Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Kamal Dasgupta


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day :

4509 Post No. : 16052

Today’s song is from an obscure film Ranee-43, which was a Bi-lingual film made by Calcutta’s Barua Productions.

The film was directed by P C Barua and the music was by Kamal Dasgupta. Barring a few big movies, the Hindi-Bangla bilingual films did not become as successful as their Bangla versions. I feel the reasons were mainly two. One was that the cast of such films consisted of most names, with which the Hindi audience was not familiar. The second point was the style of acting and the dialogue delivery of the Bangla actors was deemed strange in Hindi belt. The Hindi used in films made in Bengal was too pure to be of the liking of people who were used to Hindustani language. The audience preferred ” pyar or muhabbat ” to ” prem “, for example.

The cast of the film Ranee-43 was Jahar Ganguli, Kalavati, P C Barua, Jamuna, Patience Cooper, Bikram Kapoor etc. The music of film Ranee-43 was not popular. The year 1943 was an year when lots of films provided melodious music. There were films like Aabroo, Ishara, Kanoon, Kismat, Nadaan, Nai Kahani, Najma, Namaste, Naukar, Panghat, Poonji, Prithvi Vallabh, Ram Rajya, Sanjog, Shakuntala, Tansen, Taqdeer etc. etc. Films of popular singers like Saigal and Noorjehan were on everone’s lips. In this situation, films like Ranee with music below par could not make any impact.

There were a number of films made by Bangla artistes, like Wapas, Shri Ramanuj, Ranee, Manchali, Kashinath, and Hospital. The exodus of artistes from New Theatres had started from 1940 onwards and many came to Bombay. Whatever the reason, New Theatres had lost its sheen, which it had enjoyed till now, It was sad to see a Lion in a dilapidated and helpless situation.

P C Barus and Jamuna, the husband-wife pair, were in the lead in this film. While Jamuna still looked like a Heroine, Barua did not look suitable for the ” young and Handsome” hero’s part. Reviewing the film in his magazine, Baburao Patel cme down heavily on this misfit hero and the declining skill of the director Barua. The story of the film was about Ranee- a young and good looking girl in a village, who becomes a victim of false rumours about her character. She leaves the village, giving an impression that she has done suicide. She works as a Maid in another village with a Zamindar. The zamindar’s young and handsome brother falls in love, but she does not show inclination. He starts drinking. She leaves the house. The hero drinks and falls ill, Ranee enters as a Nurse and looks after him. The zamindar comes to know who she is and that all the rumours were false. The hero recovers completely and both get married.

Before joining The New Theatres, Barua was running his own film making outfit for a studio and a company. After leaving NT, he restarted it. Actually he wanted initially to merge his company with NT, but Sircar refused and offered him a paid job, which he had accepted.

Director P.C. aka Pramathesh Barua was born on 24-10-1903. A well educated and foreign trained prince from a Royal family came into the films only by chance. He established his own studio and made films. Impressed by his style and work, B.N.Sircar of New Theatres offered him a job in his company. Barua joined and made such films in New Theatres that the studio became famous all over India. His greatest contribution was his first film here, ” Devdas”-34 in Bangla. he did the main role and brought in a comparatively new actress Jamuna for the role of Parvati aka Paro. With the fantastic success of the Bangla version, Barua made its Hindi version in 1936, with K L Saigal as the Hero. This was mor successful than the Bangla version and became an iconic film for ever as a reference point. Then an Assamese version was also made in 1937.

With a very eventful, successful and satisfying stint in New Theatres, Barua developed serious differences with the owner-B.N.Sircar, who was known to be a disciplinarian who held the Institution ( of NT) in place. New Theatres, in the 30s , was full of Titans having larger than life images and it was inevitable that there would be clashes amongst the artistes and the owner. Like true Bengalis, they all had king size Egos and over estimated self respects.

The first crack came in 1933 when Nitin Bose and Debaki Bose clashed, resulting in Debaki Bose’s temporary exit. In the line was Barua, who had a grudge that he was not given as many films as his peers Nitin Bose and Hemchander Chunder got . The rift between Barua and Sircar was obviously born out of deep differences, because after Barua left, B N Sircar had said ” He was a remarkably innovative director who seemed to improve after every film. As an actor, he forged a style that was distinctively his own uniquely. But as a Man…..well,I would rather not discuss it ”.

However, it was known to both of them and all others connected with NT, that both these Giants had tremendous love and respect for each other. In 1951, when Barua lay dying on his bed, he instructed that his body be taken past the house of B N Sircar, where he was lying sick on bed. When Barua’s funeral convoy reached Sircar’s house, the ailing Sircar hobbled painfully to the window of his elegant Elgin Road Residence, as the prince of Players paused beneath the window for a while and then proceeded. It was a poignant moment- an act symbolic of a reference point established a long time ago in a business which was notorious for callous and impermanent relationships !

After Barua Nitin Bose left, then Kanan Bala and a few more. Only Pankaj Mullick, though hurt by NT’s neglect, stuck till the end. P.C.Barua died on 29-11-1951. He acted in 8 Hindi films( Manzil-36, Mukti-37, Adhikar-38, Jawab-42, Ranee-43, Subah Shaam-44, Amiree-45 and Pehchan-46). He directed 14 films and sang 1 song in the film Jawab-42.

Barua’s wife Jamuna Was an excellent actress. Pity that she did only 13 films in Hindi. Jamuna ( 10-10-1919 to 24-11-2005) was the fourth of the six daughters of Puran Gupta, a resident of a village near Agra, India. Each of the sisters was named after an Indian river like Ganga, Jamuna, Bhagirathi etc. As destiny would have it, Jamuna came to reside in Calcutta, a leading film producing city in India. Originally from Gauripur of Assam’s Goalpara district (undivided), Jamuna was married to the legendary actor director Pramathesh Barua, or P.C. Barua, who died in 1951. She began her acting career in her husband’s famous production Devdas in 1936 and was the film’s lead character Parvati or Paro. She went on to make a number of memorable movies in Assamese, Bengali and Hindi, notably Amiri, Mukti, Adhikar and Sesh Uttar. She stopped acting after Barua died.

Jamuna made her film debut in the 1930s and played a small role in Mohabbat Ki Kasauti (1934), Hindi version of Rooplekha (Bengali), directed by P.C. Barua. A romance started although Barua, hailing from the native Indian state of Gauripur, Assam, was already twice married. As the actress, who was to play Parbati in Barua’s next venture Devdas (1935) reported inability to attend the studio on the very first day of shooting, Jamuna was called from Barua’s residence (she was living with him by then) and was asked to get down to work straight away without any preparation whatsoever. Thus she came to be the first Parbati of Indian talkies- Miss Light had played the role in the silent version of the enormously popular Sarat Chandra novel. Aishwarya Rai happens to be the last so far and Devdas has been made and remade a number of times. Jamuna played the same role in the Hindi version also and was accepted in this very first proper exposure as an actress in her own right.

