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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Biography of artists’ Category


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

During the last two years or so, I have been working on a major exercise of presenting rare songs from films released in the 1940s on the Blog. In the process, I became aware of some of the productions houses (called banners), producers, directors, actors, singers, lyricists and music directors etc that were unknown to me earlier. One of the little known banners which I came to know about during the last few months was Sunrise Pictures. But I had no idea about the owner/s of this banner.

A notable feature of Sunrise Pictures was that they produced on an average 2-3 film per year during 1940s. The films under this banner were mostly directed by V M Vyas. In most of the films produced under this banner, the lead actors would be the top stars of that time. With this kind of background, I thought that the owner of Sunrise Pictures must be a wealthy man – a film financier/distributor who has now turned producer. But as I came to know later, it was not so.

The owner of Sunrise Pictures was none other than V M Vyas who had directed most of his films. I was surprised to know that V M Vyas did not have any filmy connection nor was he a wealthy man. He did not have any godfather in the film industry. His was one of those rags-to-riches stories who made a place for themselves in the Hindi film industry by hard work despite having some weak points. He had a very peculiar personality. He was a lean and fragile looking man. His friends – both personal and filmy – used to feel that he was half crank if not full. And above all, he was miser to the core. Let me unfold his interesting but inspiring life story.

Vishnukumar Maganlal Vyas (4/10/1905 -24/01/1962) was born in Ahmedabad. He did his schooling in Native High School Ahmadabad. During his schooling days, he did all sorts of odd jobs. After completion of schooling, he started working as a tabla-player and singer during the screening of silent films in theatres. Later on, he decided to become a photographer. His photography work was not generating enough money in Ahmedabad. Through his friends working with M/S J K Pathak & Co, machinery dealers in Ahmedabad, he got a job in their Bombay (Mumbai) Office which was located opposite Majestic Cinema. So the young V M Vyas commenced his journey to Mumbai some time in 1925.

Every day, V M Vyas used to see from the balcony of his office, the week-end crowd of filmgoers coming out from Majestic cinema. Perhaps, he was day dreaming that one day a much bigger crowd would come to see his films. But for his friends, V M Vyas was nothing less than half-crank. He soon managed to get a billet in terms of a job as an Assistant to Bhogilal Dave, the boss of Sharda Film Company. Here, he clandestinely learnt the film camera operation.

Soon V M Vyas left Saroj Films and joined Kohinoor Film Company as Cameraman. He was the Cinematographer for the silent movies like ‘Ulfat-e-Mohammed’ (1929), ‘Roaring Lion’ (1929), “Punya Prabhav’ (1929) and ‘Lutaru Lalna’ (1929). He was promoted to direct Kohinoor’s silent movie ‘Dukhiyari’ (1930).

With the coming of talkies in 1931, V M Vyas turned producer with setting up his own banner, Kumar Movietone. His first film under this banner was ‘Saubhagya Laxmi’ (1934) which he himself directed. He produced about 10 more films under this banner some of which were box office success some were not. When some of his pictures failed at the box office, he had problems with his financiers. So he was kept out of his own banner, Kumar Movietone.

But V M Vyas was not a man who would easily concede defeat. He formed another banner called Prince Movietone. Under this banner he produced and directed some films which were not well received at the box office. He soon found himself on a financial crunch. To come out of it, he joined Tarun Pictures and took some directorial assignments. It was a period of transition for him to evaluate himself as to what went wrong with his business strategies. As a director, films which brought him once again into the focus was ‘Kanyadaan’ (1940), ‘Niraali Duniya’ (1940) and ‘Prabhat’ (1941) which did well at the box office.

With his directorial successes, V M Vyas got bitten by bug of producing films in his third attempt. He formed his new banner called ‘Sunrise Pictures’. The first film under this banner, ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1941), directed by him was completed in less than six weeks. The film became a box office hit. With this film, V M Vyas had a long and a successful filmy career as producer and director under his new banner.

With the success of ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1943), V M Vyas became a pioneering film maker with social themes. Some of the reviews of his films which I have read in ‘Filmindia’ magazines indicate that his success formula was based on poor-rich conflicts. In such films, hero is shown as poor who loves a rich girl. And sometime, it is vice-versa. Baburao Patel, the editor of ‘Filmindia’ called V M Vyas’s films as ‘Vyas-Dave concotion’. Mohanlal Dave was a story, screen-play and dialogue writer in almost all the films produced and directed by V M Vyas who was associated with him since his days in Kohinoor Movietone. Mohanlal Dave always got the prominent place as M G Dave, the story writer in the advertisement of all the films.

