Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Songs about a place’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusaist of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4346 Post No. : 15656 Movie Count :

4311

So far I have discussed three of the six feature films which Sai Paranjpye has directed in her filmy career – ‘Sparsh’ (1980) in “Geeton Ki Duniya Mein Sargam Hain Hum“,  ‘Chashm-e-Baddoor’ (1981) in “Is Nadi Ko Mera Aaina Maan Lo” and ‘Saaz’ (1997) in “Baa. . .dal Ghumadh Badh Aaye“. In this article, I take up one more film by her – ‘Disha’ (1990) which, is not well known to the public at large. Sai Paranjpye accords this film as her best feature film in terms of excellence in all the main departments of the film making – story, screen-play, dialogues, direction, and the acting contributions from all the actors associated with this film.

According to Sai Paranjpye, the story of the film was in the making process for about 17 years before it got fructified in 1990. The unique feature of the film is that the story is based on three different experiences she got over these 17 years which have no connection with each other. Yet, she weaved a story around three events linking them with a common theme of the problems of migrants and casual workers. She believed that the life around us offers so much material for the films that there is no need to get inspired from Hollywood movies. In other words, Sai Paranjpye’s sources of ‘plagiarisation’ are life around her.

Sometime in early 1970s, Sai Paranjpye made a visit to a village in Pune district along with her two friends who had adopted that village for water harvesting. During that time, she met a villager, an agricultural labourer who owned a small parcel of barren land. He was convinced that under his barren land was the source of water. So, for about 12 years, he had been digging the well, all alone in his free time, sometime even the whole night. But there was no trace of water. The villagers had branded him as a mad man. Fed up with his obsession for digging well, his wife has left him many times but would eventually return. And then one day, he struck water in the well. Villagers who were earlier calling him as mad man made him the hero of the village. The well was named after him. The story of that villager was cinematic but it was not enough to make a full-length film.

After few years, Sai Paranjpye met her friend, Sabhashini Ali (ex-wife of producer-director, Muzaffar Ali) in Mumbai. She was doing some social work among the mill workers who were mostly migrants and staying in what is known in Mumbai Chawls as Gala (a type of dormitory). This was at a time when old mills in Mumbai were in the verge of closure as they could not compete with mills with technologically advanced power looms.  She accompanied Sabhashini Ali to one of the Galas in mill area and was shocked to observe their staying conditions. In a single Gala, there were nearly 40 persons staying together in the shifts of 8 hours. They seem to enjoy their life. All were doing different activities – playing musical instruments, playing cards, shaving, some going out for practising lezim (folk dance). Sai Paranjpye talked to most of the mill workers after which she felt that it was a good theme for a cinema.

After some days, Sai Paranjpye once again met her two friends who had returned from Niphani after leading a protest against the tobacco growers and bidi makers for exploitation of tobacco workers. Those days, the middleman will recruit women from the nearby villages for making bidis at the end of which they would get daily wages based on the number of bidis they rolled in a day. But the middleman will exploit them by rejecting some rolled bidis on some false pretext. Also, some of the middlemen would make attempts for sexual favours as rewards for not rejecting some of the bidis rolled by them. Her two friends had taken up the issues with bidi factories and on behalf of the bidi workers.

With these three real stories, Sai Paranjpye wrote the script linking them with a common theme of the problems of migratory mill workers of Mumbai. This time, she decided to produce the film herself besides directing, writing the script, dialogues and songs. She roped in her favourite actors and also took Nana Patekar for the first time under her direction. The first part of the film was shot in a village near Pune. The second part of the film was shot in Mumbai in Sitaram and Indu Mills and the scenes of the migrant workers were shot in a real Gala of a Chawl. Some mill workers also acted in the films.

The main cast of ‘Disha’ (1990) consisted of Shabana Azmi, Om Puri, Nana Patekar, Raghuvir Yadav, Rajshri Sawant, Neelu Phule, Shayaji Shinde, Achyut Potdar etc. The gist of the story of the film is as under:

Bakuri is a non-descript village about one hour from Pune by road. In this village, the family of Parshuram (Om Puri) consisting of his wife, Hansa (Shabana Azmi), his five children and his younger brother, Soma (Raghuvir Yadav) stays in a hut. Parshuram is an agricultural labourer and has a small barren land in which nothing grows on it except the wild-flowers. However, he is convinced that under his barren land is the source of water. Hence for the last 12 years, he has been digging well, all alone whenever he is free. Hansa resents Parshuram’s obsession with digging well and often threatens to leave him. Soma plans to go to Mumbai for getting a job as most of the time, he is unemployed.

Soma is very friendly with Basanta (Nana Patekar) who stays with his old and sickly father (Neelu Phoole) in a hut close to Parshuram’s hut. Basanta is also an agricultural labourer whose marriage has been fixed with Phoolwanti (Rajshri Sawant) from an adjoining village. Basanta’s father wants his marriage to be performed with fun fare for which he takes a loan of Rs.10000/- against the hypothecation of a cow and a buffalo. The marriage of Basant and Phoolwanti is solemnised.

Soma comes to Mumbai for job and stays in a Gala where 40 other mill workers are staying, a few from his village. He gets a job in the mill. He sends money to his brother, Parshuram every month and sometime also sends readymade garments for his nephews and niece. Basanta, after his marriage feels uncomfortable as he is unemployed and the loan instalments are to be repaid which his father has taken for his marriage. So, he also departs for Mumbai in search of employment and lands in mill workers’ gala where his friend, Soma is also staying. Basanta also gets the job in the same mill where Soma is working.

After getting to know the realities in working condition in Mumbai, Basanta is determined to return to his village after working in the mill for 2-3 years and also advises Soma to return to the village  with him so that with the money they earned, they can start a cooperative farming in the village. But Soma is determined to work in Mumbai for a long time as he is now addicted to the life of Mumbai.

After few months of stay in Mumbai, Basanta calls his wife, Phoolwanti to Mumbai to show her the city. One of his roommates in the gala arranges a independent room in a chawl for 7 days. After seeing the staying conditions of Basanta in Mumbai, his wife tells him to return to the village as early as possible when she leaves Mumbai for her village.

In the meanwhile, to run the household, both Hansa and Phoolwanti works in a bidi making unit to roll bidis for which they get daily wages in terms of the number of bidis rolled. But the munshi (Achyut Potdar) of the bidi making unit tries to exploit them by finding their faults while rolling the bidis for which no amount is paid. His intention is to force them to give him some sexual favours.

At one time, Basanta’s father writes a letter to him to come to the village for some urgent work. He returns and finds that his father has got a transistor radio and supplies of bidis from Munshi. He also comes to know that his wife is working for a bidi making unit. He is unhappy that his wife has to work for running the household.

The next day, Parshuram strikes water in the well which he has been digging for 12 years. The whole village rejoices and the mad Parshuram becomes a hero in the village. There is a felicitation by the entire village during which he declares that the water in the well is for the entire village.

Basanta returns to Mumbai earlier than schedule and his friend, Soma is surprised. Basanta tells him that he got bored in the village within two days. Then there is a twist in the story. Basanta who has been pressurising Soma to return to the village along with him after 2-3 years, decides that he is going to work in Mumbai on a long-term basis to earn good amount of money as Soma has been advising him. However, this time, Soma surprises him by revealing that his brother has struck water in the well and he is going back to the village to do farming. The film ends with Soma boarding a state transport bus which is driving to his village away from Mumbai with Basanta struck in Mumbai.

From the above narration, the story of the film looks simple. I found the film interesting to watch because Sai Paranjpye in her usual way has relied on visuals to speak for the story along with some punch-line dialogues. For example, Shabana Azmi regards the well as her ‘soutan’ as Om Puri spends more time in the well than in the house. Sometime, he takes his afternoon siesta in the well itself. To this, Om Puri’s repartee to Shabana Azmi is that she should be thankful that her ‘soutan’ is ‘baanjh’ (infertile); otherwise one more platoon of children would have joined the family. Here ‘baanjh’ has another meaning in that despite digging for many years, water has not struck in the well.

The film was released in Mumbai in November 1991 and thereafter in Pune by Sai Paranjpye as no one was willing to distribute the film. It generated interest in the initial few days with house-full board. After watching the film, Manmohan Desai offered to release the film in the Delhi circuit. With the releases in limited theatres. the box office collection could barely cover the budget of the film.

The film did not get any award in India. However, when the film was shown in Chennai International Film Festival in 1991 as a private entry (it could not be shown in Indian Panorama as it had not won any award), it was highly appreciated because of which over a period of time, the film got invitations  in as many as 23 international film festivals all over the world where it has won 5 awards with cash prizes including one at Cannes international film festival.

Sai Paranjpye has mentioned in her book that the film had three songs. However, I found only two songs in the film – one is a lavani song and the other a fun song. Songs were not released on audio format. I am presenting the fun song, “Bambai Bambai Bambai Bambai Bam’ sung by Vinay Mandke, Ravindra Sathe, Tyagraj Khadilkar, Arun Joglekar and Chorus. The song is written by Sai Paranjpye which is set to music by Anand Modak. I am not able to segregate the lyrics according to playback singers as I am not familiar with their voices except that of Ravindra Sathe. I have also observed that playback singers seem to lip sync for multiple actors  According to Sai Paranjpye, the ‘anokhe bol’ in the song have been rendered by Vinay Mandke in addition to his part of the song.

The song is picturised in a gala where about 40 mill workers stay. Except for about  10 actors, rest of the participants in the song are real mill workers staying in the gala. If one goes through the lyrics of the song, it would be observed that the sad realities of mill workers (or for that matter, migrant workers in general) have been presented in the mask of a fun song. In the last two stanzas, there are ‘locals verses migrants’ theme presented in ‘lavani’ style. The prelude music of the songs with “Dhak Dhak Dhak. . .” is akin to the sound generated by the power looms of a mill when they are operational.

This song is the essence of the film’s main theme. With this song, ‘Disha’ (1990) make a debut in the Blog.

Acknowledgements:

Some of the information about the background for making the film ‘Disha’ (1990) is based on

  1. An interview conducted by Sridhar Rangayan and Saagar Gupta titled ‘Queen of Humour: A Candid Interview with Award-Winning Director and Writer Sai Paranjpye,’ South Asianist, Vol 2, No.3 (2010).
  2. The Marathi book, ‘Sai – Maaza Kalapravaas’ (2016) written by Sai Paranjpye.

Song – Bambai Bambai Bambai Bambai Bam (Disha) (1990) Singer -Vinay Mandke, Ravindra Sathe, Tyagraj Khadilkar, Arun Joglekar, Lyrics – Sai Paranjpye, MD – Anand Modak
Chorus

Lyrics

dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak dhak dhak
dhak dhak
dhak dhak
dhak daa dham
dhak dhak
dhak dhak
dhak daa dham

arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
 
gaon mein behti doodh ki ganga aa
haay
gaon mein behti doodh ki ganga aa
kaanha murli bajaawat hai bhai 
kaanha murli bajaawat hai
aisa gokul chhoda… haay
aisa gokul chhoda bhai
kya narakpuri ye bhaawat hai
makdi ke jaal mein keeden ham
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam b-bam b-bam bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam b-bam b-bam bam
 
dhuaan gootan aur bimaari
dhuaan gootan aur bimaari
yahaan jawaan mard ke baal pakey
har kuchh bikta hai is nagri mein
bol tumhaara chaar takey
arre chaar take bhi naahin kam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
 
wahaan aankh bichaaye baithi radha
aansoo uske sookh gaye
wahaan aankh bichaaye baithi radha
aansoo uske sookh gaye
bachche jo peechhe chhode wo
shaql baap ki dbhool gaye
bachche jo peechhe chhode wo
shaql baap ki bhool gaye
arre bhool gaye to kya hai gham
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam bam bam bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam bam bam bam
 
haaaaaaaaaaa
arre kameenon
beimaanon
badh badh taane dete ho
phir bharti kyunkar hote ho
tum phir bharti kyunkar hote ho
dham chik chik dham chik dham
arre bina bhulaaye tum mehmaan
upar se ho namak haram
waapas jaao
hari gun gaao,,o
waapas jaao
hari gun gaao
yahaan tumhaara kya hai kaam
yahaan timhaara kya hai kaam
kissa abhi karo ye khatam
khatam khatam bhai karo khatam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam b-bam b-bam bam bam bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
bam b-bam b-bam bam bam bam
 
aiyya
paapi pet yahaan le aaya…aa….aa
arre paapi pet yahaan le aaya
nagar nahi ye bhul bhulaiyya
khoon paseena yahaan bahaaya
arre khoon paseena yahaan bahaaya
iss nagri ka namak chukaaya..aa aa aa aaa
yahin basera ho ab hardam
yahin basera ho ab hardam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
b-bam bam bambai
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam
arre bambai bambai bambai bambai bam


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4305 Post No. : 15573 Movie Count :

4287

—————————————–
Hindi songs in Bangla Films: 26
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Mumbai has been the leading Hindi film production centre in India ever since Dadasaheb Phalke produced the first silent film ‘Raja Harishchandra’ in 1913. After the release of India’s first talkie ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931, many more film production companies were set up in Mumbai, some of them owning the studios. The outdoor shootings, if any, in the initial stages of talkie films were done mostly in around Mumbai. It was quite natural that stories of some Hindi films would have Mumbai as the background portraying the many facets of the city. Obviously, in such films, there would be scenes from Mumbai and possibly one ‘Bombay-centric’ song.