She continued to act in Barua’s films like Grihadaha (1936), Maya (1936), Adhikar (1939), Uttarayan (1941), Shesh Uttar (1942), Chander Kalanka (1944) and the respective Hindi versions of each film. Barua had left the prestigious New Theatres in 1940 and was directing as well as producing his films. Thereafter she acted in a number of Barua directed Hindi movies like Amiree, Pehchan and Iran Ki Ek Raat. These films however did not add to the prestige of either Barua or Jamuna. Jamuna also acted outside Barua direction in three Bengali films Debar (1943) and Nilanguriya (1943) where she proved herself without Barua’s influence. Her last film Malancha (1953) was also outside Barua’s direction. She also starred in its Hindi version Phulwari (1953).

Barua’s death in 1951 when he was only 48 changed Jamuna’s life altogether. She had three sons by Barua, Deb Kumar, Rajat and Prasun. They were all minors at the time and the Gauripur estate refused to take any of their responsibilities. She had to wage a legal battle with the powerful and influential royal family to get her and her children’s dues and recognition. Time settled the matters and she was allowed ownership of the house with its vast adjoining land and also an allowance. Jamuna spent the rest of her life after Barua as a housewife, busy in bringing up her minor sons. She had to complete the unfinished film Malancha of course but bid adieu to the film industry soon after. Later in her life she did attend a number of functions to celebrate the centennial year of husband P.C. Barua and received felicitations on behalf of the Government of India and the state Government of Assam as the first Parbati of Indian talkies.

Her last days were not very comfortable and she was bedridden for more than six months prior to her death. She is survived by her three sons and their families and a host of relatives. According to her family members, she had been ill for some time, and the cause of death was illness related to old age. She died at her residence in South Kolkata. She had acted in 13 Hindi films. Her last film was Phulwari-51.

Today’s song is the third song from this film to be posted here. The names of singers of all songs are not given in the HFGK. The film was released on 4-6-1943 at Super cinema, Bombay, where it ran for only 2 weeks.


Song-Piyo ji khoob piyo main pilaun pyaar se (Ranee)(1943) Singer-Unknown female voice, Lyricist- Pt. Madhur, MD- Kamal Dasgupta

Lyrics

Piyo jee
khoob piyo
main pilaaun pyaar se ae
main pilaaun pyaar se
Piyo jee
khoob piyo
main pilaaun pyaar se ae
main pilaaun pyaar se

dil tera howe
maikhaana
saaqi ban jaaye
paimaana
bano jee
mast bano ye
jawaani ki kahaani
bano ji
mast bano ye
jawaani ki kahaani
Piyo jee
khoob piyo
main pilaaun pyaar se ae
main pilaaun pyaar se

peene kaa hi hai naam zindagi
aur aankh aankh se karti hai bandagi
dilon ke ??
nahin inkaar se
dilon ke ??
nahin inkaar se
Piyo jee
khoob piyo
main pilaaun pyaar se ae
main pilaaun pyaar se

honthhon ko hai ye jaam choomte
dil ke hain saare armaan jhoomte
mazaa peene ka peene ka
mazaa peene ka
boojh lo
aa aa aa aa
ishq ke beemaar se
Piyo jee
khoob piyo
main pilaaun pyaar se ae
main pilaaun pyaar se


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day:

4363 Post No. : 15689

I do not remember when was the last time that I wrote about a NFS. I guess it might have been about 4-5 years ago. There is no specific reason for this gap. I came across a good NFS by Hemant kumar-my favourite singer- that prompted me to take it up for discussion today.

1936 to 1956 was a period when NFS were very very popular, not only in India, but wherever in the world Indian population lived. In western Music, NFS has been a routine since the beginning. For India, where different types of Music existed, it was not possible for one type of music to be popular all over the country. In olden days, like in the period of 1900 to 1940s, the Royalties of various states, depending upon the King’s or the Nawab’s liking and understanding, gave support to Classical music or Ghazals etc. Many Classical singers and Ghazal singers won the Patronage of different states. For the common public, there used to be Jalsas, stage shows or Mushayaras etc. The audience used to be different for each type of singing.

It was somewhere in the mid 1930s when an enterprising pair of a writer and a Musician decided to promote a new type of presentation – singing of Geets. Geet was a type of song which existed in Poetry, but it was not connected with Music in any way. Poet Lyricist Faiyyaz Hashmi and Musician Kamal Dasgupta identified a few aspiring singers and recorded Hashmi’s Geets in their voice. Probably the first ever such Non Filmi Song – a Geet – came out as a 78 RPM record. From 1934 to 1945, this pair (Faiyyaz and Kamal) made NFS extremely popular all over the country. For their 400 recorded songs (in Bangla and Hindi), they selected singers like Jagmohan, Pankaj Mullick, Talat Mahmood, Juthika Roy, Hemant Kumar and few others to sing these Non Film Songs. The NFS thus got established.

Those readers, who are in the age bracket of 60 to 85, will surely remember the popular NFS during their younger days. Sometimes the sales of such NFS exceeded even the popular Film songs! These NFS were popular from Kashmir to Kanyakumari, irrespective of the language barrier. Some of the popular NFS of yore were by Hemant Kumar, Geeta Dutt, Juthika Roy, Jagmohan, K L Saigal, Pankaj Mullick etc. Seeing the popularity of these NFS, even the Film Singers cut their NFS records. Some of them were Lata, Asha, Rafi, Mukesh, Shamshad Begum, Manna Dey, Laxmi Shankar, Jaddan bai, Noorjehan and even Indurani etc etc. These lists are only indicative and not exhaustive.

Today’s NFS is sung by Hemant Kumar (16.6.1920 – 26.9.1989). Hemant Kumar was very fond of singing from his childhood. While in school, one day, one teacher was absent and the period was blank. The boys started pressing HK to sing a song. He too, enthusiastically started singing and all the students started beating the benches to give ‘ music’ to his song. All this commotion went to the Head Master’s room. He came and Hemant was sent home immediately. Next day, his parents met the Headmaster, said sorry and Hemant was allowed in the school again. While he was in H.S.C. he got a call from A.I.R to sing songs.

