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Atul’s Song A Day- A choice collection of Hindi Film & Non-Film Songs

Posts Tagged ‘Pt Indra


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3919 Post No. : 14982

 

Today’s song is from film ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944).

Hindi film makers seem to have an attraction for Mughal Empire. Films were made on life events of right from Babar to Bahadurshah Zafar- the first to the last Mughal kings. I do not know what the film makers found so magnetic in their lives. Not only Mughal kings, but also the Mongol king Changez khan, Nadir Shah and generals like Behram Khan also became the subject matters of films. May be the producers found lot of scope to show big palaces, big armies, wars, dances and songs, beautiful women etc. in such films which attracted the audience.

More than any other Mughal king, it is Babar, who has been in public discussion in India , since about 20-30 years, for well known reasons for which we are not concerned here. Babar was born as Zaheeruddin Mohammed, on 14-2-1483 in Fergana valley in what is known today as Uzbekistan. He was a direct descendant of Taimurlane. At the age of 12 years he ascended his father’s thrown and faced rebellion. Next few years were spent on fighting to save his kingdom. Having lost, and won and again lost the valley of Fergana and Samarkand three times, Babar decided to go to India.

He marched with his army towards India, which was ruled by Ibrahim Khan Lodhi that time. Babar’s army was tired and tried rebellion till they reached India. In the battle of Panipat, he defeated Lodhi and became the Emperor of India. Later he fought with several Rajput kings and won also. Babar married several times and had several children too. His 3 sons were main and Humayun was his dearest son. Babar established the Mughal Empire in 1526 at Delhi. It was Humayun, who succeeded Babar when he died on 26-12-1530.

‘Shahenshah Babar’ is a depiction of his life from childhood to death, but most part of the film is about the love affair and sickness of Humayun. After his death Babar was first buried in Agra, but later his remains were buried again in Kabul. Babar is considered a national hero in Uzbekistan and Kergystan. In India Babar is not known for such good things.

This film was made by Ranjit Movietone, calling it a historical film. It was directed by Wazahat Mirza Changezi (20-4-1908 to 4-8-1990). He directed 5 films, namely, ‘Swaminath’ (1942), ‘Jawaani’ (1942), ‘Shahenshah Babar’ (1944), ‘Prabhu Ka Ghar’ (1945) and ‘Nishaana’ (1950). He wrote lyrics in films like ‘Watan’ (1938), ‘Hum Tum Aur Woh’ (1938), ‘Bahen’ (1941), ‘Roti’ (1942) and ‘Jawaani’ (1942). Later he became famous as a screenplay and dialogue writer. Some of his famous films are ‘Zeenat’ (1945), ‘Shaheed’ (1948), ‘Shikast’ (1953), ‘Mother India’ (1957), ‘Yahudi’ (1958). ‘Mughal e Azam’ (1960), ‘Ganga Jamuna’ (1961), ‘Leader’ (1964), ‘Palki’ (1967) etc.

The music director was Khemchand Prakash and lyricists were Pt. Indra, Munshi Aziz and Munshi Shums. Out of the 9 songs, today’s song is 5th song to be discussed here. The cast of the film was Khurshid, Sheikh Mukhtar, Sushil Kumar, Yakub, Majid, Anwari, Agha and others.

Religious, mythological or historical stories have some characters who are with extra ordinary strength or even Rakshasas. Such characters maintained the equilibrium of entertainment in those films and made them more interesting with their actions. In the Hindi film industry, some actors fitted this requirement. Some of them were BM Vyas, Ramayan Tiwari, Sheikh Mukhtar, Dara Singh, Dev kumar etc. Sheikh Mukhtar fitted into these roles perfectly, for example as ‘Nadir Shah’ in film ‘Nadir Shah’ (1968), as Changez Khan in film ‘Changez Khan’ (1957), or as Sher Afghan in film ‘Noor Jehan’ (1967). In social films, roles of police officers and in action/stunt films as dacoit, drunkard, gambler etc. In some of the films directors used to make him do unimaginable and unbelievable acts like in film ‘Roti’ (1942), he brings down an aircraft with his spear throw ! As a police officer, he would hold 5-6 criminals by their scruff in his extra large hands or run barefoot after a speeding jeep and stop it !

His real name was Mukhtar Ahmed Siddiqi. He was from old Delhi. His father was a senior police officer. He was Bollywood`s first ‘hunk’ – one who would have put today`s WWF hulks to shame. Exceptionally tall and frighteningly hefty, he was endowed with an immense physique. His face was a roadmap of crisscrossing muscles. A sharp jaw line added to the dimensions of his rock-hard face. Hardly `star` material compared to the Hrithiks and Salmans of today. Yet, this rugged man was once a hero.

Those were the days when a limp-wristed hero, who could not even unlock the mysteries of the lush curls of his beloved, was universally adored in cinema halls. In such times, Sheikh Mukhtar adorned the garb of a hero. This feat was achieved by movie monarch Mehboob Khan. In ‘Ek Hi Raasta’ (aka ‘The Only Way’), a film directed by Mehboob Sb for Sagar Movietone way back in 1939, Sheikh Mukhtar was one of the three heroes. The other two were Arun Ahuja (matinee idol Govinda`s father) and a certain Harish (who later directed films such as ‘Burma Road’, he was Tara Harish). Though billed as male lead, Sheikh Mukhtar never fitted into the `romantic` mold. And why should he? He portrayed an uncouth lover, almost a pre-Neanderthal man, in Mehboob Khan`s ‘Roti’ with sensuous Sitara Devi as his beloved. In that film, Sheikh would bring down an aircraft with the mere strike of his spear. When thirsty, he would empty an entire bucket down his throat in one go. Soppy dialogues oozing with maudlin emotions such as love and romance, did not come forth from the super-hunk.

In Wadia`s ‘Krishnabhakt Bodana’ (1944), Sheikh Mukhtar was the Lord`s devotee. In ‘Bahen’ (1941), he portrayed the role of Nalini Jaywant’s brother. His imposing personality fitted well into period films which dabbled in history. He played the role of Shahenshah Babar; went on to become Chengez Khan and then donned the mantle of Sher Afghan in ‘Noor Jehan’, a film which he produced. He was often teamed with Begum Para, the bewitching beauty of that era. The pair hit it off exceedingly well on the screen. For countless cinema aficionados, the Sheikh Mukhtar-Begum Para pair was a classic case of the beauty and the beast. With pint-sized Mukri, Sheikh Mukhtar had a successful celluloid partnership. Sheikh Mukhtar produced a string of Hindi films, such as ‘Dada’, ‘Dara’, ‘Ustad Pedro’, ‘Toote Taare’, ‘Mr. Lambu’, ‘Annadaata’, ‘Mangu’ (with another beauty, Nigar Sultan), ‘Do Ustaad’, and ‘Noor Jehan’, among others.

He wove into his films a variety of songs, from “Bahaaron Ke Dole Mein Aayi Hai Jawaani”, a romantic number from ‘Annadaata’, to naughty ditties, such as “Dil Ka Ye Injan Seetiyaan Maare” from ‘Ustaad Pedro’, and “Namaste, Doctor Baaro, Hum Ko Bhi Ek Injection Maaro”. Sheikh Mukhtar`s pair of shoes, of twelve number size, (in ‘Do Ustaad’), summed up his big time existence. His role in this film was widely appreciated. Sheikh Mukhtar showcased his acting talents in the concluding scene of ‘Do Ustaad’ when he holds his long-lost brother and son to his bosom.

