Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Song of 1938’ Category


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4843 Post No. : 16631

Today’s song is from a very old, i.e. 83 year old film, which was one of the popular films of Wadia Movietone. The film was Lutaru Lalna-1938 and the title role was done by then famous stunt queen The Fearless nadia. Yes, this was a C grade stunt film. In those years, when the Talkie itself had not even entered it’s Teens, these stunt films, especially featuring Nadia were very popular. C grade stunt films were not yet looked down upon by the elite. That categorisation started from the mid 40’s, when social and films of other Genres divided the audience and stunts became the choice of the lower class of the society.

When the Talkie films started, the audience was awestruck and went to the theatres to see and enjoy whatever the producers served them on the screen. Initially, the films were mostly Mythological and Costume dramas, but in due course, the film makers realised that making a stunt film was much more profitable than a Costume drama. Stunt films could be made in Rs. 30-50 thousand, whereas for other films, the investment was more. Further religious films catered to only a particular religion, i.e. Muslim and Christian audience would not see a Mythological film and Hindu and Christians will not see a Muslim religious film. But stunt films were for all and sundry. There was no restriction.

Due to all this, the pioneers of stunt/action films decided to concentrate on this Genre only. Wadia Movietone was the leading film maker of these C grade films. Other companies who made such films were, Imperial, Ranjit, Sharda, krishna, Saraswati, Saroj, Sagar, Bharat Royal, Ajanta, Madan etc. in 1933 Wadias entered with force in this market, and followed by others, in just 3 years i.e. from 1933 to 1935, a total of 138 films of Stunt/Action, Costume, Arabian Night stories and magic based Imaginary films ( all C grade) were made. Significantly, out of these 138 films, as many as 42 films were Stunt and Action films. This was mainly because of Wadia Movietone. They introduced Fearless Nadia in Hunterwali-35 and virtually ignited the flame of Stunt/Action films from 1935 to 1950. Thus the decade of the 40s could well be called “Stunt Film Decade” with 210 such films from 1941 to 1950.

Wadia Movietone was a noted Indian film production company and studio, based in Mumbai, established in 1933 by Wadia brothers J. B. H. Wadia and Homi Wadia. It was most known for stunt, fantasy and mythological films, including Hunterwali (1935).

Wadia brothers belonged to a Parsi family, and their ancestors came from the ship building Wadia family (Wadia Group), originally from Surat, which also built the British wartime ship HMS Trincomalee (1817). Their ancestors moved to Bombay in the 18th century. It was co-established in 1933, by producer and screenwriter J. B. H. Wadia, his younger brother director Homi Wadia, film distributor Manchersha B. Billimoria, and brothers Burjor and Nadirsha Tata.

However, the Tata brothers left the partnership within three years. The company then continued production of film, documentaries and newsreels from its studios near Lowjee Castle, Mumbai, the Wadia family mansion, owned by their great-grandfather Lovji Nusserwanjee Wadia, a noted shipbuilder, who founded the Wadia Group in 1736. The company even had its logo as a ship, honouring their family legacy. Their company made Hunterwali (1935) starring Fearless Nadia, Boman Shroff and John Cawas, which became a surprise hit and its first big success. Thereafter, they made several films based on the Arabian Nights.

However, by the end the 1930s, the genre of stunt, fantasy and mythology films which dominated the early films, was beginning to fail and the company ran into heavy losses, after they invested into ambitious projects which flopped. The last film made by the company was Raj Nartaki (1941) under the direction of Madhu Bose. Thereafter, the studio premises were up for sale; V. Shantaram bought the studio in 1942 and established Rajkamal Kalamandir on the premises. Homi Wadia, who worked as a director of the company, went on to establish Basant Pictures in the same year, though initially as a film production house. Subsequently, he established a film studio under the same banner in 1947, which functioned till 1981.

Riyad Vinci Wadia, grandson of J.B.H. Wadia inherited the studio in 1990. He is most known for his film, Bomgay (1996) and a documentary on Nadia, Fearless: The Hunterwali Story. He died in 2003. Wadia Movietone, besides making stunt films, had some FIRSTs to their credit like, they made India’s first songless movie ” Naujawan” in 1937. First English film “The Court Dancer’-1941 and the first Sindhi film ” Ekta”-1942. They also made a Telugu film “Nar Narayan”-37, two Tamil films ‘Vanraz Karsan’-38 and Bharat kesari-39, one Bangla film ” Raj Nartaki”-41 and one Gujrati film Valo Namori-73.

From 1933 to 1942(till the split) they made 43 films. From 43 to 73 only 24 films. Their last Hindi film was Saaz aur Sanam-71 and the overall last film was a Gujarati film in 1973. J.B.H.Wadia was born on 13-12-1901 and died on 4-1-1986. His brother Homi Wadia was born on 22-5-1911 and died on 10-12-2004.

Their Ace Actress for most films was Fearless Nadia.

Mary Evans (Fearless Nadia’s real name), a devout catholic was born on 8-1-1908 at Perth, Australia, to a Scottish father and a Greek mother. Father,a British Army soldier, was based in Elephanta caves in Bombay. She wanted to be a singer and a dancer. She learnt dancing from father and singing from mother. She sang in the local church choirs on Sundays. In 1915, when her father died in WW I action, they shifted to first Peshawar and then settled in Bombay. After working in an Army canteen for some time, She joined a dancing troupe. Here her name was changed to first NADA and then to NADIA.

One Mr. Eruch Kanga, owner of Lahore cinema saw her performance in the troupe and told the Wadia Brothers, who were looking for a Heroine. They called her for an interview. After seeing her, the brothers realised the difficulty in making a white woman a Heroine in Hindi films. In the interview JBH wadia said, “I have never heard about you before. ” she sprightly retorted,” I too had not heard your names till this morning”. The brothers were impressed and she was appointed in Wadia Movietone. To test her, she was given small roles in films which were in the making, like Lal e yaman and Noor e yaman, while she studied speaking Hindi.

She was launched with ” HUNTERWALI-1935″ ,a dramatic story of a Princess trying to rescue her kidnapped father and salvage his Empire. It was an unconventional role and a new subject for the Indian audience.

The film opened in Super cinema on Lamington road, Bombay and instantly became a great Hit. It was like a revolution. Audience was thrilled to see a white woman, donning a mask and cracking whip at her tormentors. They were awed, happy and mesmerised, wanting more of it .She was named NADIA. They added FEARLESS for her in the ads.

HUNTERWALI was only a prelude to a remarkable career. Encouraged by the success of Hunterwali, films were made on the cause of social injustice, women’s emancipation, corruption, Land grabbing and Exploitation of the poor. She always played roles like King Arthur and Robin Hood.

Her films had a set of characters. There was her pet Horse-Punjab ka Beta, Gunboat the Dog and her jalopy was called Rolls Royce ki beti (later when Homi Bhabha started Basant Pictures with her, there was Horse Rajpoot, Dog Moti and the car- Austin ki Bachhi). In her films, usually the villain was Sayani (his stock line was ” Dekha Jaayega”), John Cawas and Boman Shroff- the heavyweight Bodybuilders.

Her stunts became more dangerous and death defying with every film. She did all her stunts herself, breaking bones many times in this.

From 1933 to 1968 she did 43 films. herv first film was Lal-E-Yaman-33 and the last film was Khiladi-68. She also sang 3 songs in 3 films, namely Noor-E-yaman-35, Hunterwali-35 and Pahadi kanya-36. Her name in many films (starting with Hunterwali) was Madhuri.

She had married and divorced early and also had a son. Later she was in love with Homi Wadia, but could not marry him due to the opposition of his mother. They married in 1961 after his mother died. She was 53 years old by then.

In her last days she was frequently seen in the lanes of Colaba in Bombay ,taking her dogs for walks.

In 1993, her great grand nephew Riyad Vinci Wadia made a documentary on her, in which she had appeared.

She died peacefully on 9-1-1996.

Nadia has a special place in my memories. Sometime in 1972, one of my friends, Mahesh Sharma, who lived in Colaba, Bombay, told me that he frequently sees Nadia in a Garden where he went for his morning walks. She lived near his apartments. Anxious to meet her and talk to her, I stayed with Sharma ji overnight. Next day morning, we both went to that garden. Sure enough, after some time Nadia entered the garden with two of her dogs. She sat on a bench and her servant took the dogs for their walks. Mahesh had a casual acquaintance with her. He greeted her and said ” this is my friend Mr. Deshmukh. He is your great fan “. I greeted her and recited names of her 10-15 films which I had seen. She looked suitably impressed . She smiled and we talked for a few minutes and left. Alas ! In those days, there was no Mobile phone, otherwise I would have had my photos with her as a prize possession. Anyway, I will never forget my meeting with her- the great Stunt Queen, The Fearless Nadia !

Today’s song is sung by Sarita, Master Muhammed and chorus. It is a typical 30’s decade song. The story of this film was almost the same as any other film of Nadia. Kind and simple king, cruel and wicked Senapati, a Masked person to fight against him , a love affair and happy ending after the audience was given a full dose of stunts by Nadia.


Song- Jagat hai sapna koi na apna (Lutaru Lalna)(1938) Singers- Sarita, Master Muhammad, Lyricist- Pt. Gyan, MD- Master Muhammad

Lyrics

Jagat hai sapna
koi na apna
jaag uthha ae bande
Jagat hai sapna
koi na apna
jaag uthha ae ?? bande

dialogues
——————————–
is boodhhe musalmaan ki ??
isi ne hindu ladki se bheekh mangwaai hai
haan haan ye sach baat hai

khaamkhaa
dharm bhrasht kar raha hai

baba
ye jurm mera nahin
jab tum hindu hokar
ek yateem kanya ko
ann aur paani na doge
to kya
ek sachha
?? musalmaan bhi apna farz poora na karega

bandhuon
ye wo buzurg hain
jinhone dharm sankat mein mujhe aasra diya thha
?? muslim se mili taaleem
ye quraan ki
Hindu hi rakkha mujhe
na fikr ki jaan ki
apni jaati ne suna na jab meri fariyaad ko
Hindu beti aa gayi godi mein musalmaan ki

?? baba

??

kya ek musalmaan ek hindu ke liye itni qurbaani kar sakta hai
kyun nahin baba

jab ??ji ka upnishad ?? ek hai
Kashi Kaba mandir masjid ??
sab ka imaan ek hai

?? ka parda ?? ka tum uthha kar dekh lo
fark kuchh mein nahin
hindu musalmaan ek hai

————————–

jagat hai sapna
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa

jaag uthha hai ?? bande
jagat hai sapna koi na apna
jaag uthha ?? bande

??? ek hai ??
??? ek hai ??
ye kahin ??
ye kahin ??
ye kahin ??
ye kahin ??
???

jaag uthha ?? bande
???
jaag uthha ?? bande
jagat hai sapna koi na apna
jaag uthha ?? bande


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws

Blog Day :

4774 Post No. : 16523

Today’s song is from a film of the First decade of Talkie films in India. After the advent of the Talkie films in India, with Imperial’s ” Alam Ara”, many strong filmmakers from the silent era jumped into the field of making Talkie films. Initially only Bombay and Calcutta were the two filmmaking centres, but soon, Kolhapur,Lahore, Madras and a few other places began making Talkie films.

Most filmmakers made films based on Mythology, Folk stories, Costume dramas, but few Social and Historical films were also made. Imperial, Sagar, Bharat, Ranjit, Krishnatone and Mohan Bhavnani’s Indian Art Production made Hindi films in the First year. From Calcutta it was only Maadan Theatres which made Hindi films.

In 1932, Kardar’s Playart Photophone from Lahore, Kamla Movietone and Oriental Pictures from Lahore, Shantaram’s Prabhat Film co. and Torne’s Saraswati Cinetone form Poona, Saroj and Sharda Movietone from Bombay, Elephanta Movietone from Punjab and from Calcutta- New Theatres and the Eastern Films from Hyderabad joined the band of Pioneering filmmakers.

Although preparations for making a Talkie film had started from 1929 itself, initial equipment acquisition and training the technicians took one year and early in 1931 beginning, the talkie films went on floors at Bombay and Calcutta. Calcutta’s Maadan Theatres was better equipped with superior Machinery and A 1 Class actors for their film “Shirin Farhad”. Ardeshir Irani at Imperial, Bombay was making his “Alam Ara” at Bombay. Both companies wanted to be the First to release their Talkie film.

Irani was a clever person. He had his own Network at Calcutta, through which he knew the progress of Maadan’s film. When he came to know that “Shirin Farhad’ would have 18 songs, he took a decision to have only 7 songs in his film. This reduced the shooting and editing days and he was in a position to release his Talkie film on 14-3-1931 at Majestic Cinema in Bombay and record his name in the History books, as the First Talkie Filmmaker. Maadan could only release their film on 30-5-1931 to become the second Filmmaker of Talkie films in Hindi. However, their film was much better technically and sound was clear…yet they were second !

Within the next few years, the decade was shining with popular and meaningful films from New Theatres, Calcutta and Prabhat Film co. Poona. The reason was that New Theatres made films with a solid story base. They tried to make films on well known authors’ works and Prabhat film company took up social evils as the central themes of their films. These two companies also made it a point to make Bilingual movies – in local and in Hindi languages, thus capturing the home market and the All India market with the Hindi version.

Today’s film “Abhagin”-1938 made by new Theatres, Calcutta was based on the story by Bangla famous author Upendranath Ganguli. It was a bilingual film. In Bangla language it was titled ‘ Abhigyan”. Hindi dialogues were by A.H.Shore and lyrics were by Arzu lucknowi. The screenplay was by Phani Majumdar – his first as a script writer, who became a well known Director in later days. Bimal Roy was the Cinematographer. He too became a big filmmaker and a Director.

The film was directed by Prafulla Roy. Prafulla Roy ( Born on 1-1-1892 at Kushtia, Bengal) started his career in the silent era by directing 2 silent films. His first talkie film in Hindi was Ramayan-34, made by Bharat laxmi Pictures, Calcutta. Bharat Laxmi Pictures had Prafull Roy as its director for Bangla and Hindi films. Roy directed 12 films in Hindi. 9 out of them were made in Calcutta, 1 film in Lahore (Prem yatra-37) and 2 in Bombay (Mera Gaon-42 and Phulwari-51). Roy had also acted in 2 New Theatres films, namely Millionaire-36 and Mukti-37.