After HSC, he joined Engineering college, but after an year, he left it and started singing. Columbia cut his few records in Bangla. Then came Bangla film playback singing in film “Nimai Sanyas”. In 1942 he gave a playback in hindi film ‘Meenakshi’-42, under the baton of Panbkaj Mullick. However there was no record issued. In film ‘Irada’-44, Pt. Amarnath gave him an opportunity to sing.

After film ‘Anand Math’-52, he came into Hindi films as an MD. He continued to sing songs even for any MD, who wanted him. Thus he sang more songs for other MDs than for his own films as MD ! On Lata’s insistence, he sang Marathi Koli Geet and some film songs too, in Marathi. He also sang in Gujarati, Punjabi,Oriya and Assamese language films. Vishwa Bharati gave him D.Litt. Sangeet Natak Akademi awarded him in 87. He refused Padmashree and later Padma Bhushan awards.

Today’s song is written by Fayyaz Hashmi, with music by Kamal Dasgupta. This must have been recorded sometime in the early 40s. This song is included in the 1961 LP No.33 E Sx 4252 ” Geets of Hemant Kumar.”

In the 1940s, Kamal Dasgupta was a star composer. He had many firsts to his name. He was the most educated man across the industry in those days. He came to the rescue of singers who were trying to break into the music world. He gave music in the most successful films of the 40s. The sale of his private records touched an all-time high. Yet the man behind many unforgettable melodies has been forgotten.

Kamal was born on July 28, 1912, in Kalia village in the district of Jasore, then in British India (now in Bangladesh). He was initiated into music by his father Prashanna Dasgupta. He later learnt it from his brother Bimal Dasgupta. Afterwards, he became a disciple of the legendary Dilip Kumar Roy and Ustad Zamiruddin Khan. He did his matriculation from Calcutta Academy. Later, he completed his B Com from Komila Victoria Collage. He joined Banaras Hindu University (BHU) for his masters. He earned his PhD from BHU for his work on Mirabai’s bhajaans and music.

Kamal Dasgupta was a versatile musical genius. He used to sing modern songs in Bangala, Hindi, Urdu and Tamil. He was a brilliant composer who composed around 8,000 songs. His first composition was recorded in 1932 in the voice of Satyaboti, (she seems to be the mother of actress Leela Desai). His composition was classical based and folk music. Later he tended to lean towards Thumri style and Naats. In 1935, Kamal Dasgupta joined the Gramophone Company of India in Calcutta as a music director. During this stint, he developed a close and lasting association with the poet Nazrul Islam. They became fond of each other and the relationship lasted for eleven years (1934-45). The culmination of their friendship were 400 songs – inspired by the works of the poet.

Calcutta was the major hub of Indian films produced in the 1930s. New Theatres and Madan Pictures were the main studios along with the other companies. After earning a name with his compositions, Kamal tried his luck in films. His first picture was Pandit Moshai (1936) in Bangla which was followed by Sarbjanin, Vivahotsab and Devyani between 1936-1942. The legendary actor, director Prathmesh Chandra Barua was impressed by his music and gave him a break in Jawaab in 1942. PC Barua directed both the version in Hindi and Bangla. The film was an instant hit. It had cult numbers like Toofan mail ye duniya toofan mail, Ae chand chhup na jana and Kuchh yaad na rahe.

Kamal Dasgupta’s next film was MP productions social, Hospital, starring Kanan Devi, Ahindra Choudhary and Heeralal. The very same year he did another Barua Production, Ranee. The cast included J Ganguly, Kalawati, PC Barua and Jamuna. Like his earlier films, his music became popular. Kamal Dasgupta was as successful in films as he was in his private recording career.

In 1944, he moved to Bombay and did the film Meghdoot (1945), based on the Sanskrit poet Kalidas. Leela Desai and Sahu Modak were in the lead. The film was directed by the legendary Debki Kumar Bose. During his stay in Bombay, he did several films across different genres. His next film was Arabian Nights, directed by Niren Lahari. The cast included Kanan Devi, Nawab and Robin Majumdar. All the numbers of the film became very popular. The same year, he did a social film Bindiya, starring Ragini, Amar, M Shakeer and E Billimoriya. The film was directed by CM Luhar. Kamal Das Gupta used the voices of Anima Dasgupta, Kalyani Das, Hemant Kumar and Amar. His next film was the mythological Krishna Leela (1946) which was directed by Debki Kumar Bose and had Kanan Devi and Paresh Banerjee in the lead. 1946 was the busiest year for Kamal Das Gupta. He did Zameen Asmaan for director Dwarka Khosla, starring Ranjana, Jeevan and Kusum Deshpande.

Coming back to Calcutta, he did Faisala (1947) followed by Manmani. The film had Ragini and Jairaj in the lead. The film was directed by Sarvottam Badami. His last film with his mentor PC Barua was Iran Ki Ek Raat (1949) – a costume drama, starring Jamuna, Narang, Chandrakant and Chandrawati. Its melodious number were: Ulfat mein jise banaya tha, Chhalke chhalke sarabein jawani ke palaye, Kaun hai teer andaaj bada, Ae dil kya and Khel hai ye zindagi. His last release was Phulwari in 1951. He had 40 films to his credit. He gave music to 17 Hindi films. His first film was Jawab-42 and the last Hindi film was Phulwari-51. He had also sung 1 song in Hindi in film Jawab-42.

Following this, the maverick composer got completely disillusioned by the film industry and recording companies. His favourite songs which were sold in the lakhs didn’t carry his name on the jackets. At the age of 44, he married his favourite singer, Firoza Begum and embraced Islam. Kamal Dasgupta, by now, became Kareemuddin Ahmed. He kept on doing movies whenever an offer came. His last film in Bangla was Bodhu Baran in 1967.

He shifted to Dhaka. When Bangladesh became independent, he became a citizen in 1972. The composer was a man of taste. He owned a Buick, a rare thing in Calcutta in the 1950s. He was a great human being. He fed hundreds of people during the Bengal famine. He was also extremely fond of cricket. He was blessed with three sons – Shafin Ahmed, Hamin Ahmed and Tahsin Ahmed. They followed their father in music and cricket. Two brothers played cricket at the state level and Hamin Ahmed was selected for the national team of Bangladesh. Kamal Das Gupta with his failing health and lack of proper medical treatment succumbed to his ailments and passed away in Dhaka on July 28, 1974, at the age of 62.

With all his work in film line, his name will be remembered forever, for making the Geet form of songs in Hindi and Bangla, popular in India. His pioneering contribution to promoting the Non Film Songs, is beyond words. Music lovers throughout the country are indebted to him for this work. Poet Lyricist Faiyaz Hashmi and composer Kamal Dasgupta were regularly churning out wonderful melodies on 78 RPM every month and listeners all over India were enjoying them fully. Surprisingly, while Kamal’s name was written correct, Hashmi was credited in several ways like F Hashmi, F. Hashmi, Faiaz Hashmi, Faiaz Hashumi, Faiyaz Hashmi, Faiyyaz Hashami, Falyyaz Hashmi, Fayyaz Hashimi etc.