Sheikh Mukhtar invested all his hard-earned money on ‘Noor Jehan’, his dream project. However, the period film bombed miserably at the box office. And with the film collapsed this mighty man. Debts began to pile up. Income Tax arrears kept multiplying in geometrical progression. Unable to resolve this crisis, Sheikh Mukhtar, who was adored in Bollywood for his integrity and for his firmness to keep vices of every variety at bay, fled to Pakistan with the alacrity of a small-time house burglar. He took with him the prints of his films. But, sadly, the Pakistan film industry offered him no succor. He kept running from pillar to post, visiting government offices with a plea that he be allowed to release his films.

He was not at all welcomed by Pak film industry. As it is Indian films were already banned there. When all efforts failed, he met General Zia ul Haq. He was a great fan of Sohrab Modi. When he learnt that Sohrab Modi was acting in this film, he allowed the film’s release. However, the Pak film industry went to Supreme court against this order. The case dragged on and finally on 11th may 1980 he won the case. While hee was returning to Lahore with his son Sheikh Moinuddin, Mukhtar got a severe heart attack in the flight. He was immediately taken home and doctor was called. Strangely no doctor came to help him. Finally by the time he was taken to hospital, he died on the way.

‘Noor Jehan’, which was released in Pakistan after Sheikh Mukhtar died, on 23rd may 1980, kept the box office registers ringing with cash. In his 40 years’ career he acted in 70 films and under the banner of his own Omar Khayyam Films, he produced 8 films. (Some information from articles by Shirish Kanekar and Jawed Hamid is used here with thanks).

Singer actress Khurshid played the heroine Hameeda’s role and sang good songs too. Here is an edited interview of Khursheed, taken in 1992,by Pakistani journalist, Navid Rasheed (Thanks to Cineplot)..

Khursheed Bano was born as Irshad Begum in Lahore, on 14th April 1914. As a child she resided in the Bhatti Gate area next to Allama Iqbal’s house. The two families were pretty close. Khursheed was a child then. There was no ambition of joining the showbiz bandwagon then and it was by chance that led her to this arena.

Khursheed was very still young when she became an actress in the early 30’s. The era of the silent movies had already ended with the release of ‘Alam Ara’ in 1931 and the Indian film industry was going through a revolution. What set her apart from other heroines were her attractive face and certain flamboyance owing to which she made her presence felt. And then she was very good actress who could be melodramatic and happy-go-lucky with equal ease.

Each star then was required to playback for themselves and Khursheed was lucky to have a good voice. Hence started the brilliant era of some timeless classical and exemplary numbers like “Panchhi Baawraa Chaand Se Preet Lagaaye”.

The graceful and decent actress was luckier to secure some of the best films including ‘Sitaara’, ‘Shaadi’, ‘Musafir’, ‘Pardesi’, ‘Bhagat Surdas’, ‘Dekha Jayega’, ‘Shehanshah Babar’ and ‘Tansen’. ‘Pardesi’ had a very famous soundtrack comprising of memorable numbers by the late actress. In ‘Tansen’ she played the protagonist Tani with Kundan Lal Saigal as Tansen. Together they made indelible performances and the role took her to great heights. She even transcended Saigal with her strong performances and pretty looks and her fans started calling her Tani after that. Her leading men in those days apart from Saigal were Motilal, Ishwar Lal, Nazeer and Sadiq Ali. She made a successful pair with Motilal the most. Her female contemporaries included actresses of caliber like Kanan Bala, Devika Rani, Leela Chitnis, Suraiya, Swaranlata and Noor Jehan. The last three were her juniors.

Khursheed said that there was no such thing as rivalry in those days and actresses worked in close coordination. Abusing, backbiting or gossiping was not amongst their traits. Even the male stars with whom she worked treated her with great respect and there were no scandals.

Though she was an accomplished singer, acting remained her forte and first love. “Singing was a requirement to be a heroine in those days”, she said, “and even heroines with not too good voices were forced to sing if they were to act. But the composers were so good that they managed to get the best out of them then. Each song was recorded after several rehearsals. But I was an actress first and singing was just to complement that.”

Khursheed was not too happy with the way films shaped up in the years to come. So much so that she never wanted to see films anymore. In the interview she expressed her displeasure, “In spite of the resources and much higher budget, there is not a single film maker in the entire sub continent who could make a film even half as good as the films made in my era. Ours were simple films but treated well and had strong content. Plus the hard work and honesty of each unit member reflected in the entire film. This thing is missing now. A film is not only about technique, rather the issue, sensitivity and sincere dedication too.

Following partition in 1947, Khursheed opted to move to Pakistan. She worked in two Pakistani films too – ‘Mandi’ and ‘Fankaar’. But then she decided to quit and tied the knot with a Karachi – based businessman Yousaf Bhai Mian. They had one daughter who lived in the US when the interview was conducted. She then concentrated on her marriage alone and emerged equally successful on the home front as much as she was in films. She was happy that she quit films before their standards declined .

Khursheed died on 18-4-2001 at Lahore.

Khursheed Bano sang about 170 songs in about 40 films in India. Her life and career would have been like any other actor/singer, but for the controversy of her initiation into films as ‘SHEHLA’ ( HFGK writes this name as SHAILA ) at Calcutta between 1931 and 1935. It was finally and conclusively proved by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji, that Khurshid and Shehla were different and two separate individuals.

The story of film Shahenshah Babar,

The film starts with the march of Babar’s army to India in 1526, with flashbacks of his childhood and activities as an young man. Defeating Ibrahim Khan Lodhi in the battle of Panipat, Babar becomes Emperor of India.

One of his knights Sardar Sheikh has a daughter Hameeda. She and Babar’s son Humayun fall in love and meet often. When Babar comes to know this, he takes a promise from Humayun that he will forget Hameeda. Humayun promises and leaves Hameeda. Heart broken Hameeda is taken by her father to their native place .

Humayun falls ill and is on death bed. To save his life Babar prays to God that he saves Humayun and instead give death to Babar. In addition, he himself goes and brings back Hameeda to Humayun. In few months Humayun gets well, but Babar dies.

I distinctly remember, when I was studying in 5th or 6th standard, we had a lesson “The Power of Prayer” and in this lesson Babar and Humayun’s story was told, how Babar sacrifices his life for son’s life by praying to God. The film too has the same theme. It seems this story is there in ‘Humayun-Nama’ written by Gulbadan Begum, half sister of Humayun. I have not seen this film.

Today’s song is a duet of Zohrabai and Munshi Aziz. The song is written by Pt. Indra.

(Some information has been used, with thanks, from book ‘Forgotten movies on Muslim Culture 1933-1947’, by Shri Kamlakar Pasupuleti ji.)

