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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Aman ka farishta kahaan jaa raha hai

Posted on: July 12, 2017


This article is written by Raja, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today, the 12th of July 2017, is the death anniversary of one of Hindi cinema’s big stars of yesteryear – Rajendra Kumar.

Today is his 18th death anniversary – he passed away in 1999.

Rajendra Kumar.

The name evokes mixed feelings amongst many Hindi movie fans. I know people who didn’t rate him at all – and I know people who were big fans of his.

And that is fair enough. Everyone has his fans and critics – and Rajendra Kumar is no exception to this.

Although most of his career was a bit before my time, some of my childhood memories are indeed of him. As I often do on such occasions, I will try to remember him through these memories – that is my personal way of paying tribute to the artiste concerned.

My first memory of Rajendra Kumar was with the movie Suraj (1966). I was very young then – but the image of Rajendra Kumar on that majestic white horse (I forget its name!) got imprinted in my mind.
And the song “titli udi”. The movie had sword-fights and I remember enjoying it without understanding what was going on.

I remember seeing many more films of his. In those days, where I lived, we didn’t get to see the latest films in our area. We’d see films which were at least 3-4 years, often much older. So even in the early 70s, I’d get to see films of mid-late 60s.

That is how I remember seeing many of his films. Films like Mere Mehboob (1963),Aayee Milan Ki Bela (1964), Aarzoo (1965), Aman (1967), Jhuk Gaya Aasmaan (1968), Saathi (1968), Anjaana (1969), Dharti (1970), Geet (1970), Ganwaar (1970) and Aap Aaye Bahaar Aaye (1971).

Then I got to see Taangewaala (1972) when our family went on vacation to Bombay in 1972.

To be honest, although I remember seeing all these movies, at that time I didn’t understand the storylines. I used to watch them, enjoy fight scenes and some songs – and that was it. In general, I was in the Rajendra+ blood group (ie Rajendra positive). 🙂

Much later, in fact only a few years ago, I rewatched each one of these films. Of course now, I could understand the storylines – so it was a different experience.

The two films of the time that were much talked about, but that escaped me at that time, were Gora Aur Kala and Lalkaar, both 1972 films. Just a year ago, I happened to watch Lalkaar. To date, I haven’t watched Gora Aur Kala. Need to tick that off my list.

By the early 70s, Rajendra Kumar’s career as a leading hero was coming to an end. He was part of the “previous generation” like Shammi Kapoor. The new generation, led by Rajesh Khanna, had taken over. Which is why I said much of Rajendra Kumar’s career happened just before my time. I vividly remember watching movies only from about 1969-70 – but because I used to get to watch movies only 3-4 years after release, they happened to be 1965-66 movies or earlier.

At that time, I had no clue that Rajendra Kumar was considered tragedy king in his own right, albeit a poorer version of Dilip Kumar. If you look at this list of films above, there’s not much to suggest a lot of tragedy. Except for Aman, the other films end on a happy note, despite the usual ups-and-downs in the story.

Much later I realized that this image came mainly from the first half of his career. With films like Dil Ek Mandir (1963) and Sangam (1964). In both these films, he sacrifices his love to another. There are probably other films too where he plays tragedy roles.

In any case, there are plenty of sad songs featured on Rajendra Kumar. Many of them became hits. Songs like “keh do koi na kare yahaan pyaar” (Goonj Uthi Shehnai-1959), “ye aansoo mere dil ki zubaan hain” (Humraahi-1963) and “humne jafa na seekhi” (Zindagi-1964).

Talking of songs, Rajendra Kumar’s films were probably blessed with some of the most popular songs of Hindi cinema. In fact, much of his popularity came from his films becoming jubilee hits – he was seen as a very safe bet for producers. But again, much of their success came from the music.

Almost every Rajendra Kumar film I can think of had at least one very popular song, if not more. That song would be reason enough to watch the film.

For example, when you think of Jhuk Gaya Aasmaan (1968), you first think of “kaun hai jo sapnon mein aaya”.

With Zindagi Aur Khwab (1961), you might think of “na jaane kahaan tum the”.

Humraahi? How about “mujhko apne gale lagaalo”?

Gharana? You have “husnwaale tera jawaab nahin”.