The earliest Hindi film in which I found a song with Bombay (now Mumbai) as the theme is Bambai Ko Chalo Bambai Ko from ‘Kirti’ (1942) written by Pandit Phani. The song talks about Boribunder station (now Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus), dhuen waali ghaadi (steam engine train), Bambai Ki Sethani, Kalkate ke babu, Marwaad ki rani, Kashi ke sadhu etc. In short, the song gives a glimpse of cosmopolitan character of Mumbai.

In the 1950s, there were two songs which, I feel, are quintessential of Mumbai even now. The first is, Ae Dil Hai Mushkil Jeena Yahaan Ye Hai Bombay Meri Jaan from ‘CID’ (1956) written by Majrooh Sultanpuri. At the outset, song would appear to be a fun song. But a closer look at the lyrics of the song would reveal that behind the fun, there is sarcasm. For example:

kahin building kahin traame, kahin motor, kahin mill
miltaa hai yahaan sab kuchh ik miltaa nahin dil
insaan kaa nahin kahin naam-o-nishaan

[Everything is available in Mumbai except love and humanity.]

Another example of sarcasm in the song:

kahin satta, kahin patta, kahin chori kahin race
kahin daaka, kahin faaka, kahin thokar, kahin thes
bekaaron ke hain kayi kaam yahaan

[There are many works available like gambling, pick-pocketing, burglary, horse racing etc. There is no dearth of employment for unemployed.]

But at the end, the song turns from the sarcasm to the theory of ‘karma’:

buraa duniyaa jo hai kahtaa aisaa bholaa tu na ban
jo hai kartaa wo hai bhartaa ye yahaan kaa hai chalan
dadagiri nahin milne ki yahaan

[By telling that the world is bad, one does not become good. Here, the motto is that one who works get the fruits of his work. Bullying will not fetch anything.]

The second song of 1950s I am referring to is about the flight of the homeless in Mumbai. The song does not have specific reference to Mumbai in its lyrics but the word ‘Boribunder’ in the lyrics is the indication as to which city the song is referring to. It is an iconic song, Cheen O Arab Hamaara Hindustan Hamaara from ‘Phir Subah Hogi’ (1958) which was written by Sahir Ludhianvi. Just three lines from the song sums of the problems of homeless in Mumbai in a sarcastic way:

rehne ko ghar nahin hai
saaraa jahaan hamaara
Hindustan hamaara

There are also songs like Jiska Joota Usi Ka Sar, Dil Hai Chhota Bada Shahar, Wah Re Wah Re Teri Bambai from ‘Guest House’ (1959) written by Prem Dhawan and Ye Bambai Shahar Ka Bada Naam Hai from ‘Kya Ye Bombay Hai’ (1959) written by Noor Devasi. Both the songs describe the life in Mumbai from different perspectives. Then there is a fun song, Ye Haseen Bambai Apne Ko To Jam Gayi from ‘Holiday in Bombay’ (1963) written by Anjaan and “Bambai Hamaari Bambai Ye Rajdulaari Bambai” from ‘Street Singer’ (1966) written by Hasrat Jaipuri.

As we come to 1970s, with the exponential growth of Mumbai as a business and commercial hub of India, Mumbai became one of the major preferred cities for migrant workers. The problems faced by migrants in Mumbai has been beautifully expressed in the song Seene Mein Jalan Aankhon Mein Toofaan Sa Kyon Hai from ‘Gaman’ (1978) written by Shahryar. The problem of finding homes for the middle class people in Mumbai who spent their bachelorhood in staying as paying guests is depicted in the song Do Deewaane Shahar Mein, Raat Mein Ya Dophar Mein, Aab O Daana Dhoondhte Hain Ek Aashiyaanaa Dhoondhte Hain from ‘Gharoanda’ (1977), written by Gulzar.

There are other ‘Bombay-centric’ songs in Hindi films which are mostly fun songs. One of the popular songs under this category is Ee Hai Bambai Nagariya Tu Dekh Babuaa from ‘Don’ (1978) written by Anjaan. I have not checked much about the songs on Mumbai in the 1980s and thereafter. But one song whose lyrics stand true to most of the migrants to Mumbai including those who came here to fulfil their dream of becoming artist in Hindi films is from an ‘off the mainstream’ film ‘Sankat City’ (2009). The apt song is “Mumbai One-Way Nagari Hai”.

All the ‘Bombay-centric’ songs I have enumerated above are from Hindi films. It was a pleasant surprise for me when I found one such Hindi song in Bangla film ‘Dui Bechaara’ (1960). The ‘Bombay’ song is “Karo Na Phere Gali Ke Mere Hanso Na Bolo Ji” sung by Geeta Dutt and Manna Dey. The song is written by Gulzar which is set to music by Bhupen Hazarika.

The film is not available for viewing. So it is difficult to visualise the situation of the song in the film. Probably, it could well be a stage song.

Audio Clip:

Song – Karo Na Phere Gali Ke Mere Hato Na Bolo Jee (Dui Bechaare) (Bangla) (1960) Singers – Geeta Dutt, Manna Dey, Lyrics – Gulzar, MD – Bhupen Hazarika
Both

Lyrics

karo na phere gali ke mere
hato na bolo ji
haay
jigar jalaa ke nazar churaa ke
kahaan chale ho ji

arre karo na phere gali ke mere
hato na bolo ji
aji jigar jalaa ke nazar churaa ke
kahaan chale ho ji

bahaane lagaaye toone
dekhi na Bambai teri
bahaane lagaaye toone
dekhi na Bambai teri
bura hai bigadna hamse
chalo aise roothho na
chalo dikhaa doon tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

puraana hai Boribunder
adda chor uchakkon kaa
puraana hai Boribundar
adda chor uchakkon kaa

badaa naam chori chakkar
rela dhool aur dhakkon kaa
badaa naam chori chakkar
rela dhool aur dhakkon kaa
aji chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

o o o
anokhe tamaashe iske
kaisi ye Bambai teri
chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

kinaare pe chaupati ke filmy pariyaan ghoomen
kinaare pe chaupati ke filmy pariyaan ghoomen
kahaan ko chale tum itni pahan ke oonchi patloonen
kahaan ko chale tum itni pahan ke oonchi patloonen
aji chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

o o o o
anokhe tamaashe iske
kaisi ye Bambai teri
chalo dikhaa doon
tumhen ghumaa doon
badaa shahar Bambai

sharam bhi yahaan sharmaaye phere maari maari
sharam bhi yahaan sharmaaye phere maari maari

samundar mein dooben jaake maari baari baari
samundar mein dooben jaake maari baari baari
chalo main haari nakal hai saari
ajab shahar Bambai
ajji kaha thhaa hamne suna na tumne
chalo chhodo Bambai

chalo chalo chhodo Bambai
chalo chalo chhodo Bambai
chalo chalo chhodo Bambai


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4272 Post No. : 15503 Movie Count :

4273

Hullo Atuldom

Ideally this post should have come last year, when this veteran of about a few hundred movies, turned 80. But then that has not happened.
I have decided that we shall not let the occasion go unnoticed. And in south India, the celebration for a person turning 80 is normally on completing 81, as the system of calculating the auspicious date to celebrate says that the person should have witnessed a 1000 full moons in his life, with the life being said to have started after the 1st birthday. Etc. Etc. Etc.

Whatever be the logic, the celebration called “Sadabhishekam” is after the person crosses 81 and our celebrity is turning 81 today. So here we are wishing this veteran a Happy 81st birthday.

He was born Syed Ishtiaq Ahmed Jafri on 29th March 1939 in Amritsar. He made his first screen appearance at the young age of 11 or 12. B.R.Chopra’s “Afsana” was the starting point followed by “Ab Dilli Door Nahin”, “Hum Panchi ek Daal ke”, “Do Bigha Zameen”, “Aar Paar” etc. AVM’s “Bhabhi” saw him in his first role of a grownup. And then there was no looking back and we have seen him in movies till 2017- a really long career. He played a leading man in a few movies before finding his comic timing in “Brahmachari”.

He has had many famous songs filmed on him -“Paas baitho tabiyat bahal jayegi”, “In pyar ki raahon mein”, we have seen him shaking a leg when Shamshad Begum sang, for Kumkum’s debut in movies, “kabhi aar kabhi paar”. This post introduces us to the person whose 81st birthday it is today.

Yes we are wishing “Soorma Bhopali” of Sholay a.k.a father of Jaaved and Naaved Jaafri of ‘Booogie Boogie’ fame. Simply put we are celebrating comedian Jagdeep’s birthday.

He may have done around 100 movies prior to “Sholay” but when Salim-Javed wrote the character of ‘Soorma Bhopali’ it changed Jagdeep’s fortunes forever. He was seen in many movies after “Sholay” too but very few remember him as the sidekick of Gopi (Mithun Chakravarty) ‘Kabari” in Surakksha”” (1979); ‘Chandu alias James Bond’ in the 1977 release “Agent Vinod”; he had a tiny-blink-n-miss role in Feroz Khan’s “Qurbani”. Jagdeep was forever requested to reappraise his Soorma Bhopali, atleast once, in many subsequent movies. He himself wrote and directed a movie with the title “Soorma Bhopali” in 1988. I don’t know much about that movie other than the fact that it had a whole lot of Jagdeep’s co-actors from “Sholay” making guest and special appearances in that movie. IMDB.com gives the list of actors as Agha, Amitabh Bachchan, Master Bhagwan, Birbal, Brahmachari, Danny, Dharmendra; Aruna Irani appears to be the sole female in the starcast.

I have chosen a song from this 1988 movie to accompany this post. The music directors were Dilip Sen- Sameer Sen and songs were written by Asad Bhopali, Jaan Nissar Akhtar and Jagdeep himself has written a song. It was a difficult task selecting a song from this movie as Jagdeep has also sung a few songs in the movie. But I finally decided that we will have a song that accompanies the movie’s credits that is what I have deduced from the available clip. This song is sung by Mohd Aziz and Jagdeep and Asad Bhopali is the lyricist. As I was writing the lyrics I caught the names of lot more actors than those that I have mentioned who were common to Sholay and this movie.

Here is wishing our very own Soorma Bhopali, who had a one-liner to his character in Sholay that said “Soorma Bhopali aise nahin hai”, A very Healthy and happy Birthday.


Song-Main hoon Soorma Bhopali (Soorma Bhopali)(1988) Singer-Md Aziz , Lyrics-Asad Bhopali, MD-Dilip Sen Samir Sen
Jagdeep

Lyrics

assalaam vaalekkum
aadaab arz hai
namaste
aao hanste hanste
aur jaao hanste hanste
paan khaalo
aur issi baat pe bajaao taali

ke main hoon soorma bhopali
arre haan soorma bhopali
ke main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali
main na rahoon Bhopal mein
toh sheher lage hai khaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali

yeh mera bhopal hai
jo pyaar se maalaamaal hai
bairagadh se T T Nagar tak
jo hai yahaan khush-haal hai
moti masjid jaama masjid
Taj ul Masjid dekh kar
jo bhi dekhe birla mandir
chamak uthhe hai uski nazar
kamlapati raani ka mahal hai
beech mein donon taalon ke
jaise meri naak hai pyaare
beech mein donon gaalon ke
meri chaal anokhi sabse
meri chaal anokhi sabse
meri ada hai niraali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali

meri cycle meri dulhan hai
isko saja ke rakhta hoon
ise akela jab bhi chhodoon
taala laga ke rakhta hoon
logon meri soorat pe na jaao
dil hai mera aaine jaisa
mujhse meri ammi ne kahaa thha
beta haath ka mail hai paisa

paise ki parwaah na karna
bhale kaam mein rehna aage
uske karam par rakhna bharosa
woh jab chaahe kismat jaage
ooparwaala
ooparwaala kadam kadam par
kare teri rakhwaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
arre haan soorma bhopali
main na rahoon bhopal mein
toh sheher lage hai khaali ee ee
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali
main hoon soorma bhopali
miyaan haan soorma bhopali


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Blog Day :

4000 Post No. : 15100

Today (1 july 2019) happens to be the first day of the month (pehli taareekh). People today are no longer as happy and bullish about pehli taareekh as they were till a few decades back, nevertheless it remains an important day for people.