Song – Hamen Bhool Mat Jaiyo Raja Ji  (Shahenshah Babar) (1944) Singer – Zohrabai, Munshi Aziz, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Khemchand Prakash

Lyrics

hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

ho raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
o raja ji
souten ke lambe lambe kes
ulajh mat jaee
ulajh mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
o rani ji
jaana padey hai bides
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
purab mat jaiyo ho morey raja
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
ho raja ji
maalan ke teekhe teekhe nain
paagal na ban jaiyo
ho paagal na ban jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dil to rahega paas tumhaare
dil to rahega paas tumhaare
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
o rani ji
naadan hai kismet kahiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
dacchin mat jaiyo o morey raja
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
ho raja ji
panihaari ki matwaali chaal
machal mat jaiyo
haaye machal mat jaiyo raja ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
pyaasa rahoon par panghat na jaavun
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo o rani ji
tum hi pyaas bujhaiyo
sandesa deti rahiyo
ho sandesa deti rahiyo rani ji
hamen bhool mat jaiyo raja ji

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Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
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हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

हो राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस

राजा जी
सौतन के लंबे लंबे केस
उलझ मत जइ
उलझ मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
ओ रानी जी
जाना पड़े है बिदेस
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
पूरब मत जइयो हो मोरे राजा
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
हो राजा जी
मालन के तीखे तीखे नैन
पागल ना बन जइयो
हो पागल ना बन जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
दिल तो रहेगा पास तुम्हारे
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
ओ रानी जी
नादाँ है किस्मत कहियों
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
दछिन मत जइयो ओ मोरे राजा
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
हो राजा जी
पनिहारी की मतवाली चाल
मचल मत जइयो
हाए मचल मत जइयो राजा जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
प्यासा रहूँ पर पनघट ना जावूँ
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो ओ रानी जी
तुम ही प्यास बुझइयो
सँदेसा देती रहियो
हो सँदेसा देती रहियो रानी जी
हमें भूल मत जइयो राजा जी

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This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3909 Post No. : 14967

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Blog Ten Year Challenge (2009-2019)-Song number 25
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This is my First song post for ‘The 10 year Challenge’ series. Today, 10 years ago, on this day, 6 songs were posted. They were 1 song each for films ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954), ‘Marine Drive’ (1955), ‘Naag Devta’ (1962), ‘Bees Saal Baad’ (1962), ‘Prince’ (1969) and ‘Lootmaar’ (1980).

From the day it started, I was keen on participating, but everyday that I checked I found films either belonging to the 60s to 80s or films which were already Yippeee’d. I became helpless. Not that I can not or don’t want to write on songs of films of 70s and beyond, but they are not of my liking. Further I like to write only on songs or films, where I have something substantial to offer to our readers.

Finally, I found one film from 1st April 2009, which had some scope for me. The song is from film ‘Bahut Din Huye’. First, out of the 17 songs only 3 songs are posted on the blog and hence lot of choice to choose a song from remaining 14 songs, and secondly, the background of the film, the stars, the producer/director, the company etc were matters where I could elaborate to my will. So, I opted for this film’s song today.

The film is from the southern giant – Gemini Pictures. The film title sounds almost like a translation of ‘Once upon a time…’. It is a very apt title too, because the film is based on a folk tale of south. I like such films made in south and also their mythological films. When I see these films, the costumes of all the actors as well as their palaces etc remind me of similar pictures that used to appear in Chandamama magazines.

Chandamama (Chandoba in Marathi) magazines vied with my childhood craze of seeing films and reading books. Like many of my age group, our childhood had an important segment covered by Chandamama (in 13 Languages, including English and Sanskrit) readings. I strongly believe that  either the south film actors copied costumes from Chandamama pictures or the vice versa, but they resembled each others, for sure !

As expected, ‘Bahut Din Huye’ was a remake of Gemini’s own block buster ‘Bala Nagamma’ from 1942. Gemini Studios was the best known Madras studio in the 1940s for redefining the concept of mass entertainment with ‘Chandralekha’ (1948), the first Madras film to break successfully into the Hindi cinema circuit. SS Vasan started Gemini as a distribution agency, the Gemini Pictures Circuit, distributing and partly financing films by K Subramanyam’s Motion Picture Producers Combine. When the Combine went bankrupt, Vasan bought the studio in 1939 at public auction for a mere Rs 86,427-11 (annas)-9 (paise) (according to Randor Guy). The studio’s début feature was probably Balkrishna Narayan Rao’s ‘Madanakamarajan’ (1941), but it only took off when cameraman-scenarist K Ramnoth joined it along with his Vauhini partner, art-director AK Sekhar. This team made most of Gemini’s early features: ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943), ‘Kannamma En Kadhali’ (1945) and ‘Miss Malini’ (1947) before the ‘Chandralekha’ blitz catapulted it on to the national stage.

In the early days, the most important event in the studio was Uday Shankar’s dance extravaganza ‘Kalpana’ (released 1948) which also provided training for most of Gemini’s technicians as well as providing the model for an Orientalist dance idiom later associated with influential Tamil choreographers like Hiralal and Chopra Master. A few minor hits followed ‘Chandralekha’ before the studio’s second major onslaught on the national box office with ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’ (1949), a trilingual that established the studio’s dominance in the genre of the costumed adventure movie. Although its Hindi version ‘Nishan’ was not a major success, Vasan continued making Hindi films, often signing up major stars of Hindi films himself: e.g. the Dilip Kumar and Dev Anand film ‘Insaaniyat’ (1955), Vyjayanthimala’s ‘Raj Tilak’ (1958) and ‘Paigham (1959) starring Dilip Kumar, Raaj Kumar and Vyjayanthimala. They also made the mega-budget Tamil classic ‘Avvaiyyar’ (1953). An important later production was ‘Motor Sundaram Pillai’ (1966), Sivaji Ganesan’s only film at this studio. In 1958 the studio expanded into the Gemini Colour lab, licensed by Eastman color Kodak film. After Vasan’s death, his son SS Balasubramanyam produced the unsuccessful ‘Ellorum Nallavare’ (1975). Gemini’s productions declined in the 70s, although it remained successful as a studio and equipment rental business now taken over by the Anand Cine Services.

The unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ into all India market, Subramaniam Srinivasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He  established the popular Tamil magazine ‘Anand Vikatan’, and owned Gemini studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film. In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a  success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’ (1950). Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. ‘Mangala’ was remade in Sinhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955 and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao (later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh), and Jamuna.

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu Version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ in 1950 followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ in 1951. They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 1960s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad, Chennai and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to novels of writers like Chetan Bhagat. And thanks to modernization.

‘Bahut Din Huye’ had a cast consisting of Madhubala, Ratan Kumar, Agha, Kailash, Savitri (debut film in Hindi), Lalita Pawar, Pushpvalli (mother of Rekha), Kanhaiya Lal etc. Ratan Kumar had a big role in this film. Another film of 1954, ‘Jagriti’ also had a pivotal role for Ratan Kumar.