Actually,in 1985,Jagmohan Sursagar wrote in his Autobiography…..

” In the initial stages Kamal Dasgupta was influenced by Rabindranath Tagore. Tagore’s songs and compositions(Rabindra sangeet) were extremely popular, but were limited to Bangla people only. Ghazal, qawwali, Dadra, Naat, Thumri, Hori, Kajari etc used to come to market but had a very limited listenership. These never reached the top.

” The fusion of Ghazal,Dadra and Qawali with Bangla Geet style gave birth to Hindi Non Film Songs or geets. As such Geet had a known and accepted place in Literature, but not in Music. To establish this new Genre, Kamal babu used lyrics by Pt.Madhur, Pt. Anjum and Faiyaz Hashmi, got them sung by Jagmohan, Hemant, Talat, Juthika etc. Their records were inscribed with ‘ Hindi Geet (Hindustani Song) ‘. What thus started as NFS Geet from 1936 continued upto next 20 years non stop. “

(adapted, with thanks, from an article by Sharad Dutt, in milleniumpost.in, ‘Yaad kiya Dil ne’ by Subhash Chandra Jadhav and my notes.)

Today’s song is a lovely NFS. I am sure you will love it too.


Song- Main saaz bajaaun tum gaao (Hemant Kumar NFS)(1943) Singer- Hemant Kumar, Lyricist- Faiyaz Hashmi, MD- Kamal Dasgupta

Lyrics

Main saaz bajaaun oon
tum gaao o
tum gaao
Main saaz bajaaun oon
tum gaao o
tum gaao
taaaron main main tumhen suna doon
is dil ki jhankaar aar
geeton mein tum mujhse keh do
chhupi baat ek baar
taaaron main main tumhen suna doon
is dil ki jhankaar aar
geeton mein tum mujhse keh do
chhupi baat ek baar
main tumko kuchh samjhaaun
tum mujhko kuchh samjhaao
main tumko kuchh samjhaaun
tum mujhko kuchh samjhaao
Main saaz bajaaun oon
tum gaao o
tum gaao

mere sur mein dard chhupaa ho o
ek jaadoo ho geet tumhaara
mere sur mein dard chhupaa ho o
ek jaadoo ho geet tumhaara
hum tum donon milen jahaan aan
hum tum donon milen jahaan
(?) wo dariya ka kinaara
meri dhun par maujen tadpen
meri dhun par maujen tadpen
tum geet se lehron ko sharmaao o
tum geet se lehron ko sharmaao o
Main saaz bajaaun oon
tum gaao o
tum gaao


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 4182 Post No. : 15361

Today’s song is from film Ranee-43. The film was made by Barua Productions, floated by producer, director, actor and singer, P C Barua, before he had joined New Theatres. He joined NT on the invitation of B N Sircar, though he had his own production outfit and studio. In fact, he wanted a merger of his company with NT, but Sircar declined and offered Barua a paid job at NT, on monthly basis.

While in NT, Barua gave hit films, one after another like, Rooplekha-34, Devdas-35, Maya-36, Manzil-36, Mukti-37, Adhikar-38 and Zindagi-40. During the making of film Zindagi, differences between him and Sircar thickened. The reason was Barua felt, he was not given as many films to make as Nitin Bose and Harischandra Chunder got. Ego of both the giants persisted and culminated in their separation.

In the History of Hindi Cinema,till the Golden 50s started,Bengal had a dominating position in films and music. Its meaningful,entertaining films and the Film and the Non Film music ruled the roost, from the early 30s. In this conquest of the East,the Lion’s share was that of NEW THEATRES-set up and owned by B N Sircar. New Theatres was not just a production company,but it was an Institution and a school for developing artistes in the 30s and the 40s.

Out of these 20 years,I would say the first almost 10 years was the Peak Golden Period for NT. 1940, being one of the best years for NT, also was the beginning of its end, with the First major shock, when P C or Pramathesh Barua left NT because of differences with B N Sircar. In the period of 1940 to 1950, one by one many people left NT. Most went to Bombay, in search of greener pastures.

There were 3 reasons. One, during the period 1946 and 1947, production at NT was almost Nil ( 1946-due to communal riots in Bengal and 1947- due to Partition blues), but NT had to pay salaries of their employees. In peak years, their salary bill alone amounted to about 45000 rupees every month. Secondly, one of their main markets for Bangla and Hindi films-East Bengal, had become another country-East Pakistan and they lost this market. Thirdly, the New Government imposed a heavy ‘Excess profit ‘Tax ‘ on successful companies like NT. This damaged them financially very much. Added to this,of course, B N Sircar failed to hold people together due to Ego problems, recognitions etc etc.

By 1950,according to Dilip Sircar-son of B N Sircar,” many people left, Finance was in disarray and we had many court cases slapped on us.” The result- B N Sircar closed the shop ! In 1954,NT was handed over to Arora Film company. Then in 1955, Deluxe Films took them over. In January-56, the company closed down officially and in August 56,a Receiver was appointed by the High Court. New Theatres went into Liquidation in March-62 and a Glorious Chapter came to a close for ever !

Even in the tumultuous and troubled final years,few Loyal artistes did not leave NT. Pankaj Mullick was one of them,who stayed with B N Sircar till the last,despite differences with him.Many others like Kidar Sharma, Kanan Devi, Uma Shashi, PC Barua, Nitin Bose, Debk Bose,Phani Muzumdar, Nabendu Ghosh, Bimal Roy, K N Singh, Prithviraj Kapoor, Kumar etc and above all, K L Saigal- the pride possession of NT, left, at different times. Most came down to Bombay.

But, you will notice that actors from this lot who came from Calcutta to Bombay, were all Non-Bangla people. From the very beginning, actors from Bengal or South, rarely came to make their acting careers. Those who came at all, majority of them were actresses, who were ready to learn Hindi to continue here or they had Non-Bangla backgrounds. For example- actress Smriti Biswas, though a Bengalee, grew up and started acting in Lahore.

There were 3 reasons why actors did not come to Bombay from Bengal or South…
1.Difficulty and reluctance in picking up Hindi language and coping up with Bombay culture.
2. King size Regional Pride and
3. Their own areas became big production centres and scope was available on familiar grounds.

Artistes from other disciplines like Direction, Music, Singing, Editing, Cinematography etc came here and prospered, but not actors, worth mentioning.