This time, it happens to be monday, the first working day as well. 😉 It is as if one is beginning a new month with a clean slate, with the first working day of the week. 🙂 There are people who dread mondays. I am sure regulars of this blog are not among such people. 🙂

This day happens to be quite an important day for the blog as well. Today is the 4000th day for this blog ! 4000 days of continuous vibrant existence, with posts almost every day !

Out of 4000 days, there have been 217 dot days (5.4 % days) when no posts were published, otherwise there have been posts everyday on 3783 days (94.6 %) out of these 4000 days !

The peak daily strike rate of this blog was 4.626 posts a day on 1902th day of the blog on 2 october 2013 when 8800th post was posted. Those were the days when covering six songs in a day was considered normal in the blog. The strike rate began to fall from 2015 onwards and today on the 4000th day of the blog we are on 15100 only !

Did I say post number 15100 ? Yes, I did. Today on the 4000th day of the blog, we reach another century post, namely post number 15100 in the blog.

Many of our writeup contents, like our strike rate of posts have dried up as well, nevertheless we still summon enough creative juices for special occasions. Blog century post is one such special occasion.

This writeup is a labour of love (a favourite phrase for this blog) and it covers a topic that I wanted to cover on 5 june 2015, which was world environment day. Though I had considerable data on this topic, I was not able to convert all that data into useful and interesting information in the limited time that I could summon by that date. So I decided that this topic would be covered while discussing post number 15100. I discussed the matter with Sudhir Jee and requested him to find a suitable song. Finally we zeroed in on a song that is quite appropriate and suitable for the occasion as well as the topic being discussed in the song.

The topic of this writeup is environment. This writeup covers a man who has singlehandedly performed a Herculean task ( भगीरथ प्रयास) in the area of environment.

Who is this man and what he has done ?

Jitu Kalita, a Jorhat-based journalist who writes a popular column on nature in Prantik, an Assamese magazine, was stalking vultures when he found himself on the far side of Aruna sapori (sapori is the Assamese word for island), entering a forest, when a visibly perturbed tribal man practically attacked him and chased him off the land.

Later, Jitu Kalita managed to pacify the man and he convinced him that he was a journalist and not a poacher as apprehended by the tribal man. It was then that the tribal man, named Jadav Payeng, gradually opened up to Jitu Kalita and Jitu Kalita had the biggest news scoop of his career.

He is a man called Jadav “Molai” Payeng, a native of Assam. A man in his late 50s, he is an ordinary man who lives in a village near Jorhat (Assam). A tribal man of Mising tribe of Assam, he makes his living by milking his cattles and selling their milk.

When he was young, he lived with his parents and family is an island on River Brahamputra, near a small town called Kokilamukh located on south bank of the river.

In 1965, there was a big flood and that devastated the island (called Kartic sapori or Aruna sapori). Jadav Payeng’s family decided to move to another island to the north, namely Majuli island (which incidentally is the biggest river island in the world).

Before relocating, acute poverty compelled his parents to leave five-year-old Jadav in the care of Anil Borthakur, a court-master at the District Judge Court in Jorhat, who looked after his schooling.

In 1979, after he had appeared for his matriculation examination in a Jorhat School, Jadav Payeng visited his native place during summer season. What he saw there devastated him. He saw hundreds of dead snakes or the dry and hot sands. These snakes, which were washed ashore that island during rainy season, had died in summer because there was no vegetation growing in the sands that could protect and nurture these snakes. Jadav Payeng was heart broken. If snakes could die like this, then in future humans can likewise die if there is no vegetation to protect and nurture them- he thought. And he resolved to do something about that.

He approached forest department (where he had worked as a labourer in their project of afforestation), but they refused to help him and stated that it was not possible to do what he wanted.

Jadav Payeng asked the elders who lived in that area about some suitable vegetations that could be grown there. They advised him to grow world’s tallest grass. Initially confused, he later came to know that they described bamboo as world’s tallest grass. They also provided him some seeds.

Jadav Payeng began to plant seeds regularly from that day in 1979. Initially it was bamboo, and later, when Bamboo trees formed a decent enough self sustaining vegetation, he began to plant other variety of seeds as well.

Jada Payeng kept on and on for more than three decades unsung, unknown, unheralded. He obviously had genuine passion for the task that he could go on and on singlehandedly for this long without any support.

It was only thanks to the chance discovery by nature photographer Jitu Kalita that people came to know about this forest which was grown singlehandedly by one man.

This forest became so large and so thick that wild animals like Elephants (from Dibrugarh), Rhinos (from Kaziranga) and tigers (from Karbi anglong) found their way into his forest.

This jungle was named Mulai kathoni (Mulai jungle) by the local people, where Mulai was his nickname.

Jadav Payeng had built his tribal style home (known as Changghar – house on stilts in the Mising style) in the jungle where he lived with his family (wife and three kids). When the herd of elephants first arrived in the jingle in 2008, they overran his home.

He stood and watched from a distance and realised the magnitude of what he had done. While the others watched on, baffled, he was overcome with joy. And he had every reason to be – he has succeeded in bringing life (that too wildlife) back to the island.

But his celebrations were short-lived. A few days later, angry villagers, having assessed the damage to their crops, blamed Mulai Kathoni for attracting the elephants. One mob manifested their anger by cutting down trees while another set fire to a patch at the far end. He reckons he lost one tenth of the forest in that first wave of mindless violence.

Fortunately, things calmed down since. The forest department too realised that wild elephants had gone to this “new” jungle that they knew nothing about till then. The ex-gratia payment for damaged crops offered by the Forest Department, the media attention and accolades bestowed on Payeng helped in suppressing the rage of the villagers.

What was empty sandbar had transformed into a full fledged jungle spread over 1360 acres (550 hectares). The forest now had around 5000 trees of over 100 different species, all singlehandedly planted by him. The vegetation included shimloo, shishoo, bhelo, gamari, segun, jamun, aam, kathol, shirish, dimolu, kohee, koroi, arjuna, amla, kadam, krishnasure, aizar, two types of neem, bagori etc (all local names). Most he planted himself; others grew from the seeds dispersed by winds, birds and the Brahmaputra. The forest now had fullfledged fauna consisting of Elephants, tigers, rhinos , deers, monkeys, rabbits, vultures and other birds etc !

Central Park in Manhattan in New York, a famous man made jungle is spread over 843 acres (341 hectares). It was created thanks to the efforts of many men and machinery.

If Central Park is larger than countries of Monaco(202 hectares) and Vatican city (44 hectares), then this forest (now called mulai kathonibari or Mulai forest) is larger than Gibralter (area 680 hectares) of Great Britain and comparable to area cocos island of Australia (1373 hectares).

Jadav Payeng’s fame spread slowly. Initially it was confined to local media. From 2012 till 2015, he became known mainly among academic circles and he was honoured by JNU (2012) where he was hailed as Forest Man of India. In 2013, he was honoured by Indian Institute of Forest Management.

Earlier, only people have access to corridors of power used to get government awards. Now a days, public are being encouraged to nominate people for such awards. That is how many unknown and unsung people are being recognised these days. That is how someone recommended his name for Padmshree Award and he received Padmshree Award at the hands of President Pranob Mukherji in 2015.

The Padmshree recognition caught the eyes of media and gave him world wide recognition. Many TV channels of various languages have visited him and have featured him in their TV programs. Even International media have covered him. He began to be called nationwide and even abroad to attend seminars and conferences.

Though a school drop out, he has vast knowledge about nature and he talks like an environmentalists that he actually is. He has knowledge which many theoretical environmentalists may not be aware of. For instance, he knows that Rhinos, Elephants and ungulates prefer to eat three different kinds of grasses. He is not familar with the English or scientific names of these grasses though.

He gets invited all over India and also abroad. wherever he goes, he is on the lookout for seeds of plants, which he keeps in his pocket. He manages to bring all these seeds with him to his native place in Assam and then plants them in the forest.

All this fame and recognition has not changed him. he is the same humble person that he was earlier. He did all this not for awards, but because he strongly believed in the cause. That is how he could go about this tast unrecognised and unsung for three decades.

Though not formally educated, he is an environmentalist at heart. He insists that Environment schience should be made compulsory in primary schools. Every kid, when he starts schooling should be given two saplings. He should be responsible for their care. By the time he leaves school some one decade later, his two plants would be full fledged trees. As for senior people not in school, they should plant one plant and nurture it. That way everyone of us would ensure our continued survival in earth.

“Man is responsible for the well-being of all animals and birds in this world,” Payeng explains. “If man does not take care of all animals, who will?”

Jadav Payeng lived in his hut in his jungle till 2011. Then he moved to “mainland”, namely a village called Eklong Mising Gaon near Kokilamukh in Jorhat in 2011, mainly to take care of the schooling needs of his three children.

He still goes to his jungle regularly from his “mainland” home, which involves walk on foot for a few kilimeters, followed by a treacherous boat ride over a stream of River Brahmputra, then walk of a few kilometeres, then another boat ride in another treacherous stream of river Brahmputra, and finally a trek of several kilometers before he reaches his jungle. Then the same trek back home.

To appreciate the logistics, I have provided the google earth image of his forest. One can also see the vastness of the river. As mentioned above, this small island is larger than some small nations of the world. The jungle grown by Jadav Payeng itself is larger than the smallest nations of the world.

Island in River Brahmpurta with Mulai forest
———————————————

Bird’s eye view, with River Brahmputra seen- See how wide is the river. The area to the north of mulai forest is Majuli island.
——————————————————————————————————————————–

It gives me great pleasure to introduce Jadav Payeng, the great self made environmentalist of India. What he singlehandedly achieved despite absolute lack of resources, encouragement and guidance is simply astonishng and out of the world. I am happy that his efforts were finally recognised, even if it took more than three decades.

I hope that we will not just pay lip service to his contributions, but that we will actually try and do out sincere bit for nature and environment.

The song that accompanies this writeup talks about the effects of hot weather as well. So pretty lady- Helen, who else, beseeches her beau to take her to Shimla, seeing how hot it is in the city. Let us grow more threes, so the temperatures in our cities remain under control. Else, even hill cities where people like to go to during summer will become as hot as plain during summer season. We are already witnessing this.

This song is from “Mud Mud Ke Na Dekh” (1962). The song is sung by Asha Bhonsle. Prem Dhawan is the lyricist. Music is composed by Hansraj Bahl.

On the occasion to 15100th song on 4000th day of the blog, I thank one and all for their continued support and well wishes. We have access to much better support from our fellow music lovers, much better support than what Jadav Payeng enjoyed, so I hope that we will be able to keep our musical bandwagon rolling on and on for as many years as possible.


Song-Ye hai june ka maheena aaye bada hi paseena (Mud Mud Ke Na Dekh)(1960) Singer-Asha Bhonsle, Lyrics-Prem Dhawan, MD-Hansraj Bahl

Lyrics

ye hai june ka maheena
aaye bada re paseena

ho ho ho ho
mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
are le chal shimle baabu
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
main mar gayi garmi se
are le chal shimle baabu

kaale pad gaye gaal gulaabi
naina pad gaye peele
kaale pad gaye gaal gulaabi
naina pad gaye peele
kabhi na poochha toone re baabu
ho ho ho
kabhi na poochha tooune re baabu
thanda sharbat peele
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu

nainital mein bachpan beeta
srinagar mein jawani
nainital mein bachpan beeta
srinagar mein jawani
toone meri kadar na jaani haaye ae ae re
tune meri kadar na jaani
ja re rajasthani
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu

dekh ke kaale kaale baadal
main to nikli ghar se
dekh ke kaale kaale baadal
main to nikli ghar se
jaane kiski lagi najariya
haaye ae ae re
jane kiski lagi najariya
chale gaye
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu
main mar gayi garmi se
le chal shimle baabu


This article is written by Avinash Scrapwala, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3897 Post No. : 14942

———————————————–
Blog 10-Year Challenge (2009-19) – Song No. 19
————————————————

Today’s song that I am presenting here is a very special song for me as it is about Rajasthan, a place that I am quite fondly attached to thanks to my stay at Kota, Rajasthan.

