Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Archive for the ‘Parent Child song’ Category


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

5085 Post No. : 17009 Movie Count :

4607

Hullo Atuldom

3rd Sunday of June is celebrated as Father’s Day and yesterday (19th June) was Father’s Day this year. The day is meant to honor Fatherhood and Paternal Bonds as well as the influence of fathers in society. In the USA, father’s day was founded by Sonora Smart Dodd, and celebrated on the third Sunday of June, for the first time, in 1910. The day is held across the world on various dates and different regions have their own traditions of honoring Fatherhood.

Here I would like to mention that Sonora Smart Dodd was the daughter of American Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart whom she held in very high esteem. Along with her father, she shared the raising of her five siblings, after the death of her mother. While hearing a church sermon about the newly recognized Mother’s Day, Sonora felt strongly that fatherhood needed recognition as well and suggested June 5th (her own fathers’ birthday) as a possible date for father’s day. The Ministerial Alliance of the Spokane County (the county where they lived) chose the third Sunday instead.

That is how Father’s Day came about to be on third Sunday of June and complements similar celebrations honoring family members such as Mother’s Day, Siblings’ Day and Grandparents’ Day.

Today we shall have a Father-Son song and continue with the celebration of Father’s Day here on our blog. We have a song from the film ‘Aamne Saamne’ (1982). The star cast of the film is Mithun Chakravarthy, Bindiya Goswami, Aarti Gupta, Tarun Ghosh, Dinesh Thakur, Leela Mishra, Kamal Kapoor etc. The film was released in January 1982 – 40 years already, wow!!! (Now I realize why I didn’t get to see it in the cinema hall back then. I was in the middle of preparing for my class 10 boards).

‘Aamne Saamne’ (not to be confused with the 1967 film with the same name, starring Sharmila Tagore and Shashi Kapoor, which has already been Yippeee’d on the blog) was produced by Shakti Samanta and directed by his son Ashim Samanta. Madan Joshi was the dialogue writer, KK Shukla wrote the story and screenplay. The songs of this film were written by Anjaan and (our very own) Panchamda was the music director. Kishore Kumar, Amit Kumar, Asha Bhonsle, RD Burman were the playback singers used. I think it is the voice of Vanita Mishra for the young boy in today’s song in duet with Panchamda for Mithun. This song may remind some people of “Papa Ko Mummy Se Pyaar Hai” from film ‘Andaz’ (1971).

The movie had a plot similar to the Rajesh Khanna starrer ‘Sachcha Jhootha’ (1970). Mithun has a double role where the simpleton Gopi from the village is spotted by Johnny, who is a stage-singer by day and a criminal by night. Johnny trains Gopi to take his place on stage so that he has an alibi if caught by the cops – age old formula, I am sure repeated later in ‘Dhoom 3’ (2013). Then there is a tiny angle of a child, who is on the lookout for his father, and has a photo of his parents to help him. Madhu Malhotra is the mother in the photo. This was Ashim Samanta’s debut as director, and Aarti Gupta’s first lead role.

With today’s post we are wishing (rather belatedly) Mithun Chakravarthy on turning 72 on 16th. May he continue to be busy with whatever his heart is after. May we get to see more of him.

The agenda closer to home of this post is to wish the Father of this blog, our very own fearless leader- Atul ji on his birthday today. Last year we had a wonderful post with the song “Main Nikla O Gaddi Le Ke” by Avinash ji on the same date. In that post Avinash ji has called the Blog a ‘gaddi’ which is driven by ‘engine’ Atul ji and all of team members and followers ‘wagons’ of this BANDWAGON. I fully endorse his thoughts.

Thanking Atul ji for taking us along with him on this grand journey of music and knowledge sharing. Thanking him also for giving us this platform and encouraging novices like me into writing out our thoughts. As always, I wish he gets more time with his family, pets, friends, music and the blog.

With this song, ‘Aamne Saamne’ (1982) makes its debut on the blog.