Film Ranee-43 was made as a Bilingual film in Bangla ( Chandaar Kalank) and Hindi. The MD was Kamal Dasgupta, Lyricist was Pt. Madhur and the cast was Jahar Ganguly, Kalavati, P C Barua, Jamuna, Patience Cooper, Vikram Kapoor (father of Meena Kapoor-singer and wife of Anil Biswas) and others. When I first heard this name “Jahar”, I was shocked, but then realised that this was a Bangla name. Obviously, its meaning must be something else,other than ” Poison”. I started searching on Google and at one place found that Jahar in Bangla means ” Gift of God “. My Bangali friend in Mumbai says it means ” Gem “.

Jahar Ganguly (October 1904 – 1969) was a Bengali film actor and theater personality. He received Best actor award in 6th Annual Bengal Film Journalists’ Association Awards in 1943 for his performance in Bandi.
Ganguly was born in undivided 24 Parganas Dist, British India. He worked in number of Bengali and Hindi films in 40s and 50s as a supporting actor in comedy counterparts to the dramatic lead. He got break through in Dena Paona directed by Premankur Atorthy. Ganguly acted under Satyajit Ray’s direction in Parash Pathar and Chiriyakhana. He also performed as stage actor until the 1960.

Information on actress Patience Cooper has not yet been given on our Blog. She was one of the 7 sisters, out of whom 3 sisters-Patience, Violet and Pearl worked in Hindi and Bangla films. Patience Cooper (1905–1993) was an Anglo-Indian from Calcutta. Cooper had a successful career in both silent and sound films. She was one of the early superstars of Bollywood. Cooper is credited with the first Female double roles of Indian cinema—as twin sisters in Patni Pratap and as mother and daughter in Kashmiri Sundari, even though earlier in 1917, actor Anna Salunke had played roles of both the male lead character Ram and the female lead character Seeta in the film Lanka Dahan.

Cooper began her career as a dancer in Brandmann’s Musical Comedy, a Eurasian troupe. She later joined Jamshedji Framji Madan’s Corinithian Stage Company as an actress. Cooper first made an impact with Nala Damayanti (1920). The film starred Keki Adajania as Nala and Cooper as Damayanti. The film was a big budget Madan Theatre production and was directed by Eugenio de Liguoro, known in Italy for his Orientalist spectacles like Fascino d’Oro (1919). Nala Damayanti was famous for its special effects at the time — Narada’s ascent of Mount Meru to heaven, the transformations of four gods into impersonations of Nala, the transformation of Kali into a serpent among others.
Her next film was Vishnu Avtar, released in 1921. De Liguoro also directed Dhruva Chartitra (1921), a mythological based on the legend of Dhruva whose quest for eternal knowledge and salvation was rewarded when he became the brightest star in the heavens, the pole star also known as Dhruvatara. The film was made as a bid for an international breakthrough for Madan Theatres and featured many Europeans in the cast along with Cooper who played the female lead, Suniti.

One of Cooper’s biggest successes was Pati Bhakti (1922). Cooper played Leelavati in the film, directed by the great JJ Madan himself, advocating that women should be devoted to their husband. The film is regarded as her greatest film and was also involved in a small controversy as in Madras, the censor demanded that a dance number be removed on the grounds of obscenity.

Cooper also played perhaps the first ever double roles in Hindi films — Patni Pratap (1923), where she played two sisters and Kashmiri Sundari (1924), where she played mother and daughter.

Cooper did films right through to the mid-1930s. One of her last major films was Zehari Saap (1933). The film was a typical Cooper vehicle about a medieval chieftain’s revolt against the good Nawab Bakar Malik. The nawab’s outlaw son vows revenge and finally all’s well that ends well. The dramatic conflict in the film sees the chieftain wanting to marry the princess, whom he had raised as his own daughter.

Cooper acted in over 40 films until she retired after performing in her last films, Iraada-44 and Khan Bahadur-46. Cooper was often cast in the role of a sexually troubled but innocent woman, always at the centre of moral dilemmas, often caused by the men in her lives.

A major aspect of Cooper’s star image was the successful achievement of the ‘Hollywood look’ in spite of different light and technical conditions. Her distinctively Anglo-Indian features, like dark eyes, sharp features, ebony hair and light skin tone, allowed technicians to experiment with the imported technique of eye-level lighting and achieve an appearance similar to Hollywood stars of the silent era.

The low number of women, especially Hindus, in the film industry during the 1920s (due to conservative attitudes) meant Anglo-Indian actresses like Cooper, were in demand. Her appearance in a string of successful films has led her to being called the first ever female Indian film star.

It is generally supposed Cooper married Mirza Ahmad Ispahani Saheb (MAH Ispahani), a well-known Indian businessman. In 1947, they migrated to Pakistan. Actually she was married to MAH Ispahani at the age of 21 and divorced soon after. She then married Gul Hamid Khan, one of the first early silent movie actors. He died six years later from Hodgkin’s Disease. She remained friends with MAH Ispahani till the end of her life. Cooper changed her name to Sabra Begum and lived the last of her days with her two adopted daughters Zeenat and Haleema in Karachi, Pakistan. Her foster daughter Syeda Nafees Rizvi lives in Houston, Texas, USA. She fostered and/or adopted 17 children during her lifetime. Cooper died in 1993. (adapted from wiki and upperstall, with thanks.)

After Partition in 1947, it did not take long for things to become normal in the Indian film industry. This was mainly because ready replacements were available in plenty to fill the vacancies caused by migration. As far as producers and financiers were concerned, almost all producers and film makers had arrived here from Lahore. It was actually Lahore which felt the absence of Film makers. Pakistan film Industry was somehow managed well by the experienced people who went from India and Pakistan enjoyed a ” GOLDEN AGE OF FILMS AND MUSIC ” from 1959 to 1977. Once the old generation retired, there was no second line to take over from them.

The film industry in Pakistan was never an organised one. Moreover the often changing Goverments did not bother to do anything to protect, sustain, help or develop the infrastructure of Film industry. Unlike India, there was neither a Films Division, nor was there anything like Film and Television Institute to build local artistes in different fields.

By 2010,the film industry in Pakistan was in such a poor shape that, against India’s film production of 13526 films in 2011, Pakistan had produced only 7 films in that year !

While Indian films were distributed in over 90 countries, there was no International market for Pakistan films.

All studios in Pakistan were in ruins and Theatres had been demolished.