Under Sunrise Pictures, V M Vyas produced and directed around 20 films out of which as many as 12 films were silver jubilee hits. He capitalised this factor for financing his films. He always used financiers/distributors’ money to produce the films. According to Manto, V M Vyas’s strategy was to sign only those actors whose current films have become box office success. While making his film ‘Naukar’ (1943), he signed Shobhna Samarth, Chandra Mohan and Nur Jahan who were in demand due to the box office successes of their respective films. With thse names, the financiers and distributors would come running to him to finance and distribute the films.

Normally, V M Vyas would direct his own films. But in case of ‘Naukar’ (1943), he signed Shaukat Hussain Rizvi as director knowing that he had developed a crush for Noor Jahan while directing her in ‘Khandaan’ (1942). Actually, at the time of planning ‘Naukar’ (1943), they were not on talking term. When they patched up, more monetary demands were made by both of them which V M Vyas successfully thwarted. The film failed at the box office but after the completion of the film, Noor Jahan and Shaukat Hussain Rizvi got married.

V M Vyas was known for not only about his cranky behaviour, he was also known to be miser to the core. During the shooting, he would advise his actors to rehearse well before the actual shot because he would like to complete the shot in a single take to save cost on raw film stocks and also to save time. Even the lighting on the sets would be low while taking the shot as this would save cost. Being a cinematographer himself, he knew the technique of taking shots in low light.

V M Vyas was a Vaishnavist Brahmin and as such he would offer simple vegetarian lunch to his actors and technicians during the lunch break. For additional items and for non-vegetarian, actors were required to bear the cost on their own account. And this was applicable even to the stars like Noor Jahan, Veena, Nazir, Chandra Mohan, Yakub, Raj Kapoor, Nargis, Premnath etc.

During his talkie filmy career, V M Vyas had produced/directed around 40 Hindi films. Some of his notable films were ‘Prabhat’ (1941), ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1941), ‘Ghar Sansar’ (1942), ’Apna Ghar’ (1942) ‘Maa Baap’ (1944), ‘Ghar’ (1945), ‘Dhanwaan’ (1946). ‘Pyaar’ (1950). ‘Sanskaar’ (1952), ‘Ghar Sansaar’ (1958), ‘Ghar Ki Laaj’ (1960), ‘Maa Baap’ (1960). ‘Apsara’ (1961) was his last Hindi film which he directed. From 1958 onward, V M Vyas did not produce any films under his banner but took directorial assignments.

V M Vyas was also involved with Gujarati films. His first Gujarati film was ‘Raanakdevi’ (1946) in which he introduced Nirupa Roy. In all, he directed 12 Gujarati films which included ‘Bhaabi Na Het’ (1948), ‘Guniyal Gujaraatan’ (1949) and ‘Naag Devata’ (1955) etc. His last Gujarati film was ‘Narsaiya Ni Hundi’ (1961).

At the time of making his second film ‘Maalan’ (1942) under ‘Sunrise Pictures’, he was the owner of at least 10 buildings in Mumbai city. Being a man of simple habit and thrift, he had saved a lot of money. When the life had become good for V M Vyas to relax and enjoy the fruits of his hard work, an Income Tax raid in his house sometime in 1961 shocked him to such an extent that he was hospitalised. He never recovered from the shock and left this world on January 24, 1962.

V M Vyas produced and directed “Maalan’ (1942), his second film under the banner of Sunrise Pictures. The star cast included Shanta Hublikar, Balwant Singh, Ratan Bai, Jagdish Sethi, Mirza Musharaf, Kalyani Bai, But Kashar, Alaknanda etc.

The film had 9 songs, all written by Ehsan Rizvi which were set to music by Shyam Babu Pathak. I am presenting the first song ‘haan saajan aaye shobhe rain sukh chhaaye’ from the film to appear on the Blog. The song is rendered by Ratan Bai. Since the name of Ratan Bai appears in the cast, it is apparent that she sang the song for herself in the film.

I like this song for having a poignant touch on a happy occasion. And because of this attribute, I remember a song of similar mood tum aaye to aaya mujhe yaad gali mein aaj chaand nikla which is also my favourite. How aptly the lyricists have used metaphors of ‘Deewaali’ and ‘Chaand’ respectively for the arrival of beloved/husband.