I had considered this song under my series ‘Desh Ki Mitti Ki Khushboo’ earlier but that could not materialise.

When I took up this series, I though of discussing songs dealing with folklore, talk about folktales, folksongs, culture, traditions, customs of our Country, patriotic songs, songs be based on historical events and yes geographical settings of our country too.

Even songs based on art and crafts of our country, if any are suitable candidates for inclusion in this ‘Desh Ki Mitti Ki Khushboo’ series. So far three songs have been covered under that series and hopefully I will try to bring more in future.

Coming back to the song of this, it falls under another series namely ‘blog ten-year challenge(2009-2019)’.

Songs from following movies were posted ten years ago on 20.03.2009 on the blog;

‘Kaaliya-1981’
‘Manpasand-1980’
‘Sahib Bahadur-1977’
‘The Great Gambler-1979’
‘Lamhe-1991’
‘Shahjahan-1946’

Out of the abovementioned six movie half of them i.e. three have already been covered with all of their songs posted on the blog viz. ‘Kaaliya-1981’, ‘The Great Gambler-1979’ and ‘Shahjahan-1946’.

The other three movies thus ‘qualify’ for the ‘blog ten-year challenge’. Today I am presenting a song from ‘Lamhe-1991’.
I also like songs from ‘Manpasand’ and ‘Sahib Bahadur’ and wish I could have presented a song from each of them as well 🙂

***

My working life started at the age of 17, with a small company (Nagpur based), at Parli-Vaijnath (Marathwada-Maharashtra) at a Thermal Power Station. When the contract of this company was completed, my boss had ensured that I get a job in a Delhi based company, so that I could continue working and get settled in my professional life.

I have mentioned i in one of my earlier post that the first thing that came to mind on the mention of Delhi was that I will get to see Delhi and other places of our great country. It actually happened and I got the chance to visit New Delhi many times thereafter and travelled a lot to different places due to my postings and official work.

I was enjoying all the travel, even though they were sometime troublesome and uncomfortable, as I was interested in seeing important places of historical and other significance. I was also getting the opportunity to observe the rich historical and cultural heritage our country hase, observe people of diverse areas who spoke different dialects and followed different customs and traditions. That interest and enthusiasm continues even now and I think that I have yet to cover a lot of ground as far as visiting different places in India are concerned.

My first ‘out of Maharashtra’ posting was at the company work site at Kota, Rajasthan.

Here I would also like to mention that fortunately I got site postings at places which were nearer to a city e.g. Phulpur near Allahabad, Aonla near Bareilly etc.

On Nov 30th 1988 late evening, I landed at Kota and stayed there till 14th Aug 1996, when I left for Phulpur-Allahabad.

I have many fond memories of my stay at Kota (and would like to share them in future posts as possible, as they cannot be concluded in just one post here).

While I enjoyed my working life, I did my studies as wello and completed my graduation through IGNOU there.

During my stay there I was always on the lookout for opportunities to visit historical places and tourist destinations, and in the process would buy books on tourism, atlas, maps etc etc.

Though I visited some of them; still many places continue to remain on my wish list till today.

When I rummaged through my travel books in my collection, I came across a book titled ‘Paryatakon ka Swarg- Rajasthan’, which I think I must have bought around 1989-90. Though the date of purchase is not marked there, I find some interesting notes on the index page of this book.
The index page mentions fifteen important places, which have separate chapters in the book, containing pictures and information of these places.

Out of these, Chittorgarh was my favorite and I visited the fort as many as three times in April & August’1992 and Nov’1993. I also travelled to the interior village Nimbaheda near Chittorgarh and stayed there with my friend, while visiting Nimach (MP) once.

I visited Jaipur in July 1990 and Udaipur and the fort at Bundi in August 1992.
(I remember that I visited Jaipur once again in 1994, but that was for an interview and not for sightseeing. So, this does not get into the list 🙂 )

Modern-day Rajasthan was formed on 1st November, 1956. Earlier it was known as ‘Rajputana’ the name given by the Britishers and it was formed on 30th March 1949 (ref – wiki)
It is also known as the ‘Princely State of India’ (Rajputana comprises as many as nineteen princely states (as per wiki).
Rajasthan is divided into thirty-three districts with seven Divisions viz. Jaipur, Udaipur, Ajmer, Jodhpur, Bikaner, Kota and Bharatpur.
By area it is the largest state of India followed by Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra.

Rajasthan has its glorious history, culture and traditions and so we have many festivals that are celebrated with huge grandeur and enthusiasm.

Hindi films have from time to time included stories and songs based on Rajasthani culture and traditions.
(And since more songs – based on Rajasthan- can be included in this series in future posts I have numbered this post as #Rajasthan-1#)

I watched ‘Lamhe-1991’ at Kota and again twice at Indore when I was travelling for Parli-Vaijnath via Indore-Purna junction. It was after three years that I was going to home since I landed at Kota in 1988. (my parents visited me once in between).

The ‘metre-gauge’ train travel also is one other subject that I wish to cover in another post, so many memories coming back to mind now …
I liked the movie ‘Lamhe’ very much then and also its songs which brings back many memories for me. The film has been shot at many fascinating and beautiful locations of Rajasthan.

So, here is a song from this film ‘Lamhe-1991’ composed by Shiv-Hari and sung by Mohiuddin. Lyrics are by Anand Bakshi and this ‘folk based song’ is composed by Shiv-Hari. If we listen this ‘magical’ composition again and again it fills us with pride and make nostalgic about the ‘glorious’ past of the ‘princely’ state Rajasthan.

I am unable to recollect now when this song appears in the movie. However I think it is a background song. As of now only the audio of this song is available.

Earlier I could not get right words at few places so I contacted one of our senior guest members whom I met during the Mumbai Gang out in 2016 – Shri. Mahendra Bafna ji and he immediately responded to my request and guided me about the correct words in the lyrics.

Enjoy the song while remembering the glorious and colorful part of India- Rajasthan.

So far three songs from this movie have been posted on the blog.

Audio

Song-Mhaare Raajasthan maa (Lamhe)(1991) Song-Mohiuddin, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Shiv Hari

Lyrics

Aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
Mhaare Rajasthan maa aa aa aa
Sarson ka nahin khet
Sone si chamke pan
Registaan ki ret

Itni prem kahaaniyaan aa
Kitney ae yuddh sangraam
Rajasthan ke naam se ae ae
ho o
Judey hain binke naam

Laal jyaada hain bahot
Ho o o
Apne khoon ka rang
Ho o o
Pyaar kiyaa to pyaar kiyaa aa aa
Jang kari to jang

Jaise pyaar mein dil diyaa aa aa aa
Yuddh mein di yoon jaan
Ho o o o
Kyun na ham par garv kare ae ae
Saaraa Hindustaan

(Note: jude hai binke naam – unke naam – binke is a word in Rajasthani folk for ‘unke)

———————————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
———————————————————–
आ आ आ आ
आ आ आ आ
म्हारे राजस्थान मा आ आ आ
सरसों का नहीं खेत
सोने सी चमके पण
रेगिस्तान की रेत

इतनी प्रेम कहानियां
कितने युद्ध संग्राम
राजस्थान के नाम से ए ए
हो ओ ओ
जुडे है बिनके नाम
लाल ज्यादा है बहोत
हो ओ ओ
अपने खून का रंग
हो ओ ओ
प्यार किया तो प्यार किया आ आ
जंग करी तो जंग

जैसे प्यार में दिल दिया आ आ
युद्ध में दी यूं जान
हो ओ ओ
क्यूँ न हम पर गर्व करे ए ए
सारा हिन्दुस्तान


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3841 Post No. : 14853

Today (23 january 2019) is the birth anniversary of Subhash Chandra Bose, one of the most admired freedom fighters of India.

One year ago, I had written a detailed writeup about his escape from his house arrest. That writeup was accompanied by the song Jodi tor daak..tanha raahi apni raah chalta jaayegaa.

Writing that article was quite a emotional roller coaster ride for me, because I tried to imagine all the meticulous planning of that escape, including the successful execution of the plan.

In the process, I watched snippets of the movie “Bose The forgotten Hero”(2004) which contains this song.

Lyrics of that song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala. One year later, he sent the lyrics of another song from the movie to be posted on this occasion with a request of a writeup by me because I have seen the movie. No, I have not seen the movie. I have only seen parts of it, because I cannot bear to see the full movie even though I know that it is a movie and the scenes depicted in the movie happened over seven decades ago.

So, my writeup is not based on my watching the movie, rather it is based on my impressions on Subhash Chandra Bose.

It seems to me, and many people would agree that his contributions towards the independence movement has been vastly underrated and attempts have been made to consign his contribution to just a few lines. We have been fed the history that non violent agitations led by Mahatma Gandhi won us our freedom.

When I try to think about it now, it does not seem to add up. If non violent agitations gave us freedom, then what explains the violence that took place during the partition ? Why the proponents of these non violence agitations agreed to the participation of Indian armymen in the second world war and also the first world war before that ? If people in India really followed non violence, then what explains the Indo Pak wars that took place and the terror attacks that are taking place from across the border.

When one tries to look at the reasons for the independence of India, it appears that the reason why India got independence was not Non violent agitations but it was mainly due to the precarious economical situation of Britain.

Britain which used to be the strongest economy in the world till the 18th century found itself being overtaken by USA and Germany by the turn of 19th century. USA was able to cash in because it pioneered new indstries, viz automobiles, motorbikes and aircrafts and became the leading manufacturer of these new technology items. The first world war and later the second world war devastated British economy. After the second world war ended Britain had lost much of its absolute wealth. Its trade reduced to just one third vis a vis its pre war trade. Dollar had become the preferred currency and Britain had shortage of dollars to pay off its wartime debts. As an emergency measure, Britain began to hive off its overseas assets. USA extracted a heavy price from Britain for getting involved in the second world war. Britain had to take a loan of $ 4.33 billions from USA. Winter of 1946-47 broke the back of British economy, with cutrailed economic production and shortage of coal. The situation reeached its worst in August 1947 !

Is it a coincidence that India got its independence in August 1947 ! With the benefit of all the information contained in the above para, it appears that Britain were in no position to be able to hold on to India any longer. Even if there were no agitations, violent or otherwise, Britain woould have left India sooner or later.

It appears to me that holding on to the Indian empire was becoming more and more prohibitively expensive for Britain. It would seem to me that “Non violent” agitations were not the only thing Britain had to worry. They also had to worry about the real possibility of disenchantment in the natives who manned Indian Army. The contribution of Subhash Chandra Bose’s Azad Hind Fauz, which actually participated in world war II cannot be underestimated.

The end of the war saw a large number of the troops of Azad Hind Fauz repatriated to India where some faced trials for treason at Red Fort in Delhi. Instead of acting as a deterrent,as hoped by the British, these trials became a galvanising point in the Indian Independence movement. The Bombay mutiny in the Royal Indian Navy and other mutinies in 1946 are thought to have been caused by the nationalist feelings that were caused by the INA trials. Many historians believe that these events played a crucial role in hastening the end of British rule in India.

After independence, Gandhian freedom fighters were given the status of freedom fighters but Azad Hind Fauz members were denied this privilege. Nevertheless, the Azad Hind Fauz remains a popular and passionate topic in Indian culture and politics.

India became politically independent on 15 august 1947. It wold take decades and decades of slog with lots of troubles enroute, before Indian fortunes would begin to look up and they would shrug off the tag of a begging bowl nation and subsequently a nation considered the fastest growing major nation in the world. I would cover this vast topic in another writeup on the occasion of Republic day, which falls three day later.

For now, let us listen to this song of hope. The hopes of securing independence. The hopes of living happily ever after. The song is a chorus song. Jawed Akhtar is the lyricist. Music is composed by A R Rahman.

Lyrics of the song were sent to me by Avinash Scrapwala.