Can you believe, In the entire Islamabad city, there is ONLY ONE Theatre-a multiplex of 4 screens ! (info from-Filmistan-Javed Shaikh 0n pk.politics.in dated 10-4-2014 )

We have heard songs composed by the Music Directors who migrated to Pakistan,i.e. West Pakistan. Today we will listen to a film song composed by a famous and talented composer of Hindi/Bangla films, who migrated to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). His name is KAMAL PRASANNA DASGUPTA or simply, Kamal Dasgupta ( 28-7-1912 to 20-7-1974.)

It is a moot point whether Kamal should be called a Film composer or a NFS composer in Hindi and Bangla. He can be called the Originator or the Pioneer, who established NFS during the period from 1935 to 1955. It was he who introduced the word ” Hindustani Song” for NFS on the 78 RPM records.

He gave music in 16 Hindi films like Jawab, Hospital, Rani, Meghdoot, Arabian Nights, Bindiya, Krishna Leela, Pehchan, Zameen Aasmaan, Faisla, Giribala, Manmaani, Chandrashekhar, Vijay yatra, Iran ki ek raat and Fulwari. However, except for Jawab and Hospital his songs did not become very popular. Kanan Devi became a National name after she sang “Ye duniya Toofan mail” in Jawab-42. He also gave music in 22 Bangla films.

He was not in good terms with his wife, Firoza Begum. In his final days, he contracted T.B. Finally he said Good-Bye to this world on 20-7-1974. The originator and populariser of NFS in India and a maker of memorable songs like “Toofan mail” left us forever-unsung !

Today’s song is the second song from this film. The story of this film was provided earlier by Sadanand Kamath ji, with the first song, so I am not repeating it here. The duet is sung by Anima Dasgupta (nee Sengupta…wife of Subal Dasgupta, MD) and an unidentified male. I liked this song .I hope you too will like it.


Song-Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali (Raanee)(1943) Singers- Kamal Dasgupta, Anima Dasgupta, Lyricist- Pt. Madhur, MD- Kamal Dasgupta

Lyrics

Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
Sawan ne boondan ki jhalar daali
boondan ki jhaalar daali re ae
boondan ki jhaalar daali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
daali ee
boondan ki jhaalar daali
jhaank jhaank kar dil ki duniya
dekh raha hoon aaj
armaanon ke sar pe rakkha hai khushiyon ka taaj
chhupi huyi hai iske andar
chhupi huyi hai iske andar
jeewan ki hariyaali ee
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali

<em.Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
arre papaiyya
zara bataa aa
kyun piyoo piyoo raha pukaar
kyun piyoo piyoo raha pukaar
gulshan mein kyun aayi
kyun aayi hai
saj dhaj kar nayi bahaar
sada ye saawan ki kyun aaye
man ko harne waali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
ye jhaalar nahin hai
ye maikhaana
jiski boonden hain masti ka paimaana
pee pee kar dekho jhoom rahi hai
pee pee kar dekho jhoom rahi hai
aur ghata ye kaali kaali ee ee
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali
Saawan ne boondan ki jhaalar daali


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3923 Post No. : 14990

Today’s song is from an almost unknown film called Zamin Asman-46. The film was made by Saubhagya Pictures, but was promoted and distributed by Prakash Pictures. While HFGK mentions name of Saubhagya, the film booklet and other records show the name of Prakash Pictures. In fact, with this film, not only the rights of this film but the company Saubhagya Pictures was taken over by the Bhatt brothers for Prakash Pictures.

The film was directed by Dwarka Khosla (born in 1904), who started from silent film era. His first Talkie film was Josh E Jawani-35 and he directed, in all, 33 films till his last film Reporter Raju-62. All songs of today’s film were composed by Faiyaz Hashmi (1920 to 29-11-2011), who wrote lyrics for only 9 Hindi films in India. The Music Director was Kamal Dasgupta and today’s song is sung by Jagmohan Sursagar and Kalyani Das.

Kalyani is a name fit for ” Same name Confusion” and I find that though kalyani Bai and kalyani Das were two different singers, most sites, Blogs and even the well known book ” Swaron ki yatra” by Anil Bhargav ji, makes a mix up and they are treated as one person. Let us know who they were….

First Kalyani Bai. Hailing from Turkman gate in Delhi, Kalyani Bai was a born singer. She took lessons from Ustad Vazir khan and in no time started singing on A.I.R and HMV. She recorded many Ghazals, Khayals and Thumris. She was taken to Calcutta at the age of 13 years to act and sing in film Pardesi, which was shelved halfway, but she was offered a job by New Theatres at Rs. 250 pm. Her nickname was Kallo. R C Boral changed her original name Zarina to Kalyani bai.

She acted and sang in 4 films of New Theatres- Anath Ashram, mukti, president and Vidyapati till 1937. She acted with all big stars of that time. Later Chandulal Shah called her to Bombay with Rs. 800 per month and she joined Ranjit in Bombay, doing her first film Toofani Toli-37. After doing 9 films, she left Ranjit and worked for several production houses. In 1945, she was in the famous All Women Qawali in film Zeenat-45- Aahen na bhari, shikve na kiye.

After her marriage in 1948, she left films to raise a family. However, she had to come back to films after after many years to do some films in 1975 onwards. After doing some films with small roles, she realised that her time was gone and she retired completely. Her last years were spent in financial difficulties. She died on 1-10-2009. kalyani Bai acted in 26 films and sang 68 songs in 41 films.

Kalyani Das was born and brought up in Calcutta. She was born in 1927 in Calcutta. Her first Hindi film song came up in film Jawab-1942, but her solo song came in Kurukshetra-45, under the baton of Pt. Ganpatrao. When Kamal Dasgupta went to Bombay, he called her and she sang in film Meghdoot-45, Bindiya-46, Zamin Asman-46, Prem ki Duniya-46, Manmani-47, Faisla-47,Giribala-47, Swayamsiddha-49 and Iran ki ek raat-49. She sang 37 songs in 11 Hindi films in addition to several songs in Bangla films.

Kalyani Bai left Calcutta in 1937 and kalyani Das started in 1942 in Calcutta. Kalyani Bai never sang for Kamal Dasgupta or any imported Bangla composer. kalyani Das sang only for Kamal Dasgupta (8 films) and in one film each for Ganpat rao, Subal Dasgupta and Prafulla Choudhari. Therefore there need not be any mix up, but you know how it is in Hindi film industry ! Shortcuts are popular.

After Partition in 1947, it did not take long for things to become normal in the Indian film industry. This was mainly because ready replacements were available in plenty to fill the vacancies caused by migration. As far as producers and financers were concerned, almost all producers and film makers had arrived here from Lahore. It was actually Lahore which felt the absence of Film makers. Pakistan film Industry was somehow managed well by the experienced people who went from India and Pakistan enjoyed a ” GOLDEN AGE OF FILMS AND MUSIC ” from 1959 to 1977. Once the old generation retired, there was no second line to take over from them.