The cast of the film was Prithviraj Kapoor, Molina Devi, Vijay Kumar, Nemo, Menaka Devi, Pankaj Mullick, Chaman Puri (makes his Debut. He was the eldest brother of Madan Puri and Amrish Puri). The film was released in Majestic Cinema, Bombay.

One of the names in the cast is that of NEMO. I remember him as Seth ji, who is disturbed in the night by the Bastiwala’s singing, in the film Shri 420. This strange name is a Latin word, meaning ” Nobody”. All these years, I tried hard but never got any information about him. Recently, however, I could get some information about Nemo. Here it is, for the first time, for our readers.

Nemo (Mirza Muhammad Begg) was born on 27th december 1903 at Calcutta. He passed his Senior Cambridge. One day he, along with some friends, visited New Theatres to see a film shooting. Mirza Muhammad Begg merely wanted to watch the shooting of ‘Yahoodi Ki Larki’ (1933) but, as luck would have it, his visit to the New Theatres studio in Calcutta led to a small role in the same film. The part was that of a Roman king and little did Begg know back then that he’d soon be turning to Latin to fish out a lasting identity.

A year later, he was invited by New Theatres’ founder B.N. Sircar to work as the production manager of ‘Karwan-e-Hayat’ (1935) and another chance role beckoned. A female actor who was supposed to play an old witch in the film failed to turn up for the shooting and Begg volunteered for the part. The make-up department stepped up to the challenge and Begg, unrecognisable in the get-up, did the job (and always considered it his best effort). What happened next is even more interesting. Once the film was ready, the makers felt apprehensive about revealing to the public that a man had played the witch’s role. Begg came up with a solution – a gender-ambiguous screen name for himself. And in a delightfully wacky move, he picked a name that means ‘nobody/nothing’ in Latin – ‘Nemo’.

The name stuck on and this was the beginning of Nemo’s steadfast association with New Theatres – one that resulted in a string of features like ‘Karodpati’, ‘Dushman’, ‘Doctor’ and ‘Zindagi’. He was Vidushak, the royal jester, in ‘Vidyapati’, a rigid but caring father in ‘Jawani Ki Reet’ and the devoted caretaker Dharamdas in P.C. Barua’s ‘Devdas’. These diverse characters earned him appreciation from audiences and critics alike. Further, the story of the Saigal hit ‘The President’ (1937) was based on his idea and he was duly credited for the same. Alongside his work in films, he also edited and published ‘Akkas’ – a very popular Urdu (and later, Urdu-English bilingual) film magazine in those days. Its surviving copies now serve as an important archive of the early talkies. His last film with New Theatres was Kashinath. When Calcutta was bombed by Japan in late 1942, Nemo migrated with his family to his ancestral hometown, Lucknow. He later went over to Bombay for a short while to work in Mazhar Khan’s ‘Pehli Nazar’ (1945), and then returned to Lucknow to settle into a life far removed from the studio lights.

In the middle of it all lies an extraordinary fact – at the time he entered the movies, M.M. Begg was a national billiards champion! He won the inaugural Indian Open Billiards Championship in 1931 and never left the game thereon, despite a busy and flourishing film career. He won the trophy again in 1937, and between the 2 wins, he was the runner-up thrice. Not to mention, he represented the country at international tournaments and also headed various administrative organisations related to the game. His contributions towards establishing and popularising billiards and snooker in India are widely mentioned, and always in glowing terms. He was also obsessed with Racing.

It was nearly a decade after ‘Pehli Nazar’ that Raj Kapoor managed to pull Nemo out of his sabbatical for 2 memorable final acts in ‘Shree 420’ and ‘Jagte Raho’. In both, Nemo played similar roles of manipulative, corrupt seths who hide their sinister designs behind a facade of respectability. If he was jittery about facing the camera after a long gap, it doesn’t show (unless Seth Sonachand’s trembling chin is not a mannerism). He was particularly effective in ‘Shree 420’, where he puts on the most evil smile possible and hisses to Raj Kapoor, “Aap se mulaqaat ho gayi, is mein fayda hi fayda hai.” He also did 2 more films- Raja Vikram-57 and Nag Champa-58.

Nemo worked in 19 films of New Theatres and 4 others totalling 23 films in all. It is believed that he died in Bombay on 18-8-1960. Cinema, publishing, sports – Mirza Muhammad Begg distinguished himself in everything he touched. And chose to call himself a nobody. ( based on information from Filmdom-1946, HFGK, muVyz but mainly an article by Yasir Abbasi, with thanks.)

Today’s song is sung by Kamala Jharia. This is the 5th song from this film to feature on this Blog.


Song- Tumse maangne mein laaj aaye (Abhaagin)(1938) Singer- Kamla Jharia, Lyricist- Aarzu Lucknowi, MD- R C Boral

Lyrics

Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein

komal tan
komal man
komal tan
komal man
?? ka bojha
kaise uthhaaya jaaye
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein

koi jo maange muraad
ab bhi hai ?? baaqi
rah gayi maangke
lene ki tamanna baaqi
koi to maange muraad ab bhi hai
?? baaqi
rah gayi maangke
lene ki tamanna baaqi

?? dukh mein koyi
murjhaayi kali
khud khil jaaye
?? dukh mein koyi
murjhaayi kali
khud khil jaaye
sab kuchh ?? khona hai ke
sab kuchh mil jaaye
sab kuchh ?? khona hai ke
sab kuchh mil jaaye

kaun hai
kaun hai
kaun hai aisa jo ki
khud ko preet mein jalaa paaye
kaun hai aisa jo ki
khud ko preet mein jalaa paaye
???
Tumse maangane mein laaj aaye
tumse maangne mein


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4713 Post No. : 16419

Today’s song is from the film Adhikar-1938. Made at Calcutta by New Theatres, the film was directed by P C Barua, who also acted in the film’s both versions-Bangla and Hindi. The film title was the same in both. While the Bangla version released on 12-1-1939, the Hindi version was delayed and released on 21-10-1939.

In the early era of film making, right from the Silent films, Bombay was the most active and important film centre. Two local communities in Bombay were predominantly engaged in filmmaking. One was the Gujarati – who were shrewd businessmen who had an eye on the profits. The other local community was Marathis. Marathi people were poor in finance, bereft of business acumen, they were very good performers. So, they were inclined to acting, direction,production, Art direction, story writing, Music directions, singing etc. Everything and anything that did not involve finance or business !

This continued till the Talkie arrived. Then one more player joined in and that was Bengali community from Calcutta. They recognised the need to showcase their films on the All India platform to make their film industry viable. So, making Hindi films for the All India market started. The pioneers in Cinema in Bengal – the Madons had their own network of Cinema Theatres and after a while New Theatres too established their film distribution network in North, West and South India.

Bengalis were hardworking and intelligent in those days and so understood the mechanics of successful films.First thing that they did was to use established novels and stories from the Bengali literature to make films. The Madons had bought the rights of all the novels of Bankimchandra Chatterjee and the New Theatres followed suit by using Sharadchandra Chatterji and the rest of the famous writers. This made their film’s base strong. Secondly, they introduced their favourite and revered Rabindra Sangeet in film songs. To the Bombay audience, who was bored with classical and stage drama music, this was a welcome change. Thus, in the early years of Talkie films i.e. 1933 to almost 1945, Calocutta contributed substantially in making films popular and profitable.

Automatically, many Bangla artistes tried their hand at acting and Music making in Hindi films. Have you ever heard of these names ?
Radhacharan Bhattacharya, Motibabu, N R Bhattacharya, Shoolpani Mukherjee, S P Mukherjee, V V Ganguly, Niren Lahiri, Shivrani Ghosh, A C Biswas, Bhishmadev Chatterjee etc etc .

I am sure none of these names ring any bell in your mind. Simply because they are not famous Bangla names. Let me tell you that these are some names of Bangla Music Directors, who gave music to Hindi films in the 30s and 40s. The contribution of Bangla artistes in various fields of film making, especially Music composition and singing has been sizable. Over a period, with the emergence and strengthening of regional centres, the contribution started reducing and in a period of 20 years,it trickled to the minimum.

In the decade of the 30s Music Directors like R C Boral, Pankaj Mullik, K C Dey, Timir Baran, Anupam Ghatak and Anil Biswas contributed heavily by building the base of Hindi Film music. In the 40s it was Pannalal Ghosh, Kamal Dasgupta, Pt.Ravishankar and Ram Ganguly. In the 50s it was S D Burman, Salil Chaudhary and Hemant Kumar. In the 60s it was Robin Banerjee, in the 70s it was only R D Burman and in the 80s it was only Bappi Lahiri.

Similarly, among Singers too the initial high number came down over a period. To start with it was K C Dey, Anil Biswas, Ashok Kumar, Asit baran, Harimati Dua, Kalyani Das(real name Zareena), Kanan Devi, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Parul Ghosh, Maya Banerjee etc. Then came Ashima Banerjee, Geeta Dutt, Hemant Kumar, Jagmohan, Juthika Roy, Manna Dey, Ranu Mukherjee, Sandhya Mukherjee, Sailesh Mukherjee, Shankar Dasgupta, Subir Sen, Utpala Sen etc. In the 70 to 85 period it was mainly Kishore Kumar, Amit kumar, Aarti Mukherjee, Bappi Lahiri, Runa Laila, Kalyani Mitra, Pankaj Mitra, Sapan Chakravarty etc. After 85 the number was reduced to Shreya Ghoshal, Abhijeet, Babul Supriyo etc.
(All names are only indicative and not exhaustive).

Amongst the singers from Bengal, possibly Pahadi Sanyal acted in the maximum number of Hindi films-36. He sang 70 songs in 20 Hindi films, the rest were for only acting. His songs with Uma Shashi, Kanan Devi, Molina Devi and Sehgal were famous. Luku Sanyal-the English news Reader of early Doordarshan News was his daughter. Today’s film Adhikar-38 had music by Timir baran bhattacharya. The cast of the film was P C Barua, Jamuna, Menaka, Pahadi Sanyal, Pankaj Mullik, Jagdish Sethi, Bikram Kapooretc.etc. From the cast, Menaka Devi was a member of Same Name Confusion, as there was another Menaka-actress and singer- from Bombay in the same time period.

Menaka Devi (Calcutta Wali) was born in Varanasi on 23-1-1921. Her mother was a resident of the holy city although her father was from Bengal. She studied upto Matriculation. She could speak fluent English and Hindi, but not much of Bangla, having been raised in Varanasi. Her interest in music and dance took her to Bombay where she starred in a couple of films like Prince Thaksen (1929), Uttara Abhimanyu, Ishwar Ki Maut and others as a child artiste. When the Talkie started she acted and sang in Bhedi Rajkumar-34, Pyara Dushman-35 and Krishna Shishtai – 35.

Reportedly, she met the legendary film director Debaki Bose of Bengal during a train journey and he was so impressed by her that he decided to cast her in the lead role of his next venture in the Hindi version of the bilingual Sonar Sansar (1936 in Bangla and Sunehra Sansar-36 in Hindi) and thus began the illustrious career of Menaka Devi.

Her devotion to work was such that she learnt Bengali, her mother tongue although she was anything but fluent in it having spent all her life till then outside Bengal, so that she could play the same role (that of Alka) in the Bengali version also. Dhiraj Bhattacharya was her first hero on the screen. P.C.Barua, who was on the lookout for a young and fresh face to play Jharna in his forthcoming production Mukti (1937) selected her for both the versions ( Bangla and Hindi) and a flow started whereby she starred in films like Adhikar (1939), Abhigyan (1938), Bardidi (1939 in Bangla and Badi Didi in Hindi), Rajat Jayanti (1940) and others.

She decided to try her luck in Bombay around 1944 and starred in a few films there and definitely made her presence felt although playing the second lead most of the time. Kishore Sahu procured her services for Hamari Duniya (1952). She was married to Pannalal Shrivastav and had 1 daughter ( Jaya Ganguly). She turned producer also and this proved her undoing. Both her films as producer, Apna na Huye Apne (No information of this film,probably incomplete) and Jeene Do-48, both starring herself with prominent Bombay stars flopped.

She returned to Calcutta a broken woman and found to her dismay that roles were not coming to her. She joined the MG Enterprise, a drama group of Molina Devi and performed on the stage to continue to live as an actress. She even arranged magic shows along with husband Pannalal Srivastava while small roles came pouring in films like Ekti Raat (1956) and others. The feature that strikes even today while seeing her performance is the spontaneous nature of her acting. Why good roles eluded her is a mystery. She was last seen on the screen in Bhombal Sardar (1983). In all, she acted in 60 films-Bangla and Hindi together. She was in 19 Hindi films and sang 8 songs in 4 Hindi films.

Her end came on 22-1- 2004 after a prolonged fight not only against poor health but also poverty. Her death was reported only in one Bengali daily although news of her death received good coverage on television.

Here is a small note on Jagdish Sethi.

Jagdish Sethi was born on 15-1-1903 at Pind Dandan Khan (Campbellpore) in Punjab.

After matriculation in 1920, he graduated from Lahore. He was known as a fighter in college due to his dominating nature. He joined the film line as assitant cameraman in Punjab film company in 1928.

He went to Calcutta to work as an extra in New Theatres, came back to Bombay and worked in Alam Ara-31. He went back to New Theatres in 1933 and worked in films like President,Anath Ashram,Mukti, jawani ki reet,Ghar ki laaj etc.

He worked in about 85 films in his career. In Bombay he was famous as a person with changing moods. He did not have many friends. He worked in films made by Imperial, Amar Movietone, Maiden Films, New Theatres, Laxmi Productions (belonging to L V Prasad), Janak Productions, Filmistan etc etc. He started his own J.S.Productions and produced and directed films like Do Dil-47, Raat ki Rani-49, Jaggu-52 and Pensioner-54.

He amassed huge wealth. He was fond of Racing, Cards and Tennis. He was also a writer and published a book “Hichkiyan”-short stories on Film world.

He died on 12-6-1969.