With this song, the film ‘Maalan’ (1942) makes its debut in the Blog.

——————————————————————————————————————————

Sources of information for the article:

1. The relevant information on Sunrise Films and V M Vyas gathered from the various issues of ‘Filmindia’ magazines of 1937-49 including a short write-up on V M Vyas which appeared in December 1941 issue.

2. Sadat Hasan Manto’s book ‘Stars from another sky’ (2014) – Chapter on ‘Noor Jahan’ in which the author discusses the making of V M Vyas’s film ‘Naukar’ (1943).

3. I am grateful to Harish Raghuwanshi ji, the film historian who provided me with a copy of his article on V M Vyas written in Gujarati andpublished on April 24, 2009. His article enabled me to provide some missing links to the filmy career of V M Vyas.


Song-Haan saajan aaye (Maalan)(1942) Singer-Ratan Bai, Lyrics-Ehsan Rizvi, MD-Shyam Babu Pathak

Lyrics

haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e ae
sohe rain sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi
aashaaon ne deep jalaaye
aashaaon ne deep jalaaye
haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

man darpan hai ab ujiyaara
man darpan hai ab ujiyaara
preetam bin kyaa roop hamaara
preetam bin kyaa roop hamaara
haan preetam jeewan laaye
haan preetam jeewan laaye
shobhe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

roothhe huye ko main ghar laayi
roothhe huye ko main ghar laayi
man ki jeet huyi hai aaj
man ki jeet huyi hai aaj
haan aaye
saajan aaye..e ae
haan
aaye saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi
haan saajan aaye..e
ae
haan saajan aaye..e
sohe rain
sukh chhaaye
deewaali aaj aayi
deewaali aaj aayi

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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

During 1945-47, Hindi film industry went through a difficult phase. The speculative gains made by some businessmen during the period of WWII which were partly chanellised in the film industry, dried up which affected the film production. When the film industry was just recovering from the after effect of WWII, communal riots broke out on the eve of as well as following the partition, affecting film productions at Bombay (Mumbai)whereas Lahore film industry was badly affected as many film financiers and technicians migrated to India.

M R Bhakri whose filmy career as a story writer and lyricist was taking shape in Lahore film industry just after the end of WWII, became one of the many victims of partition in 1947 from the Lahore film industry. He alongwith his brothers (all associated in the film industry) arrived in Bombay (Mumbai) soon after the partition.

Mulkhraj Bhakri (18/12/1913 – ??) was born in Gujranwala in Punjab (now in Pakistan). His father, Moolchand Bhakri was a store-keeper in Indian Army Service Corps (IASC) at Pathankot. He went to school in Lyallpur (now Faisalabad) in Pakistan.

According to character actor Janaki Dass, M R Bhakri was an ardent fan of films. He watched almost all the films which were shown in the theatres of his place. His memory was so sharp that he used to recite important dialogues from the films and also remembered most of the songs. It was natural that after completion of his Matriculation examination in 1931, he was keen to join the film industry.

M R Bhakri started his career as a Cinema Manager. But it took a long time to get his first break in the film ‘Arsi’ (1947) as story and dialogue writer. After the success of the film, M R Bhakri got two films – ‘Barsaat Ki Ek Raat’ (1948) and ‘Papiha Re’ (1948) for which he wrote story, dialogues, screen play and lyrics. Both these films were being produced in Lahore studios. Unfortunately, these two films became victims of partition and were temporarily abandoned. These films were later released in some parts of India.

After arriving in Bombay (Mumbai), he devoted his time to bring together most of the displaced actors and technicians from Lahore some of whom were associated with his films and helped the creation of a film production banner ‘Nigaristan (India) Films’. Simultaneously, he wrote story, dialogues, screen-play and lyrics for films like ‘Chunariya’ (1948), Saawan Baadhon (1949), ‘Naach’ (1949), ‘Roomal’ (1949) ‘Chakori’ (1949) and ‘Lachhi’ (Punjabi,1949). ‘Bansariya’ (1949) was his first film as a producer under the banner of Nigaristan (India) Films, for which he also wrote story, dialogues, screen play and lyrics.

