Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Mo Se Rooth Gayo Banwaari

Posted on: March 25, 2015


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Life is short but art and for that matter music is permanent. There is no death of a true art and so is it with music.”

These are the words of one who is known as the ‘Gentleman Musician’ amongst the community of music directors and musicians, both in Bombay and in Calcutta.  Vistas Ardeshir Balsara – a name that is part of a long list of very talented musicians, whose contributions to the making of the film music has been immense.  These musicians, instrumentalists and arrangers, most of whom were  experienced and capable of being music directors in their own right, rarely got to appear in the limelight and be recognized for their work.  V Balsara is one such gifted musicians who did get the opportunity to step out from behind the curtain, and be known for his art.  I am sure all will remember the iconic song “Ae Mere Dil Kahin Aur Chal” (‘Daag’, 1952) in all its flavors.  The piano accordion in this song is played by him.

Remembering V Balsara on the anniversary of his passing away (24th March).

Born in Bombay on 22nd June, 1922, he belonged to a Gujarati speaking Parsi family.  Both his mother and grandmother were musically inclined, and this had a significant influence on him.  He learnt playing the harmonium from his mother Nazamaye.  Barely at the age of 6, he got his first opportunity to give public performance, at a packed CJ Hall in Bombay.  By the time he was 10, he had joined a musical group that used to play at marriages and other social functions.  One of his colleagues in this group used to work as an instrumentalist in films also.  It so happened one day that this friend was at a studio recording, when the regular piano player did not turn up.  In a flurry of getting a replacement immediately, his friend called him in for the recording.  That was the first taste of the film music for the young man.  He was sixteen, and the year was 1938.

With this reference in place and his expertise becoming known, he continued to get assignments as an instrumentalist for various film song recordings.  By the time he was 20, he had made a place for himself as the assistant music director to Ustad Mushtaq Hussain.  His first formal assignment was with Eastern Pictures film ‘Baadal’ (1942) directed by Zahur Raja.  In 1943, his name appears as the assistant music director for the film ‘Mazaaq’, another film directed by Zahur Raja.  In this film, Zahur Raja’s name appears as the music director, but it is said that the music compositions were by V Balsara himself.

1943 was also the year when his name appears in the credits of the film ‘Circus Girl’, as a music director sharing the responsibility with another music director Basant Kumar.  In 1944, Zahur Raja produced and directed ‘O Panchhi’, and he called upon V Balsara for music direction.  Other films followed, as a music director, and also as the music director for background music, as his work as an arranger and in the area of instrumental music was gaining attention.  By this time, he got a permanent position in the music department of Filmistan Studios, where he assisted many famous music directors starting with Ustad Mushtaq Husain and on to Rafiq Ghazanvi, K Datta, Ghulam Haider, Anil Biswas, MA Rauf, Ustad Jhande Khan, Meer Saheb and Khan Mastaana.  In 1947, he became the orchestra director at HMV.  He continued to work with Filmistan also, and also assisted Madan Mohan, Vasant Desai, C Ramchandra and Naushad. In 1950, he was called up by Raj Kapoor, and he joined RK Studios as assistant to Shankar Jaikishan.

In 1953, he was invited to Calcutta for a musical program, by Gyan Prakash Ghosh, a well known music director in Bengali cinema.  (Note: Gyan Prakash Ghosh is a name not limited to Bengali cinema only.  In fact he has composed for some Hindi films as well in the 1940s – ‘Paraaya Dhan’ (1943), ‘Mujrim’ (1944) etc.).  Something clicked with the city of Calcutta, for this young and almost famous musician in his early thirties, and he decided to make it his permanent home.  Getting his first assignment of a Bengali film ‘Agni Pareeksha’ (1954) put a seal of confirmation on this decision.  He moved to Calcutta, and got immersed in the culture, cinema and music of Bengal.

He continued with the Hindi cinema also, albeit just occasional forays.  Producer, director, lyricist Prahlad Sharma put in a lot of faith in him, and invited him to be the music director of three of his films – ‘Vidyapati’ (1964), ‘Wohi Ladki’ (1967) and ‘Pyaar’ (1969).  Going by this one song, this faith was well honored. Beyond that the records lists only one released film – ‘Jai Baba Baidyanath’ (1979) and one unreleased film – ‘Jogi Aur Jawaani’ in the Hindi arena.  He continued to be very active in Bangla cinema, and also composed music for two Nepali and four Oriya films.  While in Calcutta, he also worked very closely for Hemant Kumar, Salil Chaudhry, and Nachiketa Bose as their background music director and an arranger.