 

Video

Audio

Song – Daddy Tum Auntie Se Pyaar Karte Ho (Aamne Saamne) (1982) Singer – Vanita Misra, RD Burman, Lyrics – Anjaan, MD – RD Burman
Mithun Chakravarty
Bindiya Goswami

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

daddy
tum chup kyon ho

hmm,
nahin to

auntie
tum chup kyon ho

main
nahin to

main sab jaanta hoon

kya jaante ho

daddy
tum auntie se pyaar karte ho

o daddy tum auntie se pyaar karte ho
o daddy tum auntie se pyaar karte ho
lekin mujhse darte ho
chup shaitaan kahin ka

auntie tum daddy se pyaar karti ho
o auntie tum daddy se pyaar karti ho
lekin mujhse darti ho
a a bura mat maan’na
bachcha hai
kehne do na
achcha hai

lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la
lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la

o daddy ki nazar
jhukti nahin
auntie ki nazar
uth’ti nahin
peechhe reh gaya
saara shehar
gaadi ye kahin
rukti nahin

arre
chalo utro
utro neeche

aage tum chalo
main peechhe peechhe
o chori se tum aankhen chaar karte ho
daddy tum auntie se pyaar karte ho

hutt tere ki
jhonka bhi diya
doli nahin
mauka bhi diya
boli nahin
daana to bahut
daala magar
chidiyon ne munh kholi nahin

arre
lo ye choclate
aur chup ho jaao
achcha
tum mujhe rishwat dete ho

o yaani ke
tum iqraar karte ho
o daddy tum auntie se pyaar karte ho

khel khel mein
baat kya hui
aansoo nikle
khoyi hansi
auntie ne mujhe
pappi jo di
mummy ki mujhe
yaad aa gayi
auntie ko daddy meri mummy bana do
mujhse agar tum pyaar karte ho

o daddy tum auntie se pyaar karte ho
lekin mujhse darte ho

ha ha ha ha
ha ha ha ha

lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la

o ho ho ho

lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la
lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la
lallall la
lallall la
la lallall la


This article is written by Peevesie’s Mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4912 Post No. : 16731 Movie Count :

4554

Hullo Atuldom

‘Adhikaar’ meaning ‘Rights’ is a title that has been used four times by Bollywood. This information I gathered from the blog’s ‘List of songs- Moviewise’ tab. Of the four films titled ‘Adhikaar’ the ones released in 1938, 1954, and 1971 have already made their debut on the blog; in fact the ones released in 1954 and 1971 have been Yippeee’d too. The 1938 ‘Adhikaar’ has four out of seven songs on the blog. Today’s post sees ‘Adhikar’ (1986) make is debut on the blog. The song with this post is the one that plays as the movie’s titles play on-screen and we can see this ‘Adhikar’ is an ‘a’ short.

“Adhikar” (1986) was a movie that I recall having seen in a cinema theater. It had the standard, run-of-the-mill story, popular in that period.

A rich girl loves and marries a not so rich man. Her parents initially agree to the wedding but cracks begin to appear in the marriage when the girls’ parents start interfering in the couple’s daily life.

This is the two-line synopsis of movies like ‘Pyar Jhukta Nahi’ (1985), ‘Pyar Ke Kaabil’ (1987) etc.

The common element between ‘Pyar Jhukta Nahin’ (PJN), ‘Pyar Ke Kaabil’ (PKK) and ‘Adhikar’ is Bindu- she played the heroine’s interfering mother in all the three films. PJN had Padmini Kolhapure play a simple girl born to rich parents, and PKK had her (Padmini) play a lady working in her mother’s business venture. ‘Adhikar’ was slightly hat ke in the sense that Tina Munim played a simple girl born to an ambitious mother who wants her to be a singer and become rich & famous. So that should give a brief idea about what the movie was about.

‘Adhikar’ had Tina Munim and Rajesh Khanna play the parents to a sweet boy credited as Master Lucky on some sites (even in the titles of the film) and Baby Bulbul on others. Zarina Wahab, Bindu, Danny, Raza Murad, Murad, Sulochana, Yunus Parvez etc. form the supporting cast. Tanuja is there in a special appearance. Bappi Lahiri is the music director and Indeevar is the lyricist. Lata Mangeshkar, Chandrani Mukherjee, Anupama Deshpande, Uttara Kelkar, Kavita Krishnamoorthy and Kishore Kumar are the playback singers used in the movie. The movie is directed by Vijay Sadanah and produced by Jawaharlal Bafna and Vasant Doshi. It is the last movie that Rajesh Khanna and Tina Munim came together for and then the hit pairing came to an end.

