Bikas Roy who also acted in the film. The main cast consisted of Basanta Chowdhury, Sabtri Chatterjee, Pahadi Sanyal, Sunanda Devi, Bikash Roy, Aparna Devi, Asha Devi, Nitish Mukherjee etc. The music was composed by Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh who had in the 1940s also composed songs for two Hindi films, ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943) and ‘Muzrim’ (1944).

When I first came to know about this Bangla film, I assumed that this may be a remake of Hindi film ‘Basant Bahaar’ (1956). After watching the Bangla film, I realised that except the common theme of Hindustani classical music, the story of both Hindi and Bangla films are quite different.

In Hindi version of the film, the story is about a rivalry between two singers to become the royal court musician by way of competition. When it became apparent that Bharat Bhushan has the best chance of a winning singer, his rival singer’s father gives him a glass of holy water with some substance which ruins his voice. It is the dancer (Nimmi) who helps him to regain his voice and wins the competition to become the royal court musician.

In Bangla version of the film, after watching the film (unfortunately, the film is not available with English sub-titles), my understanding of the story is that there is a cold war going on between the teacher, Munni Bai (I am not able to recognise the actress) and her disciple Jayanto (Basanta Chowdhury). This cold war is accentuated by the disciple falling in love with Munnibai’s daughter, Lata (Sabitri Chatterjee) who is also her mother’s disciple. The relationship is resented by Munnibai as also from Jayanto’s family because of the different background. Both Jayanto and Lata secretly get married in a temple.

While Lata’s father (Pahadi Sanyal) who is also a sarangi player for Munnibai in her concerts, is sympathetic towards his daughter’s relationship with Jayanto, he is not vocal about his stand in front of Munnibai. As a result, Lata is forced to stay separetely with her parents, In desperation, Jayanto leaves the place and wanders all over India.

In the meanwhile, Munnibai repents and decided to leave for Kashi where she dies. Lata’s father takes care of her musical training as a vocalist. In her maiden public concert, she fumbles her lines to be timely prompted by a person from the audience who is none other than Jayanto. They are united. The film ends with their daughter rehearsing a bandish in Raag Basant Bahar with which both Lata and Jayanto were also trained. They are happy with their daughter’s performance.

Two important features of the film are the use of songs in Hindustani classical music and a part song in Tamil in Carnatic music along with an excellent 5-minute kathak dance performance by Roshan Kumari (daughter of playback singer, Zohrabai Ambalewaali).

‘Basanta Bahaar’ (1957, Bangla film) had 14 songs (including multiple versions) of which 7 were in Hindi (Hindustani classical vocals) in different raags. However, only 9 songs in record versions were issued (7 Bengali songs +2 Hindi songs). Rest of the songs were available on the film’s sound track only.

I am presenting from the film a traditional bandish, ‘naveli kali khilan ab aayi ban ban mein’ in Raag Basant Bahar rendered as a Chhota Khayal by Hirabai Barodekar. The song is picturised on an actress in the role of Munnibai in a Hindustani classical music conference. It has two more version rendered in the film – first by Manik Varma for Sabitri Chatterjee as a solo while she is rehearsing and second by Manik Varma and Pandit A T Kanan as duet providing vocals for Sabitri Chatterjee and Basanta Chowdhury on the screen. The record version of this duet is longer as alaaps, taan, bol-baant and sargam are incorporated. However, the bandish bol (lyrics) are the same for all the four versions. Hence, I have given below lyrics for Hirabai Barodekar version of the song only.

It is interesting to note that all the singers of this Bandish belong to Kirana Gharana or had an influence of this Gharana. Hirabai Barodekar, apart from the daughter of Ustad Abdul Karim Khan, the doyen of Kirana Gharana has been the disciple of Ustad Abdul Wahid Khan and Suresh Babu Mane, both of Kirana Gharana. Manik Varma (nee Dadarkar) was the disciple of Hirabai Barodekar. Pandit A T Kanan’s style of singing was influenced by Ustad Amir Khan who first adopted the Kirana Gharana style and later improvised it to be called the Indore Gharana.

By the way, I was always wondering for a long time as to how Hirabai started using the surname as ‘Barodekar’. She could have used her mother’s surname ‘Mane’ after separation of her mother from her father, Ustad Abdul Karim Khan in 1922 or her husband’s surname ‘Gandhi’. In this context, I recently came across a trivia mentioned in the book ‘The Lost World of Hindustani Music’ (2006) by Kumar Prasad Mukherjee.