In 1950s, he produced films like ‘Moti Mahal’ (1952), ‘Shah Behram’ (1955), ‘Alladin Leila’ (1957), ‘Guest House’ (1959) and ‘Bhangra’ (Punjabi, 1959). Thereafter, he was associated with films mostly as screen-play and dialogue writer. His last film as a screen-play and dialogue writer was ‘Sansaar’ (1971).

M R Bhakri had three brothers – Lekhraj Bhakri, Deshraj Bhakri and Rajkumar Bhakri. All brothers were associated with Hindi film industry. Lekh Raj Bhakri who started with Kuldeep Pictures as Controller of Production for ‘Chunariya’ (1948) eventually became a producer-director.

Some of the films which Lekhraj Bhakri produced/directed were mostly under the banner of Kuldeep Pictures, Jubilee Pictures, Golden Films and Tasveeristan. His notable films as director were ‘Rajput’ (1951), ‘Resham’ (1952), ‘Daak Babu’ (1954), ‘Naqaab’ (1955), ‘Fashion’ (1957), ‘Sahaara’ (1958). ‘Panchaayat’ (1958), ‘Shama’ (1961) and ‘Banarasi Babu’ (1962). Desh Raj Bhakri looked after the film production side and Rajkumar Bhakri was a Cinematographer. M R Bhakri’s son, Mohan Bhakri was also a producer-director who was mostly connected with about a dozen ‘B’ Grade horror films made during 1980-2000.

Manoj Kumar is a second cousin of Bhakri brothers. In fact, the first shot he gave was in the film ‘Fashion’ (1957) directed by Lekhraj Bhakri. In this film, the song ‘maati ko lazaana nahin mera desh hai mahaan’ was picturised on him. Manoj Kumar also got a side role in ‘Sahara’ (1958) which was also directed by Lekhraj Bhakri.

As I mentioned earlier, ‘Papiha Re’ (1948) was one of the two films which were under production in Lahore when communal riots broke out. The film’s producer, Kuldeep Sehgal along with M R Bhakri, the story and dialogue writer and other actors and technicians associated with the film arrived in Bombay (Mumbai) almost penniless. According to Janki Dass, it was M R Bhakri who organised the finance, casting, technicians and distribution for the film and got it released in 1948. In fact, in some references, M R Bhakri has been mentioned as the producer of ‘Papiha Re’ (1948) though the banner is Kuldeep Pictures owned by Kuldeep Sehgal.

‘Papiha Re’ (1948) was directed by Lahore-based Dawood Chand. The star cast included Amarnath, Akhtari, Pran, Asha Posley, Mumtaz Begum, G N Butt etc. Not much information about the story and plot of the film is available online. As happened with some of the films caught in the sword of partition in 1947, this film also did not get an all India release. The film was released in limited places in India.

The film had 12 songs written by Mulkhraj Bhakri which were set to music by Dhaniram, a debut film for him. Here is the film’s first song ‘kat gayi waadon mein kuchch waadon mein kuchch kat jaayegi’ to appear in the Blog. The name of the singer is not known but it is apparent that the voice is that of Ameerbai Karnataki.

Incidentally, a song with similar first line was also listed under the film ‘Dhamki’ (1945). But the singer, lyricist, and the music director were listed as ‘Zeenat Begum, D N Madhok, and Pandit Amarnath respectively. Unfortunately, I could not trace the song online.

With this song, ‘Paphia Re’ (1948) makes its debut in the Blog.

Note: The main source of information on the early life of Mulkhraj Bhakri is from an article written by the character actor Janaki Dass which appeared in July 1949 issue of ‘Sound Magazine’.


Song-Kat gayi waadon mein kuchh waadon mein kuchh kat jaayegi (Papeeha Re)(1948) Singer-Amirbai Karnataki, Lyrics-Mulkraj Bhakri, MD-Dhaniram

Lyrics

aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aaa
kat gayi waadon mein kuchch
waadon mein kuchch kat jaayegi
aankh bhar aayegi jab
meri wafa yaad aayegi

jitna jee chaahe
sataa lo
ek din wo aayega
aa aa aa
jitna jee chaahe
sataa lo
ek din wo aayega
dard ban kar yaad meri
dil mein sau bal khaayegi
dard ban kar yaad meri
dil mein sau bal khaayegi

dekh lo o o
mere tadapne
ae ae ae ae ae
ae ae ae ae
kaa tamaashaa
dekh lo aa aa aa aa
dekh lo o o
aa aa aa aa
mere tadapne kaa
tamaashaa aa
dekh lo
aa aa aa aa
meri khaamoshi bhi tumko
ek din tadpaayegi
meri khaamoshi bhi tumko
ek din tadpaayegi
kat gayi waadon mein kuchch
waadon mein kuchch kat jaayegi
kat gayi waadon mein kuchch


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

What is common among Sulochana (real name: Ruby Mayer), Rose (Rose Musleah), Pramila (Easther Victoria Abraham), Sabita Devi (Iris Gasper) and Ramola Devi (Rachel Cohen)?