The song with this post plays at the start, establishing Rajesh Khanna’s (Vishal’s) single parent status. The song shows Lucky developing interests in horses etc. Oh, I forgot to add that Rajesh Khanna plays a retired jockey. The sad version, in Kavitha Krishnamurthy’s voice, occurs at the end, when the child sings it to try and revive an unconscious Vishal. Vishal has had an hemorrhage after winning his last race as a jockey, and the doctor has given little hope of his survival. But Vishal survives and the film has a happy ending with the misunderstandings between the couple clearing up.

This song showcases Rajesh Khanna at his emotional best. His charming smile, that reaches his eyes and the mustachioed look, at the start of the song is what I liked about Rajesh Khanna – remember the look he sported at the start of ‘Dushman’ (1971). He was the heart throb of a whole generation of movie goers in the early 70s and he had ardent followers who were loyal to him forever – whatsay Avinash ji, Raja ji, and others!!!! We were upset when Amitabh Bachchan dislodged him but there were people, like yours truly, who loved to see ‘Anand’, ‘Namak Haraam’ as much for Kaka as for Amitabh Bachchan. I loved AB Sr. in ‘Inquilaab’ as much as Kaka in ‘Aaj Ka MLA Ram Avatar”. I am sure there were fans who didn’t know who to choose as favorite. The careers ran parallel for some time. But then all these have been written a number of times and will be written forever till the 70s generation decides who they loved more —- that means forever I suppose.

Thinking of Kaka a.k.a Rajesh Khanna on his birth anniversary. He would have gone a year closer to 80.

Male Voice

Female Voice

Song – Main Dil Tu Dhadkan, Tujh Se Mera Jeevan (Adhikar) (1986) Singer – Kishore Kumar, Kavita Krishnamurthy, Lyrics – Indeevar, MD – Bappi Lahiri
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

Male Version
oo oo oo oo
oo oo oo oo

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

suraj se kirnon ka rishta
seep se moti ka
tera mera wo rishta
jo aankh se jyoti ka

main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan

aa aa aa aa
aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa

tu hi khilauna
tu hi saathi
tu hi yaar mera
ek ye chera
ye do baahen
ye sansaar mera
tu hi khilauna
tu hi saathi
tu hi yaar mera
ek ye chera
ye do baahen
ye sansaar mera
khud ko bhi dekha hai tujh mein
tu mera darpan
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan
main dil tu dhadkan

tere dum se judi hui hai
saanson ki ye kadi
tujhse bidhhad ke jee na sakoonga
main to ek ghadi
tere dum se judi hui hai
saanson ki ye kadi
tujhse bidhhad ke jee na sakoonga
main to ek ghadi
mere jeevan ka ye deepak
tujhse hi roshan
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan
main dil tu dhadkan

Female Version
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan

aaa aaa aaa
aaa aaa aaa

tu hi khilauna
tu hi saathi
tu hi yaar mera
ek ye chera
ye do baahen
ye sansaar mera
tu hi khilauna
tu hi saathi
tu hi yaar mera
ek ye chera
ye do baahen
ye sansaar mera
khud ko bhi dekha hai tujh mein
tu mera darpan
main dil tu dhadkan
tujhse mera jeevan
kaanch se jaisa toot jaunga
toota jo ye bandhan
main dil tu dhadkan

aaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa

tere dum se judi hui hai
saanson ki ye kadi
saanson ki ye kadi
tujhse bidhhad ke jee na sakoonga
main to ek ghadi
tujhse bidhhad ke jee na sakoonga
main to ek ghadi. . .
main to. . .  ek ghadi. . .

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa aa


This article is written by Peevesie’s mom, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog.This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3875 Post No. : 14896

Hullo to all in Atuldom

I love masala movies as much as I love movies which are close to reality. I am of the opinion that movies should make us forget our daily tensions as much as entertain us. There were a few movie makers during my growing up years whose films were a must-see for my parents as they were entertaining as well as showed middle-class families and their ways. These movies were generally targeted towards family audiences – ‘Khoobsurat’ (1980), ‘Golmaal’ (1979), ‘Baaton Baaton Mein’ (1979), ‘Khatta Meetha’ (1977), ‘Chupke Chupke’ (1975) etc fell in this category and I must thank Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Basu Chaterjee for these gems.