Gehra Daag? “Tumhe paake humne jahaan paa liya hai”.

Aap Aaye Bahaar Aayi? “Mujhe teri mohabbat ka”.

Even the somewhat sober and “hatke” film “Aman” is often remembered for “aaj ki raat, ye kaisi raat”.

Many of his films even had a complete track of hits. Films like Sasuraal, Mere Mehboob, Dil Ek Mandir, Aarzoo, Ayee Milan Ki Bela, Suraj – each of these was studded with hit songs. And though Sangam, a blockbuster with every song a big hit, was mainly a Raj Kapoor show, it still had the very popular “ye mera prem patra” picturised on Rajendra Kumar.

So it is not incorrect to say that Rajendra Kumar was blessed with excellent music in his films. And to a large extent, credit for that goes to Shankar Jaikishen, who composed for most of his hit songs in the 60s, though there were exceptions like Naushad for Mere Mehboob, Saathi and Palki, and Kalyanji Anandji for Geet. And Rafisaab, who was Rajendra Kumar’s voice for most of his songs.

The other thing that I noticed about Rajendra Kumar is that in some of his films, he would have a disability. He’d lose a limb (Aarzoo) or become blind (Taangewaala, Pyar Ka Saagar) or lose his voice (Geet). I’ve probably missed out a few – please feel free to add. 🙂 I don’t think any other hero has so many such roles – though Dilip Kumar, the original tragedy king, might be competition.

Rajendra Kumar might not have been a superstar in the league of Dilip Kumar or Dev Anand or Raj Kapoor – which is why in the first sentence of the post I used the term “star”, not superstar. But he was one hell of a successful and bankable hero. And that is what, at the end of the day, a producer wants.

Talking of production, many of Rajendra Kumar’s films (and hits!) were South Indian productions. Unlike Dilip Kumar, Dev Anand and Raj Kapoor, who didn’t enjoy working with South Indian producers, Rajendra Kumar had no such qualms.

Not only did he work for South Indian banners, he delivered many hits for them. Sasuraal (1961), Humraahi (1963), Dil Ek Mandir (1963), Zindagi (1964) and Suraj (1966) were all big hits.

Anyway, all in all, whatever others say, I have pleasant memories of Rajendra Kumar. I can watch a film of his without knowing anything about it – at the very least, I’d be assured of some good songs. 🙂 Most probably, Rafisaab. 🙂

So on his death anniversary today, I remember him fondly.

Let’s move on to the song for today.

This is from Aman (1967).

Aman was one of the films I saw when I was very young. At that time, what shocked me most about the movie was that Rajendra Kumar dies in the end. To me, that was unheard of. The hero dying? Later I would see Suhaag Raat (1968) starring Jeetendra, and get the same shock again.

I’d always heard that Aman was a different sort of film – especially for the times. The 1960s (or Swinging Sixties, are the decade is often called) is well known for being the era of colour and glamour, rock-n-roll. This was a global phenomenon in cinema – and cinema in India was not immune from this.

And yet, Aman was different. It dealt with a serious issue – the issue of nuclear radiation. Rajendra Kumar is a doctor who volunteers to go to Japan to help survivors of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki atomic blasts. The film deals with his experiences in Japan, the physical and mental effects of the atomic explosions on the survivors, and so on.

Sure, the film has its typical moments of romance and songs like in other Hindi films – but it never loses its focus. When I watched the film a couple of years ago, I quite liked it – though it is not considered quite a box-office success like so many formulaic films of the times. Maybe people were more interested in fun and masala while spending money to watch a film, than be given a sobering message. Fair enough.

Aman is also known for Bertrand Russell, the famous philosopher, making an appearance in it – as himself.

This song is at the end of the film, when Rajendra Kumar has sacrificed his life in trying to rescue people stranded in an area that has been hit by radiation. His body is brought back home – this is the song at his funeral procession.

On his death anniversary, this song seemed apt for the occasion.