They all were Jews (almost all of them being Baghdadi Jews) hailing from Calcutta (Kolkata) and were star actresses in Hindi films during 1930s and 40s. Barring Ramola Devi, all of them started their filmy career with silent films. It is surprising that those days when oriental women were mostly relegated to the four walls of their homes, how these Baghdadi Jew actresses found their way to the film industry which was not regarded as a respectable profession even in their Middle-East culture. To understand this, it is necessary to go into the genesis of Baghdadi Jews in India.

Some Baghdadi Jews migrated to India sometime in the beginning of 18th century from Iraq and other Middle-East countries to escape religious persecution and for better business opportunity. Once in India, they quickly adapted to the British culture. The children were educated in convent schools run by Christian missionaries. Over a period of time, they switched over from Arabic to English as language of communication within the families. By virtue of education and a good command over English, Baghdadi Jews got the employment opportunity with British companies and Government organisations. The woman folks mostly worked as teacher, nurse, telephone operators and secretaries.

During the early stage of film industry in India, the producers found it hard to get female actors as those days joining film industry was not regarded as a respectable profession by most of the Hindus and Muslim families. On the other hand, the Baghdadi Jews families living in Calcutta were liberal in this respect. Moreover, the Indian audiences’ weakness for the fair skin was a favourable proposition for film producers to get the Baghdadi Jews and Anglo-Indians as actress for their films.

In this article, I am discussing one of star actresses belonging to Baghdadi Jew family of Calcutta. And the star actress is Rose Musleah, who was known as Rose or Miss Rose in the film industry.

I had given a short profile of Miss Rose in my article hamen kyaa ab khizaan jaaye na jaaye. Arun ji had also given a short profile of her in his article aayenge saajna aayenge. Sometime back, I had read a detailed interview of Rose taken by Susheela Rani Patel in November 1941 issue of ‘Filmindia’ Magazine. But the thought of writing an article on her came to my mind now only as I have mp3 clips of a couple of her rare songs.

I also used information on Rose that was available in the other featured sections of ‘Filmindia’ in its various issues from 1937 to 1945. For Baghdadi Jews in India, some of the information has been taken from the articles appearing on the internet in connection with production of a documentary film ‘Shalome Bollywood – The Untold Story of Indian Cinema’ in which the contributions of Indian Jewish artists would be covered. The documentary is yet to be released.

Rose was born on June 19, 1911 in a wealthy Baghdadi Jew family in Calcutta (Kolkata). Her father was the private secretary to Sir B B Banerjee, the Consul General of Costa Rica who was the son-in-law of Maharaja Jatindra Mohan Tagore. At the age of 15, Rose passed Senior Cambridge examination and was set to become a doctor. However, her father was not in favour of her further studies and instead at the age of 16, he got her married to a boy from Ezra family. The marriage ended in a divorce by which time she had two daughters from him.

Like father, Rose became a private secretary in a British company. Side by side, she also became an instructor for Ball Room dancing. Because of her flair for dancing and acting apart from being an attractive looking girl, her friends suggested her to take up the acting career. This prompted her to join the stage under Agha Hashr Kashmiri, the famous poet and playwright of that time. Under his tutelage, Rose learnt to speak fluent Hindustani and improved her acting skill.

After getting experience of acting on the stage, Rose met J F Madan of Madan Theatre with a letter of recommendation from the owner of Tollywood Studio and joined the banner. [I, however, find her first film to be the silent film ‘The Culprit’ aka ‘Apraadhi’ (1931) produced under the banner of Barua Film Unit]. Her first talky film with Madan Theatre was ‘Pati Bhakti’ (1932). Thereafter she worked in ‘Hindustan’ (1932), ‘Alladin Aur Jaadui Chiraag’ (1933), ‘Turki Sher’ (1933) and other 5-6 films.