Ratan Kumar’s real name was Syed Nazar Ali (born 21-8-42 at Ajmer, passed away 12-12-2016 at California, USA). He started working as a child star when he was just 4 year old. His first film was Baburao Patel’s ‘Gwaalan’ (1946). He did 25 film roles before he acted in film ‘Jagriti’. He worked in many famous films like ‘Sargam’ (1950), ‘Malhaar’ (1951), ‘Afsaana’ (1951), ‘Baiju Bawra’ (1952), ‘Do Bigha Zameen’ (1953), ‘Boot Polish’ (1953) etc. After doing film ‘Jalwa’ in 1955, he migrated to Pakistan in 1956, with his family, and remade ‘Jagriti’ in Pakistan, as ‘Bedaari(1957) – Urdu translation of the Hindi word Jagriti. This film used the same old tune for a film song in Pakistan, aimed at igniting a similar emotion and patriotic zeal, among the listeners. – “Aao Bachcho Tumhe Dikhayen Jhaanki Hindustan Ki… (come children let us show you glimpses of India), is a popular Hindi film song of the 1950s. “Aao Bachcho Sair Karaayen Tumko Pakistan Ki… (children, let us take you on a tour of Pakistan) is an equally hit song of the same period in Pakistan. The movie ‘Bedaari’ (1957) was produced by his elder brother Wazir Ali Rizvi.

He played a young boy’s role in many Pakistani films later. ‘Naagin (1959) was the first Pakistani film he played a lead actor opposite Neelo as the lead actress. Ratan Kumar’s success, as a lead actor, could not last long because his later films did not do well at the box-office and he eventually faded away.

In 1977, his 4 years old daughter died in an accident in Lahore, Pakistan. He was so emotionally upset after that accident that he decided to quit the Pakistani film industry. In 1979, Ratan Kumar left Pakistan never to return again. In the late 1960s, Ratan Kumar also got into the business of selling oriental carpets and had started travelling back and forth from Pakistan to Europe for this business. Eventually he ended up settling down permanently in the United States after 1979.

Ratan Kumar was living in California, in his old age, and was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia 10 days before his death on 12 Dec 2016. He had a long history of illness, though. In 1996, his lungs had collapsed twice in the same year. When they collapsed the third time in 2000, he was left paralyzed and went into a coma for eight days. Then he recovered in four to five months and became somewhat normal again. His survivors include 2 sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren .

Music for film ‘Bahut Din Huye’ is by a pair of BS Kalla and E Sankar Sastry. Many south Indian composers had tried their hand at giving music to Hindi films in the 50s decade. MDs like Ghantasala, BS Kalla, SD Parthasarathi, E Shankar, B Laxman, Vishwanathan, R Sudarshanam, SV Venkataramana, TR Ramanathan and TG Lingappa are few of the lesser known music directors from south, who composed music for Hindi films. They gave melodious music, but somehow they did not succeed here. One reason could be their use of southern singers, for whom acceptability was a problem here for Hindi songs. Names like Ramesh Naidu, Adi Narayana Rao and the pair of Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy were at least known names here. Their films like ‘Piya Milan’ (1955, MD – Ramesh Naidu), ‘Suvarna Sundari’ (1958, MD – Adi Narayana Rao) and ‘Naya Aadmi’ (1956, MD – Vishwanathan-Ramamurthy) had many popular songs.

The film had 17 songs, 7 of these were sung by Lata Mangeshkar and the remaining were either by chorus or unnamed male/female singers. The lyrics were by Pt. Indra. Let us now hear today’s chorus song and enjoy the song and dance video.

[Thanks to Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Rajadhyaksha, HFGK, MuVyz, The Hindu, Wiki and my notes.]

Song – Swaagat Raajkumar Tumhaara, Swaagat Raajkumar  (Bahut Din Huye) (1954) Singer – Chorus, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – BS Kalla

Lyrics

aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aaaa aaaa aaaaaaa
tananan tananan tananan tann
aa aa aa aaaaa
aa aa aa aa
aa aaa aaaaa aaaaa
aaaa aaaaa

swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar
swaagat raajkumar tumhaara
swaagat raajkumar

aaaa aaaa aaaa
ye akhiyan matwaali kab se
rahi hain baat nihaar
aaaa aaaaa aaaaaa aaaa
aaaa aaaa aaaa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa
aaa
aaa aa

aao baitho ratan hindole
aaaa aaaa aaaa
ratan hindole
pawan veg se jhulo
tum pyaare mehmaan hamaare..ae..ae
aao sab kuchh bhulo
jhoola jhulo

aaaa aaaa aaaa aaaaa
mmmm mmmmm mmmm
mmmm mmmmm mmmm

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आsss आsss आssssss
तननन तननन तननन तन्न
आ आ आ आssss
आ आ आ आ
आ आss आssss आssss
आsss आssss

स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार
स्वागत राजकुमार तुम्हारा
स्वागत राजकुमार

आ आ आ
ये अखियाँ मतवाली कब से
रही हैं बाट निहार
आsss आsss आsssss आsss
आsss आsss आsss
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ
आss
आss आ

आओ बैठो रतन हिंडोले
आsss आsss आsss
रतन हिंडोले
पावन वेग से झूलो
तुम प्यारे मेहमान हमारे॰॰ए॰॰ए
आओ सब कुछ भूलो
झूला झूलो

आsss आsss आsss आsss
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम
म्ममम म्ममम म्ममम


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3881 Post No. : 14905

I wish all our readers a very Happy and cosmic MAHASHIVRATRI, to be celebrated today, i.e. 4th March 2019.

This is the one day in the entire year (barring Shravan Somvars) on which I become more religious and engage in pooja, listening to Shiv Bhajans and also do fasting. Our family was very religious. My father was a Sanskrit Scholar and had spent some time in Banares, giving religious sermons in the Kashi Vishveshar Temple during 1948-49. This was the time when he had gone underground to avoid arrest, as most Hindu Mahasabha leaders were arrested along with Savarkar, after Gandhi ji’s death. He was finally arrested and freed by the court “ba-izzat“. We came down to Hyderabad and he started practicing as a Lawyer as he was BA LLB.

Very soon we moved into our spacious bungalow, adjacent (within our compound) to which he constructed a Mahadev Mandir. It was open to public also. Every Shrawan Somvar and Mahashivaratri, there used to be big celebrations, a pooja by 101 bramhins and playing of Shiv Bhajans throughout the day. All this has been etched deep on my mind and I too became a Shiv Bhakta. Now also I do poojas on these days, but I miss all those days’ enjoyment as a growing teenager.

I have read the Shiv Puraan completely (and also other Puraans). The marriage of Shiv-Parvati has been described very minutely in this Puraan. They are believed to have married on the midnight of Mahashivratri. During the period upto early 70s, I never missed any Hindi/ Marathi/ Telugu/ Kannada Shiva film. I have also seen this film – ‘Shankar Parvati’ (1943).

‘SHANKAR PARVATI’ was quite a successful movie in those days, as it appealed to the religious minded Indians, who have grown up listening to mythological stories. I remember seeing this movie in its second run, as there was an attraction of trick scenes in this movie. The story is about how Sati (Sadhona Bose) the daughter of King Daksha, goes to attend Yagnya by Daksha, uninvited and gets insulted for her husband – Shankar (played by Arun Kumar Ahuja- father of actor Govinda). She jumps into the fire and dies and on hearing this, Shankar is very angry and does the Tandav Nritya. Sati is reborn as Parvati, who, to regain her love back, dances and wins Shankar. Their elder son Kartikeya ,destroys Tarakasur etc.