After eloping with Tarabai Mane, the daughter of Sardar Marutirao Mane who was the brother-in-law of the then Maharaja of Baroda, Ustad Abdul Karim Khan never visited Baroda again. After some years, Sayajirao Gaekwad, the Maharaja of Baroda visited Mysore to witness Dussera festival. There, he met Ustad Abdul Karim Khan and enquired about his family. Ustad while asking for His Highness’s forgiveness said that it was his destiny which took him away from the magnanimous patronage of Maharaja of Baroda. He revealed to Maharaja that as part of his gratitude to Baroda, he attached ‘Barodekar’ to the names of all his children.

But only Champu (Hirabai) used the surname ‘Barodekar’ till her last.

Video Clip(Hirabai Barodekar version)

Video Clip(Manik Verma solo version)

Video Clip (Partial)(Manik Verma and Pandit A T Kanan)

Audio Clip (Full)(Manik Verma and Pandit A T Kanan)

Song-Naveli kali khilan ab laagi ban ban mein(Basanta Bahaar)(Bangla)(1957) Singer- Hirabai Barodkar/ Manik Verma/ Manik Verma, Pt A T Kanan, MD-Pandit Jnan Prakash Ghosh

Lyrics (Based on Hirabai Barodekar version)

aaaa aaa aa aaaa aaa
aa aa aa aaaaaa aaaa
aaa aaa aaa aaaaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa aaaaa aaa
aa aa aaaaa
naveli kali…ee ee ee
naveli kali
khilan ab laagi ban ban mein
madmaati daar daar
baar baar koyal boli
naveli kali
naveli kali……ee ee ee ee
aa aa aa aa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaa
aa aa aa aa aaa
aaaaaaaa aaaa
aa aa aa aa aa aaa
aaaaaa aa aaaaaa aa
naveli kali
khilan ab laagi ban ban mein
madmaati daar daar
baar baar koyal boli
naveli kali

aaaaaaaa
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi…eeeeee
aa aa aaaaa na aa
aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa aa na
aa ah aa ah ha ha ha ah
aaaaaaaaaa aaaa aaaa aa aa haa
aayi bahaar sab ke mann bhaayi
lagan jagaayi prem badhaayi
lagan jagaayi prem badhaayi
sabhi rang mein kunj gali
aaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaa aa
naveli kali
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
naveli kali
aaa aaa aa aaa aaa aa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
naveli kali….ee…eeee
naveli kali
naveli kali
naveli kali


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4199 Post No. : 15383

Hullo Atuldom

Happy festival at the outset.

A festival that goes by various names :- Makara Sankranti (AP, Karnataka, Kerala, Goa, Maharashtra), Pongal (TN & Pondicherry), Lohri (Punjab, Haryana, Delhi), Sakraat & Makraat (Bihar, UP, Uttarakhand), Uttarayan (Gujarat, Diu, Daman), Suggi (in parts of Karnataka), Magh Saaji (HP), Ghughuti – (Kumaon), Makara Chaula (Odhisha), Kicheri (Poorvanchal, East UP), Pousha Sankranti (Bengal and North East), Magh Bihu (Assam), Shishur Sankraat (Kashmir ), etc etc. Outside of the country, in some neighbouring Asian countries to be exact, it is celebrated as Maaghe Sankrast – Nepal, Tirmoori – Sindh Pakistan, Songkran -Thailand , Pi Ms. Lao – Laos, Thingyan – Myanmar, Mohan Songkran – Cambodia etc. Basically we are all celebrating the transition of the Sun across the Equator, on it’s journey from the southern hemisphere to the northern hemisphere.

Each region of India have their own ways of celebrating the event but as I have come to understand there are a few things common to all –Jaggery, til (also called gingelly, or sesame seeds), sugarcane, and freshly harvested ears of corn, wheat or even turmeric (in South India). Then of course the children enjoy themselves with kite flying which takes on the form of competition at times. So let us say Happy Festival. Tamil Nadu has its festivities spread over 3-4 days culminating in what is called Mattu Pongal – celebrated the next day of Sankrant with races with cattle involved. (PETA has tried to bring some order to the extent to which the animals can be made use of, and the conditions in which the races take place).