Today’s song is sung by Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal and Pratap Mukherji. The tune of today’s song is similar to one used in film Forty Days-1959 song of Asha-Manna Dey “Naseeb hoga mera meherbaan kabhi na kabhi”….MD-Bipin-Babul. Enjoy….


Song- Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho (Adhikaar)(1938) Singers- Pankaj Mullik, Pahadi Sanyal, Pratap Mukherjee, Lyricist-Arzoo Lucknavi, MD- Timir Baran Bhattacharya

Lyrics

Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho
zakhm ki tarah hanso
haan zakhm ki tarah hanso
dard ki haalat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
sukh mein jo hain
unhen kya kadr (??)
paraaye jo thhaken
haan aan aan
haan haan
haan aan
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
?? se achcha hai ke haajat(??) na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

sabr kadva hai magar
haan aan aan
sabr kadva hai magar
sabr ka phal meethha aa hai ae
haan aan aan
haan
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
bhes badli hui ??aahat ko
??yat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

Bhed khulta hai
bharam jaataa hai
hoti hai hansi
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
?? aane se hi ?? na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho

aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
aa aa aa aa
apne hi munh se
haaye ye apni hi tauheen
haan aan tauheen
sharm izzat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
gar museebat ki agar hai
to museebat na kaho
Aish waalon se gareebi ki museebat na kaho


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4524 Post No. : 16083

Today’s song is from the film 300 Days and after-1938. This was a film made by Sagar Movietone. Based on an English film “A Billionaire’s story “, directed by the famous Haward Hawks. The film was adapted to indian conditions by Babubhai Mehta and the dialogues were written by Wazahat Mirza and Waqif. Music was by Anil Biswas and the 9 songs were written by Zia Sarhadi. Cinematographer was Faredoon Irani. The film was a comedy film directed by Sarvottam Badami. Later he further directed two more comedies – Aap ki Marzi and Ladies Only both in 1939.

Badami was a living example of the famous saying ” where you come from is immaterial. What is important is where you have reached. ” An ordinary Motor Machanic became a famous film director, Head of the Documentary section of Films Division and a management consultant for an Industrial House like the Kamanis in Bangalore. His life story is very inspiring indeed.( another Motor Mechanic became a famous writer and director-Gulzar).

Sarvottam Badami was born in 1910 at Channapatna in Karnataka,to a revenue officer working in Mysore. He passed his SSLC and worked as a garage mechanic and then a projectionist in Select Picture House, Bangalore, both of which were owned by Dr. Ambalal Patel. Patel moved to Bombay and financed Ardeshir Irani of Imperial Film Company, and Chimanlal Desai as a partner forming Sagar Movietone in 1930.
At the age of 19 years, Badami went to Bombay to study automobile engineering. He was asked by Ardeshir Irani who met him at a wedding to help out with the recording equipment he had purchased from abroad.

Badami helped in the sound recording department for the first Talkie in India, Ardeshir Irani’s Alam Ara (1931). Around that time a German director making the film Harishchandra left half-way and Badami offered to complete it, the co-director was Raja Chandrasekhar, although the co-director credit has also been cited as T. C. Vadivelu Naicker. The film turned out to be successful. He was contracted by Sagar Movietone (Sagar Film Company) to direct three films, two in Telugu and one in Tamil: Galava Rishi (Tamil), Rama Paduka Pattabhishekam and Shakuntala in Telugu. The success of these films established him as a director. His working team had people like the cinematographer Faredoon Irani, music director Anil Biswas and the Sagar Movietone favourites Sabita Devi and Motilal.

Initially, to avoid embarrassment to his family he requested not to be credited in the regional language films. He did not know Hindi but from 1932-1947, he worked for Sagar Movietone and also directed nearly 30 films in Hindi, for many others. His first Hindi film was Chandrahasa (1933) starring Noor Mohammed Charlie. He was paid Rs 2000 per film with the complete film being made within Rs 50,000. He worked with most of the top actors of the time like Motilal, Nargis, Ashok Kumar and Pahari Sanyal. He brought Mehboob Khan who was then doing roles as an extra out of obscurity and gave him the role of Sabita Devi’s father in the film Vengeance is mine(1935).

He made several films based on novels. Some of the writers whose work he used were K.M.Munshi, Sarat Chandra and Ramanlal Vasanthlal Desai. The film Aap ki Marzi (1939) was inspired by the Hollywood film Paradise for Three (1938). He became known for his satirical comedies and “socially relevant films”.His film Grihalaxmi (1934), which starred Jal Merchant and Sabita Devi had the woman getting into marriage only if her doctor husband agreed not to want children. The success of the film mitigated the enraged public reaction at the time.

He showed his understanding of media publicity required for films when in 1937, Badami resorted to woo audiences by announcing cash prizes of Rs.500, Rs.200 and Rs.100 for the best reviews of his newly released film Kulvadhu (1937). The promotional gambit worked sending audiences to the theatres. According to an interview, most of Badami’s films didn’t survive as the negatives were burnt to extract the silver from the silver nitrate.

After Aap ki Marzi-38, he followed his mentor, Dr. Patel and joined Sudama Pictures, when in 1939, Sagar Movietone merged into National Films. Badami

also worked in Famous Cine Laboratories, from 46 to 48.

Apparently, in 1948 Deputy Prime Minister Vallabh bhai Patel, who was then also in charge of the Information Ministry, on a visit to the Cine Laboratories Bombay, asked Badami to help set up a NewsReel and Documentary section. The Films Division was established in 1948. He became chief producer in the newsreel department and made several documentaries. He worked in the Films Division making documentaries from 1948-1952. After that he stopped making films and returned to Bangalore to retire as “I was a forgotten man in the feature film world”. He became an industrialist by starting a manufacturing business. Later he worked as a Consultant for Kamani Group of Industries also. He died in 2005 in Bangalore, Karnataka, India.

FILMOGRAPHY: 1932: Harishchandra; Galava Rishi; Paduka Pattabhishekham; Shakuntala; 1933: Chandrahasa; 1934: Grihalakshmi; 1935: Dr. Madhurika; Vengeance is Mine; 1936: Jeevan Lata; Grama Kanya; 1937: Kokila; Kulavadhu; 1938: Three Hundred Days and After; 1939: Aap Ki Marzi; Ladies Only; 1940: Chingari; Sajani; 1941: Holiday in Bombay; 1942: Khilona; 1943: Prarthana; 1944: Bhagya Lakshmi; 1945: Ramayani; 1946: Uttara Abhimanyu; 1947: Manmani; 1951: Vinoba Bhave (Doc);1952: Roof over the head

(Ack: Sapnon ke saudagar by Vithal Pandya, Sagar Movietone by Biren Kothari, HFGK, muVyz, Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, and my notes)

The cast of the film was Sabita Devi, Bibbo, Motilal, Yakub, Sankata prasad and many more. Though Motilal was the Hero, his name came after two leading ladies as they were seniors and he was comparatively a junior actor. Sabita Devi was a beautiful Anglo Indian girl who joined films in the silent film era. When Talkie started, she too had a problem of Hindi speaking and singing, like all other non indian girls in films in those days. She was a determined lady and she , just like Ruby Meyers (sulochana), learnt Hindi to speak and did singing lessons too, by taking a one year’s gap in career.

The real name of Sabita Devi was IRINA GASPER. She was an Anglo-Indian, born in an affluent family of Calcutta, in 1914.

After completing education she wanted to join films, but her family objected. Without the family’s knowledge, she sent her resume and Photo to British Dominion Film Co., owned by Dhiren Ganguly in Calcutta. When they informed their consent the family resisted and kept her locked in the house. She fell ill and finally, the family conceded to her wish.

Her first Silent film was Flames of Flesh-1930. Then came Kanthahaar, A touch of Love, After the death, Aparadhi, Money makes what not and Bhagyalaxmi as silent films.

When the talkie came, she determinedly learnt Hindustani and Urdu and also Music.

Her first Talkie film was Radhakrishna-33, in which she sang 16 out of 23 songs in the film, but no records were made. Next was Ek din ka Badshah-33. She shifted to Bombay for better opportunities. In 1934,came Shahar ka Jaadu,with Motilal as a debut actor and this film was a Hit. Later she and Motilal became a popular pair.

She did many films. Her some films were-

300 days and after, Apki marzi, kokila, Kulvadhu, Amrapali, Ladies only, Chandragupta, Chingari, Dr.madhurika, grihalaxmi, holiday in bombay, Jeevan Lata, King for a day, Lagna bandhan, Manmaani, , Phantom Of the hills, Silver king, vengeance is mine, Village Girl etc etc. In all, she acted in 23 Talkie films and sang 15 recorded songs in 7 films.

She was a good Piano and Harmonium player. In later days in 1943 onwards, she stopped singing herself. Her last picture was Amrapali-45.

In 1946, she got married and left for England. She came back again only to die in Calcutta in 1965.

The other leading lady in the film was Bibbo, whose real name was Ishrat Sultana. Besides being an actress, she was also India’s First Woman Music Director.

Film 300 Days and after-38 was a popular film which was a comedy.

I started seeing films from almost the end of the 40’s decade. During that period, some films of the 30’s were still being shown in the Morning shows in specific theatres of Hyderabad. These theaters were known to show old films at concessional rates. The tickets started at 4 Annas, 6 annas, 8 annas and 12 annas for Balcony. So, it was affordable to me. The Morning shows used to be only on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. Invariably, I used to miss school on saturdays and see different films on Saturday and Sundays regularly. As a habit, I used to note down the seen film’s details in a notebook. I remember having seen this film in Royal Talkies in Hyderabad. This way I was lucky to see some films from the 30’s. The story of this film was….

Sudhir (Motilal) is a bachelor billionaire,doing nothing and enjoying life to the fullest with wine, women and gambling. As a result, his health starts falling prematurely when he is just 25-26 yrs only.

one day he falls down and a Doctor is called. After many tests and inspection of everything his family doctor tells him that because of his wayward living and uncontrolled lifestyle he is suffering from many ailments.If he treats them now, he may get all those again and again. The only remedy is Sudhir should do hard manual work, exercises and lead a simple living, which,the doctor says, Sudhir will never be able to do.

Sudhir is angry. He challenges the doctor that he will leave all his wealth, go out in the world, do physical work and earn money for himself. The doctor takes a bet with him and the deal is Sudhir should go out for 300 days without using a single paisa from his existing wealth for himself. Sudhir is ready for this.

Next day Sudhir goes out with a few ordinary clothes, little money and a strong will to face the big bad world.

The film is full of funny situations when Motilal gets different jobs and does not know how to do them. First he tries to work as a Vegetable vendor, but he does not know the names of any vegetable.

He even takes some fruits as vegetables,to sell. Next he tries to work as an assistant in a Barber shop, where he shaves off half the mustache of a customer. He tries to work as a car driver and a Tram ticket collector also.

Finally, he joins as a worker in a Soap factory, where he has to drive sometimes Seth’s wife -Ramola devi(Bibbo), who tries to entice him. Sudhir starts liking a typist girl in the factory Sharada(Sabita Devi). Sharada teaches music to Ramola, wife of Seth Laxmi Das. Motilal takes her everyday to the tuition. They start loving each other. Motilal stays with a kind hearted Vegetable vendor woman as a tenant. She tends to him , feeds him well and takes his care as her son.

Suddenly the Factory must close down due to some loss. All workers are worried. Motilal secretly sends his own money to Sethji as an anonymous partner. The Factory is saved.

Now in this all jumble, 300 days come to an end. Surprisingly Motilal finds himself absolutely fit, healthy and understands the meaning of true life and Love.

He goes back to the doctor to claim his bet money, which he donates to a school.

Sudhir marries Sharada and brings the kind vegetable vendor lady as his family member to live with him for ever.

Today’s song is sung by Sabita Devi.


Song- Koi geet manohar nyaara (300 days and after)(1938) Singer- Sabita Devi, Lyricist- Zia Sarhadi, MD- Anil Biswas

Lyrics

Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
nit gaaye
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare ae
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare

mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
jahaan pushp hon pyaare pyaare
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
mera ghar ho nadi kinaare
jahaan pushp hon pyaare pyaare
rahoon ban mein saanjh sakhaare
rahoon ban mein saanjh sakhaare
sun geet manohar nyaara
sun geet manohar nyaara
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
nit gaaye
nit gaaye
nit gaaye saanjh ka taara
Koi geet manohar nyaara
Koi geet manohar nyaara


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4521 Post No. : 16079 Movie Count :

4391

Today’s song is from a film which is 82 years old – Baazigar-38.

It was released just 2 years before I was born. The word Baazigar means a Juggler, Magician, an Illusionist – one who can create magic or one who has the capacity to do the unimaginable things. Perhaps, like a person who wins unexpectedly at the last minute after losing all the while, or one who turns the tables when no one expects him to do so. I have not seen this film, nor I know about its storyline, but my guess is, it must be a story of a person who was daring and changed the game in his favour when everyone thought that he would surely lose it.

There were 4 films called Baazi – made in 1951,1968,1984 and 1995 and then there were 4 films called Baazigar made in 1938, 1959, 1972 and 1993. There was even a film Baazigar-The Iron Man-2008, which was dubbed from a South Indian film.Today’s film Baazigar-38 was made by Ranjit Movietone. In the early era of the Talkie films, Ranjit was a respected big name. The spirit behind Ranjit Movietone was Chandulal Shah – who was a Baazigar himself in this film. An ordinary low level operator in the Cotton market built an empire in the film industry, like a true Baazigar, indeed !

Hindi film industry’s growth in the early years of 20s to 40s was contributed by 2 major communities. One of them was the Gujarati businessmen who immediately identified this business as the future gold mine. The other major community was the Local Marathi, who lent their brain and hard work to this industry. As the time went by, people from Punjab, U.P., Bengal and other states of India joined hands to help this industry to prosper. However, till the mid 50s it was the Gujarati Sethias who poured the finances. Financiers like Sampat Sheth, Gokuldas Pasta, Manik Sheth Patel, Chunilal Munim, Mangaldas Parekh, Abdulali Yusufali, Mohd. Ali Rangwala, Chimanlal Desai, Bhogilal Dave, Mayashanker Bhatt etc only supplied the money, but never dabbled in other departments nor did they learn anything about the film making, more than what was needed to get some profits.