Video
(video)
Audio

Song-Ham Dilli Dilli jaayenge (Bose-The Forgotten Hero)(2004) Lyrics-Jawed Akhtar, MD-A R Rahman

Lyrics(Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)

Ham Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Fauji ban ke rehna hai
Dukh dard museebat sahna hai
Ab fauji ban ke rehna hai
Dukh dard museebat sahna hai

Subhash kaa ye kehna kehna hai
Chalo Dilli chal ke rehna hai
Ham Dilii Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge

Ham goli kha ke jhoomenge
Maut ko badhh ke chumenge
Matawaale ban aazaadi ke
Hum dariya jungle ghoomenge
Goli kha ke jhoomenge
Maut ko badhh ke choomenge
Matawaale ban aazaadi ke
Ham dariya jungle ghumenge
Subhash hamaara haawi hai
Ghulaami ke taalon ki chaabhi hai
Phir kaisa khatraa baaki hai
Khuda bhi hamaara saathi hai
Ham Dilii Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge

Fauji ban ke jaayenge
Aur Dilii ko sajaayenge
Fauji ban ke jaayenge
Dilii ko sajaayenge
Zaalim firangi qaum kaa
Ham naam-o-nishaan mitaayenge
Ham Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Dilli Dilli jaayenge
Ham apna Hind banaayenge
Fauji ban ke rehna hai
Dukh dard museebat sahna hai
Ab fauji ban ke rehna hai
Dukh dard museebat sahna hai
Subhash kaa ye kehna kehna hai
Chalo Dilli chal ke rehna hai

—————————————–
Devnagri Script lyrics (Provided by Avinash Scrapwala)
—————————————–

हम दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
फौजी बन के रहना है
दुःख दर्द मुसीबत सहना है
अब फौजी बन के रहना है
दुःख दर्द मुसीबत सहना है

सुभाष का ये कहना कहना है
चलो दिल्ली चल के रहना है
हम दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे

हम गोली खा के झूमेंगे
मौत को बढ़ के चूमेंगे
मतवाले बन आज़ादी के
हम दरिया जंगल घूमेंगे
गोली खा के झूमेंगे
मौत को बढ़ के चूमेंगे
मतवाले बन आज़ादी के
हम दरिया जंगल घूमेंगे
सुभाष हमारा हावी है
ग़ुलामी के तालों कि चाभी है
फिर कैसा ख़तरा बाकी है
खुदा भी हमारा साथी है

हम दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे

फौजी बन के जायेंगे
और दिल्ली को सजायेंगे
फौजी बन के जायेंगे
दिल्ली को सजायेंगे
ज़ालिम फिरंगी कौम का
हम नाम-ओ-निशान मिटायेंगे

हम दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
दिल्ली दिल्ली जायेंगे
हम अपना हिन्द बनायेंगे
फौजी बन के रहना है
दुःख दर्द मुसीबत सहना है
अब फौजी बन के रहना है
दुःख दर्द मुसीबत सहना है

सुभाष का ये कहना कहना है
चलो दिल्ली चल के रहना है


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3821 Post No. : 14820

Nautanki (Indian Opera or Ballad) is one of the major forms of Hindi theatre which has been in vogue for over 200 years as a popular form of entertainment in the rural and semi-urban area in some parts of North India. It is believed that Nautanki originated around the present day Mathura-Vrindavan-Hathras regions in Uttar Pradesh in the forms of Raas leela, Swaang etc. Over a period of time, it become popular in Braj speaking areas such as eastern Rajasthan (Khayal, similar to Nautanki) and Northern Madhya Pradesh which are closed to the border of the western Uttar Pradesh. Later its influence got extended in the Awadh region of Uttar Pradesh and some parts of Bihar.

Initially, nautankis were staged in Brajbhasha. Later the writers used the hybrid of Hindi, Urdu and local dialects in keeping with the changing taste of the audience who were now exposed to Hindi films.

The stories for the Nautanki have come from mythology (example: Harishchandra-Taramati), history (Amar Singh Rathod), folklore (Laila-Majnu, Puranmal), romance (Pak Mohabbat), noble bandits (Sultana Daaku) and the contemporary social and political issues. The stories are depicted in both the dialogues and singing. There are two main style of Nautanki. Hathrasi style gives more preference to singing in opera style with melodic exchanges between the actors on the stage. The Kanpuri style has a mix of dialogues and fast-paced singing. Probably, Kanpuri style was influenced by the touring Parsee Theatres’ plays.

The lyrics and the tunes of the songs in Nautanki are mostly traditional having been passed on orally from one generation to the next. However, newly composed songs are also included keeping with the stories used in the Nautanki. The main musical instruments used in the traditional Nautanki were Nagada, Dholak and Harmonium. The sounding of Nagada was intimations to the people that a nautanki mandali had come to perform in the village. But by the end of 1950s, additional musical instruments like Sarangi, Clarinet etc were introduced. The modern Nautanki theatres uses Keyboards, Drums and even Guitar in keeping with the music trends.

People would be attracted to watch the nautanki if the actors had powerful voice (there was no mike those days)- both for singing and dialogues and their effective interpretations of the lyrics of the songs through the facial expressions, the hand gestures and the dances. A couple of traditional folk songs are sung by the singers-dancers in between the acts as fillers to keep the audience’s interest intact during the nautanki shows.

Nautanki had been the male-dominated form of theatre when it had bloomed in the early 20th century. But one personality who has changed this tradition in early 1930s was Gulab Bai who became the first female artist to join the male-dominated Nautanki theatre. There are more ‘firsts’ to her credit. She was the first female who owned a successful Nautanki Mandali called Great Gulab Theatre Company’. She was the first recipient among the Nautanki artists to get Sangeet Natak Akadamy Award (1985) and ‘Padma Shri’ Award from Government of India (1990). Gulab Bai is a story of a girl born in extreme poverty who rose to the status of a nationally honoured nautanki artist. Yet she died sad and disappointed as the form of nautanki which she had actively nurtured had almost vanished in front of her own eyes.

Gulab Bai (C.1920 – 13/07/1996) was born in Balpurva village in the present day Kannauj district in Uttar Pradesh. She was the eldest among the 12 siblings. Her father’s was a wanderer who would go to forest for hunting and bring home small games like rabbit and birds. He also indulged in petty pilfering like stealing from agricultural fields. Her family belonged to Bedia community where the girls were bread earners by way of street performance as singers and the entertainers to the wealthy traders and businessmen. The Bedia men-folk seldom worked. Naturally, Gulab Bai’s father encouraged her to sing and dance to add to his income. She had inclination to learn singing and dancing from her childhood as she had been brought up among the other female members of her extended family who were performing artists.

A chanced visit to a nearby town called Makanpur with her father for the Annual Urs of Madar Shah, a Sufi saint, changed the outlook of Gulab Bai to become something greater than the street singer. During the Urs, one of the visiting Nautanki Mandalis called Tirmohan Lal’s Nautanki Theatre was staging ‘Harishchandra-Taramati’. Gulab Bai watched the nautanki and was impressed by the musical presentation with actors singing and dancing. She told her father that she would be interested in joining the nautanki theatre. Those days, both male and female roles in the nautanki were enacted by males only. There was no way that Gulab Bai would be taken in any nautanki mandalis. Nonetheless, her father took Gulab Bai to Tirmohan Lal, the owner of the Nautanki.

Tirmohan Lal, first refused to take Gulab Bai as in male-dominated nautanki theatres, females had no place. However, later he relented on the conditions that Gulab Bai would be paid only for her upkeep and she would have to travel to Kanpur where they had programmes lined up for a long duration. So this was the start of Gulab Bai’s first exposure to nautanki theatre. Her father or brother accompanied Gulab Bai to Kanpur.

Initially, Tirmohan Lal gave her job of singing dadras, rasiyas and lavanis in-between the nautanki acts and scenes as fillers (something, I guess, akin to ‘item number songs’ in Hindi films). Her songs were applauded by the audience which made Tirmohan Lal to consider her for higher roles in the nautanki. Her days were spent in learning the finer nuances of nautanki music from Tirmohan Lal. She also received the training from Mohammed Khan of Hathras who was well-versed in Hindustani classical raags and nautanki music. Thus she was groomed for taking subsidiary roles in the nautanki which she did admirably.

Over a period of time, with her natural flavour for singing and dancing and the audience’s favourable response, Tirmohan Lal gave her the lead roles of Taramati in ‘Harishchandra-Taramati’, Rani Haadi in ‘Amar Singh Rathod’, Laila in ‘Laila Majnu’, Shirin in ‘Shirin-Farhad’ etc. Her tremendous success and popularity among the nautanki audience motivated other female artists to join the other nautanki theatres most of whom were from the extended family of Gulab Bai.

By early 1940s, Gulab Bai had become the topmost nautanki artists with her monthly salary rising to Rs.2000/-. Tirmohan Lal’s Nautanki Theatre had become one of the topmost nautanki theatres due mainly to the popularity of Gulab Bai. A few of the competing nautanki theatres tried to lure Gulab Bai to join them at a higher salary. But she declined the offer as her loyalty was with Tirmohan Lal. On his part, Tirmohan Lal also raised her salary in keeping with her earning capacity for his nautanki theatre.

Sometime in 1954, Gulab Bai was need of some money urgently to meet the medical expenses for one of her younger sisters who had accidentally fallen from the staircase of her haveli. Gulab Bai was in Kanpur for that night’s nautanki show. Gulab Bai requested Timohan Lal for a day’s leave and Rs.100 for the medical treatment which he refused both. This attitude of Tirmohan Lal for whom she had worked for nearly 2 decades, made Gulab Bai upset. She left Tirmohan Lal’s nautanki, arranged money from her colleagues to attend to her sister’s medical treatment. After this incidence, Gulab Bai did not perform for Tirmohan’s nautanki.

In 1955, Gulab Bai formed her own nautanki theatre called the Great Gulab Theatre Company. Her 3 younger sisters and Raja, the hero from Tirmohan Lal’s nautanki joined her. In all her nautankis, Gulab Bai continued to be the heroin while Raja acted opposite her mostly in lead roles. During this period, Raja amd Gulab Bai started living together as husband-wife though they never legally married. He was the second ‘husband’ for her, as she had separated from the first sometime in the late 1940s. In a short time, Great Gulab Theatre became an established name churning show after show based on the popular stories in the various places. At one point of time, the Great Gulab Theatre had 120 artists on its role.

Towards, the end of 1970s, the fortune of Great Gulab Theatre Company was on the decline so also of others due to declining patronage of audience. With the advent of TV, VCDs and VCRs, the new generation of audience had different expectation from the Nautankis akin to what was churned out in Bollywood films. The Government had imposed entertainment tax on Nautanki shows. At the same time, Gulab Bai was in no mood to compromise on the production value of her Nautankis.

Gulab Bai must have sung hundreds of songs during her active career in the nautanki theatres. Unfortunately, very few songs have been released on the gramophone records. So far, 16 songs have been listed as being released on 78 RPM gramophone records. Her two most popular dadras, ‘nadi naare na jaao Shyam paiyyan padoon’ and ‘moko peehar mein mat chhed baalam’ were recorded and released in the late 1940s by HMV on 78 RPM gramophone record. These dadras were often played on wedding functions. Later, she also sang these on All India Radio.

Interestingly, these two dadras were used in Sunil Dutt’s film, ‘Mujhe Jeene Do’ (1963) sung by Asha Bhonsle. These songs became more popular than the original ones sung by Gulab Bai since early 1930s due to film’s pan India reach. Lawyers of Kanpur approached her to file a case against the producer of the film for using her songs without acknowledgement and compensation. She reprimanded the lawyers by saying that these were songs from the Braj. Women of Braj had been singing these songs for ages with their dholaks. There is nothing to write or compose. These are folk songs.

I guess, the issue of copyrights which was all over the newspaper must have given an opportunity for HMV to make money by bringing out Gulab Bai’s recorded songs in public by way of a LP. In 1969, HMV released 12 songs on LP. Probably, this was a better way of earning her dues by way of royalties than fighting a case in the court.

After Gulab Bai was awarded Sangeet Natak Akadamy Award in 1985, Government began inviting her company to perform on some state functions. Even though such invitations came in few and far between, Gulab Bai preferred state patronage as it was hassle free. She received a lump sum payment without the tension of a box office failure. Also there was no pressure from the audience for the cheap entertainment. Hereafter, her company reduced the public performances and did only the commissioned performances.

Gulab Bai breathed her last on July 13, 1996 after a short illness. She left behind her two sons one of which worked with SBI as an Officer. Her two daughters, Asha and Madhu are educated and married. They are traditional Nautanki artists.

During her active days in nautanki theatres, Gulab Bai had trained many artists so as to ensure that the folk theatres strive and there is continuity in the keeping alive the tradition. One of her wishes was that the Government should set up a Nautanki Academy in Kanpur to keep alive the folk tradition of nautanki by enrolling young people as nautanki artists. Unfortunately, her suggestion was never considered. She rued this just a few days before her death in a TV interview by way of couplet from Jigar Muradabadi which she told her daughter to sing.