Last weekend, I was lucky to be asked to join my Chacha and Chachi, to an evening full of OPN songs by a newly formed music group. The members of the group were out to entertain themselves and showcase their talent among their close friends and relatives. The closest anyone of the group had come to anything Bollywood was when the hostess’s father had his ardent fan moment when he came face to face with OP Nayyar sometime in the 70s or 80s. That man was a self taught Harmonica player and encouraged his children and wife to sing along. And the wife and daughter of the (now) deceased man were at the forefront of the group which had female and male singers who sang in their own voices without aping any of the originals and that was a welcome change. The group presented medleys of songs with similar beats- the trade mark tonga-beat songs, and songs dipped in Punjabi folk tunes. The evening began with the song from ‘Sambandh’ – “Chal Akela Chal Akela” and then one song followed the next. The evening climaxed with songs that fell in tune with “Sar Pe Topi Laal Haath Mein Resham Ka Roomal”. In between there was an instrumental rendition of songs from ‘Kashmir ki Kali’, ‘Ek Musafir Ek Haseena’, ‘Kismat’ and ‘Phir Wohi Dil Laaya Hoon’ using the saxophone by Shri Shyam Raj ji who (if I heard right) had been a saxophone player for many of OPN’s songs.

Let me add that we were invited to the evening because my cousin’s husband has taken up singing and joined this group post his retirement. It was a revelation that he sang so well. The first song he sang that evening was “Piya Piya Piya Mora Jiya Pukaare” and “Surma Mera Niraala” was his next. And I must say he “yodels” almost like the Kishore Kumar whose fan he is.

As is my habit (ever since I associated with this blog) the first thing I did on returning home was to look up the anniversary page of our blog and see what was the date of OPN’s anniversaries. Next I checked what songs of OPN are yet to make their appearance on the blog. I found many movies of the 50s & 60s with two or three songs left to attain yyiippeeeehood. Then I began looking up for associated videos on YouTube, these songs are not yet available on YouTube too. In fact only the audio of some songs are available and not the whole movie. So that makes reaching videos difficult. But we cannot let the occasion of remembering OPN go by without a song.

So here it is. A song from the film ‘Raagini’ of 1958. The film is produced by Ashok Kumar, jointly with TS Ganesh, and is directed by Rakhan. This movie had a song which was enacted on screen by Kishore Kumar and playback was by Mohd Rafi. Now I discovered another song, as I was hunting songs for this post, which is again classical raaga based and Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan and Fateh Ali Khan are the playback singers. On screen we have Padmini performing a classical dance and Kishore Kumar sitting on stage in a classical gaayaki mode and lip-syncing. A very uncharacteristic Kishore and a very uncharacteristic Omkar Prasad Nayyar who was popular as OP Nayyar. The song ends with Padmini matching steps to the brilliant tabla accompaniment.

As I was writing this post I recollected a post by Atul ji where he has mentioned about movies with names of popular actresses of the time but the actresses were not part of the cast of that particular movie, e.g. ‘Kalpana’ (1960) didn’t have Kalpana as heroine. An this film, ‘Raagini’ has Padmini as the heroine; Raagini the actress was her sister.

Let us enjoy this rare presentation, Kishore Kumar lip syncing a classical song in the voice of Bade Fateh Ali Khan.


Song – Chhed Diye Mere Dil Ke Taar Kyun (Raagini) (1958) Singers – Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan, Bade Fateh Ali Khan, Lyricist – Jaanisar Akhtar, MD – O P Nayyar
Ustaad Amaanat Ali Khan + Fateh Ali Khan

aaaaaaa aaaaaaa
aaaa aaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa

chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
baaj rahi paayal madmaati
baaj rahi paayal madmaati
chaal chale pag pag lehraati
chaal chale pag pag lehraati
jhoom raha jiya baar baar yoon
jhoom raha jiya baar baar yoon
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun

(sargam)
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
(sargam)
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
aaaaaaaa aaaaaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke taar kyun
aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaa aaaaa aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun
aaaaaaa aaaaaa
aaaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaaaaaa
aaaaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun
chhed diye mere dil ke tar kyun

 


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over THIRTEEN years. This blog has over 16400 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Movies with all their songs covered =1280
Total Number of movies covered =4483

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