One person, however, was different. CHANDULAL SHAH. He not only put crores of rupees in film making, but also learnt the technique and art of making films, direction, building organisations of producers, developing political connections and what not. He did everything that was needed to become a successful filmmaker and a leader in the industry. That is why Baburao Patel called him “Sardar”. Chandulal Shah made his company Ranjit Movietone, a force to reckon with.

Chandulal Shah belonged to Jamnagar-Gujrat. He was born on 13-4-1898. He was into the cotton trade and used to visit Bombay frequently. Later he started working in Bombay Stock Exchange. He used to visit the Laxmi films, nearby to watch shootings. On one occasion, the director of a silent film ” VIMLA “-1925 fell very sick and on the recommendation of a solicitor friend, Chandulal Shah got an opportunity to direct the balance film. Impressed by his work style he was offered 2 more films. He left the Stock Exchange job and took up the film line completely.

From Laxmi, he shifted to Kohinoor Film Company, where he met actress Gauhar Jan Mamajiwala, who became his mate for the next 50 years till he died. Gauhar used to feature in his films. With Gauhar, he did GUNSUNDARI in 1927 and in 1934 (silent and Talkie respectively).

This film was a tremendous hit and it helped them to establish their own film company, Ranjit Movies in 1929. In the next 3 year’s time they made 39 silent films. After the advent of Talkie, they changed the name of Ranjit to Ranjit Movietone. Chandulal liked to do things only kingsize. Thus he established Ranjit studios with 4 large sound stages. He also hired around 300 people in the beginning. They made ,on an average, 6 feature films every year. His studio was an assembly line production house. At a time at least 5 to 6 films were being made in his studios. He had a big army of famous Actors, Writers, technicians, directors, Music directors etc. on his payroll.

Actors like Gauhar jaan, Bilimoria, Nirupa Roy, Motilal, Madhuri, Khursheed, and K L Saigal, Music directors like Gyan Dutt, Bulo C Rani, Khemchand Prakash etc, Lyricists and writers like Kidar Sharma, Pradeep, Saadat Hasan Manto and many others were on his Payroll.

Chandulal was very proud of his empire and used to advertise ” There are more stars in Ranjit than in the sky “. At the peak time, there were about 700 people employed in Ranjit and the Government had opened a Ration shop in his studio premises for the workers’ benefit ! Khemchand Prakash did 20 films in Ranjit from 1940 to 1945, Gyan Dutt 25 films from 1937 to 1943 and Bulo C Rani did 20 films from 1943 to 1954 here.

From 1929 to 1963 Ranjit made Silent films-39, Tamil-1, Marathi-1 and Hindi Talkie films 120

Unfortunately due to a fire, except 7 talkie Hindi films, all other films were destroyed. Chandulal Shah was an active person. Besides filmmaking he took interest in many Cine Associations and also led delegations abroad. He was a keen Horse racer, better and a Gambler.

In 1944, in one day he lost ONE CRORE TWENTY FIVE LAKH rupees in cotton betting and that was the beginning of his downfall. He had to mortgage all his and Gauhar jaan’s properties, but it could not save Ranjit from ruins. He returned to Film Direction to make money and his First film after 14 years was PAAPI-1953. It had the hit pair of those times-Raj Kapoor and Nargis. For the First time Raj Kapoor did a double role, but the film flopped. Clearly the times were bad for Chandulal. All his kundali was topsy turvy !

He tried 3 more films, all failed. His last film was ‘Akeli mat jaiyo’-1963.A man who ruled an Empire started travelling in local trains and buses.

Chandulal Shah died on 25-11-1975.

The year 1938 was a year in which the film industry was trying to shed the “carried forward” load of the Silent era and make a new beginning towards a better future. Many new production houses, actors, directors and composers were in full steam and churned out films after films. major studios contributed heavily to the total films made that year. Ranjit made 5 films, New Theatres-4, Bombay Talkies-3, Mohan Pictures-6, Sagar Movietone-6, Minerva Movietone-4, Mohan Bhavnani-4, Prakash Pictures-4 etc.

In 1938, Master Bhagwan debuted as a Director with Bahadur kissan, Renuka Devi (Begum Khursheed Mirza) debuted as an actress with Bhabhi, Meenakshi Shirodkar debuted in film Bramhachari, Lalita Pawar produced a film Duniya kya hai. Surprisingly, all these 3 Heroines were married at the time of their Debut. There was a variety in film subjects – comedy, suspense, crime, social, mythological, social evils, stunts, adventure, historical, musical and various other Genres were tried in films. If one goes through the films made this year, it indicates the way the film industry was growing in its initial years.

Baazigar-38 a Costume Drama by Ranjit was directed by Manibhai Vyas- who started his career from the Silent era and became an independent Talkie director with Dukhiyari-1937. He directed 26 Talkie films. His last film was Bajrang Bali-1976. The cast of the film was Khatun, Trilok Kapoor, N M Charlie, Ila Devi, Anis, Suresh etc.etc. All the 13 songs of the film were written by P L Santoshi and Gyan Dutt provided the music.

Iladevi was a new name. Even after efforts, no information was available to me about her. From the question-answer column of the magazine Film India, I learnt that Ila Devi’s original film name was Miss Ilmas. I do not know in which religion or community, this name is used.After making her debut in Hindi films in ‘ Nishan -E- Jung ‘-1937, she changed her name to Ila Devi and acted in 6 more films. Four films in 1938 (Billi, Bazigar, Rikshawala and Gorakh Aaya) and two films in 1939 (Adhuri Kahani and Kahan hai teri manzil). After this her name is not found in any films, when I checked.

This change of name, after using one name in a film, is not unique, though,this seems to be the First such instance. I know, off hand, at least two more such instances in Film industry. Actress Ameeta (Tumsa nahi dekha fame) had used name Jaijaiwanti in her first film Thokar-1953 ( her second film kaafila -52 was released first as Ameeta,however), but she changed it to her name Ameeta from next film onwards. ( her real name was Qamar Sultana). The second example is actress Zeb Rehman who was known first as Preetibala, then she changed her name to Zeb Rehman.

There is another name ‘ Khatun ‘ in the cast. Miss Khatun Bano was born and brought up in a poor Muslim family of Lahore. As per the family tradition, she learnt dancing and singing. Once, when she was performing on stage in Lahore, the Talent hunter of Sagar movietone spotted her and she was offered a role in a Talkie film- which was a novelty in 1931. Her first film was Abul Hasan-31. Then came Subhadra haran-32, Meerabai-32, Maya Bazar-32 etc etc. In all, she acted in 59 films, till her last film Ibrat-60. She also sang 25 songs in 12 films.

Today’s song is sung by Rajkumari Dubey and Noor Mohd. Charlie, as per the uploader’s information on the You Tube. With this song film Baazigar-38 makes its Debut on this Blog.


Song-Hai koi dil lene waala (Baazigar)(1938) Singers- Rajkumari Dubey, Charlie, Lyricist-P L Santoshi, MD- Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

Haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan
kya tum dil bechti ho
haan
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna bhola
chot lage sah jaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
mera dil hai itna komal
dhoop lage murjhaaye
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
le lo jee
le lo dil mol
haan aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan

aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
aise bhole komal dil ko
dil mein band rakhoonga
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa aa
chot na lagne doongaa sajni
dhoop na lagne doongaa
kya keemat hai bol
kya keemat hai bol

dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil ka sauda dil se baalam
dil de de
dil le le
dil hai ye anmol ol
dil hai ye anmol ol
haa aan aan aan aan
hai koi dil lene waala
le lo jee
lo lo dil moi
haan aan aan aan aan


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4309 Post No. : 15583

Today’s song is from an old film Duniya kya hai-1938.

Silent films era started from 1912, when 2 silent films were made and exhibited. However, they were not feature films made completely by Indians. The cinematographer was British and the films were processed in England. Thus Dadasaheb Phalke’s totally indigenously produced feature film ‘ Raja Harshchandra’-1913 became the first fully Indian Silent film and it was hailed as the beginning of the Silent film era. In that year one more film ” Mohini Bhasmasur” was also made.

One would think that after this, the silent films were made rapidly by ambitious people. However, the fact is that it took a while to get the momentum in silent film making, for whatever and for various reasons. The following table will show the progress and the ultimate decline of silent films, after Talkie films came.

Year Silent films
1912 2
1913 2
1914 1
1915 2
1916 1
1917 5
1918 4
1919 8
1920 16
1921 45
1922 67
1923 52
1924 63
1925 87
1926 96
1927 93
1928 115
1929 146
1930 201
1931 211
1932 68
1933 42
1934 8

(information from Film Index by Hamraz ji)

Harish Raghuwanshi ji informs that the last silent film was ” Shareef Badmash”, made by Shri Ganesh film company.
Censor Certificate No. B-13975 dated 2-11-1934.

There were hundreds of actors, directors, producers, companies and allied artistes involved in making silent films. The cost of making a silent film was around 20000 rupees only. After the Talkie films started, except the actors, almost all other artistes came over to the Talkie films. However, the actors and actresses now needed a good knowledge of speaking Hindi/Urdu and a reasonable singing (for lead actors). In this test, most Anglo-Indians, Jews, European etc actresses failed miserably. Some actors like Master Vithal too had difficulties. Only a handful of the actresses survived, as they quickly learnt this language and singing. Artistes like Ruby Meyers (Sulochana), Beryl Claessen (Madhuri) and Iris Gasper (Sabita Devi) are such examples, from among others.

Some silent actors spilled over the Talkie era and survived for another 10 to 15 years- a few upto upto the 70s, like Wazir Mohammed khan, for example, ( his first Talkie was Alam Ara -31 and the last film was also Alam Ara-1973 !). As I can remember, P.Jairaj and Lalita Pawar were the notable long survivors in Talkie films, coming from the silent era. Both died 2 years apart in the years 2000 and 1998.

Today’s film Duniya Kya Hai-1938 was produced by Lalita Pawar and directed by her husband G P Pawar. The film was based on Count Leo Tolstoy’s famous novel, ” Resurrection”, published in 1900. The cast of the film was Lalita pawar, Madhav Kale, Indira Wadkar, Begum Fatma, Bipin Mehta and many others. The MDs – Annasaheb mainkar and Kikubhai Yadnik composed songs written by Munshi Aziz.

In the film industry, there were 3 people only, who were called Annasaheb. Incidentally, all were Music Directors. They were Annasaheb Mainkar
(Shankar Vinayak Mainkar), K. Datta (Datta korgaonkar) and C.Ramchandra ( Ramchandra Narhari Chitalkar). Even the prefix ” Masterji’ was used with only 3 MDs, if I remember right.

The composer of this film, Annasaheb Mainkar is not a name known to many people. Born in 1904 at Sangli, Maharashtra, he was trained in classical music at Poona,Baroda,Indore, Mysore and Lucknow. Before joining the film line, he had cut many discs of his songs.

His first film was AWARA SHEHZADA-1933.Incidentally,this was also India’s first film having a double role. Shahu Modak had done the roles of a Rajkumar and a commoner Bholaram in it. It was also the first film of Master Vithal as a Director. He himself was the first to do a double role in a silent film in 1928.

Annasaheb worked for Saraswati cinetone, Imperial, Venus, Huns, Atre and Sunrise films. He gave music to 21 Hindi films, composing 187 songs. His singers were,Master Vinayak, Vanmala, Shahu Modak, Shanta Hublikar, kalyanibai, Sarla Devi, Vatsala Kumathekar etc. His last film was Ashirwad-1943. He died young at 41 yrs.in 1944.

Kikubhai Yagnik was a small time composer from 1933 to 1938 and was not very popular. He had given music to 10 films, composing for 86 songs.

The film Heroine Lalita Pawar was one of a kind artiste. One of the major actors who succeeded in both Silent and Talkie films equally,that too for 70 active years,was LALITA PAWAR.
Today’s generation probably knows Lalita Pawar only as an actress doing crooked Mother in law’s roles only, but in her hay days she was called a ‘ SEX BOMB ‘ !
Born Ambika Laxmanrao Sagun on 18-4-1916, at Indore, her father was a rich person.She started acting very early when she was 10-12 years.Her first silent film was ‘Patitodhar’-1928.

She became a heroine soon and acted in as many as 30 silent films. In the silent and early Talkie era,she did adventurous and stunt films,just like Fearless Nadia did. Because of her boldness she did sexy and romantic roles.I have seen some of her costumes from her early films and those will match any sex-siren of today,I can guarantee !

She was a Heroine till 1942,when while shooting a scene for “Netaji Palkar”-1942, her co-star slapped her during a shot, so hard that she suffered from facial paralysis and damage to her eye.
Inspite of 3 years’ treatment she became unfit for heroine’s roles and at the age of just 25-26,she switched over to character and supporting roles.
She acted in some 7oo Hindi and Marathi films.Some of her roles like the Kelewali in Shri 420,mrs.D’sa in Anari(she won Filmfare award for this role) and Manthara in Ramayana,are quite memorable,though mainly she is known for her wicked roles.
In case of marriage,she competed with Noorjahan(4 marriages) and Meena Shorey(5 marriages).Lalita Pawar’s first husband was Hanuman More,second was G.P.Pawar,her director for stunt films.This marriage went sour when he had an affair with Lalita’s younger sister. Then she married a film producer Rajprakash Gupta, who established Ambika Studios in Bombay.

Her death was tragic. She was found dead-for 2 days-when her husband, son and daughter in law had gone to Mumbai. She was staying alone in her bungalow in Aundh, a suburb of Pune.
She died on 24-2-1998 and it was known on 26th February 1998.

I reproduce here, an obituary as appeared in a Marathi Newspaper of Pune, after her death…(Freeway translation from Marathi)

” Lalita, an actress and a gentlewoman !

Lalita Pawar, the renowned actress of yesteryear who passed away in Pune early this week, enjoyed a most chequered career on the silver screen.

In her seven decades on screen, she has played roles of all variety — from a heroine of the silent era to the squint-eyed mother-in-law of the talkies.

Born as Ambika Laxman Sagun on April 18, 1916 at village Yeole in Nashik district, she made her debut as a child artist in the film Patittodhar. Arya mahila was her first film as a teenaged heroine.