One of his favorite genres was to play Indian classical pieces on the piano.  Plus he composed many non film albums, for established and emerging singing stars.  He was prone to merge the Indian classical and western rhythms, but he refused to call it fusion music.  (Searching for information about him brought up a few very good web pages with very interesting information).

V Balsara passed away in 2005, in Calcutta.  He was 83, and the (Bangla) film ‘Til Theke Taal’ for which he is the music director, was showing in the theaters – a very significant underscore to his ‘never say die’ spirit.

Coming to this film and song.  When I had initially planned this article, I had selected a very light and endearing melody from the film ‘Wohi Ladki’ (1967).  The draft post for the same is already on the blog.   Late in the day yesterday, just on a stray thought, I picked up to listen the available songs of the film ‘Vidyapati’ of 1964.  As per the earlier impressions, I remember this to be a Maithili language film, and that is why probably I did not pay much attention to it.  As I got on to it again yesterday, I read the footnote with the listing of this film in Geet Kosh.  The remark says that the information about the language of this film was received very late, and hence this film is listed in a separate appendix containing regional language films.  This film is actually a Hindi film and just its song have a touch of Maithili.

I picked up this song to play, and within half a minute, I was floored.  May be not the same as “O Duniya Ke Rakhwale” (‘Baiju Baawra’, 1952), but very much in the same league.  The music, the rendering and the words, have all combined to result in this captivating piece of music.  The pace and the tuning sound almost perfect for the emotional content; tuned any other way, this song would not have the effect it has.  A very wonderful experience indeed.

Searching online, I located a video clip uploaded on YouTube, which has two stanzas.  As I went back to the audio version that I have, I realized that the complete song probably consists of both these pieces put together.  For as I listen to the video version, I am able to make out a distinct discontinuity from the mukhda (title piece) to the antaraa (stanza).  And in the audio version, there is only one antaraa, but it is very uniformly continuous.  It seems as if the complete song is a three antaraa song.  The 78 rpm recording has only the first antaraa.  The video version has the last two antaraas and not the first one.  (Either that or the folks who would have prepared the disc version maybe snipped out the first antaraa).  In any case, all three paras are available, and the lyrics that you see in this post are a composite of the audio and the video versions.  I have given the links for both.

The film is about the  great Maithili ‘Kavi Kokil’ – Vidyapati, about his life and his writings.  Folks will well remember the earlier incarnation of this film from 1937 – the version which is probably much better known and treasured by the aficionados.  Produced by New Theatres, the music in that version is by RC Boral.  That towering film boasts of luminaries like Prithviraj Kapoor, KC Dey, Kanan Devi and Pahadi Sanyal, with the music and songs to match the stature of production.  This version from 1964 is produced under the banner of Chitra Vihar.  The producer, director and lyricist is Prahlad Sharma.  The star cast includes Bharat Bhushan, Simi Grewal, Nazima, Kamaljit, Murad, Vipin Gupta and Natwar, amongst others.  I have so far heard just two songs of this film, this one and another song – “Radha Chaatur Gori Sakhi Hey”.  Both are in the voice of Rafi Sb and both are excellent creations that must be heard.  And if these songs are the indication, then the music of the rest of the film is expected to be good.

Maybe it is my bias, but I would prefer the audio version.  Bharat Bhushan performing this deeply emotional song on screen seems comparatively stoic and wooden.  The way he stands with his arms folded, seems like a person of resolve expressing strength, almost aggression, rather than the dissolute and dejected person who is wading through the agonies of separation from the beloved.  But anyway, that is my personal bias.

A superb creation in my opinion, and a heart rending expression that Rafi Sb injects into it as he renders it, is sure to move and touch any heart.  The more I say, the longer I keep you from listening.  So just go ahead and play this wonderful composition.

Artists don’t make such songs any more.
Rather I should say, He makes such artists no more.
Amen.