The film industry in Pakistan was never an organised one. Moreover the often changing Goverments did not bother to do anything to protect, sustain, help or develop the infrastructure of Film industry. Unlike India, there was neither a Films Division, nor was there anything like Film and Television Institute to build local artistes in different fields.

By 2010,the film industry in Pakistan was in such a poor shape that, against India’s film production of 13526 films in 2011, Pakistan had produced only 7 films in that year !

While Indian films were distributed in over 90 countries, there was no International market for Pakistan films.

All studios in Pakistan were in ruins and Theatres had been demolished.

Can you believe, In the entire Islamabad city, there is ONLY ONE Theatre-a multiplex of 4 screens ! (info from-Filmistan-Javed Shaikh 0n pk.politics.in dated 10-4-2014 )

We heard songs composed by the Music Directors who migrated to Pakistan,i.e. West Pakistan. Today we will talk about a famous and talented composer of Hindi/Bangla films, who migrated to East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). His name is KAMAL PRASANNA DASGUPTA or simply, Kamal Dasgupta.

It is a moot point whether Kamal should be called a Film composer or a NFS composer in Hindi and Bangla. He can be called the Originator or the Pioneer, who established NFS during the period from 1935 to 1955. It was he who introduced the word ” Hindustani Song” for NFS on the 78 RPM records.

Kamal Prasanna Dasgupta was born on 28-7-1912 in village Narail,Jessore district in East Bengal. He matriculated in 1928 and did his B.Com. Then he earned a doctorate in music from the Banares Hindu University. His father Tara Prasanna died early. Kamal, his brother Subal and sister Sudhira were brought up by the eldest brother Bimal Dasgupta.

In 1935, he joined HMV as a Music Director. Here he met Kazi Nazrul Islam, who was also employed there. Kamal was a singer himself and sang many songs in Hindi, Bangla and also Tamil. He tuned almost 400 songs written by Kazi as Nazrul Geeti. It was here that he met and developed the talents of singer Juthika Roy and Jagmohan. The modern songs tuned in Rabindra and a mixed ghazal style were labelled as ” HINDUSTANI SONG ” and soon became popular all over the country. Lyricist Faiyaz Hashmi was the third person in the team of Kazi, Kamal and Faiyaz. Besides Jagmohan, Kamal Dasgupta also helped Talat Mehmood and Hemant Kumar to get established with NFS in Hindi and Bangla. His close ties with Juthika Roy were ‘special’. She wanted to marry him, but when it was clear that it was not possible, she chose not to marry at all and remained a spinster throughout her life.

He gave music in 16 Hindi films like Jawab, Hospital, Rani, Meghdoot, Arabian Nights, Bindiya, Krishna Leela, Pehchan, Zameen Aasmaan, Faisla, Giribala, Manmaani, Chandrashekhar, Vijay yatra, Iran ki ek raat and Fulwari. However, except for Jawab and Hospital his songs did not become very popular. Kanan Devi became a National name after she sang “Ye duniya Toofan mail” in Jawab-42. He also gave music in 22 Bangla films.

Kamal was a chain smoker and suffered from Gall Bladder stones. Instead of an operation, he started taking Morphin injection for pain relief, but then he became its addict. His elder brother died and all the family responsibility fell on his shoulders. He had earned a lot, but all his money was lost when his bank went bankrupt. In Calcutta, New Theatres was almost on the verge of closing down. Arrival of new blood in music field took away focus from him and he felt neglected. He became a depressed person. Around 1958 he migrated to Dhaka-East Pakistan. He converted to Islam, changing his name to Kamal Islam. He also married singer Firoza Begum. The got 3 sons and a daughter.

After the emergence of Bangla Desh, the Government tried to help him, but it was too late by then as he had become disillusioned and depressed. In frustration he wrote to a friend “The pictures you see in front, everybody remembers them and praises them. But nobody wants to know the people who work behind the scenes, nor talk about them. That is the nature of the world.”

His was not in good terms with his wife. In his final days, he contracted T.B. Finally he said Good-Bye to this world on 20-7-1974. The originator and populariser of NFS in India and a maker of memorable songs like “Toofan mail” left us forever-unsung !

The Heroine of this film was Ranjana. Now, hardly anyone knows about this actress who had worked as a Heroine with Dilip Kumar also in his early career. One can not get any information about her in any book or on the internet. here is some information about her, for our readers.

Ranjana’s real name was Ratan Shantaram Deshpande. She was born in Nagpur on 20-10-1927. While studying in St. Ursula High School, she learnt dancing and music from well known ustads. After passing her 6th standard examination, she came to Bombay to her elder sister, Kusum Deshpande, who was already working as actress with Minerva Movietone films. Kusum married Vasant Thengadi, a handsome actor in Hindi films of those times.

Kusum arranged for specialised dancing for Ratan in the holidays. later Ratan was taken to Vijay Bhatt of Prakash pictures for an interview. She was immediately selected and got a role in the famous film Ramrajya-1943. In this film she was Chitralekha, Sita’s sakhi. Vijay Bhatt also changed her name to Ranjana. She was on pay roles of prakash for Rs. 2000 pm. She acted in films like police-44, Vikramaditya-45 and Hamara Sansar-45. Next films were Nai Maa-46 and Zamin Asman-46.

Ranjana was called by Bombay Talkies to do Heroine’s role opposite Dilip Kumar in film Milan-46. This film was based on Bangla film Nauka Doobi written by Tagore. She did the role of Hem Nalini in this film’s Hindi version. The same role was done by Meera Sircar in the Bangla film Nauka Doobi.

After this film, Ranjana was in great demand, but she wanted to quit films and get married to live a simple life. But as the Luck would have it, she had to continue working in films till 1975. She also worked in many Marathi films. In all, she worked in about 35 films or so. Ranjana worked with many big stars of her times like, prem Adeeb, Prithviraj Kapoor, Jairaj,Dilip kumar,Jeevan, Umakant etc etc

It is interesting to note that her sister and her brother in law acted with her in few films. Some such films were Zamin Asman-46 and Shadi se pehle-47. In film Saajan ka Ghar-48 all three had worked together. Her sister Kusum Deshpande was born on 20-11-1914 at Nagpur. She came to Bombay in 1930 and worked in Minerva as an apprentice, without pay. She worked in A.I.R. and some Marathi dramas and films. Her first Hindi film was Ghar ki Rani-40. She also did Charnon ki Daasi-41, Village Girl-45, Wamaq Azra-46 and Zamin Asmaan-46. In all she did 20 Hindi films. She married actor Vasant Thengadi on 30-11-1944.