Sadhana Bose was an internationally acclaimed dancer and acted in some Hindi and several Bengali movies in the 1940s and 1950s.
Her most famous film was ‘RAJNARTAKI’ (1941), opposite Prithviraj Kapoor and it was made in Hindi, English and Bengali at the same time. Though a box office failure, it had fabulous dances by her.

There are few songs sung by Sadhana Bose in ‘Shankar Parvati’ and ‘Paigham’ (1942). According to Timir Baran, these are not sung by her, but by Suprabha Ghosh. However, famous music Historian Kamalakar Pasupuleti says that Sadhana Bose was an accomplished dancer and singer too. In her all time favourite ‘ALIBABA’ in Bengali she, as Marjina, and her director husband Madhu Bose, as Abdulla in the film, sang many duets which are popular even today in Bengal.

Arun Mukherji, Music Director of ‘Parineeta’ (1953), had literally translated one song from ‘Alibaba’ in Hindi “Aye Baandi, Tum Begum Bani….’ sung by Kishore and Asha in ‘Parineeta’ (1953).

The film was directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi. During the early era of talkie films, till the 1960s, there was a horde of Gujarati directors and producers. Bhatts, Trivedi, Thakur, Shahs, Desais, Pancholi, Doshi, Daves were some names frequently found directing various genres. Usually they specialised in certain class and type of films. The Bhatts (Shankar and Vijay) liked to do Mythological films, Ramnik Shah handled stunt, action, fantasy films, Jayant Desai was social film oriented etc.

Chaturbhuj Doshi (1894–1969) was a Hindi and Gujarati writer-director of Indian cinema. He was one of the top Gujarati screenplay writers, who helped script stories for the Punatar productions. He is stated to be one of the leading figures who launched the Gujarati film industry with work on notable films like ‘Gunsundari’ (1948) and ‘Nanand Bhojai’ (1948). He was ‘well known’ for his family socials and had become ‘a celebrity in his own right’. He made a name for himself as a journalist initially and was referred to as the ‘famous journalist’ & publicist by Baburao Patel, editor of Filmindia.

His debut film as a director was ‘Gorakh Aya’ (1938), produced by Ranjit Movietone, though he joined Ranjit in 1929, as a scriptwriter. In 1938, he directed another film for Ranjit, a social comedy, ‘The Secretary’, and both films were box-office successes for Doshi. His forte was socials, regularly adapting stories and novels for films. He worked initially on comedies like ‘Secretary’ and ‘Musafir’ (1940), but then ‘shifted to more significant films’.

Chaturbhuj Anandji Doshi was born in 1894 in Kathiawad, Gujarat, British India. He was educated at the University of Bombay, after graduation he started work as a journalist for a daily, Hindustan (1926), working for editor Indulal Yagnik. His entry into films was working as a scenarist in the silent era for directors like Jayant Desai, Nandlal Jaswantlal & Nanubhai Vakil. He joined Ranjit Movietone in 1929, and wrote stories and screenplay for several of Ranjit films.

Film ‘Gorakh Aya’ (Gorakh has come) in 1938, was the first film directed by Doshi. It was produced by Ranjit Movietone with screenplay by Gunvantrai Acharya & dialogues by PL Santoshi. The music, termed ‘good’ was composed by Gyan Dutt. ‘The Secretary’ (1938), was a “riotous comedy”, starring Madhuri, Trilok Kapoor. Charlie. The music was composed by Gyan Dutt, became a regular in most of the films directed by Doshi. Musafir in 1940 was a comedy costume drama, which had Charlie playing a prince.

‘Bhakta Surdas’, a devotional film directed by Doshi in 1942, is stated to be the “most famous” of the several versions made. It starred KL Saigal and Khursheed “the singing idol(s) of millions”, winning “unprecedented popularity” everywhere.

‘Mehemaan’ (1942) starred Madhuri, Ishwarlal, Shamim and Mubarak. Music director Bulo C. Rani had come to Bombay in 1942, and joined Ranjit Studios assisting Khemchand Prakash in music direction.

Doshi helped enormously in the development of the Gujarati cinema. During 1948-49 he directed three successful Gujarati films which “brought immense success to the industry”. The success of the Gujarati film ‘Kariyavar’ in 1948, directed by Chaturbhuj Doshi from a story by Shaida, called Vanzari Vaav, helped establish the Gujarati film industry along with other films like ‘Vadilo Ne Vanke’ (1948) by Ram Chandra Thakur and ‘Gadono Bel’ (1950) by Ratibhai Punatar. His next Gujarati film was ‘Jesal Toral’ (1948) based on folk-lore, which proved a big box-office success. In 1949, Doshi directed another Gujarati film, ‘Vevishal’, an adaptation of Meghani’s novel of the same name.

He also wrote stories, and one of his stories ‘Pati Bhakti’ was used in the Tamil film ‘En Kanawar’ (1948) produced by Ajit Pictures, which starred the Veena maestro, Sundaram Balachander, who was also the debut director and music composer for the film. In all he directed 24 Hindi films. His last Hindi film was ‘Sanskar’ (1958). He had also written few songs in film ‘Maya Bazaar’ (1932).

Chaturbhuj Doshi died on 21 January 1969 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India. Filmography

1932: Narasinh Mehta (Writer), 1934: Sitamgarh (Writer), 1938: Gorakh Aya, Secretary, 1939: Adhuri Kahani, 1940: Musafir, 1941:Pardesi, Sasural, 1942: Bhakta Surdas, Dhiraj, Mehmaan, 1943: Chhoti Maa, Shankar Parvati (Director, Writer), 1944: Bhartrahari, 1945:Murti, 1946: Phulwari, 1947: Bela, Kaun Hamara, 1948: Jesal Toral, Kariyavar (Director, Writer), Sati Sone, 1949: Bhakta Puran, Vevishal, 1950: Akhand Saubhagya, Kisi Ki Yaad, Ramtaram, 1954: Aurat Teri Yahi Kahani, 1956: Aabroo, Dashera, Dassehra, 1957: Khuda Ka Banda, Shesh Naag, 1958: Sanskar, 1960: Mehndi Rang Lagyo (Writer, Lyricist).

The cast of the film was Sadhona Bose, Arun Ahuja, Mahipal, Rewa Shankar, Narbada Shankar etc. The MD was Gyan Dutt. Today’s song is sung by Rewa Shankar Marwadi. This is only the second song of Rewa Shankar on this blog. About 3 years ago, our Sadanand Kamath ji had given a complete biography of the actress dancer Sadhona Bose, while discussing the song – “Ganga Kinaare Mohe Bagiyaa Lagaa Do Sainyya“, of this film, hence I will not repeat it.

Sadhana Bose was responsible for the names of at least 2 actresses in Bombay. Actress Sadhana Shivdasani’s mother was very much impressed with the dancing skills of Sadhana Bose. She was her fan and saw her films repeatedly. When she was carrying for Sadhana, she had decided that if she gets a girl, her name would be Sadhana only. Thus Bombay Sadhana got the Calcutta Sadhana’s name.
Secondly, actress/dancer Kumkum’s real name was Zebunnisa. When she was selected by director Shahid Lateef, for his film ‘Sheesha’ (1952), first time for debut, there was already an actress Zebunnisa existing. What’s more, this Zebunnisa was also in the same film, so Shahid was thinking for a new name for the newcomer. He remembered that his favourite Sadhana Bose had acted in a film by the name ‘Kumkum-the Dancer’ (1940), so he selected the name Kumkum for this new dancer and Kumkum got her name.
After Sadhna stopped her dance films as a heroine, she resumed her work as a choreographer. In the early 50s, she choreographed in films like ‘Bhola Shankar’ (1951), ‘Nandkishore’ (1951), ‘Shinshinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952). She used to do bit roles too in these films to earn money. It is very sad that she died in penury and neglect, but artistes in the 40s and 50s-many of them- had similar stories.