<em.‘yahaan insaaf kis se maangne aaye ho ‘Jigar’
chalo yahaan se ye andhon ki rajdhaani hai

I was toying with the idea of selecting one of her 12 non-film songs in the LP for presenting along with this write-up. While looking for the video clip of the song on YT, I accidentally came across a video clip of a film song ‘Dilli se mol dupatta manga do’ sung by Gulab Bai in an obscure film ‘Diwanji’ (1950). So here is that song. While the lyricist is unattributed, the nautanki type song is set to music by Sushant Bannerjee.

To the best of my knowledge, this was the only song which Gulab Bai sang for a Hindi film.
Acknowledgements:
1. Gulab Bai : The Queen of Nautanki Theatre by Deepti Priya Mehrotra (2006).
2. Nautanki – Folk Theatre: A Study of Women Performers And Audiences in Mathura, UP by Vyomika Sharma-Bhardwaj (2013).
3. ‘Ek Thhi Gulab Bai’ – TV documentary by Krishna Raghava (1996).

Audio Clip :

Song-Dilli se mol dupatta manga do (Divanji)(1950) Singer-Gulab Bai, MD-Sushant Bannerji

Lyrics

Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa
laakhon kahi is ne ek na maani
laakhon kahi is ne ek na maani
kaise chhipaaun mein uthhti jawaani
uthhti jawaani
kaise chhipaaun mein uthati jawaani
uthati jawaani
ab koi reet bataa do
bataa do
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyan

Dhaake ki malmal ho rang ho dhaaani
Dhaake ki malmal ho rang ho dhaani
cham cham chamkegi mori jawaani
cham cham chamkegi mori jawaani
uspe gota kinaari lagaa do
do
uspe gota kinaari lagaa do
aur malmal manga do
malmal manga do
malmal manga do
malmal manga do
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa

pahan dupatta ?? raani banoongi
raani banoongi
pahan dupatta ?? raani banoongi
raani banoongi
apne dewariya se binti karoongi
apni dewariya se binti karoongi
kya
sainyyan se
haan
sainyyan se mohe milaa do
do o
sainyyan se mohe milaa do
aur malmal manga do
malmal manga do
malmal manga do
malmal manga do
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa
Dilli se mol dupatta manga do
manga do sainyyaa


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3803 Post No. : 14796 Movie Count :

4046

Sometimes, suddenly and unexpectedly, Lady Luck smiles on you and you are so bewildered, you don’t know how to enjoy that moment of Luck. This happened in my case. I have been writing about songs in old time movies and discussing about the people who made that film, that song and the circumstances in which the movie was made etc.

Sometimes,I come across a film, about which nothing-absolutely nothing- is available. No information, no songs, nothing. This is the dead end. But like a true crusader, I continue my efforts about that film, even when, leaving it aside, I have continued with my work. At times, I strike Gold, when it is not expected and I feel like dancing in the rain !

It is not only about a song or a movie, even an actor can get me stumped and then suddenly, there is light at the end of the tunnel ! I can quote several such examples, but I will limit my discussion only about today’s film, song and the MD.

I bought HFGK in mid 2012, that is six years ago and since then film Chowrangee-42 was on my radar. I was very curious about this film, because this was the only Hindi film in which the Great Poet of Bangladesh- Kazi Nazrul Islam, had composed some songs ( 2 songs, confirmed) as a Music Director and also had written those two songs as a Lyricist.

Kazi Nazrul Islam is to Bangladesh, what Rabindranath Tagore is to West Bengal. While, to my knowledge, Tagore never wrote any Naat or a Muslim religious verse, kazi wrote hundreds of Bhajans and Geets on Lord Rama and Krishna. Though many films- Bangla and Hindi- are based on the stories or novels of Tagore, he has not contributed anything directly to any Hindi film ( I do not know about Bangla films). On the other hand Kazi has written story of film Sapera-39 and provided Lyrics and Music to film Chowrangee-42 directly. Like Tagore’s Rabindra Sangeet, it was Nazrul Geeti in Bengal. I am not comparing them. Both were great souls.

The life story of Kazi is full of ups and downs. His last few years were spent in Glory but in very bad health.There were several deaths in his family. His wife became paralytic and he spent time in a Mental Hospital in Ranchi. After the formation of Bangladesh in 1971, the new country, invited him, bestowed honours on him, declaring him ” The National Poet”. The Bangladesh government also took good care of him in his last 4 years, but he was medically unfit to enjoy his glory.

Kazi Nazrul Islam (24 May 1899 – 29 August 1976) Composer and songwriter was born in Burdwan Dist., Bengal. With Tagore he was the major influence on popular Bengali music in the 20th C. Known as the Bidrohi Kavi or Rebel Poet and directly associated with radical nationalist movements (e.g. through the journal Dhoomketu which he edited in 1922, leading to his imprisonment on a charge of sedition), his poetry constitutes the first radical intervention into Hindu and Muslim devotional music, e.g. his famous addresses to the goddess Kali, his ghazal compilations (Chokher Chatak, 1929) and Islamic devotionals (Zulfikar, 1932). Much of his music, continued by the IPTA’s Bengali song repertoire, was polemically seen as a radical-romantic use of the ‘ tradition’ (e.g. Salil Choudhury, 1955). One of the first composer-writers to sign contracts with major record companies in Bengal (for Megaphone and Senola and later HMV) and with the Indian Broadcasting Corp., opening up new employment opportunities to a generation of younger composers such as Anil Biswas, S.D. Burman, Kamal Dasgupta and even Kishore Kumar (whose song Ai ek dui tran char gili gili/bam chick boob chick badhke bol in Kehte Hain Mujhko Raja, 1975, adapts Islam’s famous Cham chiki ude gelo). Created an urban variation of tribal jhumur music for Sailajananda Mukherjee’s Pataal Puri and wrote the songs for Nandini (1941) and Dikshul (1943). Some sources credit him as director for Dhruva, in which he played the Hindu sage Narad. Started Bengal Tiger Pics with Abbasuddin Ahmed. Their film of Islam’s novel Madina remained unfinished.

A significant impact of Nazrul’s work in Bengal was that it made Bengali Muslims more comfortable with the Bengali arts, which used to be dominated by
Bengali Hindus. His Islamic songs are popular during Ramadan in Bangladesh. He also wrote devotional songs on the Hindu Goddess Kali. Nazrul also composed a number of notable Shyamasangeet, Bhajan and Kirtan, combining Hindu devotional music.

Bengali polymath, poet, writer, musician, revolutionary and philosopher. Popularly known as Nazrul, his poetry and music espoused Indo-Islamic renaissance and intense spiritual rebellion against fascism and oppression. Nazrul’s impassioned activism for political and social justice earned him the title Bidrohi Kobi (The Rebel Poet). His musical compositions form the avant-garde genre of Nazrul geeti (Music of Nazrul). Accomplishing a large body of acclaimed works through his life, Nazrul is officially recognised as the National Poet of Bangladesh and highly commemorated in India and the Muslim world.
Born into a Bengali Muslim Quazi (Kazi) family, Nazrul received religious education and worked as a muezzin at a local mosque. He learned of poetry, drama, and literature while working with theatrical groups. After serving in the British Indian Army, Nazrul established himself as a journalist in Calcutta. He assailed the British Raj in India and preached revolution through his poetic works, such as Bidrohi (The Rebel) and Bhangar Gaan (The Song of Destruction), as well as his publication Dhumketu (The Comet). His nationalist activism in the Indian independence movement often led to his imprisonment by British authorities. While in prison, Nazrul wrote the Rajbandir Jabanbandi (Deposition of a Political Prisoner). Exploring the life and conditions of the downtrodden masses of the Indian subcontinent, Nazrul worked for their emancipation. His poetry and music fiercely inspired Bengalis during the Bangladesh Liberation War.
During his visit to Comilla in 1921, Nazrul met a young Bengali Hindu woman, Pramila Devi, with whom he fell in love, and they married on 25 April 1924. Brahmo Samaj criticised Pramila, a member of the Brahmo Samaj, for marrying a Muslim. Muslim religious leaders criticized Nazrul for his marriage to a Hindu woman.

Nazrul’s writings explore themes such as love, freedom, and revolution; he opposed all bigotry, including religious and gender. Throughout his career, Nazrul wrote short stories, novels, and essays but is best known for his poems, in which he pioneered new forms such as Bengali ghazals. Nazrul wrote and composed music for his nearly 4,000 songs (including gramophone records), collectively known as Nazrul geeti (Songs of Nazrul), which are widely popular today. In 1942 at the age of 43 Nazrul himself fell ill and gradually began losing his power of speech. His behaviour became erratic, he started spending recklessly and fell into financial difficulties. In spite of her own illness, his wife constantly cared for her husband. However, Nazrul’s health had seriously deteriorated and he grew increasingly depressed. He underwent medical treatment under homeopathy as well as Ayurveda, but little progress was achieved before mental dysfunction intensified and he was admitted to a mental asylum in 1942. Spending four months there without making progress, Nazrul and his family began living a quiet life in India. In 1952, he was transferred to a psychiatric hospital in Ranchi. Through the efforts of a large group of admirers who called themselves the “Nazrul Treatment Society”, Nazrul and Promila were sent to London, then to Vienna for treatment. The examining doctors said he had received poor care, and Dr. Hans Hoff, a leading neurosurgeon in Vienna, diagnosed that Nazrul was suffering from Pick’s disease.It was rumoured that this was because of slow poisoning by the British Government. His condition was judged to be incurable, Nazrul returned to Calcutta on 15 December 1953. On 30 June 1962 his wife Pramila died, and Nazrul remained in intensive medical care. He stopped working due to his deteriorating health.

On 24 May 1972, the newly independent nation of Bangladesh brought Nazrul to live in Dhaka with the consent of the Government of India. In January 1976, he was accorded the citizenship of Bangladesh.Despite receiving treatment and attention, Nazrul’s physical and mental health did not improve. In 1974. his youngest son, Kazi Aniruddha, a guitarist, died, and Nazrul soon succumbed to his long-standing ailments on 29 August 1976.

His Filmography – 1937: Bidyapati (Writer), 1938: Gora, 1939: Sapurey (Writer), Sapurey/Sapera (Writer), 1942: Chauranghee, Chauranghee, 1949-Chattagram Astraghar Lunthan, 1972: Padi Pishir Barmi Baksha (Lyricist) ( information adapted from Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema and wiki).

I was ecstatic when recently, I could lay my hands on one song of this film, composed and written by Kazi. These songs are so rare that for the last 76 years none of these songs have ever appeared on public domain, like YT etc.
Film Chowrangee-42 was a Muslim social film on a professional singer’s life, who had a Kotha on Chowrangee area of Calcutta. The film was produced by Fazli brothers, known to make films on Muslim background only. The film was directed by the younger brother- Sibtain Fazli.

The producers Fazli brothers, were the sons of Khan Bahadur S M Fazal Rabb of Beharaich- about 125 kms from Lucknow in U.P. The elder brother was Hasnain and the younger brother was Sibtain ( born on 9-7-1916). Hasnain Fazli was born on 12-1-1912 in United Province (today’s U.P.). Their family belonged to the noble Sayyads of Allahabad. Hasnain was a graduate of Allahabad University. Though his father was a Khan Bahadur, a Government Jahagirdar and lifetime Magistrate, Hasnain refused to do any service and did not complete his I.C.S. studies, as expected by the family.

He had a creative mind. He joined film line. He was very keen on making a film on Muslim Society. In those days it was considered outrageous to produce a film on Muslim society for fear of the ire of the fundamentalists. However Hasnain broke the barrier and the first Muslim Social film Qaidi-40 was produced and directed by him under the banner of Film Corporation of India, Calcutta. Very cleverly, the film was made at Calcutta, ( though the film depicted life in Lucknow ), and not at Bombay to avoid any disruption in the making of the film. The film was made so well that it was received very well by all strata of population, including the Muslims and became a hit film. After this Hasnain made more Muslim social films like Masoom-41, Chowranghee-42, Fashion-43 and Ismat-44. These films discussed Muslim family life and problems etc.

His first directorial film was at his 23rd year- Triya Charitra-35. Then came Sajiv Murti-35, in which the Handsome Vijay Kumar from Himachal Pradesh was the Hero. Fazli brothers also made Dil-46, Mehendi-47, Duniya-49 and Khoobsurat-52. Hasnain was so talented that he himself wrote the film stories, screenplays and dialogues usually. Sibtain Fazli directed 3 films-Chowranghee-42, Ismat-44 and Mehendi-47.