In a career spanning 72 years, she acted in more than 800 Hindi, Marathi, Gujarathi and Bhojpuri films. She was the leading lady of the silent era and, later, a character artiste till she retired from the celluoid.

Her classic silent films include Thugsen Rajputra and Chatursundari. She also tried her hand at the production of Himmat-e-marda and Duniya kya hai. But the films did not do well. Lalita acted as heroine to Baburao Pendarkar’s Netaji Palkar and Jai Malhar. An accident on the sets abruptly ended her career as a leading lady. During the shooting of Jung-e-azadi, Master Bhagwan had to slap her. Her left ear started bleeding profusely. The left part of her face was paralysed and she developed a squint in the left eye.

Talk about courage and turning what would have been a fatal blow to her career into a distinct advantage. That squint alone possibly made her into a famous woman in all her mother/mother-in-law roles.

The Bombay film industry mourned the death of this ‘actress par excellence’ and ‘fine human being’. Shammi Kapoor, with whom she worked in evergreen classics Junglee and Professor said she was a thorough professional. “It is sad that age catches up with people,” Dev Anand said, “We have losta tremendous artist.”

Jairaj, a veteran actor from the silent era, described Lalita Pawar as a capable actress who had a mind of her own. “She expressed herself very well,” he said, “We acted together in Kirtiwhich was remade as Sharda starring Raj Kapoor and Meena Kumari many years later. She also acted as the leading artiste in my home production Mohar.”

The Marathi film Sasurvashin, where Lalitha played the role of a wicked mother-in-law, earned her much popularity. In the Gujarati Mehndi rang laee, which was remade in various languages, Lalitha acted in all the remakes.

In Raj Kapoor’s Shri 420, Lalita was a banana vendor which earned her the Filmfare award. She had this to say about the film: Raj Kapoor gave her a clean and ironed Maharashtrian nine yard saree and dialogues with neat Hindi diction and accent. She told the showman she was prepared to do the role, but would rather do it her way. She improvised the dialogues into the typical Maharashtrian colloquial Hindi and got a very old and shabby saree. Accordingly, she performed the role and won rave reviews.”

The Hero was Madhav Kale. Madhav Kale was born in Nashik in 1903. After his school education at Nashik, he joined Deccan college at Poona and passed Intermediate course. He was interested in playing in dramas, which was opposed by his mother. But he used to take part in dramas while in college. He was a good singer too. Wanting to join films, he sent applications to many companies. Saroj and sharda companies responded. He acted in several silent films like Mukti sangram, kanak kesari etc. He entered the Talkie films with Vikram Charitra-32, Mera Imaan-34 and Vishnu Bhakti-34. During this period, he got married in 1934.

He acted in 21 films. His last film was Gokul ka chor-59. He even directed one film, Sacha Sapna-42. He sang 13 songs in 7 films till 1942.
There is no information about him after this.

After writing this biography of Madhav Kale, I came to know that after the films, Madhav went back to Nashik, where he was active in local politics. He became a Municipal Councillor, but lost Assembly elections, which he was very hopeful of. He died somewhere in 1980.

In the cast there is one more name Indira Wadkar. Hansa Wadkar’s father had three sisters, Kesharbai, Indirabai and Sushilabai. Sushila was married to Master Vinayak, a renowned actor-director of the early era of Indian cinema. The elder sister as well as Indira Wadkar were acting in films and Indira was a classical singer as well. Indira acted in several films including Duniya Kya Hai (Resurrection) (1937) and in Vinayak’s production company “Hans Films” like Devata (1939) in Marathi. Indira used the surname Wadkar to avoid using the family name Salgaokar, for fear of reprisal from society against women acting in films. Her older sister, Kesharbai, was working in a film made by M.G. Rangnekar and suggested that Wadkar work in films to sustain her family. She acted in 11 Hindi films. She was popular mother in law in Marathi films.

Today’s song is sung by Lalita Pawar herself. I have got it confirmed from Girdharilal Vishwakarma ji. Lalita Pawar sang 10 songs in 3 films. Today’s song is her last song in her career, as a singer.


Song-Yauwan mein rut basant aayi (Duniya Kya Hai)(1938) Singer-Lalita Pawar, Lyrics-Munshi Aziz, MD-Annasahab Mainkar

Lyrics

Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
prem badariya chhaayi
prem badariya chhaayi

priytam aawan ka sandesa
priytam aawan ka sandesa
koyal kook sunaaye

koyal kook sunaaye
sajni basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
ankhiyaan tarasen tumhre daras ko
ankhiyaan tarasen tumhre daras ko
?? kyun na bhaawe
?? kyun na bhaawe
man ko chain na aaye
man ko chain na aaye
sajani basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
Yauvan mein rut basant aayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
sajani prem badariya chhaayi
Yauvan mein rut basant


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day?: 4266 Post No.: 15492

Today’s song is from an old film Baghbaan-1938. There was one more film Baghbaan made in 2003, but the story was different. One film having similarity in name was film Baadbaan made in 1954. This too was a different one.

Baghbaan-38 was the first film of A R Kardar as a Director in Bombay, after his very successful foray in to the Calcutta Film world. This film was made by General Films, Bombay.The music was by Mushtaq Hussain, who had a young, ambitious and talented assistant for this film, whose name was Naushad. Yes, he is the same Naushad, who paired with Kardar in later years and gave us unforgettable music from many films.

The name of Music Director Mushtaq Hussain may not be known to today’s music lovers. Mushtaq was famous as a Classical singer and was called a Ustaad. He started giving music to films in 1933. His first film was Aurat ka pyar-33. He gave music to few films only, like Sauteli Maa-35, Balaa ki raat-36, Jaljalaa-36, Bhedi Trishul-38, Baghbaan-38, Pati patni-37, Kanyadaan-40, Baadal-42, Chhed chhad-43, Do or die-44, Daasi ya Maa-46 and his last film was Bombay- 49. After this, perhaps he realised that the public taste was changing and he left films. During the period of 1938, Naushad worked as his assistant in his struggle days and learnt few things.

The cast of the film was Bimla Kumari, B.Nandrekar ( one of the most handsome actors of Hindi films ), Sitara Devi, Yasmin, Putlibai, Ashraf Khan, Lala Yakub, K N Singh, R Wasti and many others. The 11 songs of the film were written by Hafiz Jallundhari and Mirza Musharraf, who wrote with a Pen name of Mirza Shauq. He had also acted in this film as a comedian. His typical style of mixing Urdu dialogues with English words was very popular in those days. Comedian of the 70s-Ram Avtar made his Debut with this film.

The film was a roaring success and brought many lucrative directorial offers to kardar from big banners like Ranjit and Circo etc. This also gave Kardar a confidence that he can himself own and start a studio and production company in Bombay. He had his pioneering small production company in Lahore, but that was for Silent films. Making Talkie films in Bombay was entirely different.

!942 was an year in which many ambitious and talented artistes established their own companies. There was Mehboob Khan, V.Shantaram, Homi Wadia, and the splinter group from Bombay Talkies also established Filmistan company. Abdul Rashid Kardar too plunged into the flowing river and established his own Kardar Studios. His first film was Sharda-42, which released on 23-1-1943. It was a Hit film. That way, Kardar’s life was full of adventures.

Abdul Rashid Kardar (1904–1989), often abbreviated as A.R. Kardar, was an actor and film director/film producer. He is credited as establishing the film industry in the Bhati Gate locality of Lahore, British India (now in Pakistan).

Kardar was born on 11-10-1904 at Lahore in a rich family. He was provided with all facilities and put into a very good school. Kardar was more interested in bunking school and seeing films and dramas than his studies. As a result he failed in his Matriculation examination. By the time he was 18 year old, he came to Bombay in 1922 to join films. He met director Homi Master in Kohinoor film company. With his good looks and good manners, he was employed as an extra, but there was no work. he used to visit the sets where shootings were taking place in the studio. One day the Cameraman Narayan Devre found him meddling in the shoot and he asked the owner Dwarkadas Sampat to throw him out of the company.

Dejected, he returned to Lahore and studied Calligraphy and Painting, in which he soon gained excellence. Kardar started as an arts scholar and a calligraphist making posters for foreign film productions and writing for newspapers of the early 1920s. His work would often lead him to meet filmmakers around India.

In 1924, the first silent film, The Daughters of Today was made and released in Lahore at a time when the city only had nine operational cinema houses. Most of the films shown in theatres in Lahore were either made in Bombay or Calcutta, besides ones made in Hollywood or London. The Daughters of Today was the brain-child of G.K. Mehta, a former officer with the North-Western Railway, who had imported a camera into the country for this very project from London. He asked Kardar to assist him as an assistant director on the project and ended up giving Kardar his début role in his film as an actor. Muhammad Ismail, his friend and fellow calligraphist, accompanied Kardar in the making of the film.

In 1928, with no work left after their maiden venture, Kardar and friend M. Ismail sold their belongings to set up a studio and production company under the name of United Players Corporation, the foundation stone for the film industry in Lahore. After scouting for locations, they settled for their offices to be established at Ravi Road. Although, the dim-lit area presented with much difficulties after the studios were established. Shootings were only possible in the day-light but nevertheless the area had some very important landmarks like the Ravi Forest and the tombs of Mughal emperor Jahangir and his wife Nur Jahan.

It is reported that the team working at the studios would commute on tangas and even lost equipment once while travelling on the bumpy roads on the horse-drawn carriage.However basic and crude their working conditions, Kardar believed in his work and in 1930 he produced the first film under the studio’s banner.

With this film, Husn Ka Daku a.k.a. Mysterious Eagle, Kardar made his first directorial début. He also cast himself as an actor in the male lead opposite Gulzar Begum with Ismail in a supporting role. The film featured an American actor, Iris Crawford, as well. The film had mild success at theatres but prominently established Lahore as a functioning film industry. Kardar vowed on not acting in any other film and instead focusing on direction.

Immediately afterwards the studio released the film Sarfarosh aka Brave Heart, with Gul Hamid playing the lead role with more or less the same cast as in the previous film. This production proved equally appealing but was able to stir noise about this industry in film production circles throughout India. Kardar made 12 silent films at Lahore.

When the Talkie era started, he closed down making silent films and produced his first Talkie film ” Heer Ranjha” in 1932 , with Rafiq Ghaznavi and Miss Anwari in the lead. Ghaznavi was the MD also. The film was a big flop.

Kardar shifted to Calcutta after this; and joined the East India Film Company, where he made about seven films for them. He acted in a costume drama-Aab E Hayat-33, as a Hero. Later he directed 6 films for this company. Almost all films were successful. After the company closed down in 1937 he moved to Bombay and joined Film City (in Tardeo) where he made one film Baaghban-38, for General Films, Bombay. It won the Gohar Gold Medal starring Bimla Kumari, B. Nandrekar and Sitara Devi.

Subsequently he joined Ranjeet Movietone towards the end of 1937 and made only three movies with them. He also made film Pooja-40 for National Studios. From here he moved to Circo Productions Ltd., and made 2 films for them .But just one year later, in 1942, when Circo Productions Ltd. went into liquidation, Kardar bought out the company and started Kardar Productions. In the same compound, he also started Kardar Studios and started making movies under the Kardar Productions banner from 1942 onwards. His first film was Sharda-42, which released on 23-1-1943. Kardar Studios was one of the best equipped studios in those days and also the first to have air-conditioned make up rooms.

In 1946, Kardar gave a commercially successful film with K. L. Saigal and composer Naushad, Shahjehan (1946).Claimed as a “masterpiece”- the film songs became all hits.

Following Partition in 1947, A. R. Kardar and his co-brother Mehboob Khan both left for Pakistan. However, according to Bunny Reuben, as quoted by Mihir Bose, they returned to India, but no reason was given for their return. In this connection Journalist and author of several books, Ambarish Mishra writes, ” when I asked Kardar about his Pakistan visit, he told me that after the Partition, Mehboob immediately went to Pakistan. He was disturbed with the news of Hindu-Muslim conflicts in Bombay Film Industry. It was said that Hindus will not allow Muslims in film industry – which was totally wrong and only a rumour. He wanted to take an idea about his future in this new country. He was keen on settling there. After a month or so, I went there. Being from Lahore, I understood that the film conditions were not conducive for our growth there, as nothing was in order. Everything was in a mess there. I convinced Mehboob somehow and we both came back for good. I told him, as long as Nehru was there, they had no problems in India.” By coincidence, Nehru died and next day Mehboob also died !

Kardar went back to film making and directed Dard (1947), which starred Suraiya and had music by Naushad. Dillagi (1949), a romantic tragedy, was a commercial success at the box-office. Inspired by Wuthering Heights (1939), Kardar later used the plot in Dil Diya Dard Liya (1966). Dillagi’s music by Naushad became extremely popular, especially Suraiya’s song “Tu Mera Chand”. Dulari (1949) had equally popular music, with a memorable Mohammed Rafi song “Suhani Raat Dhal Chuki”.

Dastan (1950) a tragic melodrama, was inspired from the film Enchantment, and was cited as “one of the biggest commercial hits”. Jadoo (1951) and Deewana (1952) marked the parting of ways between Kardar and Naushad. Dil-E-Nadaan (1953) had popular music by Ghulam Mohammed. He made three more films before starting Dil Diya Dard Liya (1966), which again had music by Naushad. Kardar’s last film was Mere Sartaj (1975)

He introduced many artists to the Hindi film industry who went on to become renowned in their own right, such as Naushad, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Suraiya. The legendary singer Mohammad Rafi got his first hit from the song, ‘Suhani raat dhal chuki’ – from Kardar’s film Dulari. He also started the Kardar-Kolynos Contest, to find new talent and through this contest he discovered and introduced to the industry, Chand Usmani and Mahendra Kapoor.

kardar was popularly called as Miyan ji. He directed in all 37 films in his career. He had acted in one film Aab E Hayat-1933.

Mehboob Khan’s wife Sardar Akhtar was the sister of Bahar, Kardar’s wife. Kardar was the step-brother of Pakistan’s famous cricketer A. H. Kardar (Abdul Hafeez Kardar). Kardar’s marriage to Bahar has an interesting story.