Then there were these absolute entertainers which needed us to keep “logic at home” before going to see them. Else how does one explain the story of a pair of twins one of whom looks much older than the other -‘Dharam Veer’ (1977) and ‘Suhaag’ (1979). How does one explain the jumps in the climax; the heroes begin punching the villains on board a ship – belonging to a Rajput clan- that is anchored at sea but sing romantic songs and songs of friendship in the environs of Kashmir (in ‘Dharam Veer’). Or the heroes are following the villain who has kidnapped their mother through the streets of Mumbai on the way to the Juhu airport (which used to be where people parked their private aircrafts formerly) but strangely the streets look like some foreign land – turns out it was Singapore!! But when the climax scene is getting over, and the villains meet their final fate, all the places that Mumbaikars are familiar with make an appearance on the screen (in ‘Suhaag’).

Now ‘Suhaag’ and ‘Dharam Veer’ are two movies which I must have seen a number of times (have lost count) in spite of all these glaring ‘logic-less-ness’ (I know there is no such word in English language). There are a few other movies which fall under the ‘entertainer without logic’ category- ‘Chacha Bhatija’ (1977), ‘Parvarish’ (1977), ‘Naseeb’ (1981), ‘Desh Premee’ (1982), ‘Coolie’ (1983), ‘Mard’ (1985) – which I have seen about 100 times (not exaggerating). And it seems the maker of these Mr. Manmohan Desai had the confidence that his audience will lap it all up without questions.

In recent times I have been seeing these series of videos on YouTube wherein Amitabh Bachchan (the permanent fixture in most of the above-mentioned Manmohan Desai movies) in company of Rishi Kapoor was relating how they enacted all those scenes, as directed by Manji (Manmohan Desai’s pet name apparently) even if they were not personally convinced that there was any logic in the scene. The duo specially drew attention to the “mother of all logiclessness” scene – three people lying in a row and donating blood to an accident victim. Now there is nothing illogical in three people donating blood; but blood from the three being collected into a single bottle? And a single tube carrying blood to the patient!!! And has anyone heard of the blood group of RH. Also, Amitabh pointed out how Manji thought the villains were brainless as they could not see through the disguise of 3 people who have gate-crashed into a wedding and singing on top of their voices – ‘Amar Akbar Anthony’.

Anyway, such were the movies of Manmohan Desai in the 70s. He started making movies in the 60s with ‘Chhalia’ (1960) being his directorial debut. Which was followed by ‘Bluffmaster’ (1963), ‘Budtameez’ (1966), ‘Sachaa Jhootha’ (1970), ‘Kismat’ (1968) etc. Of the 20 films he made in a career span of 29 years 13 were successful. He had writers like Kadar Khan, KK Shukla, Prayag Raj, Salim Javed, Anand Bakshi, Sahir, Qamar Jalalabadi, Gulshan Bawra and Shailendra pen the stories and songs for these movies. He had also worked with Kalyanji Anandji, Laxmi Pyare, RD Burman and Anu Malik for music direction in his movies.

Today’s post is to remember the magic of Manmohan Desai on his 82nd birth anniversary and what better song than the one that shows his logical thinking. One patient getting blood from three donors all at once. 🙂

Audio

Video

Song-Khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin (Amar Akbar anthony)(1977) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Anand Bakshi, MD-Laxmikant Pyarelal
Chorus

Lyrics

maa sirf nataa nahin
yeh kuch aur bhi hai
maa se bichad ke bhi
ye toot jaata nahin
yeh sach hai koi kahaani nahin
aaa aa aaa aaa aa 
yeh sach hai koi kahaani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin

aaa aa aaa aa

phoolon ki pehchaan hai rangon boo se
pehchaane jaate hain insaan lahoo se
insaan lahoo se
haan isse badi kuchh nishaani nahin
aaa aa aaa aa
haan isse badi kuch nishaani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin

aaa aa aaa aaa aaaaa aaa
aaaa aaaa aaa aaa aa 

ye khoon jis ne paida kiya hai
wo doodh maa ka sab ne piya hai,
sab ne piya hai
kya is ki keemat chukaani nahin
aaa aa aaa aa
kya iski keemat chukaani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin
khoon khoon hota hai paani nahin