Audio

Video

Song – Mo Se Rooth Gayo Banwaari (Vidyapati) (1964) Singer – Mohammed RafiLyrics – Prahlad Sharma, MD – V Balsara

Lyrics

aaa aaaaa aaaaaaa

oo ooooo ooo
ooo oooo

door gagan ke chanda kahiyo
saajan se sandes
ghar ghar alakh jagaawe radha
kar joganiya bhes

oo oo oo oo
haaye
mo se rooth gayo banwaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari
jari gayo madhuban
sookhi jamuna
gali gali dukhiyari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari

chhod gayo re
man ka mitwa
jiya na ab to maane
haaye re
jiya na ab to maane
kaun tarat re
na koi samjhe
tum jaano hum jaanen
re oo
tum jaano hum jaanen
piye bin kaamni jee na sakegi
piye bin kaamni jee na sakegi
laage ghaavat bhaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari

oo ooo oooooo
aaaa aaaa aaaaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaaaa
aaaa aaaaaaa aaaaa

ye poonam ki raat chaandni
aag jiya mein laagi
re oo
aag jiya mein laagi
chanda se yun door chakori
virhaa vednaa jaagi
re oo
virhaa vednaa jaagi
rowat sagri ran bitaai
rowat sagri ran bitaai
aayo naa girdhaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari

madhur milan ki aas lagaaye
phulwan sej bichhai
re oo
phulwan sej bichhai
path herat akhiyaan pathraai
nindiya kab hu naa aayi
re oo
nindiya kab hu naa aayi
aao kaanha der karo naa
aao kaanha der karo naa
tum jeete main haari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari
mo se rooth gayo banwaari

——————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
——————————————

आs आsss आsssss

ओ ओssss ओss
ओss ओsss

दूर गगन के चंदा कहियो
साजन से सन्देस
घर घर अलख जगावे राधा
कर जोगनिया भेस

ओ ओ ओ ओ
हाय
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी
जरी गयो मधुबन
सूखी जमुना
गली गली दुखियारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी

छोड़ गयो रे
मन का मितवा
जिया ना अब तो माने
हाए रे
जिया ना अब तो माने
कौन तरत रे
ना कोई समझे
तुम जानो हम जानें
रे ओ
तुम जानो हम जानें
पिय बिन कामनि जी ना सकेगी
पिय बिन कामनि जी ना सकेगी
लागे घावत भारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी

ओ ओss ओsssss
आsss आsss आsssss
आsss आsss आsssss
आsss आssssss आssss

ये पूनम की
रात चाँदनी
आग जिया में लागि
रे ओ
आग जिया में लागि
चंदा से यूं दूर चकोरी
विरह वेदना जागी
रे ओ
विरह वेदना जागी
रोवत सागरी रैन बिताई
रोवत सागरी रैन बिताई
आयो ना गिरधारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी

मधुर मिलन की आस लगाए
फुलवन सेज बिछाई
रे ओ
फुलवन सेज बिछाई
पथ हेरत अखियाँ पथराईं
नींदिया कब हु ना आई
नींदिया कब हु ना आई
आओ कान्हा देर करो ना
आओ कान्हा देर करो ना
तुम जीते मैं हारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी
मो से रूठ गयो बनवारी

 

8 Responses to "Mo Se Rooth Gayo Banwaari"

Sudhir ji,
Nice and deep searched write-up on V Balsara.I became familiar with this name in connection with the other sweet but melancholic song of Vidyapati- More Naina Sawan Bhadon…….Strange, you have not mentioned about this song.I remember,during Radio days,this song,because of its superb echo effect,used to be aired on radio in almost all ‘Geeton Bhari Kahani’ programme based on ‘Spirit Love’
Song in your post also is a gem and I would love to treasure this also.
My compliments for the post !!

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Rakesh ji,

Goodness, what an enchanting and entrancing reminder. I have heard this song before. It is in my audio collection. Just that somehow I did not realize it is from this film.

In the post above, I write that I have heard two songs of this film. Now, with this reminder, I correct myself and say that I have heard three songs of this film. And I just heard it once again after reading your comment.

The song you mention is equally divine, and Lata ji has created a wonderful effect singing it. With eyes closed, one can feel powerful pathos squirming in the heart.