I tried very hard to get some information about today’s singer Rewa Shankar Marwadi, who was an actor, lyricist, singer and also music director  in the 1930s and 1940s. However I could not get anything concrete. Anyway I found a note on this multi talented artist of the early era, written by Shri Dhananjay Naniwadekar aka Nani, on the old RMIM forum, some 15 years ago and adapted by me for this article.

Some of Ranjit Movietone’s earliest talkie films had music by Ustad Jhande Khan. Next came the trio of Banne Khan, Ganga Prasad Pathak and Rewa Shankar Marwari. None of that music was ever released on 78 rpm records. From 1938-39, the great duo of Jnan Dutt and Khemchand Prakash took over the charge of Ranjit’s music, later to be joined by Bulo C Rani. It was only around 1938 that Ranjit started releasing its film music on 78-rpm records.

Rewa Shankar Marwari’s association with Ranjit Films and films produced or directed by ex-Ranjit hand Jayant Desai continued in the
1940s. While it is a pleasant surprise that imdb.com has a page for an obscure name like ‘Rewashankar Marwadi’ at all, it is not surprising
that his filmography has been put together for the site by people who are far from competent at that sort of thing. He acted in 27 films, till 1955, sang 12 songs in 9 films and gave music to 21 films from ‘Veer Babruwahan’ (1934) to ‘Matrubhoomi’ (1949).

Rewa Shankar sang a beautiful classical composition ‘Jai Jai Shankar’ in the film ‘Shankar Parvati’ for composer Jnan Dutt. It is available with only few collectors, and is a rare instance of film music using Raag Shree.

Song – Jai Jai Shankar Gangadhar Shiv Sukhkaari  (Shankar Parvati) (1943) Singer – Rewa Shankar, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Gyan Dutt

Lyrics

jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari

jai indu bhaal ur vyaal maal hitkari
jai indu bhaal ur vyaal maal hitkari
jai ashutosh har dosh rog tripurari
jai ashutosh har dosh rog tripurari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai ajar amar anandroop bhayahaari
jai jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar
jai shankar gangadhar shiv sukhkaari
jai jai

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-

जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी

जय इन्दु भाल उर व्याल माल हितकारी
जय इन्दु भाल उर व्याल माल हितकारी
जय आशुतोष हर दोष रोग त्रिपुरारी
जय आशुतोष हर दोष रोग त्रिपुरारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय अजर अमर आनन्दरूप भयहारी
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय शंकर गंगाधर
जय जय शंकर गंगाधर शिव सुखकारी
जय जय


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in other sites without the knowledge and consent of the web administrator of atulsongaday.me, then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3800 Post No. : 14792

Today’s song is from film ‘Mangala’ (1950). This was a film made by Gemini Films of Madras and directed by its boss SS Vasan. The music was given by a team of Balkrishna Kalla, MD Parthasarathy and E Sankar Sastry. The cast of this film was P Bhanumathi, Ranjan, Agha, David, Badri Pershad, BS Kalla etc.

The film was a remake of the hit Tamil film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’ (1943). After the unprecedented foray of Gemini’s Vasan’s hit film ‘Chandralekha’ (1948) into the All India market, Subramaniam Srini Vasan or simply SS Vasan, became aware of the unlimited scope of the Hindi belt market for south-made Hindi films. Vasan was a writer, editor, producer and director, but above all, he was a business tycoon. He had established the popular Tamil magazine “Anand Vikatan”, and owned Gemini Studios, Gemini Laboratories and Gemini distribution circuits.

He soon decided to take advantage of the success of ‘Chandralekha’ and made another tri-lingual film . In Tamil it was called ‘Apoorva Sahodarargal’, in Telugu, it was ‘Apoorva Sahodaralu’, and in Hindi it was called ‘Nishan’ (1949). This film too was a great success. Encouraged by this, SS Vasan made his 1943 Tamil Hit film ‘Mangamma Sapatham’, into a remake in Hindi with the name ‘Mangala’.

Not by coincidence, but by design, the hero for all these 3 remakes and the originals was Ranjan. (This film was remade in Simhalese as ‘Mathalan’ in 1955, and in Telugu as ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ in 1965, featuring NT Ramarao, later the Chief Minister of erstwhile Andhra Pradesh, and Jamuna).

Enthused and inspired with Vasan’s success in the Hindi belt, another giant from the South came forward. AVM’s Tamil film ‘Vazhkai’ (1949) was a big hit in south. AVM made a Telugu version of it with the name ‘Jeevitham’ (1950) followed by a Hindi version ‘Bahaar’ (1951). They introduced Vyjayantimala with this film, in Hindi. The story of the film and the Music by SD Burman made film a big hit in Hindi too. AVM then made Hindi film ‘Ladki’ (1953), with a Tamil and Telugu version. This too became a hit film. However by that time the South market had grown manifolds and there was no need for the south film makers to venture into the Hindi belt to earn money. Thus, there was a slow down in this type of activity. The south now started making Hindi films directly in Madras by calling actors from Bombay. And some films were dubbed too.

Actually, the southern film activity, though as old as Hindi talkie films, is strictly limited to four southern states. It was only the adventurous SS Vasan who ventured into the bastion of Hindi film markets, by promoting his film ‘Chandralekha’. In fact this had encouraged other producers like AVM, Prasad, Vijaya etc. to tap the Hindi belt. While making a multilingual film, the south producers always called the Hindi artistes, be it actors, directors ,composers or singers to come to Madras, but they never went to Bombay. It was only through dubbed or remade films that south actors, composers or actors were exposed to the Hindi arena. Those days anyone from south was a ‘madrasi‘ and likewise anyone from other than south was a North Indian or a Punjabi ! No one from the North bothered to distinguish between Tamil, Telugu, Kannada or Malayalam – films or people. Everything was ‘madrasi‘.

The divide between the north and the south went on widening, which finally resulted in the anti-Hindi agitations of the 60s and 70s in Madras and other southern places. Fortunately, in recent times and with the new generation, thanks to the coalition politics at the centre and states as well as IT centres at Hyderabad and Bangalore, the North-South exchange is much better and each state is identified individually. Thanks also to writers like Chetan Bhagat’s novels. Thanks to Modernization.

In the early times of the film industry, very few educated people used to join here. That is why graduates or postgraduates used to flaunt their degrees with pride – like Moti, BA – the lyricist (though he was actually MA), or Kavi Pradeep’s pseudo name – Miss Kamal BA or even singer Surendra as BA, LLB etc.