Song-Aman ka farishta kahaan jaa raha hai (Aman)(1967) Singer-Rafi, Lyrics-Hasrat Jaipuri, MD-Shankar Jaikishan

Lyrics

hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm
hmm hmm hmm hmm hmm

Aman ka farishta
Kahaan ja raha hai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Aman ka farishta
Kahaan ja raha hai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

Kiya kaam aisa
Ki hulchul machaa di
Ye duniya jahannum thhi
jannat banaa di
Ye duniya jahannum thhi
jannat banaa di
khinchi aa rahi hai
ye saari khudaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

Na ujdegi duniya
kisi bhi dulhan ki
Na royegi raakhi
kisi bhi behen ki
Na royegi raakhi
kisi bhi behen ki
Judaa ab na hoga
Bhai se bhai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai

aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa
aa aa aa aa

Bahut der jaaga thha
Soya hua hai
Aman ke khayaalon mein
Khoya hua hai
Aman ke khayaalon mein
Khoya hua hai
Ye kaisi mohabbat
Ye kaisi judaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai

aa aa aa
aa aa aa

Ye jeevan ki manzil
pe chhoota hai humse
koi to manaao
ki roothha hai humse
koi to manaao
ki roothha hai humse
nazar mere baabu
ko kisne lagaayi
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai
Chaman ro raha hai
Machi hai duhaai

Aman ka farishta
Kahaan ja raha hai
Chaman ro raha hai (aa aa aa )
Machi hai duhaai (aa aa aa )
Chaman ro raha hai (aa aa aa )
Machi hai duhaai (aa aa aa )

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8 Responses to "Aman ka farishta kahaan jaa raha hai"

18 years? I still remember that day. I came home after dropping my kids to schools and my husband gave me this sad news. He himself was not happy to share this news as he knew I was a die-hard fan of the jubliee Kumar.
Other favorites of mine to add are Talash, Goonj Uthi Shehnayi, Kanoon, Sajan Bina Suhagan, ….list can go on.
Thanks Rajaji for sharing your thoughts and feelings here.

Thanks, Khyatiben.
I also had the same thought – 18 years! But yes, it has been that long. I remember the Kargil war was going on at that time. When I got news of his death, it came as a shock to me. I didn’t know he was suffering from cancer.

I don`t remember correctly but I have read somewhere in the magazines that Naseeruddin Shah appeared in one of the mob sequences of movie Aman(1967), Someone has to confirm this or else I have to watch the movie scenes …….HELP……or confirmation needed

Prakashbhai, “hum sab ustaad nahin hai” iss maamle mein. Hum aap ki aur dekhte hai aisi pareshani mein aur aap kehte ho doosre ki aur nazar karo. 🙂
We are sure you will confirm this info.
Regards

Naseer ji ke baare mein kuchh nahi mila but found an interesting trivia on one of the website –

“Here’s one for Ripley’s Believe It Or Not: Bertrand Russell, the eminent mathematician and philosopher, once made a cameo appearance in a Bollywood movie.

The year was 1967. Russell was by then a very frail 95-year-old man. Besides finishing work on his three-volume autobiography, Russell was devoting much of his remaining time to the struggle for peace and nuclear disarmament. To that end, he sometimes made himself available to people he thought could help the cause. (See our March 2012 post, “How Bertrand Russell Turned the Beatles Against the Vietnam War.”)

So when he was asked to appear in a movie called Aman, about a young Indian man who has just received his medical degree in London and wants to go to Japan to help victims of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Russell said yes.

It’s a weird scene. The eager young graduate, played by Rajendra Kumar, is granted an audience with the famous philosopher, who gives him his blessing and offers a few words of wisdom. Sadly, much of what Russell has to say is drowned out by the Hindi-language narration. But the clip above offers an intriguing glimpse of Russell at his home in London only three years before his death. Its appearance on the Internet has caused considerable amusement.”

Here is the video clip of that scene –

Thank you Khyati`ji

Bahut dinon ke baat yaad kiyaa aapne,
Thank you also for the link about the trivia regarding Russel

And

Thank you for writing to me…….

Regards
Prakash

Thank you Raja ji for this post.
I too like, and must say that I have enjoyed all the movies of Rajendra Kumar whether from black white era or later color movies. He has a great fan following in our family and I have vague memories of watching his movies with my uncles, aunts and my grandma talking about his movies when I was growing.
I have already put in my thoughts about him in my following post on the blog

https://atulsongaday.me/2015/07/12/shatranj-ki-chaal-hamaari/

Liked it your post and the ‘apt’ song for this occasion very much.
Thanks again ,

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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