Thanks again and regards
Sudhir

Like

Oh that song! My husband introduced this song to me almost 30 years back. I am reading all the comments on the blog while listening to it. Thanks Rakeshbhai for reminding.
https://atulsongaday.me/2013/02/27/more-naina-saawan-bhaadon/

Thanks Sudhirbhai for the post. 🙂 Jagdish has a audio CD of V Balsara’s live instrumental concert. Ab wo cassette dhoondhke sun na padega.

Love and Regards
Khyati

Like

Sudhirji,
I agree with what you say about Bharat Bhushan. However it can be interpreted as calmness and serenity of his mind. But let us agree that he was master of lip-synch the song as he was classically trained. It is a lovely song along with mere naina sawan bhado

V Balsara And Pralhad Sharma had collaborated in
Jai Baba Baidyanath (1979)
Pyar (1969)
Wohi Ladki (1967)
Other movies>>
Qurbani (1952)
Madmast (1953)
Talaash (1952)
Chaar Dost (1956)
Prahlad Sharma had also penned in>>
Prem Ki Ganga-71

Vishtasp Ardeshir Balsara > 22/06/1922 – 24/03/2005
He was given the title ‘Gentleman Musician’ from the film and music fraternities.
As the Founder Secretary of peer bodies like Bombay Cine Musicians’ Association and Bombay Cine Music Directors’ Association, Balsara earned the love and respect of his associates and young musicians.
He assisted Khemchand Prakash also. Since he was fully involved with Bengali films he took interest in Rabindra Sangeet. During this period, he was connected with about 30 Bengali films in various capacity – Orchestra Conductor, background music, assistant music director and music directors. He had many music albums to his credit particularly as an instrumentalist and symphony orchestra music composer. Parts of his orchestra albums were often used by AIR and Radio Ceylon as filler after the end of a radio programme.
At 83, Balsara was still going strong on the music front with his Bengali film production ‘Til Theke Taal’ running in theatres in West Bengal.
Balsara had his brush with the who’s who of the music world after he became the orchestra director of music company HMV in 1947 and then switched over to the R K Films banner three years later to work with the likes of Shankar Jaikishan and Naushad.
At the coveted New Empire Theatres, he charmed audiences again in 1962 arranging music for Rabindranath Tagore’s celebrated play ‘Debatar Grash’ while debuting his own group the Indian Symphony Orchestra. He gave Kolkata another first — the city’s maiden stereo recording in 1970 — when he put together ‘The Sound of Music’ recording strains of four Indian instruments in one album.
He had to his credit numerous popular film albums, both in Hindi and Bengali, a language he chose to speak more frequently in and with much more ease than his native Gujarati.
In Madhu Shraboni, Joy Baba Baidyanath, Maa, Chalachal, Panchatapa, Subho Bibaha, Manik, Kanchan Kanya, Panna and Pathey Holo Dekha in Bengali, he had an enviable repertoire.
Balsara who was greatly influenced by western music learnt to play the piano from Hildafield, a German musician. His knowledge of the piano made him use it to play Indian classical music also with ease. He mastered the technique of using the instrument for playing Indian classical music from Muneswar Dayal of Gaya. He was equally at ease with string and wind instruments.
During the last phase of his life, he lost many of his close relatives including his wife and two sons. However, his music and his well wishers gave him company until his death in March 23, 2005.

Lovely NFS by V Balsara>>all of them my fav
gaaye gaaye gaaye naye trane gaaye by Geeta Dutt
ye hawa ye fiza ye bahar by GD
ye awara rate by Manna Dey>most romantic song ever
main dukh ki raat hu by Talat
raat andheri door kinara-Talat
aabad raho mere dil ko jalaane walo by Mukesh
jakhani konogan –Sandhya M




Tribute to V Balsara Radio Ceylon March 24, 2012

Like

Nitin ji,
Any film song of Mukesh for V Balsara?. I am unable to recollect.

Like

I am fortunate to have seen and enjoyed the fiesta of marvelous songs by Kanan and Sunyal. But I always thaught that Vidyapati was a Bengali Bhukta Kavi. Can you double check? . Thanks ! Vasishtha

Like

Vidyapati was a Maithili poet from Bihar, which is not far from Bengal.

Like

Thanks! Now I know better.

Like

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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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