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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘“Welcome” song’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3909 Post No. : 14967

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Blog Ten Year Challenge (2009-2019)-Song number 25
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This is my First song post for ‘The 10 year Challenge’ series. Today, 10 years ago, on this day, 6 songs were posted. They were 1 song each for films ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954), ‘Marine Drive’ (1955), ‘Naag Devta’ (1962), ‘Bees Saal Baad’ (1962), ‘Prince’ (1969) and ‘Lootmaar’ (1980).

From the day it started, I was keen on participating, but everyday that I checked I found films either belonging to the 60s to 80s or films which were already Yippeee’d. I became helpless. Not that I can not or don’t want to write on songs of films of 70s and beyond, but they are not of my liking. Further I like to write only on songs or films, where I have something substantial to offer to our readers.

Finally, I found one film from 1st April 2009, which had some scope for me. The song is from film ‘Bahut Din Huye’. First, out of the 17 songs only 3 songs are posted on the blog and hence lot of choice to choose a song from remaining 14 songs, and secondly, the background of the film, the stars, the producer/director, the company etc were matters where I could elaborate to my will. So, I opted for this film’s song today.

The film is from the southern giant – Gemini Pictures. The film title sounds almost like a translation of ‘Once upon a time…’. It is a very apt title too, because the film is based on a folk tale of south. I like such films made in south and also their mythological films. When I see these films, the costumes of all the actors as well as their palaces etc remind me of similar pictures that used to appear in Chandamama magazines.

Chandamama (Chandoba in Marathi) magazines vied with my childhood craze of seeing films and reading books. Like many of my age group, our childhood had an important segment covered by Chandamama (in 13 Languages, including English and Sanskrit) readings. I strongly believe that  either the south film actors copied costumes from Chandamama pictures or the vice versa, but they resembled each others, for sure !

As expected, ‘Bahut Din Huye’ was a remake of Gemini’s own block buster ‘Bala Nagamma’ from 1942. Gemini Studios was the best known Madras studio in the 1940s for redefining the concept of mass entertainment with ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), the first Madras film to break successfully into the Hindi cinema circuit. SS Vasan started Gemini as a distribution agency, the Gemini Pictures Circuit, distributing and partly financing films by K Subramanyam’s Motion Picture Producers Combine. When the Combine went bankrupt, Vasan bought the studio in 1939 at public auction for a mere Rs 86,427-11 (annas)-9 (paise) (according to Randor Guy). The studio’s début feature was probably Balkrishna Narayan Rao’s ‘Madanakamarajan’ (1941), but it only took off when cameraman-scenarist K Ramnoth joined it along with his Vauhini partner, art-director AK Sekhar. This team made most of Gemini’s early features: ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943), ‘Kannamma En Kadhali’ (1945) and ‘Miss Malini’ (1947) before the ‘Chandralekha’ blitz catapulted it on to the national stage.

In the early days, the most important event in the studio was Uday Shankar’s dance extravaganza ‘Kalpana’ (released 1948) which also provided training for most of Gemini’s technicians as well as providing the model for an Orientalist dance idiom later associated with influential Tamil choreographers like Hiralal and Chopra Master. A few minor hits followed ‘Chandralekha’ before the studio’s second major onslaught on the national box office with ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’ (1949), a trilingual that established the studio’s dominance in the genre of the costumed adventure movie. Although its Hindi version ‘Nishan’ was not a major success, Vasan continued making Hindi films, often signing up major stars of Hindi films himself: e.g. the Dilip Kumar and Dev Anand film ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955), Vyjayanthimala’s ‘Raj Tilak’ (1958) and ‘Paigham (1959) starring Dilip Kumar, Raaj Kumar and Vyjayanthimala. They also made the mega-budget Tamil classic ‘Avvaiyyar’ (1953). An important later production was ‘Motor Sundaram Pillai’ (1966), Sivaji Ganesan’s only film at this studio. In 1958 the studio expanded into the Gemini Colour lab, licensed by Eastman color Kodak film. After Vasan’s death, his son SS Balasubramanyam produced the unsuccessful ‘Ellorum Nallavare’ (1975). Gemini’s productions declined in the 70s, although it remained successful as a studio and equipment rental business now taken over by the Anand Cine Services.

The unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ into all India market, Subramaniam Srinivasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He  established the popular Tamil magazine ‘Anand Vikatan’, and owned Gemini studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film. In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a  success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’ (1950). Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. ‘Mangala’ was remade in Sinhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955 and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao (later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh), and Jamuna.

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu Version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ in 1950 followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ in 1951. They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 1960s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to novels of writers like Chetan Bhagat. And thanks to modernization.

‘Bahut Din Huye’ had a cast consisting of Madhubala, Ratan Kumar, Agha, Kailash, Savitri (debut film in Hindi), Lalita Pawar, Pushpvalli (mother of Rekha), Kanhaiya Lal etc. Ratan Kumar had a big role in this film. Another film of 1954, ‘Jagriti’ also had a pivotal role for Ratan Kumar.