In 1935, Rose shifted to Bombay (Mumbai) and joined Imperial Film Company for a two-year contract. ‘Hamaari Betiyaan’ aka ‘Our Darling Daughters’ (1936) was her first film with Imperial in which she shared the star cast with her cousin Pramila. This was followed by ‘Ghulam Daaku’ (1936) and ‘Do Auraten’ aka ‘Two Women’ (1937).

After the end of the contract, Rose joined Saroj Movietone and worked in their films ‘Kal Ki Baat’ (1937) and ‘Rifle Girl’ (1938). After her stint with Saroj Movietone, Rose seems to have become a freelancer as she did Sagar Movietone’s ‘Hum Tum Aur Who’ (1938), Saraswati Cinetone’s ‘Sach Hai’ (1939), National Studios’ ‘Sanskaar’ (1940), ‘Kasauti’ (1941) and ‘Garib’ (1942), Ranjit Moveitone’s ‘Adhuri Kahaani’ (1939) and ‘Aaj Kaa Hindustan’ (1940), Kishore Sahu’s ‘Bahurani’ (1940), Prakash Pictures’ ‘Maala’ (1941) and Prabaht’s ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943).

In the interview, Rose had said that since she had two growing daughters, she wanted to have the flexibility of working in the films according to her convenience and as a freelancer she could get that freedom. However, it would appear that in trying to balance her career with family responsibilities, she missed her career in the later years as I find that in 1944, she did not have any films for release. In 1945, she had only one film ‘Ramayani’ (1945). Her filmy career ended with ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946).

Rose worked in 28 films during 1931 to 1946. Unfortunately, only one of her film, ‘Nayi Kahaani’ (1943) is available for viewing. From the reviews of some of her films of 1940 and thereafter, it appears that she had done mostly the role of an educated and sophisticated girl.

I could not get the information as to how Rose spent her life after her ‘retirement’ from the films. All I know is that during 1940s, she was staying in Keval Mahal at Marine Drive. And those days, it was a status symbol for successful film stars to stay in Marine Drive in buildings like, Keval Mahal, Kapur Mahal, Zaver Mahal, Krishna Mahal (all these buildings are adjunct to each other).

Rose had two daughters – Marjorie and Cynthia. Cynthia was 87 when her interview was taken in her apartments in Las Angles (USA) sometime in 2015 in connection with the documentary film I referred to above. I guess Marjorie remained in Mumbai until her death if I go by a comment of her daughter Rachel Reuben, the super model and now a film editor, in an article which appeared in ‘Outlook’, July 2006.

Coming to the song, I have selected a rare song ‘qismat mein koi sukh nahin’ rendered by Rose from an obscure film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’ (1946). The film was produced under the banner of Star Productions (Ratanbai’s film production company) and was directed by Ramnik Desai. The star cast included Rose, Shahu Modak, Durga Khote, Shantarin, Chandabai, Majeed, Zillo etc. The film had 9 songs written by Wahid Qureshi which were set to music by Mustaq Hussain (Ustad Mustaq Hussain Khan of Bareilly), probably based on Raag Malkauns.

With this song, the film ‘Daasi Yaa Maa’(1946) makes its debut in the Blog.


Song-Qismat mein koi sukh nahin (Daasi Ya Maa)(1946) Singer-Miss Rose, Lyrics-Wahid Qureshi, MD-Mushtaq Hussain

Lyrics

qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
qismet mein koi sukh nahin
dil mein koi khushi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin
mere liye to zindagi
maut hai zindagi nahin

hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
hansna bhi chaahoon main agar
aansoo nikal paden abhi
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin
honthon pe aaye kyon hansi
qismet mein jab hansi nahin

maut ki aur baat hai
maut ki aur baat hai
maut kathin sahi magar
maut kathin sahi magar
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin
jab ke na koi aas ho
jeena bhi dillagi nahin
———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
क़िस्मत में कोई सुख नहीं
दिल में कोई खुशी नहीं
क़िस्मत में कोई सुख नहीं
दिल में कोई खुशी नहीं
मेरे लिए तो ज़िन्दगी
मौत है ज़िन्दगी नहीं
मेरे लिए तो ज़िन्दगी
मौत है ज़िन्दगी नहीं

हँसना भी चाहूँ मैं अगर
आँसू निकाल पड़ें अभी
हँसना भी चाहूँ मैं अगर
आँसू निकाल पड़ें अभी
होठों पे आए क्यों हंसी
क़िस्मत में जब हंसी नहीं
होठों पे आए क्यों हंसी
क़िस्मत में जब हंसी नहीं

मौत की और बात है
मौत की और बात है
मौत कठिन सही मगर
मौत कठिन सही मगर
जब के ना कोई आस हो
जीना भी दिल्लगी नहीं
जब के ना कोई आस हो
जीना भी दिल्लगी नहीं



This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today (9 july 2017) is the birth anniversary of Sanjeev Kumar (9 july 1938-6 november 1985), one of the true legendary actors of Hindi cinema.