After the Partition, Fazli brothers migrated to Pakistan. Sibtain remained in Pakistan and Hasnain returned to India to make 2 more films. Later Hasnain too relocated to Lahore and died there on 16-7-1957. His brother Sibtain ( 9-7-1916 to 25-7-1985) who had directed 3 films in India, made 4 films in Pakistan, including the most popular Urdu film of Madam Nurjehan – Dupatta-52.

Film Chowrangee had 13 songs. It included 3 wonderful Ghazals- 2 by Jigar Moradabadi and 1 by Mirza Ghalib ( I have heard these songs). It will be the first time that a song from this film-in its full form- will be available on You Tube, because our Sadanand ji Kamath has uploaded it on my request. Thanks Sadanand ji.

Hanuman Prasad Sharma ( aka Hanuman Prasad Triloki. Both are same. Triloki and Sharma are surnames in Brahmins. This is like the other case. The son of Bhagatram Batish, of Husnlal-Bhagatram duo, Ashok, calls himself as Ashok Sharma.) was also a Music Director for this film. With this film he made his debut in Hindi films. Unfortunately, except for 4 songs-2 for each MD- HFGK is silent on the singer or MD’s names of remaining 9 songs, making it difficult to know the reality. However, according to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, the Lori, ” aa jaa ri nindiya ” is also composed by Kazi. May be, in future, some proof or information will emerge to confirm or clarify matters !

There were as many as 5 Lyricists for these 13 songs- Kazi Nazrul Islam, Arzoo lucknowi, Mirza Ghalib, Jigar Moradabadi and Partav Lucknowi. With this song , not only the movie, but also Kazi Nazrul Islam makes his Debut on the Blog as an MD and a Lyricist. Enjoy this historical song….


Song-Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee (Chowrangee)(1942) Singer-Unknown female, Lyrics- Kazi Nazrul Islam, MD- Kazi Nazrul Islam

Lyrics

Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee
iski duniya rang birangee
iski duniya rang birangee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee

gore kaale aawen jaawen
gore kaale aawen jaawen
apni apni chhab dikhlaawen
apni apni chhab dikhlaawen
ye dagar mein sab sansaar aar aar
ye dagar mein sab sansaar aar aar
iski duniya rang birangee
iski duniya rang birangee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee

kitne aawe raaja baabu
kitne aawe raaja baabu
kitne hamse bechaare
kitne apne dil ke bande
kitne prem pujaari ee ee
kitne prem pujaari
koi kisi ko raah lagaaye
koi aakar khud kho jaaye
koi kisi ko raah lagaaye
koi aakar khud kho jaaye
seedha rasta peer hazaar
seedha rasta peer hazaar
iski duniya rang birangee
iski duniya rang birangee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee
Chowranghee hai ye chowranghee


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This article is his 700th writeup in the blog.

Blog Day : 3789 Post No. : 14773

This is my 700th article on this Blog. At this moment, of course, I am very happy. I can not forget the people who helped me reach here. The first is our ATUL ji, who has always been very supportive, helpful and considerate. I have been associated with this Blog for more than 8 years now, but believe it or not, I have yet to meet him ! We have not even talked on Phone anytime. His work is so systematic and perfect that this has never been a hindrance. I do hope to meet him in one of his visits to Mumbai.

The other person is the most popular one on this Blog. You guessed it right. SUDHIR ji. From our first interaction in 2011 on E mail, we are in contact with each others. I had the good fortune to meet him a couple of times. He has been very helpful to me in more than one way. Thank you, Atul ji and Sudhir ji.

Besides these two V.I.P.s, I am fortunate in getting many friends in the Atulite’s group. I find that every one of them has some special characteristic, from which I learnt something. Yes, it is never too late to learn from others.

Sometimes I wonder how the Destiny works. I retired from service in 1998. After being a Pharma Consultant for next 6 years, I left working and enjoyed life with family, visiting various places all over India with my wife. After I crossed 70 years of my age, I learnt working on Computers from my grandchildren on a Laptop gifted by my son in law. At the same time I learnt using the smart Phone and some other gadgets. I, then, found this Blog on the Internet and my life changed. I dug out my old diaries and notebooks in which I used to note down information on every film that I saw. Though some had spoiled with white ants, faded and torn, they were very useful . My first article on this Blog appeared on 1-10-2012 and then there was no looking back. I started writing on various sites and Blogs, but my heart was always with this Blog.

I never imagined in my dreams even, that I would ever write more than 700 articles on old films, that I would write a Book, or that I would be invited to join the Boards of some Pharma companies. But all this did happen, after I crossed my 70 years of age. Looks like, that age is just a number. What matters is your outlook towards life. A positive approach and a will to learn new things makes all the difference.

My First 100th article came on 11-4-2013…..after 6 months

Here is the progress of my writeups in the blog.

Century article Number Song Date Period taken
100th article Meri aankhen banin deewaani (Jagmohan Sursagar NFS) 10-4-2013 7 months
200th article Bhagwaan ye de vardaan mujhe (Tulsi Vivaah)(1971) 16-11-2013 7 months
300th article Hey Satyanaraya swaami (Maha Pooja)(1954) 10-6-2014 7 months
400th article Tu mi piaci caara(Bewaqoof)(1960) 21-4-2015 10 months
500th article Bedard tujhko pyaar kiya (Tajmahal)(1941) 6-4-2016 12 months
600th article Main patton mein chhupi kali hoon (Aandhi)(1940) 4-9-2017 17 months
700th article Shehron mein se sheher (Heer Ranjha)(1948) 2-12-2018 15 months

My sincere thanks to everyone.

Today’s song is from film Heer Ranjha-48, the first film in which the great composer Khayyam gave the music, albeit as Sharmaji, along with his colleague Varmaji as a pair Varmaji-Sharma ji. In one of his interviews, Khayyam had said, ” After working with the Batish brothers ( Pt. Amarnath, Pt.Husnlal and Bhagatram), I went to Lahore and joined G.A.Chishti. In 1947, he took me to Calcutta. I assisted him in 2 films- Yehi hai zindagi-47 and Jhuti kasme-48. His other assistant was one Rehman Varma. After these 2 films, Chishti saab went back to Lahore and we two came to Bombay. Those were the Partition times and we were little scared. We met Husnlal-Bhagatram. They not only assured us safety but also encouraged us to start giving music as a pair. They suggested that we call ourselves ” Varma ji-Sharma ji “. On their suggestions we went to Punjab Film Corporation, owned by Wali sahab. He knew me. He heard our tunes. Those days he was making a film Heer Ranjha and wanted some Punjabi type songs. Aziz Hindi, taken by him already was unable to do Punjabi type music. Wali sahab told us to make such songs and Aziz would do other songs. Thus started my music career.”

Today’s song is ” Shehron mein se shehar suna tha Lahore….”. Those who lived in Lahore in pre-partition days were extremely attached to that city. There was a saying ” Jine Lahore nai dekhya, wo te jamiya hi nahin” ( one who has not seen Lahore, has not been born). Everyone is proud of his town, but Lahore wasi people were different.

From my house towards Juhu, there is a building at the corner of Gulmohar Circle which has a board-” Karachi Residents’ Association”. On inquiry I discovered that this was a building owned by ( Sindhi speaking Hindu and Muslims) people who resided in Karachi before Partition. I was told that 5-6 such buildings exist all over Mumbai. On further inquiries, I was informed that there were a few buildings of ” Lahore Residents Association” also( Punjabi speaking Hindus and Muslims). When I met one of the residents of ” Lahore” wala building, that old gentleman was speaking so lovingly about old Lahore that I was surprised. Even after 70 years of Partition, these people had such fondness for Lahore…or Karachi, for that matter.

Lahore had played an important role in India’s film industry till Partition separated us. Lahore had a built in advantage that it was in the midst of Hindi/Urdu speaking population. Bombay was far off and Calcutta and Madras catered mainly to regional aspirations. In the 40s, some really good films like Khazanchi, Khandan, Daasi etc were made in Lahore. All the 3 leading actors, Dilip, Raj and Dev had roots across the border. Shyam, Omprakash, Karan Dewan, Pran, Surendra, Balraj Sahni, Khursheed, Mumtaz Shanti, Veena, Begum Para, Noorjehan, Meena Shorey, Suraiya, Manorama, Kamini Kaushal, Shyama…. a string of artistes who worked in Lahore enriched Indian films. Pancholi, Kardar, Rafi, Shamshad Begum, Jhande Khan, Ghulam Haider, Pt. Amarnath and brothers, Hansraj Behl, Khayyam, Vinod also worked in Lahore.

Lahore city in particular gave us many Gems in Music. They came from HIRA MANDI. (old name ‘ Tibbi’ ). Hira Mandi was an area which was for Tawayafs. For centuries, Hira mandi in Lahore nurtured some outstanding performing artistes. The famous Noorjehan, Khursheed, Shamshad begum, Mumtaz Shanti and many others came from Hira Mandi. Sardar Akhtar and Bahar Akhtar, wives of producer Mehboob khan and A.R.Kardar were also from Hira Mandi.

Most of the early film actresses for pre-partition Lahore cinema came from the Kothas of Hira Mandi. Cine people scouted Hira mandi for fresh new talents. The art of Music was confined to the streets of the courtesans, with Hira Mandi taking the lead as the largest settlement in the cultural capital of the state in the undivided Punjab.

Writer Nirupama Dutt said about Hira Mandi, in her book,’ Half the sky ‘…

Come evening and they would be out in their balconies in the finest of silks and jewels. Their eyes would be lined with kohl and their lips red with dandasa, bark of the walnut tree and the most fragrant of eastern perfumes or itars would fill the air. They were known as diamonds and such was their glitter that the whole street would seem studded with stars. These were the courtesans of Heera Mandi of Lahore in the years before Partition in 1947.

Heera Mandi was to Lahore what Chowk was to Lucknow, Sonagachi to Calcutta, Bhendi Bazar to Bombay and Mehboob ki Mehendi to Hyderabad, before Independence. These forbidden yet most sought-after bazaars where women sold their many talents were known as “kothas”. In these abodes lived women, many of them very talented artists, who were nevertheless social outcasts living on the fringes of the society. Interestingly, this place was first known as Tibbi Bazar. And this name is recorded in a Punjabi “tappa”:

Tibbi waliye la de paan ni teri

Tibbi de vich dukan ni”,

Pran Nevile,a Die hard ” Lahorite” and a retired I.A.S Diplomat of International reputation, says about Lahore,in his book ‘ Lahore ‘ –

Why was Lahore called the gem of India?” I asked. “That it indeed was,” Pran replied, “It was totally different from the rest of India, in every way. It was the educational centre of North India. It had more colleges than any other city of India. The student population of Lahore was lively and wonderful. Co-education came late, but there it was. Lahore was always very prosperous; it was the hub of North India right up to Peshawar. Everything about Lahore was special. If you wanted to see the best-dressed young men in India, they were to be found in Lahore. The best food in India was to be found in Lahore. It was a city of gourmets and it had romance. A popular film song of those days went: Ik shehr ki laundia, nainoon ke teer chala gayee.And this doggerel that we all knew and I to this day remember: Tibbi mein phir ke jalwa-e-Parwardigar dekh: Hai dekhney ki cheez issay baar baar dekh.The great stars, the great movers and shakers of the Bombay movie world were all from Lahore.”

The song mentions not only Lahore, but some other cities of old Punjab( pre-partition) like Multan,Ambala etc. The music and tune has a clear Punjabi style and it is having a fast rhythm too. Considering that it was Khayyam’s first film as an MD, the songs are very catchy.Among the crop of new composers, who began their career after Independence, I rate Khayyam very high. Unlike some others, his name was never heard in any controversy or filmy behaviour. He was always very dignified.

Khayyam did only 69 films composing 381 songs. He wanted to be a singer and actually started his film career by singing a song in film Romeo and Juliet-47. Later he also sang one ore song in film Anjuman-86. His last fil, so far, is Bazaar E Husn-2014.

Let us enjoy this song, obtained from the collection of our Sudhir ji. I am sure you too will like it.