We have many families like this in Hindi films. I remember Zubeida and her mother and sisters, Sitara Devi and her 2 sisters, Nargis,her mother and brothers, Kapoor family, Dilip kumar, his brother and sister in law, many film couples and families of several film people are examples. Ranjana was perhaps one early example. Thank God this Ranjana was not around when yet another Ranjana came to Hindi films. She was Ranjana Deshmukh, niece of actress Sandhya(nee Vijaya Deshmukh). This Ranjana, however , worked mainly in Marathi films and did only 4 Hindi films starting with the famous film Chaani-77. Unfortunately, she first met with an accident and then died of Heart attack at the age of just 40 years or so.

Film Zamin Asman-46 was about a love triangle. Baburao Patel severely criticised this film and especially Jeevan- the Hero, in his film magazine Film India issue. The film was released on 12-7-1946 at Lamington Theatre, Bombay. The story of the film as outlined in this magazine was-

Nanak Chand (Ramesh Sinha) owns a sugar mill in partnership with Ravi (Jeevan)- son of his dead partner Pooran Chand. Ravi’s marriage with Nirmala (Kusum) is already announced, before he went to England for higher studies, but Ravi is not interested. Ravi is distressed by the plight of his factory workers, he meets Kamala (Ranjana) in a jungle ashramcalled Bharati Ashram. They fall in love.
There is a conflict between Nanak Chand and his workers. Ravi takes workers’ side. Finally, Nanak chand has to bow down and Ravi and Kamala unite.

Here is a duet sung by Kalyani Das and Jagmohan Sursagar. Jagmohan has not sung many songs in Hindi films. He was more interested and famous for his wonderful NFSs. Therefore it is more enjoyable. I like the voice of kalyani Das.

( Thanks to http://www.beetehuedin.blogspot.com for information culled from Kalyani Bai’s interview by Shishir Krishna Sharma ji )


Song-Ek geet sunaana hai hamen ek geet sunaana hai (Zameen Aasmaan)(1946) Singers-Kalyani Das, Jagmohan Sursagar, Lyrics- Faiyaz Hashmi, MD- Kamal Dasgupta
Both

Lyrics

Ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai
Ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai
rone waalon ko hansaana hai
duniya ko swarg banaana hai
hamen naach naach ke gaana hai
hamen jhoom jhoom ke gaana hai
hamen naach naach ke
jhoom jhoom ke
gaana hai ae ae
ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai

aansoo bhi hansi ban sakte rhain
haan aan aan aan
aan aan aan aan aan
kaanten bhi kali ban sakte hain

haan aan aan aan
aan aan aan aan aan
aansoo bhi hansi ban sakte hain
kaanten bhi kali ban sakte hain
ye kar ke hamen dikhaana hai
ye kar ke hamen dikhaana hai

hamen naach naach ke gaana hai
hamen jhoom jhoom ke gaana hai
hamen naach naach ke
jhoom jhoom ke
gaana hai ae ae
ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai

thhirak thhirak kar jaise baati
aanchal bhar bhar jyot lutaati
ee ee
waise hi

auron ke liye jal jaana hai
jal jaana hai

hamen naach naach ke gaana hai
hamen jhoom jhoom ke gaana hai
hamen naach naach ke
jhoom jhoom ke
gaana hai ae ae
ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai

ab na rahen ye sapne adhoore ae ae ae
ye geet hamen kar denge poore
ae ae ae

jo khoya hai so paana hai
paana hai ae ae
jo khoya hai so paana hai

hamen naach naach ke gaana hai
hamen jhoom jhoom ke gaana hai
hamen naach naach ke
jhoom jhoom ke
gaana hai ae ae
ek geet sunaana hai hamen
ek geet sunaana hai


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Bindiya”(1946) was directed by C M Luhar for Sun Art Pictures, Bombay. The movie had Raagini, Amar, M Shaqir, E Billimoria, Pratima Devi, Bhagwan Das, Leela Mishra, Leela Pawar, Qayam Ali, Madhukar Gupte, Sukumar, Himmat Lal, Mehar Banu, Bhimji etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Manmaani” (1947) was directed by Sarvottam Badami for I A Productions, Bombay. The movie had Jairaj, Ragini, E. Billimoria, Sabita Devi, Nazir Hussain, Amar etc. in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

BINDIYA (1946) was produced under the banner of Sun Art Pictures and was directed by Chimanlal Luhar. The star cast included Amar, Ragini, E Billimoria, Kamal Zamindar, Leela Mishra, Pratima Devi, Shakir, Bhagwandas, Leela Pawar etc. The film was reviewed in August 1946 issue of ‘Filmindia’. I was surprised to find for a change that the review was somewhat lengthier than the usual. After reading the review, I came to know as to why it was so. The additional length of the review was utilised for heavily criticising the director of the film for his inapt handling of the emotional scenes and for Prabhulal Dwivedi, the story writer for the film story based on a mix of several mythological stories.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Jawaab”(1942) was produced and directed by P C Barua for M P Production, Calcutta. The movie had P C Barua, Kanan Devi, Jamuna, Ahindra Chaudhary, Devbala, Zahar Ganguly, Tulsi Chakraborty, Tandon, Bikram Kapoor etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

“Jawaab”(1942) was produced and directed by P C Barua for M P Production, Calcutta. The movie had P C Barua, Kanan Devi, Jamuna, Ahindra Chaudhary, devbala, Zahar Ganguly, Tulsi Chakraborty, Tandon, Bikram Kapoor etc in it.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

In my last write-up kyun dil mila hamaara tumhaara jawaab do, I had discussed the confusion about ‘Kalyanis’- Kalyani Bai, the actor-singer and Kalyani Das, the playback singer. I had also mentioned therein that their distinct voices help listeners distinguish between the two. The song I had presented in that write-up was sung by Kalyani Bai. I was toying with the idea of presenting a song sung by Kalyani Das immediately after my last write-up. I had already identified her song from ‘Manmaani’ (1947).
Read more on this topic…


What is this blog all about

This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

This is a labour of love, where “new” songs are added every day, and that has been the case for over TWELVE years. This blog has over 16000 song posts by now.

This blog is active and online for over 4000 days since its beginning on 19 july 2008.

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Total number of songs posts discussed

16060

Number of movies covered in the blog

Movies with all their songs covered =1232
Total Number of movies covered =4388

Total visits so far

  • 13,991,013 hits

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Category of songs

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Historical dates

Blog Start date: 19 july 2008

Active for more than 4000 days.

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