A highly qualified person and that too in an unrelated subject joining films was a wonder then. Thus, a young man with an unlikely name for a hero, like RAMNARAYAN VENKATRAMAN SARMA alias actor RANJAN was a novelty. Ranjan was born in Madras on 2-3-1918 in an orthodox Brahmin family. He did his BA with Physics and then completed M Litt in Carnatak music and dance, and became a Research Fellow for Ph.D. He also became the managing editor of ‘NATYAM‘ a magazine for dance, drama and music. In total contrast to his expertise in fine arts, he learnt fencing (sword fighting) after he saw it in the Olympic Games.

He was spotted by a Tamil producer and he made his debut in the film ‘Ashok Kumar’ (1941). After a few films in Tamil and Telugu he got the role of Shashank in the magnum opus film ‘Chandralekha’ in 1948. The drum dance and his fencing were the two main attractions in the film. The final sword fighting is considered the longest ever fencing fight in films till today ! The film was a hit and Ranjan became type cast in action films. Ranjan was a very poor actor, but his fencing skills were marvelous.

In 1949 came ‘Nishaan’, based on the Hollywood film ‘The Corsican Brothers’ – one good and one bad. It was a story of twins. The audience liked a scene from the film which showed that there were marks on one brother’s back if the other one was whipped ! The film, in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu, was a hit everywhere mainly for its fencing scenes. In ‘Mangala’ opposite Bhanumati, he was the villain and the hero too.

He was invited by New York University for a research fellowship, but Vasan did not leave him, so after ‘Mangala’, as soon as the contract was over, Ranjan came to Bombay.

‘Shin Shinaki Boobla Boo’ (1952) saw him with Rehana but as a romantic hero, he was worse than Bharat Bhushan or Pradeep Kumar ! He acted in ‘Sindbad The Sailor’ (1952),  ‘Nishan Danka’ (1952), ‘Kafila’ (1952), ‘Baaghi’ (1953), ‘Shahenshah’ (1953), ‘Baap Beti’ (1954), ‘Baghdad’ (1961), and a host of B and C grade films, many of them dubbed or remakes of southern films. He was known for only fencing. But he never became famous like Stewart Granger in ‘Scaramouche’ for his fencing. In the 1950s he acted in 23 films, in 1960s he did 18 films and in 1970s his tally was 17 films. A total of 58 films in Hindi.

After sword fighting became obsolete he shifted to writing. The story of film ‘Munim ji’ (1955) was written by him. After few years in south he was seen again in ‘Chor Chor’ (1974) and ‘Chaitali’ (1976). ‘Ram Balram’ (1980) was his last film.

He married a Muslim girl and she converted to Hinduism taking the name of Laxmi. Ranjan wrote 12 books on dancing and music. He shifted to USA to live with his son in New Jersey. He passed away 12-9-1983, due to a heart attack. He was so much forgotten that even the news of his death was not published in India.

The composers of ‘Mangala’ was a team of D Parthsarthi, Balkrishna Kalla and E Shanker. This team also gave music to few other films like ‘Sansaar’ (1951), ‘Mr Sampat’ (1952), ‘Bahut Din Huye’ (1954). Balkrishna Kalla with Mohd Shafi gave music to ‘Krishna Kanhaiya’ (1952). Independently he gave music to only one film – ‘Do Dulhe’ (1954). The southern composers gave music only to dubbed films or remakes.

In the original version of ‘Mangala’, which was ‘Mangamma Shapatham’ (1943), the heroine was Vasundhara Devi – mother of Vaijayantimala. In Hindi film ‘Mangala’, the heroine was P Bhanumathi, but the hero was same – Ranjan. There were some Hindi actors like Agha, David and Badriprasad. The composer of today’s song, Balkrishna Kalla also did a small role in this film. When Shamshad Begum sang songs for ‘Chandralekha’, her songs were recorded in Bombay, but for ‘Mangala’, Shamshad went to Madras first time and sang 9 songs out of its 15 songs. In this film the songs and dances of Carmen Miranda were freely copied in the Tamil, Telugu and Hindi versions.

The late 1940’s was marked in Bollywood with the remake of several super hit movies from south, especially from Tamil. The 1950 hit ‘Mangala’, produced by Gemini Pictures, was one such movie which was originally made in Tamil. SS Vasan was the director of the Hindi version. The newspaper, The Hindu, in its issue of 3-2-2013 has said this, about film ‘Mangala’,

Bhanumathi Ramakrishna was so bowled over by the performance of Vasundhara Devi (mother of yesteryear heroine Vyjayanthimala Bali) in Gemini’s blockbuster 1943 Tamil hit, Mangamma Sabadham , that she wished, if at all the film were to be remade in Telugu, she would act in it. In fact, the Tamil movie was released by Gemini supremo S.S. Vasan at a few centres in Andhra also and was well received there too. A few years later, Vasan decided to remake the movie in Telugu and Hindi under the title Mangala . Impressed by Bhanumathi’s performance in the Tamil film, Rajamukthi , he decided to sign her and approached her husband, Ramakrishna Rao. It was an opportunity she was waiting for and Bhanumathi immediately accepted the offer. She was paid a remuneration of Rs. 1 lakh for both the versions. Ranjan, who did the hero’s role in Mangamma Sabadham , was retained to play the lead role in both Telugu and Hindi versions. Popular editor of the time, Chandru (who had done commendable work as editor for Gemini’s earlier trilingual, Apoorva Sahodarulu) was entrusted with the job of directing the Telugu movie.

Based on a popular folklore, an engrossing narrative was weaved by Gemini’s story department. Mangala (Bhanumathi), the charming daughter of a rich farmer, is very haughty by temperament. When Prince Sugunapal (Ranjan) fails to win her love, he throws a challenge that he would marry her and then imprison her for life, denying her the marital bliss. She counter-challenges him that she would bear a child from him and make the child whip him in his court.

The prince marries her and puts her in a lonely palace. She makes her father (Doraiswamy) dig a tunnel from the palace to her village, sneaks through it to her house and learns dance. Disguised as a gypsy, she entices the Prince, secretly gives birth to a child, and when he grows up (Ranjan – dual role) gets her vow fulfilled through him. Realisation dawns on the Prince and the tale ends on a happy note.

All through it is Mangala’s show and Bhanumathi essayed it brilliantly. If Vasundhara Devi was admired for her nice dances in the Tamil version, Bhanumathi scored through her acting prowess. Ranjan made his presence felt in dual role.

The songs and dance sequences were all hits of that time. Music was composed by Partha Sarathi, Kalla and E Sankar Sastri. Two songs from this film were inspired by the famous Brazilian dancer Carmen Miranda’s classics. The song “Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma Mummy” was based on Carmen Miranda’s “Mama Yo Quiero” and “Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se” (today’s song) in which Bhanumathi is dressed like Carmen, was based on “I Yi Yi Yi Yi — I Like You Very Much”  from the film “That Night in Rio ” (1941), sung by Carmen Miranda herself.

Enjoy the dance and song video….

 


Song – Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Ayyi Mari Main To Laaj Se  (Mangala) (1950) Singer – P Bhanumati, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – MD Parthasarthy, BK Kalla, E Shankar Shastri

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa
ch ch ch ch..ch

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na ra naa naa. . .
ta na na na na naa. . .
ta na na na na naa
ta na na na na naa

taa na na naa raa nanna
naa raa nanna
naa raa nannaa
ta na na na na naa. . .
ch ch ch ch..ch

taa na na naa raa nanna
taa na na naa raa nanna
taa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na na na naa. . .
taa naa naa naa. . .