Song- Shehron mein se shehar suna tha (Heer Ranjha)(1948) Singers- Uma Devi,Unknown female voice, Lyrics- Wali Sahab, MD- Varmaji- Sharma ji
chorus

Lyrics

o o
beliyaa
Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna Lahore

main mar gayi
sheher suna Lahore
miley jo mera chhail chhabeela
miley jo mera chhail chhabeela
kuchh na maangoon aur
main mar gayi
kuchh na maangoon aur
kuchh na maangoon aur
main mar gayi
kuchh na maangoon aur

ho o
beliyaan

Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna thha Dehli
Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna thha Dehii
main mar gayi
sheher suna thha Dehli

bina piye wo huye sharaabi
bina piye wo huye sharaabi
dekh ke mujhe akeli

baalam le chal re
le chal re mohe Dehli
baalam le chal re
le chal re mohe Dehli
baalam le chal re ae
ho o

ho o
beliyaan
Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna Multan

main mar gayi
sheher suna Multan

aaye jo pardes se baalam
aaye jo pardes se baalam
jaan meri qurbaan beliyaa
jaan meri qurbaan
jaan meri qurbaan beliyaa
jaan meri qurbaan

ho o
beliyaan

Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna Kashmir
Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna Kashmir
main mar gayi
sheher suna Kashmir

baalam ki mohe yaad sataaye
baalam ki mohe yaad sataaye
uthe ped ke ??

baalam
le chal re
le chal re Kashmir
baalam
le chal re
le chal re Kashmir
baalam
le chal re ae
ha aa

ho o
beliyaan
Shehron mein se shehar suna tha
sheher suna Ambala

main mar gayi
sheher suna Ambala

main chhori hoon gori gori
main chhori hoon gori gori

baalam kaala kaala
main to dekhoongi
dekhoongi Ambala
main to dekhoongi
dekhoongi Ambala
main to dekhoongi
haa


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3734 Post No. : 14680

6th October, he would have been 72. Life is such. It always, well almost, seems as if this was not the time to go. But this passage is such – no one has any say about it. One can only express emotions and reflect upon the loss. And then there are souls, people who are more close to heart than others. And the loss, the vacuum, seems to be bigger and deeper.

A person who once had declared that “. . . cricket, not films, is my first love”. At school, college and local club levels, he played a fair amount of good cricket, in the company of would be test players like Eknath Solkar and Budhi Kunderan. But then, he settled for a career in films, when he realized that he could never be a Vishwanath. [Author’s Note: These references are excerpted from an interview with Illustrated Weekly of India, in 1979.]

Born in 1946, he was not even a year old, when the family moved from Peshawar (now in Pakistan) to Bombay, when the partition happened in 1947. There was a temporary back and forth movement of the family between Bombay to Delhi (1957) and then back to Bombay (1960). Throughout his school and college days, he had a very normal progression of life, playing cricket and watching films. He aspired to be a cricketer, and also, he was enamoured by films.

As he stepped into his 20s, and completed his college education, a meeting with Sunil Dutt brought to him his break in films. Sunil Dutt was in preparation for his film ‘Mann Ka Meet’ (1968) which was intended to be a launch vehicle for Som Dutt, his younger brother`. Vinod played the a grey villain type role in this film. Some of his next few assignments followed in the same vein – supporting roles or villain’s roles – ‘Purab Aur Paschim’, ‘Aan Milo Sajna’, ‘Sachcha Jhootha’, ‘Mastana’ in 1970 and ‘Elaan’ and ‘Mera Gaon Mera Desh’ in 1971.

1971 is also the kind of firming-up an take-off year for Vinod. This year came his first film as an action hero in ‘Hum, Tum Aur Woh’. Also, this year was released the much acclaimed ‘Mere Apne’, produced and directed by Gulzar. A sensitive film about coming of age youngsters and the growing angst among the new generation, Vinod was cast in a strong lead role, challenged by another equally strong role of Shatrughan Sinha, the two heading competitor street gangs in a typical city in India.

Come 1973, and Gulzar cast him in the lead role in an off-beat theme on the commercial circuit – and a surprise songless film no less from this poet and film maker. ‘Achanak’ takes on where ‘Ye Raaste Hain Pyaar Ke’ (1963) faded out ten years earlier. Loosely connected with the famous/infamous Nanavati case (1959-61) from real life, the film takes off from the point where, in real life, the jury’s verdict of not guilty (at the Session Court level) was overturned by the Bombay High Court and awarded life imprisonment to the accused. The film was critically acclaimed – and so was the lead role played by Vinod.

Quite well considered as an established actor by this time, we see him in 1974, in the role of a college lecturer in ‘Imtihan’. A string of action films continues, far too many to be listed. I will follow him through the films that I actually viewed in that decade – ‘Aarop’ and ‘Haath Ki Safai’ in 1974, ‘Shaque’ and ‘Hera Pheri’ in 1976, ‘Parvarish’ in 1977, ‘Inkaar’ and ‘Main Tulsi Tere Aangan Ki’ in 1978, ‘Meera’ in 1979 and ‘The Burning Train’ in 1980. I am sure you will say I missed some. Yes, surely did. Just for a special mention – the highest grossers and the most popular films of their years – ‘Amar Akbar Anthony’ in 1977, ‘Muqaddar Ka Sikandar’ in 1978 and ‘Qurbani’ in 1980. With a portfolio as the one sampled above, the career discussion is fully represented, even if we choose not to mention his films that came later.

His film career was punctuated between 1982 and 1986, when he took a self-imposed leave from his career and went to stay with Osho, or Guru Rajnish. But whatever the circumstances may have been, he returned to the industry in 1987, and just continued without a pause with his career.

Vinod Khanna passed away on 27th April last year (2017).

Remembering him on his birth anniversary, here is a lesser known, but a wonderfully performed song from the film ‘Aadha Din Aadhi Raat’ from 1977. The film is from the banner of Bharati International, Madras and is directed by Dhundi. The star cast includes Asha Parekh, Vinod Khanna, Shabana Azmi, Prem Chopra, Om Shivpuri, Jalal Agha, Jayshree T, Prem Bedi, TP Jain, Surendra Nath, Kirti Kumar, Pratima Devi, Vishu Raje, Makranee, Shobha Harman, Ranjeet, and Keshto Mukherjee etc.

The song is penned by Anand Bakshi and the music is by Laxmikant Pyaarelal. The scene is a party, ostensibly at the residence of Prem Chopra, in honor of a certain person / friend returning from abroad. It is apparent that Vinod Khanna is in disguise and masquerading as that friend of Prem Chopra. Shabana, who plays the role of Prem Chopra’s daughter, is offended at the wooing advances being made by this foreign returned gentleman whom she quite clearly does not fancy. The body language and the silent exchanges indicate that Prem Chopra is trying to make her stay on in the party, so possibly there is some business angle to this interaction also. And the presence of some dangerous looking characters in the party frame, indicates that the ‘business’ that Prem Chopra is pursuing is not really a good happy one.

Menewhile in the CSP (comic side plot), apparently the real ‘foreign returned’ gentleman has been kidnapped by our hero and is being held captive, with the help of his side kick – Jalal Agha.

The actual gentleman who is being forcibly kept away from the prospecting party event, is the character actor by the name TP Jain. In 1960s and 70s, TP Jain was a very active figure in the Delhi theatre circles and a very active presence in the plays on Delhi Doordarshan.

This song reminds one of “Priye Praneshwari” (‘Hum, Tum Aur Woh’, 1971), a similar disguise song, albeit a suited booted version.

Enjoy this farcical performance, and a lesser known lilting melody – “Main London Chhod Ke Aa Gaya”.


Song – Main London Chhod Ke Aa Gaya (Aadha Din Aadhi Raat) (1977) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Lyrics – Anand Bakshi, MD – Laxmikant Pyaarelal
Unidentified Male Voice
Unidentified Female Voice
Chorus

Lyrics

hmmmmm mmmmmmmm
mmmmmmm mmmmmmmm

hey..ey..ey
mmmmmmm mmmmmmmm

haa..aa..aa..aa..aa

baahar jaa ke maine
fashion dekhe aise aise
kaise kaise
arey baalon ka cut bhi ek jaisa
ha ha ha ha ha
aur kapde bhi
ik jaise
arey ladka hai ya ladki hai
koi pehchaane kaise
aa he pagdi baandh ke main gaya tha
ke pagdi baandh ke main gaya tha
chunri odh ke aa gaya
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya

maine london jaa ke babli
paisa bahut kamaaya
maine london jaa ke babli
paisa bahut kamaaya
motor le li
chauffer rakha
bangla naya banaaya
khaali bangley
mein rehne se lekin mazaa na aaya
khaali bangley
mein rehne se lekin mazaa na aaya
teri yaad jo aai to main
teri yaad jo aai to
teri yaad jo aai to
main waapas daud kea a gaya
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya

gori memen lipstick powder
na kaajal na bindiya
gori memen lipstick powder
na kaajal na bindiya
ye rang roop kahaan jo loote
ek nazar mein nindiya
made in foreign se achha hai
kuchh bhi made in india
made in foreign se achha hai
kuchh bhi made in india
mere paas thi jitni cheezen
mere paas thi jitni cheezen
mere paas thi jitni cheezen
saari tod kea a gaya
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya

babli
tum bhi gaao
la lalla la laa
la lalla la laa
arey aap log bhi gaao na bhai
la lalla la laa
lallaa lallal lal laa
la lalla la laa
lallaa lallal lal laa
la lalla la laa
lallaa lallal lal laa

mushkil se rehta hai saath
wahaan par koi joda
arey mushkil se rehta hai saath
wahaan par koi joda
sabka hai dastoor
ke is ko pakda us ko chhoda
london ki ik madam ne jab
london ki ik madam ne jab
mere dil ko toda
tere pyaar se toote dil ke
tere pyaar se toote dil ke
tukde jod ke aa gaya
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa gaya
aa gaya..aa..aa
main london chhod ke aa

——————————————–
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————

हम्ममममम म्मममममम
म्ममममममम म्मममममम

हे ए॰॰ए॰॰ए
म्ममममममम म्मममममम

हा॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आ॰॰आ

बाहर जा के मैंने
फ़ैशन देखे ऐसे ऐसे
कैसे कैसे
अरे बालों का कट भी एक जैसा
हा हा हा हा हा
और कपड़े भी
एक जैसे
अरे लड़का है या लड़की है
कोई पहचाने कैसे
आ हे पगड़ी बांध के मैं गया था
के पगड़ी बांध के मैं गया था
चुनरी ओढ़ के आ गया
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया

मैंने लंदन जा के बबली
पैसा बहुत कमाया
मैंने लंदन जा के बबली
पैसा बहुत कमाया
मोटर ले ली
शौफ्फर रखा
बंगला नया बनाया
खाली बंगले में रहने से
लेकिन मज़ा ना आया
तेरी याद जो आई तो मैं
तेरी याद जो आई तो
तेरी याद जो आई तो
तेरी याद जो आई तो मैं
वापस दौड़ के आ गया
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया

गोरी मेमें लिपस्टिक पौडर
ना काजल ना बिंदिया
गोरी मेमें लिपस्टिक पौडर
ना काजल ना बिंदिया
ये रंग रूप कहाँ जो लूटे
एक नज़र में नींदिया
मेड इन फौरन से अच्छा है
कुछ भी मेड इन इंडिया
मेड इन फौरन से अच्छा है
कुछ भी मेड इन इंडिया
मेरे पास थी जितनी चीज़ें
मेरे पास थी जितनी चीज़ें
सार तोड़ के आ गया
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया

बबली
तुम भी गाओ
ला लल्ल ला लाss
ला लल्ल ला लाss
अरे आप लोग भी गाओ ना भई
ला लल्ल ला लाss
लाल्ला लल्ललल ला ला
ला लल्ल ला लाss
लाल्ला लल्ललल ला ला
ला लल्ल ला लाss
लाल्ला लल्ललल ला ला

मुश्किल से रहता है साथ
वहाँ पर कोई जोड़ा
मुश्किल से रहता है साथ
वहाँ पर कोई जोड़ा
सबका है दस्तूर
के इसको पकड़ा उसको छोड़ा
लंदन की इक मैडम ने जब
लंदन की इक मैडम ने जब
मेरे दिल को तोड़ा
तेरे प्यार से टूटे दिल के
तेरे प्यार से टूटे दिल के
टुकड़े जोड़ के आ गया
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ गया
आ गया॰॰आ॰॰आ
मैं लंदन छोड़ के आ


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Important Announcement

(© 2008 - 2020) atulsongaday.me The content of this site is copyrighted and it may not be reproduced elsewhere without prior consent from the site/ author of the content.

Total number of songs posts discussed

16078

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1236
Total Number of movies covered =4389

Total visits so far

  • 14,010,412 hits

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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