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

माँ सिर्फ नाता नहीं
ये कुछ और भी है
माँ से बिछड़ के भी
ये टूट जाता नहीं
ये सच हैं कोई कहानी नहीं
आs आ आs आs आ
ये सच हैं कोई कहानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं

आs आ आs आ

फूलों के पहचान है रंग ओ बू से
पहचाने जाते हैं इनसां लहू से
इनसां लहू से
हाँ इससे बड़ी कुछ निशानी नहीं
आs आ आs आ
हाँ इससे बड़ी कुछ निशानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं

आs आ आs आs आsss आs
आss आss आs आs आ

ये खून जिसने पैदा किया है
वो दूध माँ का सबने पिया है
सबने पिया है
क्या इसकी कीमत चुकानी नहीं
आs आ आs आ
क्या इसकी कीमत चुकानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं
खून खून होता है पानी नहीं


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3719 Post No. : 14653

When ‘Bawarchi ‘ was released in 1972, I had seen it on the big screen in the theatre with family. In this film, Hrishikesh Mukherji has woven a remarkable story of a joint family and their interesting interactions. The head of the family (a widower), his three sons, two daughters in law, third son still a bachelor, and three children. The roles of the two daughters in law were played by Durga Khote and Usha Kiran. Being quite un-exposed to cinema otherwise (it was school years for me) I was quite unfamiliar with these two ladies when I saw this film for the first time.

I was later to recall these two senior actresses, when I would get to see their earlier, older films. The first such re-introduction was when I saw ‘Mughal-e-Azam’ (1960) on TV for the first time. Then I came to recognize Durga Khote in her role as Jodha Bai, and connected her with her role in ‘Baawarchi’. The two films had a difference of 12 years, and decidedly, she is looking much younger and sweeter in her role as Badi Maa in ‘Baawarchi’, compared to her royal appearance as the empress of India and wife of Emperor Akbar. One scene (from ‘Baawarchi’) that really amazed me and mesmerized me, is the family song situation from an early morning impromptu get together of the family members – “Bhor Aayee Gaya Andhiyaara”. During the course of this song, the two supposedly middle aged daughters in law perform the rapid pace thaap steps dance to the rapid taal – “dhiga tum naa naa naa naa naa” being rendered by the family help Raghu (role played by Rajesh Khanna). It was a real wonder to see the two ladies perform that sequence. A quick check reminded me that Durga Khote was, goodness, 67 years of age, when she performed in ‘Bawarchi’.

Remembering Durga Khote on the anniversary of her passing away (22nd September).

The first and the top most lady luminary of the Hindi cinema, Durga Khote was born on 14th January, 1905, in a well­ known family of Bombay. The family hailed from Goa and spoke Konkani at home. Her mother’s name was Manjulabai. Her father, Pandurang Shamrao Laud, was a famous lawyer and her brother was also a well known barrister. The young Vita Laud (her maiden before marriage) was educated, like her siblings, at Cathedral High School and St. Xavier’s College from where she did her B.A. While still in college, she was married into the Khote family, graduated and settled down with her husband. By the age of 26, she was a widowed mother of two sons – Bakul and Harin.

Into this scenario, and a life of a very traditional family, plopped in something utterly new – the world of cinema. Durga Khote wanted to work to support her children. In doing so, she became a pioneer of sorts. It was a time when the film industry was regarded as the preserve of the base and the bawdy. Also, most of the female characters were played by men at the time.

It all came about through her sister Shalini, also married and having amongst her circle of friends, a gentleman by the name JBH Wadia. At the time JBH was working with Mohan Bhavnani as the latter’s assistant. The talkies had just made their appearance on the silver screen. Bhavnani who had just made a picture, wanted to give it the box office appeal of a “talkie” ending. The picture starred Mrs. Bhavnani and her husband was  looking out for a girl who would feature with his wife in the climax scenes of the film. Approached by JBH, Shalini refused. But knowing Durga as a person who would try anything once, she recommended her. Durga was ready to have a go at the part, accepted the role and went off to the studios the same day. Mr. Bhavnani’s heterogeneous production was soon completed, printed and made ready for release.