Sardar Akhtar and Bahar were sisters and were singers and dancers in Lahore’s famous Heera Mandi. They were known as Daari and Beharo. Bahar was very good looking. Kardar selected her as a Heroine for his film, opposite himself as a Hero and the shooting started. Kardar fell in her love, but Bahar was guarded closely by her escorts and sister Sardar Akhtar. Kardar was wondering how to go about. He opened his mind to friend M.Ismail. a 6 feet tall,and hefty friend. Ismail went to Bahar’s residence and lifted her on shoulders and brought her to Kardar. They hurriedly got married. Meanwhile Sardar Akhtar came to know this and made a Police complaint. The police came , arrested kardar and all shooting artistes. He spent 2 days in Police custody. Then it was Bahar herself who gave in writing that she was an adult and she married Kardar by her consent only. Kardar and others were released then. Few years later Sardar Akhtar married Mehboob Khan and Kardar became his Co-brother.

Kardar, who lived in Marine Drive, died at the age of 85 years, on 22 November 1989, in Mumbai, Maharashtra.

Kardar supported and helped composer Naushad in his struggling times. Naushad was in a contract with Kardar studio, even when he had become famous, but he never left Kardar on his own. Kardar also took advantage of Naushad. Kardar also helped directors S U Sunny and M Sadiq. Sunny was working as a gatekeeper in Maadan Theatres of Calcutta. That time Kardar took him as an assistant. M.Sadiq’s father was a Tailor and he was looking after Kardar Studio’s costume department. He requested that his son may be taken by Kardar. kardar took him also. Both were initially paid Rs. 300/-. Slowly it became Rs.3000/- and then they learnt the art of direction and became independent.

Film Baghbaan (Gardener, Maali) was slated to be released on 16-7-1938, but just one week prior to its release date , Prabhat Film Company filed a case against film’s hero B Nandrekar and applied for a stay on film’s release. B Nandrekar aka Baba Saheb Nandrekar had acted in Prabhat’s famous film “Sant Tukaram-36″ (Marathi Version. Its Hindi version came only in 1948). That time Prabhat had signed a 3 year contract with him. But after Tukaram, Nandrekar was not given any film, so he acted in film Baghbaan. The case came up in the court on 13-7-1938. His advocates were Jinnah and Setalwad. He won the case and the court refused to give a stay. The case was summarily dismissed. The film released and became a Hit film. Nandrekar was a very popular actor. The chappals he used in film Baghbaan became famous as ” Nandrekar Chappals” and sold hundreds in market.

The story of film Baghbaan -38 was…..

SARUP (Nandrekar) is a disciple of Sadhu Bhagat Ram(Ashraf Khan). One day the Sadhu starts singing a devotional love song, but Sarup, without understanding its real meaning gets lost in thoughts of love. Seeing his condition, the Sadhu sends him to a janmashtami fair. In the fair also Sarup walks thinking about love, not knowing where he is going or what he is doing. The police suspect him, arrest him and he is sent to jail.

In the jail, Sarup is given the gardener’s job at the Superintendent’s bungalow. In one jail riot, he is injured. Seeing this,Durga ( Bimla Kumari),the jail Superintendent’s daughter, along with her friend Shanta(Sitara Devi) takes Sarup inside the house and Dr. Hansraj, father of Shanta is called. On arrival Dr. Hansraj suspects that Sarup is his long lost son, feared drowned, after marriage to Durga. Since then Durga is treated as a widow, but no one knows this. Durga takes care of Sarup, who is now a free man also. Slowly they develop love. The parents of Durga want to remarry Durga to somebody now. Ranjit (Yakub),a spent young man, wants to marry Durga. he spreads the news that Durga is a widow, so that no one will marry her.

As expected his marriage is fixed with Durga, much to the ire of his earlier lover kammo (Yasmin). Durga asks Sarup to go back. Sarup comes to Sadhu Bhagat Ram and tells everything. The Sadhu reveals that actually Sarup is Durga’s long last Husband and son of Dr. Hansraj.

They hurry up to Durga’s house, where the marriage ceremony has started. The Sadhu enters the mandap and utters Bollywood’s famous Dialogue- ” Yeh shaadi nahin ho sakti “. There is a great commotion. Then the Sadhu explains that Sarup is the long lost husband of Durga. As a proof, he produces the locket which Sarup had in his childhood.

Suddenly Kammo enters the mandap and shoots at Ranjit, killing him. She then kills herself also.

The long lost Husband and wife reunite and all are happy !

Today’s song is the 3rd song from this film to appear on this Blog. It is sung by Sitara Devi and Bimla Kumari.

(For this article, information has been culled from ” Music and arts in Hyderabad Deccan”-Kamlakar pasupuleti, ” Ateet ke Sitare’-Nand kishore, “सुंदर ती दुसरी दुनिया ” – Ambarish Mishra, ” Asli nakli chehere’ – Vithal Pandya, wiki, muVyz, HFGK, Film India-Sept-40 issue and my notes. Thanks to all)


Song-Aao mil jul ke (Baaghbaan)(1938) Singers-Sitara Devi, Bimla Kumari, Lyricist- Not mentioned in HFGK, MD- Mushtaq Hussain (Asst-Naushad )

Lyrics

Aao gale mil ke
Aao gale mil ke
jhoolen
padat phuhaar sajani ee ee
ae aao mil jul ke
aao mil jul ke
lotten fasle bahaar sajani ee ee
ae aao mil jul ke ae
aao mil jul ke

rut barsaat ki
rut barsaat ki re
rut barsaat ki
aayi ?? malhaar sajani
ae ae
kaali kaali badali ye
kaali kaali badali
chaaayi man mein ?? sajani
piya bina naahin re
piya bina naahin

?? zulfon ka ?? sajani
ae ae
piyaa binaa naahin te
piyaa bina naahin

jiya lalchaave
jiya lalchaave ae
jiya lalchaave ae
jiya lalchaave ae
jiya lalchaave
ke jiya lalchaave
?? charan piya sajani
ae ae
jiya lalchaave te
jiya lalchaave

man mandir mein ae
man mandir mein ae
man mandir mein ae
man mandir mein ae
man mandir mein
ke man mandir mein
aao karo upkaar sajani
ae ae
aao gale mil ke
aao gale mil ke
jhoole padat phuhaar sajani
ae ae
aao mil jul ke te
aao mil jul ke
looten fasl e bahaar sajani
ae ae
aao mil jul ke
aao mil jul ke


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4258 Post No. : 15479 Movie Count :

4267

Today’s song is from a relatively unknown or rather less known film ‘Vasanti’ (1938). The film was made by Minerva Movietone. The film was given to a novice for direction – KM Multani. He was with Sohrab Modi since his drama days and worked as a cinematographer for Modi’s first two films made by his Stage Films Company. After this first film, Multani also directed 4 more films, namely ‘Virginia’ (1940), ‘Vaseeyat’ (190,) ‘Ujala’ (1942) and ‘Umang’ (1944).

‘Vasanti’ had a pair of music directors. They were Govindrao Tembe and Meer Sahab. Meer Sahab joined Minerva in 1937 and gave music to its first film ‘Atma Tarang’ (1937). Though this film was a flop, he was continued to give music to few more Minerva films like ‘Vasant’, ‘Jailor’ and ‘Divorce’ in 1938, ‘Pukar’ (1939), ‘Main Haari’ (1940), ‘Sikandar’ (1941), ‘Phir Milenge’ (1942). ‘Patharon Ka Saudagar’ (1944) and ‘Lal Haveli’ (1944). either solely or with other MDs.

When Meer Sahab was giving music to an outside film ‘Bahadur Kisan’ (1938), his assistant was C Ramchandra during this period. He became very friendly with Master Bhagwan who was film’s director, hero and a singer too. Meer Sahab was an expert in classical music, but he used to forget tunes. That is why he was best when working with some other MD. In film ‘Vasanti’, his co-MD was Govindrao Tembe. Govind Sadashiv Tembe, popularly known as Govindrao Tembe (5 June 1881 – 9 October 1955), was a harmonium player, stage actor, and music composer. He grew up in Kolhapur and became attached to music early in life. He was largely self-taught as a harmonium player. He has acknowledged the debt of Deval Club for his initial forays into Hindustani classical music.

Tembe learnt his art from Bhaskarbuwa Bakhale and, although he never received direct guidance from Alladiya Khan of Jaipur Gharana, Tembe considered Khansaheb as his guru. He used to accompany Pt. Bhaskarbuwa Bakhale, and would also often perform solo, but later gave up harmonium for most part of his career. He composed music for the drama ‘Maan Apmaan’ in 1910, and also for the first Marathi talkie ‘Ayodhyecha Raja’ (1932). He also acted in both these productions.

He was a personal friend of Late Yuvaraja of Mysore, HH Sri Kanteerava Narasimha Raja Wadiyar. Prof Tembe was part of a large entourage of Yuvaraja during his trip to Europe in 1939. The troupe performed before the Pope and at other places during this trip. As World War II broke out, they stayed at London for a long time and ultimately returned in Jan 1940. Yuvaraja died soon after, at his Palace Anchorage (next to Hotel Taj) in March 1940 and Prof Tembe lost his patron.

Prof Tembe was part-owner of Gandharva Natak Mandali when it was formed in 1913. Two years later, he started his own company named Shivraj Natak Mandali. He wrote dramas and also the padas (songs) in them.

While in film industry, he dabbled in many departments. He was fond of acting. He acted in 6 films, namely ‘Maya Machhindra’ (1932), ‘Ayodhya Ka Raja’ (1932), ‘Seeta’ (1934), ‘Usha’ (1935), ‘Nand Kumar’ (1938) and ‘Krishna Sudama’ (1945). He sang 15 songs in his first 4 films, where he had acted. He directed one film – ‘Raj Mukut’ (1935) and he was a MD in 12 films, from ‘Ayodhya Ka Raja’ (1932) to ‘Saathi’ (1938).

Govindrao’s death was in a strange circumstance. His friend, VH Deshpande has written about it in an article, I found on http://www.parrikar.org, as follows.

Govindrao’s death was unexpected. Of late, he had taken considerable interest in the work of the Central Audition Board of All India Radio. He had gone to Delhi in connection with the work of this Board and suffered a heart attack on 29th September, 1955. Dr. Sumati Mutatkar conveyed the news to the Minister in charge of Information and Broadcasting Dr. B.V. Keskar and Shri P.M. Lad, I.C.S., who took keen personal interest and had Govindrao removed to Wellington Nursing Home. They also arranged for a thorough medical check-up and treatment by expert doctors.

It was felt that somebody from Govindrao’s family should go over to Delhi and stay with him. Shri P.M. Lad, Secretary to Government in the Department of Information and Broadcasting, wrote to Govindrao’s eldest son, Pilunana and called him to Delhi. For the first few days Govindrao was unable to move his hands and feet. But soon he rallied round and was well enough to send a telegram home saying – “I am feeling better. The A.I.R. officers have made excellent arrangements for my treatment. There is, therefore, no need for anybody from the family to come here. There is absolutely no cause for anxiety.”

In the meantime his youngest son, Bhaurao and his eldest daughter-in-law, Indirabai, had left Kolhapur for Delhi; but having seen (at Pune) the reassuring telegram from Govindrao they returned home. Fearing that the telegram might not have reached Kolhapur and that Bhaurao might have started for Delhi, Govindrao pressed Pilunana to go to the Delhi Railway Station to fetch him. Pilunana left the Nursing Home for the station. At 5.35 p.m. Govindrao suffered a heart attack apparently caused by a coughing fit which brought his life to an end in a matter of seconds. When Pilunana returned from the station at 7 p.m. he found that his father had passed away.

Officers of the All India Radio rushed to the hospital on hearing the news. Dr. Keskar too came to pay his respects to the departed soul. He gave
instructions to his officers in regard to the funeral. During this terminal illness of Govindrao, Dr. Keskar, Shri P.M. Lad and Dr. Sumati Mutatkar had
paid personal attention to Govindrao’s treatment and made every effort to make his stay at the hospital as comfortable as possible. They all felt a sense of guilt for the tragedy since it was in response to their invitation that Govindrao had gone to Delhi. “

Minerva Movietone was one of the major and famous film companies. Its initial films were very purposeful and tackled social evils like divorce, alcoholism and incest etc. Minerva was also famous for its grand historical movies and the solid dialogues delivered by Sohrab Modi. All this success did not come to him easily. He learnt through bitter lessons.

In the 30’s, when the talkie films started, there were about 9 big, famous and trend setting film companies. Most companies had graduated to talkie status after they made silent films. Only Bombay Talkies and Minerva Movietone started after talkie films had established a foothold. Let us see when these companies started their film making.

Company Year started
Madon Theatres 1919
Imperial 1926
Ranjit 1929
Prabhat 1929
Sagar 1929
New Theatres 1931
Wadia Movietone 1931
Bombay Talkies 1933
Minerva Movietone 1936

From this chart, it is clear that Minerva was the youngest of all these companies. Modi brothers had started a company called Stage Films Co. in 1935, which shot 2 films from a running stage drama. They were ‘Hamlet’ (1935) and ‘Saeed e Hawas’ (1936). Both were flops. Minerva Movietone was started by Sohrab and brother Rustom Modi in 1936, when they realised that the stage dramas, filmed as feature films did not get the public approval. Production from Stage Films- their first film production enterprise- was suspended till Minerva became successful. ‘Aatma Tarang’ (1937) was the new company’s first film. C Ramchandra was the harmonium accompanist for MD Habib Khan and Bundu Khan. He also did a small role in ‘Aatma Tarang’ and earlier ‘Saeed e Havas’ (1936). Minerva’s first film proved to be a let down.

Sohrab found that there were hardly 20 to 30 persons in the audience on the very first show. The film was based on the power of ‘Bramhacharya’ (Celibacy). In those days, Sohrab was greatly influenced by the teachings of Ramkrishna Mission. Seeing the poor response, he was upset. Thoughts of quitting the film production line were crowding in his mind. Suddenly, he saw four men coming towards him. They came, confirmed that he was Sohrab modi and told him that his film was very good. They further advised him to keep making such good films and one day he will be on top. Later on he learnt that these gentlemen were the Judges of Bombay High Court.