Today, he would have been 79 – but sadly, he didn’t even get to live to the age of 50. He was just 47 when a heart attack took him away from this world, and from millions of his fans. Just like Guru Dutt (also coincidentally born on the 9th of July and who died way too early), Sanjeev Kumar’s death left a void in Hindi cinema.
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

taqdeer ka fasaana. . .

So much to be said for destiny and luck. Especially in an industry as unkind and pitiless, as the film industry. They always say, success sells; nothing succeeds like success. But then what to say of success stories that really didn’t go any place.
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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today’s song is from film Raajkanya-55. It is a wonderful song by Rafi. Written by G.S.Nepali, it has been composed by the king of melody, my favourite Music Director Chitragupta.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, I am writing about one of the prominent actors of 1930s and 40s who started his film career in the silent film era and became producer-director during the second half of 1940s. His name – Mazhar Khan, a forgotten name not only for the current generation but also for many in my generation as well.
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This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

This post is 501st post by Sadanand Ji. Due to a tagging error, we all missed the event of 500th post by him (his previous post).

In the early part of the golden era of Hindi film music, there were many films which were box office disasters. These films got released but vanished from the theatres quickly. These films also got ‘erased’ from the memories of the film audience of that time except those who had interest in Hindi film history. Some of such obscure films had the treasures of melodious songs.

If I confine myself to the first half of 1950, I get quite a good numbers such obscure films having melodious songs. Some of such films were ‘Adaa’ (1951, Madan Mohan), ‘Malati Madhav’ (1951, Sudhir Phadke), ‘Ghunghroo’ (1952, C Ramchandra), ‘Nirmohi’ (1952, Madan Mohan), ‘Raag Rang’ (1952, Roshan), ‘Baaghi’ (1953, Madan Mohan), ‘Fareb’ (1953, Anil Biswas), ‘Jhaanjhar’ (1953, C Ramchandra), ‘Chor Baazar’ (1954, Sardar Malik), ‘Naaz’ (1954, Anil Biswas), ‘Rishta’ (1954, K Datta), ‘Garam Coat’ (1955, Amarnath Chawla), ‘Madhur Milan’ (1955, Bulo C Rani) etc. The list is not exhaustive.
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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today’s song is from from an almost forgotten film of the Golden period- Jeevan Sathi-57. This particular song is a very melodious one which had been quite popular in those days. I was surprised how this song was not yet posted here so long. The song is sung by Geeta Dutt, written by Indeevar, it is composed by by a talented but a moderately successful composer- Bulo C. Rani.
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This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.
With this post, the blog now carries 700 songs by Laxmikant Pyaarelal.

The story of Laxmikant Pyaarelal reads like a dream rags-to-riches story. But it is also a story of hard work and persistent effort. Laxmikant, the senior partner in the team, was three years elder to Pyaarelal. Interestingly, both were born on 3rd of the month, Laxmikant in November and Pyaarelal in September. Pyaarelal is the son of the renowned musician Ram Prasad Sharma. Although active in the film industry since the latter part of 1930s, Ram Prasad did some films independently from 1947 to 1950. Not adept with commercial acumen, his financial status was poor most of his life. Pyaarelal, his eldest son, had to start working as a musician in recording studios at the age of 12, to support his family. The story of Laxmikant’s childhood is even more depressing. He was raised in the slums of Vile Parle in Bombay. His father passed away when he was just a toddler. A friend of his father supported him and guided him towards learning music. With time, his talent shone through, and he too started working as a musician in the film industry.

Remembering Laxmikant Shantaram Kudalkar on the 19th anniversary of his passing away today (25th May).
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What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for more than nine years. This blog has over 13500 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 3300 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

Total number of songs posts discussed

13529

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1015
Total Number of movies covered =3712

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Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 3250 days.

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