The film flopped. And for the beautiful young housewife and mother there followed a period of embarrassment at being connected with a filmy disaster. The film was ‘Farebi Jaal’ (also titled as ‘Trapped’ in English). “That is just how I felt when I saw it. It was a terrible film,” Durga Khote recalls in an earlier interview. She goes on to say that, “. . . my position was more than awkward. I had suddenly achieved a fair measure of notoriety. I just couldn’t walk around in Girgaum without people pointing at me.”

Looking back on it she laughed at the by-gone crisis. Through all this turmoil and unease there was one solid consolation: both the Laud and the Khote families were far too intelligent and sophisticated to be worried by the affair. On the contrary “My families stood up for me” declared Durga Khote with a proud smile of affection.

Amongst those who saw the film ‘Trapped’, was the then up and coming producer and director V Shantaram. After seeing her performance, he offered her the female lead role of Taramati in the bilingual film ‘Ayodhyache Raaja’ – ‘Ayodhya Ka Raja’ (1932). Durga Khote saw in it an opportunity to vindicate herself. Once again encouraged by the families, she accepted the role and played it beautifully. The film was not only good but a big hit, in both the Hindi and Marathi versions.

V Shantaram simultaneously cast her also in ‘Maya Machhindra’ (again 1932). This was a also a smash hit. These two top successful films established her straight off as a top star. Following came a number of films that won her acclaim from the public and from the film industry. After the two fabulous successes in 1932, what followed is no less dazzling a repertoire of well known films and famous roles.

In 1933, she appeared opposite to Prithviraj Kapoor in the New Theatres Production from Calcutta – ‘Raajrani Meera’. This year also saw her play the lead role opposite to a very young and handsome new entrant into the industry – P Jairaj, in the film ‘Patit Paavan’ (Pratima Phototone, Bombay).

1934, and she is paired opposite to Prithviraj once again in ‘Seeta’, from East India Film Company in Calcutta.

1935, another production from New Theatres – ‘After The Earthquake’, as the female lead opposite to Syed Mohammed Nawab. And once again, paired with Jairaj in ‘Jeevan Natak’ – a Debaki Bose Production in Bombay.

In 1936 came one of her many superlative roles on the screen – ‘Amar Jyoti’ from the production house of Prabhat, with co stars Chandramohan, Vasanti and B Nandrekar.

She played the lead role in ‘Pratibha’ in 1937, opposite to Master Shyam; film by Shalini Cinetone.

1938, and she appeared in two films – ‘Nand Kumar’ (Jaishree Films), working with Govindrao Tembe and ‘Saathi’ from Natraj Films, paired with Mubarak – another popular hero of that era.

1939 saw her appearing with Prithviraj once again in the Ranjeet Studios production – ‘Adhoori Kahaani’.

In 1940 it is Chandramohan and the film is ‘Geeta’ from Circo Productions. Also in 1940 came the famous and popular hit film, ‘Narsi Bhagat’ working with Vishnupant Pagnis.

1941 and it is ‘Charnon Ki Daasi’ from Atre Pictures, paired with Gajanan Jagirdar.

In 1942, she appeared in 2 films, ‘Bharat Milap’ of Prakash Pictures, with co stars Prem Adeeb, Shahu Modak and Shobhana Samarth; and in ‘Vijay’ from National Studios, opposite to Harish.

1943 turned out to be a blockbuster year for her, appearing in the lead role in six films. She was seen in ‘Qurbani’ opposite to Ishwar Lal, ‘Mahasati Anusuya’ with Shahu Modak, E Billimoria and Shobhana Samarth; ‘Mahatama Vidur’ with Vishnupant Pagnis; ‘Tasveer’ – paired with the young newcomer Motilal; and ‘Zameen’, paired with Biswas. The listing for 1943 is complete only when we talk about the mega film from Minerva Movietone – ‘Prithvi Vallabh’ in which she is paired with Sohrab Modi.