Ratan Kumar’s real name was Syed Nazar Ali (born 21-8-42 at Ajmer, passed away 12-12-2016 at California, USA). He started working as a child star when he was just 4 year old. His first film was Baburao Patel’s ‘Gwaalan’ (1946). He did 25 film roles before he acted in film ‘Jagriti’. He worked in many famous films like ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Malhaar’ (1951), ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Boot Polish’ (1953) etc. After doing film ‘Jalwa’ in 1955, he migrated to Pakistan in 1956, with his family, and remade ‘Jagriti’ in Pakistan, as ‘Bedaari(1957) – Urdu translation of the Hindi word Jagriti. This film used the same old tune for a film song in Pakistan, aimed at igniting a similar emotion and patriotic zeal, among the listeners. – “Aao Bachcho Tumhe Dikhayen Jhaanki Hindustan Ki… (come children let us show you glimpses of India), is a popular Hindi film song of the 1950s. “Aao Bachcho Sair Karaayen Tumko Pakistan Ki… (children, let us take you on a tour of Pakistan) is an equally hit song of the same period in Pakistan. The movie ‘Bedaari’ (1957) was produced by his elder brother Wazir Ali Rizvi.

He played a young boy’s role in many Pakistani films later. ‘Naagin (1959) was the first Pakistani film he played a lead actor opposite Neelo as the lead actress. Ratan Kumar’s success, as a lead actor, could not last long because his later films did not do well at the box-office and he eventually faded away.

In 1977, his 4 years old daughter died in an accident in Lahore, Pakistan. He was so emotionally upset after that accident that he decided to quit the Pakistani film industry. In 1979, Ratan Kumar left Pakistan never to return again. In the late 1960s, Ratan Kumar also got into the business of selling oriental carpets and had started travelling back and forth from Pakistan to Europe for this business. Eventually he ended up settling down permanently in the United States after 1979.

Ratan Kumar was living in California, in his old age, and was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia 10 days before his death on 12 Dec 2016. He had a long history of illness, though. In 1996, his lungs had collapsed twice in the same year. When they collapsed the third time in 2000, he was left paralyzed and went into a coma for eight days. Then he recovered in four to five months and became somewhat normal again. His survivors include 2 sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren .

Music for film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ is by a pair of BS Kalla and E Sankar Sastry. Many south Indian composers had tried their hand at giving music to Hindi films in the 50s decade. MDs like Ghantasala, BS Kalla, SD Parthasarathi, E Shankar, B Laxman, Vishwanathan, R Sudarshanam, SV Venkataramana, TR Ramanathan and TG Lingappa are few of the lesser known music directors from south, who composed music for Hindi films. They gave melodious music, but somehow they did not succeed here. One reason could be their use of southern singers, for whom acceptability was a problem here for Hindi songs. Names like Ramesh Naidu, Adi Narayana Rao and the pair of Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy were at least known names here. Their films like ‘Piya Milan’ (1955, MD – Ramesh Naidu), ‘Suvarna Sundari’ (1958, MD – Adi Narayana Rao) and ‘Naya Aadmi’ (1956, MD – Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy) had many popular songs.

The film had 17 songs, 7 of these were sung by Lata Mangeshkar and the remaining were either by chorus or unnamed male/female singers. The lyrics were by Pt. Indra. Let us now hear today’s chorus song and enjoy the song and dance video.

[Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Rajadhyaksha, HFGK, MuVyz, The Hindu, Wiki and my notes.]

Song – Swaagat Raajkumar Tumhaara, Swaagat Raajkumar  (Bahut Din Huye) (1954) Singer – Chorus, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – BS Kalla

Lyrics

aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aa aa aa aaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaa aaaaa

swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar
swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar

aaaa aaaa aaaa
ye akhiyan matwaali kab se
rahi hain baat nihaar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa

aao baitho ratan hindole
aaaa aaaa aaaa
ratan hindole
pawan veg se jhulo
tum pyaare mehmaan hamaare..ae..ae
aao sab kuchh bhulo
jhoola jhulo

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmmm mmmmm mmmm

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
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आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आ आ आ आssss
आ आ आ आ
आ आss आssss आssss
आsss आssss

स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार
स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार

आ आ आ
ये अखियाँ मतवाली कब से
रही हैं बाट निहार
आsss आsss आsssss आsss
आsss आsss आsss
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ

आओ बैठो रतन हिंडोले
आsss आsss आsss
रतन हिंडोले
पावन वेग से झूलो
तुम प्यारे मेहमान हमारे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आओ सब कुछ भूलो
झूला झूलो

आsss आsss आsss आsss
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम

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This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Even as we have been celebrating the journey of this blog over 3000 days, there has been another journey that has taken place recently.

Avinash Scrapwala, our Nagpur-based Atulite, happened to visit Bengaluru earlier this week for a short trip with his wife. If you’ve read the post , you will notice a mention of his boarding the train at Nagpur at 10:10 hrs and expecting to reach at 06:40 hrs the next morning.
Read more on this topic…


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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TEN years. This blog has over 15000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3900 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

15041

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Movies with all their songs covered =1171
Total Number of movies covered =4124

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