This gave lot of motivation to Modi. It also boosted his self confidence. As such he was sure of his success in films, but now he knew that he must make films on subjects of interest of the public and not his own philosophy, if he wants to succeed commercially. His second film was ‘Khan Bahadur’ (1937), based on the bravery and generosity of a Muslim king who became famous for his bravery. The English rulers gave him the title of Khan Bahadur. The film did a reasonable business.

This incident infused him with new hopes and enthusiasm. This changed his life. Initially he focused on making films on social evils like drinking (‘Meetha Zehar’ (1938)), husband-wife separation (‘Divorce’ (1938)) and incest (‘Bharosa’ (1940)). Enthused with this experience, he made successful films and took his company to the top. Renowned for big budget historical films, Minerva benefited from Modi family’s distribution interests in Gwalior, expanded by his third brother Keki Modi into western India. At one time he controlled a chain of 27 theatres in 10 cities. In 1952, they established India’s first Technicolour Laboratory.

In those days, every film company had its own committed audience. In addition, the language used in every studio’s films had a special touch e.g. Prabhat film language (i.e. dialogues and song lyrics) had a Poona Marathi influence, Ranjit films were Gujarati oriented and New Theatre’s language was ‘Bhoyankor and Bhishon’ – all words were rounded. Bombay Talkies brought in a day to day simple Hindi language. Minerva used Urdu and Farsi influenced words and pronunciations. It suited the long and forceful dialogues of Modi in his historical movies.

The cast of film ‘Vasanti’ was Naseem Banu, Navin Yagnik, Putli, Kusum, Sadiq Ali, Jamshed ji, Ghulam Hussain and many more. Something about the unusual name in the cast – Jamshed ji. His full name was Jamshed ji Bairam ji Khan Saheb. In some films, he was credited as Khan Saheb also. He was born in Bombay in 1889 as a typical Parsee. He was one of the oldest and most experienced actors having worked with several directors and over 25 years of acting.

He started with Silent films like ‘Pyaari Mamta’, ‘Madhuri’, ‘Sohni Mahiwal’, ‘Pooran Bhagat’, ‘Gulshan e Arab’, ‘Hoor e Baghdad’ and ‘Indira’. His first talkie film was ‘Daulat Ka Nasha’ (1931) and ‘Noorjahan’ (1931). He acted in about 50 films. His last known film was ‘Andaz’ (1949).

Jamshed ji, also gave music to 3 films- ‘Naya Zamana’ (1935), ‘Zaate Shareef’ (1936) and ‘Jagat Kesari’ (1937).

Hero of film ‘Vasanti’ was Navin Yagnik. Navin was a well known stunt film actor who did social films also with the same ease. Navin was born in Calcutta on 3-10- 1912. His father was from UP and mother from Bengal. During school days, he was more interested in sports, dramas and oratory. He did not complete his Matriculation, but ran away to Bombay, to become an actor-against the wishes of his family. He joined Sagar Films in 1930, as an extra, without salary. After few months he got Rs. 35 pm, but no credited roles. After a year or so, he left Sagar and joined Mohan Bhavnani’s Ajanta Film company. He first worked in film ‘The Mill ‘ (1934). Unfortunately, this film was banned for 2 years. The film was based on a story by Munshi Premchand and depicted the poor conditions of mill workers in Bombay. The Mill Owners’ Association brought pressure on Government and got the film banned. After 2 years, the film was released as ‘Ghareeb Parvar’ (1936) aka ‘Daya Ki Devi’. Two more films and Navin became hero in film ‘Pyar Ki Maar’ (1935).

In her autobiography, actress Hansa Wadkar says,”My hero in this film was one Navin Yagnik, a handsome boy from UP. He was very shy and after the shootings, he would quietly sit in one corner reading something. He never joined our drink parties, nor he participated in any other group activity. I was attracted towards him but he gave no response. He sent me invitation card of his marriage, when it was fixed.”

He also worked in Minerva Movietone, Prakash pictures, Filmistan and other good banners. Some of his well known films were, ‘Zambo-The ape Man’ (1937), ‘Meri Bhool’ (1937), ‘Divorce’ (1938), ‘Vasanti’ (1938), ‘Son of Zambo’ (1939), ‘Main Haari’ (1940), ‘Vasantsena’ (1942), ‘Raja Rani’ (1942), ‘School Master’ (1943), ‘Prithvi Vallabh’ (1943), ‘Chal Chal Re Naujawan’ (1944) etc. His last recorded film was ‘Bhagwat Mahima’ (1955). In all, he worked in 30 films.

Navin Yagnik died on 28-10-1977.

Today’s song is probably composed by Govindrao Tembe, but HFGK does not credit any song to individual MD in the duo. With this song, film ‘Vasanti’ makes its debut on this Blog.


Song – Roop Anoop Wahi Hai Sajani (Vasanti) (1938) Singer – Naseem Banu, Lyricist – Abdul Baqi, MD – Govindrao Tembe and Meer Saheb

Lyrics

roop anoop vahi hai sajani
roop anoop vahi hai sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave sajani
roop anoop wahi hai sajani
roop anoop wahi hai sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave

prem mein mann aisa kho jaawe
prem mein mann aisa kho jaawe
apna dhyaan na aawe ree sajni
apna dhyaan na aawe ree sajni
sab sudh budh bisraawe sajni
sab sudh budh bisraawe

yaad mein jeewan unke bita doon
yaad mein jeewan
aa aa aa aa aa
yaad mein jeewan unke bita doon
prem ki aag suhaave sajani
prem ki aag suhaave sajani
prem mein mann sukh paave sajani
prem mein mann sukh paave sajani
roop anoop wahi hai sajani
roop anoop wahi hai sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo preetam ko bhaave ri sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave sajani
jo saajan ko lubhaave

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————

रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे सजनी
रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे

प्रेम में मन ऐसा खो जावे
प्रेम में मन ऐसा खो जावे
अपना ध्यान ना आवे सजनी
अपना ध्यान ना आवे सजनी
सब सुध बुध बिसरावे सजनी
सब सुध बुध बिसरावे

याद में जीवन उनके बिता दूँ
याद में जीवन
आ आ आ आ आ
याद में जीवन उनके बिता दूँ
प्रेम की आग सुहावे सजनी
प्रेम की आग सुहावे सजनी
प्रेम में मन सुख पावे सजनी
प्रेम में मन सुख पावे सजनी
रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
रूप अनूप वही है सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो प्रीतम को भावे री सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे सजनी
जो साजन को लुभावे


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4038 Post No. : 15162 Movie Count :

4165

Today’s song is from film Talwar ka Dhani-1938. It is a very rare song. The film was made by Vishnu Cinetone and the director was its owner Dhirubhai Desai, who became well known for C grade action / stunt and costume films, later on. The MD for this film was Kikubhai Yagnik. The lyricist was Pt. Gauri shankar lal ‘ Akhtar ‘. The cast of the film was, Anil kumar, Putli, Shaikh, Gulab, Anwari, Moosa Pehelwan, Urmila, Meher Sultana and others. There were 8 songs in the film, Names of Anil kumar, Meher Sultana and Urmila are given for 4 songs. The balance 4 songs remain uncredited in HFGK.

20 years later, there was another film with the same title, Talwar ka Dhani, featuring Manhar Desai, Nadira etc etc. This too was a stunt/Costume film like its earlier version.I remember having read in one interview of Dwarka Khosla, Director of the latter film, that this was a only a remake of the earlier film of the same name. No wonder, because many films were remade from old films of early era. One example I remember off hand is that of film Gunsundari. Original silent film Gunsundari – 27, was remade as Talkie Gunsundari in 1934.The Heroine was same-Gauhar Mamajiwala. Both films were directed by Sardar Chandulal Shah. 14 years later, Chandulal Shah’s nephew Ratilal Punatar made Gunsundari in 1948, with Nirupa Roy in the lead role. The story was same in all 3 versions.

The story of Talwar ka Dhani was woven around a routine, commonly used story of a lone queen, her abandoned son, ambitious and cruel Head of Army, desirous of usrping the throne and how the lost son defeats the Army chief and gives relief to the kingdom’s subjects- while reuniting with the Queen Mother. A love story was also inter woven.

The Hero of the 1938 film, Talwar ka Dhani was Anil kumar. This name is obscure and there is no chance that our readers will know anything about this actor of the 30s and 40s films.His real name was not Anil Kumar, but it was Sardar Gul. He was a Muslim.During the era of Silent films and Talkie films of the early years, it was a trend to take on a Hindu name for films. Whether the actor was Jew, Anglo-Indian, European or a Muslim, a Male or a Female, an actor or a singer, this trend was predominant. Of course, not all artistes changed their names- some continued with their real names, but made them shorter, like Majid, Masood, Rehman etc.

Most name changes were found in actresses. Some examples are Sabita Devi (Irene Gasper), Feroza (Susal Soloman), Indira Devi (Effie Hippolet), Lalita Devi (Bonnie Bird), Pramila (Esther Abraham), Sulochana (Ruby Myers), Seeta Devi (Renee Smith), Madhuri (Berryl Classen), Manorama (Winnie Stewart), Nadira (Florence Ezekiel), Meera (Muriel Alexander), Mohna (Mona Cabral), Kammo (Kamarjehan), Shyama (khurshid Akhtar), Purnima (Meher Bano), Indurani (Ishrat jehan), Ameeta (Qamal Sultana) etc etc.

Some examples of Males- Dilip kumar (Yusouf Khan), Kumar (Syed Ali Hasan Zaidi), Jagdeep (Syed Ishtiaq Ahmed), Ajit (Hamid Ali) etc etc.

Actor Anil Kumar (Sardar Gul) was born in 1915 at Calcutta.His father had a fruit business. They were from Peshawar (just like Dilip Kumar). He was not much educated but could speak Hindi, Urdu and English fluently. Once he went to Bombay to meet a friend. There he met an old acquaintance, who took him to Sohrab Modi.

The good looking Sardar Gul was liked by Modi and he offered him the lead role in his film ‘ Saed E Havas’-36. Sardar Gul was given a screen name of Chandra Kumar. The film was based on a translation of William Shakespeare’s drama- King John, by Agha Hashra Kashmiri in 1907. Sardar Gul was to get Rs. 200 for this work. The film was a flop and Sohrab Modi refused to pay him more that Rs 50. Annoyed, he left Bombay and returned to Calcutta.

However he came back in 1938 and did his first film with a new screen name Anil Kumar. The film was Talwar ka Dhani-38. Soon he was well known and acted in 10 films in next 3 years. As the decade of the 40s saw many new actors, producers and directors, he was reduced to Character roles and side roles. By 1950, he was almost like an extra. He did work in many films, but only few films credited him, as his roles were negligible. We find his name in just 30 films, where he was credited, the last such film being Tarzan and Deliailah-64.

The Heroine of this film was Putli or Putlibai. She was from a Bohra Muslim family of Delhi – originally from Kutch, Gujarat. She started her career by acting in stage dramas, duly shifting to Silent films. She did 23 silent films. She was the mother of Gauhar Mamajiwala- wife of Sardar Chandulal Shah. She entered Talkie films and did 26 films. Some of her films were, Raj Tarang-35, Matwali Jogan, Jungle ka Jawan-38, Farzand E Watan-39, Civil marriage-40, Mere Saajan-41, Inkaar-43, Reporter-46 etc. Her last film was Chunnu Munnu-49.

As I have stated many times, it is very difficult to get information about old time artistes and it entails lot of hard work. From the HFGK, we can get their Filmography easily.

In the cast, you will find a name Urmila- in some films she is named as Urmila Devi, and Urmila Gupta also. She was not a very good looking actress, but she compensated it with her good acting. Urmila Gupta was born in 1921 at Panja Sahib, Rawalpindi district of United Punjab. Her father, who was a Civil Contractor, died when she was only 5 year old. She did not get much education but could read and write as well as talk fluently, Urdu, Hindi and English.

She started her career with a small uncredited role in film Mirza Sahiban-33. She was the younger sister of Mirza in this film. After some more small roles, she got her major role in film Aasuon ki Duniya-36. After this, she did not look back and did Punjab Lancers-37, Talwar ka Dhani-38, Kahan hai manzil Teri-39, Hurricane special-39, Flying Ranee-39, Desh Bhakt-40, Sasural-41, Sajjan-41, Mere Sajan-41, Naari-42, Das Baje-42, Call of youth-42, Badal -42, Apna Paraya-42, Tamasha-42, Kirti-42, Salma-43, Bansari-43 etc etc. Urmila got married to Vinod Talwar, a businessman and stopped working in films, for some time, may be for raising a family. She resumed working in films and acted in another 20 odd films till 1952. She had sung 12 songs. In all, she worked in about 55 films.

Today’s song is a rare song and it appears on You Tube for the first time,kindly uploaded by our Sadanand Kamath ji. I thank him for this. With this song both, singer Meher Sultana and the film Talwar ka Dhani-38 will make a Debut on the Blog. The Lyricist, Pt. Gauri Shankar Lal ‘ Akhtar’ was a well known writer in Hindi and Urdu. Some of his Urdu books are available.

(some information used in this post is courtesy Isuru Udayanga Kariyavasam, Sri Lanka- presently in UK, and from the All India film Directory-46, Statistics are from MuVyz and CITWF. My notes are also used herein).


Song- Chakho prem ka maakhan aay (Talwaar Ka Dhani)(1938) Singer- Meher Sultana, Lyricist- Pt. Gauri Shankar Lal ‘Akhtar’ , MD- Kikubhai Yagnik

Lyrics

??
Chakho prem ka makhan aay
prem prem chhalkaay
maakhan sundar
prem bhi sundar
maakhan sundar
prem bhi sundar
man sundar tarsaaye

sundar man ??
mohan sundar aa man mandir
mohan sundar aa man mandir
?? ter suna
bhavsaagar se tar jaa
chakho prem ka maakhan aay
prem prem chhalkaaye

daras dikha ke
?? chura ke
daras dikha ke
?? chura ke
aaye aaye phir jaaye
aaye aaye phir jaaye
natkhat natwar neha lagaa ke
natkhat natwar neha lagaa ke
darshan ko tarsaaye
sakhi kaun un ko samjhaaye
chakho prem ka maakhan aay
prem prem chhalkaaye
chhalkaaye


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

3969 Post No. : 15053 Movie Count :

4130

Today’s song is from a film of the first decade of the Talkie, ” Yangrilla “-1938. The song is sung by Sarla. No information is available about this singer. The cast of the film was Enakshi Rama Rau, Nayampalli, David, Gyani, Saalu, Shareefa, S L Puri, Fatty Prasad and few others.