In 1944, it is ‘Maharathi Karn’ paired with Prithviraj Kapoor once again, and ‘Dil Ki Baat’ a romantic social, working opposite to Ishwar Lal.

In 1945, it is ‘Lakahrani’ from Prabhat, working opposite to Sapru; ‘Panna Dai’ working with Chandramohan and Mubarak; and ‘Veer Kunal’ with Mubarak, Kishore Sahu and Shobhana Samarth.

In 1945, we also see a major qualitative shift in her career. She stepped away from lead roles and very gracefully migrated towards support roles as a character artist. ‘Village Girl’ was probably the first such film, in which she does not play the lead role. But her films and her roles continue to be significant and powerful.  She had already stated to play non-romantic lead roles in films like ‘Charnon Ki Daasi’ (1941) and ‘Bharat Milap’ (1942). Her filmography beyond 1945 speaks volumes of her prowess as an actress, and her ability to command the scenes, and the films. Moving to character roles, her assignments continue to increase, and she continued to be a busy and an in demand artist for another almost four decades. During her career, she has appeared in more than 200 films.

A special mentions needs to be made of the 1953 film ‘Chacha Chaudhry’ – a comedienne performance which took the industry and the public by storm. The brilliant timing of her expression, gestures, movement and dialogue combined to make that role such a scintillating comedy portrayal that she all but stole the picture from the consummate actor Raja Paranjpe – who doubled as director and lead player – and Dhumal. The three of them made it a slick, hilarious romp.

Durga Khote’s portrayals have been sensitive and consummate. Notable mentions must be made of some of her performances;

as Queen Kaikeyi in the 1942 film ‘Bharat Milap, jealously coveting the throne for her own son – her personification of the grasping queen made one understand if not quite condone the old king’s doting weakness;

as Shachi Devi, mother of Chaitanuya Mahaprabu in the 1953 biopic ‘Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu’ – a heart-rending performance of a mother torn between her love for her son and the gratification she feels in his single-minded devotion to God, and her heartbreak for his bewildered, forsaken girl-bride, and her gradual resignation, made for a portrayal which was a gem of histrionic art;

as Jodha Bai, the empress of India, wife of Akbar – once again called upon to make a dreadful choice of loyalties, torn between the warring father and son – at first unable to invoke the blessings for her husband leaving for the battlefield, with the certainty of the fear that her son will be killed, and then when Akbar challenges her by attempting to erase the sindoor from her forehead, very sternly and studiously she performs the pooja giving the due honor to her suhaag even in the face of an eventuality of possibly losing her only child.

These and many other such power packed performances have made Durga Khote the dame thespian of the Indian cinema. She was honored with the Padam Shri award in 1968 and the coveted Dada Saheb Phalke Award in 1983.

In 1950, Durga Khote naturally gravitated towards the stage and she joined the Marathi Sahitya Sangh, starting her long association with the theatre also. She kept busy acting in, producing and directing plays. She also founded Durga Khote Productions which produced short films – advertising, documentary, educational and industrial.

She continued to be active both in films and in theatre till the mid 1980s. After that, she moved into semi-retirement. She passed away this day, in 1991, in Bombay.

The film ‘Amar Jyoti’ has been acclaimed as a film much, much ahead of its time, both in terms of handling of the subject matter as well as in terms of technical finesse and special effects. The film represented India in the Venice film festival in 1937 and won praises and accolades as one of the best three films at the festival.

The film deals with the theme of suppression and negation of the role of the woman in the society, and one lady’s rebellion against it. As a subject, this was a daring endeavor by V Shantaram, given the prevalent sentiments in the society of that era. Nevertheless, this film was much acclaimed and became very popular at the box office too. Since the story revolves around pirates, scenes related to sailing ships and ships in conflict, it was a major accomplishment for the director, to be able to create the necessary environment within the studio, and film all the naval scenes using advanced special effects techniques, within the confines of the studio itself.

The film pertains to an undefined historical period. A queen (role played by Karuna Devi) and her cruel minister Durjay (role played by Chandramohan) are challenged by a woman turning a pirate and terrorizing the coastal provinces of the kingdom. This woman, Saudamini (role played by Durga Khote), has been much wronged by her husband. But when she pleads for justice from the royal court, Durjay decrees that a husband was the complete master of his wife, whom he could ill-treat, use as a chattel or dispose of as a slave. She is denied custody of her son by the queen, after she refuses to return to her matrimonial home. This greatly enrages Saudamini and drives her to revolt and seek revenge. She takes on the mantle of a male role and gets into a commanding position, as the captain of a pirate ship. She is assisted by her associate, Rekha (role played by Vasanti).

Durjay is captured and is kept as a prisoner with one of his legs cut off, to make him realize the eternally enslaved condition of women. Her next big catch is the princess Nandini (role played by Shanta Apte), the queen’s daughter. In her relationship with the princess, Saudamini plays an even bigger game by converting the princess to her creed of female emancipation, which considers love and marriage as a bondage. The princess suppresses her feelings for a shepherd boy, Sudhir (role played by B Nandrekar), whom she had met during her days in the pirate’s den. Unknown to even Saudamini, this shepherd boy is actually her own son, who was separated from her years ago.

In the continued sequence of events, Durjaya escapes with the help of Sudhir and returns to arrest Saudamini. Saudamini is captured, but the others, along with Nandini and Rekha, escape. It is finally revealed that Sudhir is Saudamini’s long-lost son. Nandini and Sudhir are married and Rekha carries forward Saudamini’s legacy.

Shantaram has used the symbol of the lamp and the flame very effectively. He deployed many other techniques that were considered path-breaking at that time. The film’s real success is in bringing out the inner conflicts of women, who may become male-like rebels, at the cost of suppressing their natural urges as wife or mother. In one of the most moving scenes in the film, we see Saudamini secretly fondling the tiny garments of her son, who has been separated from her.

In this song, we see this brief interlude, as Saudamini is remembering her child. The brief song is written by Pt Narottam Vyas, and the music is composed by Master Krishna Rao Phumblikar. The playback singing voice is that of Vasanti.

Remembering and honoring the enduring legacy of this fine actress – Durga Khote.

[Author’s Note: Acknowledgements – This article has adapted material from online sources viz., Cineplot and Wikipedia. Filmography details have been prepared using the Geet Kosh voumes 1 and 2.]

Audio

Video

Song – Ankhiyan Ke Tum Taare Pyaare (Amar Jyoti) (1936) Singer – Vasanti, Lyrics – Pt Narottam Vyas, MD – Master Krishna Rao
Durga Khote

Lyrics

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

[sudhir. . .]
[main teri maa. . .]

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

aansoo nainan mein se

aansoo nainan mein se
aansoo nainan mein se
kaahu tohey pukaarun
kaahu tohey pukaarun
waaroon sukh dukh saare
waaroon sukh dukh saare
waaroon sukh dukh saare

akhiyan ke tum taare pyaare
chhod mohey mat jaa re
ab mat jaa re

[ab mat jaa re]

———————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————–

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

[सुधीर॰ ॰ ॰]
[मैं तेरी माँ॰ ॰ ॰]

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

आँसू नैनन में से

आँसू नैनन में से
आँसू नैनन में से
काहू तोहे पुकारूँ
काहू तोहे पुकारूँ
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे
वारूँ सुख दुख सारे

अखियन के तुम तारे प्यारे
छोड़ मोहे मत जा रे
अब मत जा रे

[अब मत जा रे]


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Premnagar”(1940) was produced and directed by Mohan Bhavnani for Bhavnani Productions. The movie had Prof Ramanand, Husn Bano, Bimla Kumari (senior), Rai Mohan, Fanty Prasad, Nagendra, Girish, Salu, Sheel Prabha, Gulzar etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Mahesh Mamadapur, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Mukesh and his Composers – 3
———————————
The off-screen romance between Dev Anand and Suraiyya was well known. On-screen, if there was any song which symbolized the relationship it was this romantic duet from Vidya 1948 sung by Mukesh and Suraiyya.

Hold on. Mukesh giving playback for Dev Anand?. Well, yes, there were 3 occasions in which this rarity occurred. A solo and a duet in Vidya and a duet in Shair with Lata under Ghulam Mohammed.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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