It is generally said that in the early era, most actors and actresses came from poor families and most artistes had no or had negligible education. While it is true to a great extent, it is not 100% true. It is not that even in this period, there were no educated persons in the film industry. Right from the beginning of the Silent era to Talkie film era up to the end of the 40s decade, there were actors, actresses, directors,producers and musicians who were quite educated. Some of them had even been trained in western countries.

Take the case of Himanshu Rai and Devika Rani and their team of writer like Niranjan Pal, from the silent era. They were all highly educated and from rich. cultured families. Niranjan Pal was the son of the Freedom fighter Bipin chnadra Pal. B.N.Sircar is another example. Director Nanubhai Vakil was actually an advocate with B.A. LL.B degree. Surendra was BA, LL.B. Motilal was a graduate, so were Ramchandra Thakur, Nandlal Jaswantlal, Jayant Desai, Jairaj, Umakant Desai. Ashok kumar, Dev Anand and his 2 brothers etc.

Among actresses, Leela Chitnis, Shanta Apte, Durga Khote, Renuka Devi were graduates. Vanmala was BA,BT. Kamini Kaushal was BA. The point here is, there were educated and people with respectable family background were also a part of film industry. But of course, initially their number was smaller compared to others who were either illiterate or less educated. For example, the beautiful Meena Shorey and Sitara Kanpuri could not even sign- leave alone reading and writing !. That is why, they were cheated in their contracts by Sohrab Modi and W.Z.Ahmed ( of Shalimar Pictures and husband of actress Neena).

In today’s film, Yangrilla-38, the Hero, Heroine and the Director were all highly educated. The Heroine, Enakshi Rama Rao was the daughter of an ICS officer of Madras Presidency. She came to England for her graduation. After graduation, she took part in some stage dramas, where she got introduced to Niranjan Pal and Himanshu Rai. When Himanshu Rai decided to make a silent film on Tajmahal story, he asked Niranjan Pal to write the film story. Sita Devi aka Renee Smith was selected for the Vamp’s role and Enakshi was selected for the main role of Selima ( who was later named Mumtaj Mahal by Prince Khurram- who was later known as Shahjehan.). The film was named Shiraz.

Enakshi is a very unusual name. Comparatively, Meenakshi is a well known name. Meenakshi means ” one with eyes like Fish “. Enakshi means ” one with the eyes of Doe or Deer”. In other words, Enakshi means Mrignayani. Except name of this actress, I have never ever come across this name (Enakshi) in my life elsewhere !

Her work in film Shiraz was applauded in England, Germany and India. When she returned to India, She met Bhavnani, who made a silent film Vasantsena-31, with her in the lead role. More than as an actress of Silent and Talkie films, Enakshi’s name was known in Elite circles for different achievements, after she stopped working in films.

Not many of us know that Meenakshi Bhavnani ( Enakshi Rama Rao before her marriage ) has done an enormous service to expose Indian dances and Designs to West. No lesser is her contribution to expose Kashmir Crafts and Designs ( Fabric , Wood and Papier Mache ) to west. An American Tourist told in Kerala recently about her detailed work on Kashmir Designs ( shawls , Jackets ).This side of Meenakshi’s personality and work is in addition to her contribution as a Dancer, photographer and actress .Two scholarly Books written by Meenakshi Bhavnani were also published. Both the books are preserved in American Museum of Natural History.These are ..

(1) Folk And Tribal Designs of India
(2) The Dance of India: The Origin and History Foundation, Art and Science of the Dance in India .

This exceptionally talented woman stayed in Kashmir for sometime in 1950 and met cross section of people connected with Arts and Crafts . She had been a visitor thereafter as well . She also visited Leh and kargil for her Book. During this period she also clicked some photographs in Kashmir portraying its rich culture and scenic beauty.She also shot a Documentary “ VALEY OF KASHMIR “ during this period..
Meenakshi was an active member of the Crafts Council of India, which was founded in 1964 to support artisans and keep their crafts relevant and marketable amid rapidly changing economies at home and abroad.
The Photographs clicked by her have also appeared in National Geographic Magazine especially her series.
And in her book on folk dances of India , Meenakshi covers all forms of Kashmirian folk dances .

Enakshi married film maker Mohan Bhavnani ( 1903-1962 ) who was trained in Germany and Hollywood. She was a dancer , Actor , Photographer and writer on Arts , Crafts and culture. From 1929 to 1938, She acted in six films as a leading lady . Out of these six films five ( Vasantsena-31 , Trapped-31 ,Jagaran-36 , Himalaya ki Beti-38 and Yangrilla-38 ) were directed by her husband Mohan Bhavnani . Only Shiraz ( 1929 Produced by Himanshu Roy ) was directed by Franz Osten .

Producer Director Mohan Bhavnani was a learned and illustrious person. This is what the Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema says about him-
Mohan Dayaram Bhavnani (1903-62)

Hindi director born in Hyderabad, Sindh. Studied at College of Technology, Manchester (1921-4), then studied film-making in Germany at UFA (1924). Contracted to Kohinoor (1925- 6) where his Sulochana films were the earliest efforts in the Indian cinema to create a Hollywood-type movie star, e.g. Cinema Ni Rani where she plays a famous actress with whom the painter hero falls in love, or Wildcat of Bombay where she played multiple roles. Joined Imperial (1927-9), where he made Khwab-e-Hasti, adapted from the novel Dreamland (later also adapted by N. Taurog’s Strike me Pink, 1936). Scripted by A.S. Desai, this film is not to be confused with Kashmiri’s play of the same title. Vasantsena was the first Kannada intertitled film. Became independent producer with Indian Art Prod. (1931-2). Returned to Germany to study sound film technique. Started Ajanta Cinetone (1933-4) and his own Bhavnani Prod. (1935-48). Sound de´but was a flop, but it introduced Durga Khote. Hired Premchand to script Mazdoor, representing the author’s only direct encounter with film, following it with the unemployment melodrama Jagran. Produced and directed the first full-length colour film shot on 16mm Kodachrome and blown up to 35mm, Ajit. Joined Films Division and became its first Chief Producer (1948-55). In 1958 Bhavnani followed up an invitation from Zhou En-Lai to make a documentary on China and travelled extensively throughout the country shooting with cameramen Kishore Rege and S.K. Kulkarni. His wife Enakshi Rama Rao, who acted in Vasantsena, had earlier played the lead in Shiraz (1928) and became a noted dancer and author of the book The Dance of India (1965).

FILMOGRAPHY: 1925: Cinema Ni Rani; Matri Prem; Veer Bala; Seth Sagalsha; 1 9 2 6 : Pagal Premi; Diwan Bhamasha; Mena Kumari; Ra Kawat; Samrat Shiladitya; Bhamto Bhoot; 1 9 2 7 : Naseeb Ni Lili; Daya Ni Devi; Trust Your Wife; Wildcat of Bombay; Gamdeni Gori; 1929: Hawai Swar; Khwab-e- Hasti; Mysore, Gem City of India (Doc); Khedda (Doc); 1 9 3 0 : Vasantsena (all St); 1 9 3 1 : Shakuntala; Farebi Jaal; Lafanga Langoor (Sh); 1 932: Veer Kunal; 1 933: Afzal; Rangila Rajput; 1 9 3 4 : Dard-e-Dil; Mazdoor; Sair-e-Paristan; 1935: Jung Bahadur; Navjeevan; Shadi Ki Raat; 1936: Dilawar; Garib Parwar; Jagran; Wrestling (Doc); 1 9 3 7 : Zambo the Ape Man; 1 9 3 8 : Double Cross; Himalay Ki Beti; Yangrilla; 1 9 3 9 : Zambo Ka Beta; 1940: Jhoothi Sharm; PremNagar?; 1945: Biswi Sadi; 1 946: Rang Bhoomi; 1 948: Ajit; 1 9 4 9 : Vale of Kashmir (Doc); 1 9 5 0 : The Private Life of a Silkworm (Doc); 1 9 5 1 : Lest We Forget (Doc); 1 9 5 2 : Kumaon Hills (Doc); 1 9 5 3 : Folk Dances of India (Doc); Republic Day Record (Doc); 1 9 5 5 : Republic Day 1955 (Doc); 1 956: Operation Khedda (Doc); 1 957: The Himalayan Tapestry (Doc ).

Like the Heroine, the name of the film was also strange. I tried very hard to find out what the word Yangrilla meant, but I could not get it. Finally, undaunted, I started going through the list of books on line. Lo and behold ! I bumped into a book with a title ” Rilla of the Inglewood ” written by Lucy Maud Montgomary, published in 1921. Some part of the book was available for reading online and while reading it, I found that ” Yangrilla ” in Swahili language meant a Hunter. Not going into the book and its boring story, I was glad that at last I decoded the word Yangrilla…a Hunter. Considering that the film ‘ Yangrilla’-38 was a Costume drama, I can guess that this film’s story must have been connected with hunting, Jungle and such other interesting and thrilling matters. Film Yangrilla-38 was financed by Ramnarayan Dubey, who in later years swallowed Bombay Talkies with its Land and started an Industrial complex on its land with about 250 to 300 manufacturing units. Recently his grandson was in news for announcing revival of Bombay Talkies !

The Hero of this film was Nayampalli. S.B. Nayampally (or Nayampalli) was working at the firm of Killick, Nixon and Company, in Bombay when he was discovered by film director P.Y. Altekar at a gym where Nayampally regularly exercised. Altekar felt that Nayampally very much resembled the famous French boxer Georges Carpenter and would be perfect for the stunt films that had become popular at the time. At Altekar’s urging, Nayampally joined Imperial Studios and was quickly cast in his first film, Wedding Night(1929), opposite the popular actress Jilloo. When he arrived at Imperial to begin his first day of filming he was amused to find that the building now used for the studio had formerly housed the school he’d attended as a child.“Wedding Night was a stunt film of the Robin Hood type,” Nayampally explained in a 1964 interview. “It had a little more of a plot to it than many films of the same class. My next film, Hell’s Paradise (1929), I remember for three reasons. One, it was based on a real-life episode involving an Indian prince and a foreign girl, described as an adventuress. Two, Mama Warerekar, the noted writer, did the story. Three, the film had a kissing scene, probably the first ever in an Indian film.”

Nayampalli was cast in Imperial’s Noorjehan (1931), which was initially to be a silent picture, but because of the success of their film Alam Ara (1931), which was India’s first talkie, the studio decided to make Noorjehan partly with sound. Nayampally was not originally cast in Noorjehan, but a chance meeting with the film’s director, Ezra Mir, got him the role of Prince Salim in the film.Nayampally then played Karna in Imperial’s next sound film, the mythological Draupadi (1931), but the actor considered his best mythological role to be that of the wily Shakuni in Mahatma Vidur (1943), a part that was appreciated by critics and the public, alike.

As sound films came in, silent actors were being discarded in favor of those with stage backgrounds and could not sing, so Nayampalli joined the Grant Anderson Theatrical Company which specialized in Shakespearean plays. After gaining some experience he tried to rejoin films, but without much luck. His previous roles had been leads, so he decided if he wanted to work regularly, maybe he should take a different approach and he offered himself up for character parts.His break came in the role of a hunchback in love with the heroine in Ezra Mir’s Zarina which starred Jal Merchant and Zubeida. The dentures he wore for the role were created specially by a dentist named Jimmy Gheista who had trained abroad with the dentist who had made similar dentures for Lon Chaney.

Nayampally had learned early on how to apply make-up for his roles and, in fact, he became so good at it he eventually came to specialize in horror make-up, which earned him the nickname “The Indian Lon Chaney.” Indeed, Chaney, Erich von Stroheim, Emil Jannings, and John Barrymore were the actors that Nayampally most tried to emulate. Boris Karloff was another of his role models. He was able to put his make-up expertise to good use for the film Sair-e-Paristan (1934), where he was a vampire-like devil, and in Zingaro(1935), in which he played a monster created by a mad scientist, and then as a the hairy “missing link” in Zambo (1937) and its sequel Zambo Ka Beta (1938). For Kalkoot (1935) he created a make-up to resemble the wrinkled effect that Karloff had used in The Mummy(1932).

Nayampally continued working in films throughout the 1940s and 50s, particularly in mythologicals and costume pictures including Raj Nartaki (1941), Nagad Narayan (1943), Vishwas 1943), Taramati(1945), Urvashi (1946), Jhansi-Ki-Rani (1953), Durgesh Nandini (1956), Basant Bahar (1956) and Shiv Parvati (1962) His last credited film appearance was in 1970’s Priya.

After the career in films ended, he started making Documentaries. He made about 35 documentaries. He won ‘Silver Dolphin’ award for his documentary in the International Film Festival at Teheran in 1970. He died on 7-5-1994, in Mumbai.

Pt. Badri Prasad was the Music Director of film Yangrilla-38. He used 6 different singers for 11 songs in the film. Besides issuing records for its songs, the producer also floated 2 records of ‘ Bhavnani Productions orchestra ‘.

The uploader of today’s song, our own Sadanand ji Kamath has certified this song to be ” rarest amongst the rare ” songs. With this song, film Yangrilla-38 makes its Debut on the Blog.


Song- Kaase main kahoon piya hiya ki baat(Yaangrilla)(1938) Singer- Sarla Devi, Lyrics- Unknown, MD- Pt. Badri Prasad

Lyrics

Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki
kaun sunega prem kahaani
kaun sunega prem kahaani
aur usey phir meri zabaani
aur usey phir meri zabaani
yah duniya to preet ki bairan hai
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
kaase main kahoon

is duniya ke rahne waale
is duniya ke rahne waale
kapti paapi man ke kaale
kapti paapi man ke kaale
paap(?) hi inka ghar(?) aur joban hai
Kaase main kahoon
piya hiya ki baat
kaase main kahoon
kaase main kahoon
kaase main kahoon


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