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
sainyyaan dekhe mohey pyaar se
aayi aayi raja torey paas re
piya se milan ki aas re
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

kaun jaane kaisa jaadu daal ke
chheen liya dil mora haaye
khili khili khili rahe chaandni
chanda sa ye much muskaaye
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . .
suno suno pyaare morey saajna
baaje morey dil ka sitar
gori gori chhori main to baalma
puchho reejho reejho hai kyon nikhar
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .

meri chaal nihaar
kaisi thummakdaar
meri kamar nihaar
kaisi lachakdaar
mere nain nihaar
jaise tez kataar
meri nath nihaar
kaisi hai chammakdaar
ye bahaar
ye nikhaar
tum shikaar
main shikaar
phadak phadak
thadak thadak

ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
haaye ri main to laajon mari
hanh hanh
ayyi ayyi ayyi ayyi mari main to laaj se
saayyaa ji jee
du du de de dor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
piya se milan ki aas re
chhoti si raat
chhoti si baat
dil ki pukaar
sumba limbaa. . . aa. . .

suno suno pyaare morey saajna
cha cha chu chu chu chu chaye chechor
ka ka ki ki ku ku ke ke kaye kekor
ta tta ta ti tu tu tuteyi tetor
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yaa. . .
ahaa haa haa haa. . .
ayyi ayyi ayyi yayyi yayyi yaa. . .

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na na naa raa nanna
taa naa naanaa

ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa. . .
ta ra ra na na naa naa. . .
ta na na naa raa naa
ta na na naa raa naa

ta na na naa raa nanna naa raa nanna naa raa nanna
taa naa naa naa raa. . .
ta na na naa raa nanna
ta na naa raa nanna
ta na na na naa. . .
ta. . na. . na. . naa. . .

———————————————————-
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————-


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3632 Post No. : 14460

Mohammed Rafi – Duets – ‘अ’  से  ‘ह’ तक  (From ‘अ’ to ‘ह’) – 18
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

‘द’ – दिल्ली वाले साब गजब कर डाला रे ॰ ॰ ॰

– – – –

खुदा भी आसमान से जब ज़मीं पर देखता होगा॰ ॰ ॰

तेरी आवाज़ को किसने बनाया, सोचता होगा॰ ॰ ॰

The voice, that defined a new benchmark for divinity; no wonder if God Himself would be wondering, how such a human voice got created. . .

– – – –

Presenting the next song in this series.

This one turns out to be a fun exchange between a lady and a gentleman, who most likely are a husband-wife pair. From the lyrics, one can surmise that the gentleman works with the police force and has recently been promoted to be a ‘thaanedar’, or in other words – the inspector who heads a police station. In today’s parlance, this would be equivalent of an SHO – Station House Officer.

So the lady is expressing wonder at the action of some higher up officer – ‘Dilli Waale Saahb’ to make her husband an inspector. She seems not being able to believe it – ‘gajab kar daala re’. And then the rest of the song follows, with some fun lyrics as the two exchange some humorous comments. Listen to the lyrics, and the enjoy the fun.

The song is from the film ‘Bhikhaari’ from 1949. Now a very interesting thing noted in Geet Kosh. This film seems to be the same as the 1948 film ‘Satyanarayan’. As we review the information about these two films, all the demographics, as in production banner, director, music director, lyricists and actors, all are exactly the same. And further, the list of songs is almost identical. The nine songs are listed with exactly the same mukhda. The film ‘Satyanarayan’ has one extra item, as in instrumental music recording. Interesting thing is that the serial nos. of the gramophone records are different. This indicates that the songs were released twice on two different sets of gramophone records, under the respective names of two films.

The film is produced under the banner of Bhagwan Pictures, Bombay. Two names are listed as directors – Kumar Sahu and R Vishnuram. The nine songs are penned by four lyricists – Pt Indra, Madhukar (a name that is likely the same as Madhukar Rajasthani), Sewak and Surjeet (again, a name that is likely the same as Surjeet Sethi). Music is composed by Hansraj Behl. List of actors includes Ranjeet Kumari, Roop Kumari, Jawahar Kaul, Balakram, Sewak, B Gill, SP Mahindra, Chanchal Kumari, Leela Gupte, and Laxmi Chand.

The singing voices are of Mohammed Rafi Sb and Binapani Mukherji. Enjoy this fun song – another addition to the list of memorable duets of Rafi Sb.

 

Song – Dilli Waale Saahb Ghajab Kar Daala Re  (Bhikhaari) (1949) Singer – Binapani Mukherji, Mohammed Rafi, Lyrics – Pt Indra, MD – Hansraj Behl

Lyrics

dilli waale saa..aab
dilli waale saab
gajab kar daala re
dilli waale saab
dilli waale saab
meri chhoti si pistol
gajab kar daala kya
chhoti si pistol
chhoti si pistol
mere piya ko thaanedar bana diya matwaala
dilli waale
mere piya ko
thaanedar bana diya matwaala
dilli waale
oy dilli waale saab
gajab kar daala re
dilli waale saab

sun sun baat gawaar naar
tu thi gwaale ki chhori
sun sun baat gawaar naar
tu thi gwaale ki chhori
maine hi bana diya tujhko
thaanedar ki gori
maine hi bana diya tujhko
thaanedar ki gori
kaam karey na. . .
balam keesi ka howe thaanedar
ho oo thaanedar
ho oo thaanedar
kaam karey na. . .
balam keesi ka howe thaanedar
aath pehar jo sajag bharey
aur raakhe haath kataar
aath pehar jo sajag bharey
aur raakhe haath kataar
kab piye wo jal ka pyaala
julm kar daala
sitam kar daala hoye
dilli waale
oy dilli waale saab
gajab kar daala re
dilli waale saab
dilli waale saab

thaanedar ki biwi hona badey bhaag ki baat
thaanedar ki biwi hona badey bhaag ki baat
sau sau karey salaam padosan
tujhko din aur raat
sau sau karey salaam padosan
tujhko din aur raat
ye saawan ka. . .
ye saawan ka mast mahina
ye rim jhim barsaat
ho oo barsaat
ho oo barsaat
ye saawan ka mast mahina
ye rim jhim barsaat
kisey chaahiye paas padosan
jab ho baalam saath
kisey chaahiye paas padosan
jab ho baalam saath
jab pyaar ne hosh sambhaala
julm kar daala
sitam kar daala hoye
dilli waale
oy dilli waale saab
gajab kar daala re
dilli waale saab
dilli waale saab

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————

दिल्ली वाले सा॰॰आब
दिल्ली वाले साब
गजब कर डाला रे
दिल्ली वाले साब
दिल्ली वाले साब
मेरी छोटी सी पिस्तौल
गजब कर डाला क्या
छोटी सी पिस्तौल
छोटी सी पिस्तौल
मेरे पिया को थानेदार बना दिया मतवाला
दिल्ली वाले
मेरे पिया को
थानेदार बना दिया मतवाला
दिल्ली वाले
ओय दिल्ली वाले साब
गजब कर डाला रे
दिल्ली वाले साब

सुन सुन बात गवार नार
तू थी ग्वाले की छोरी
सुन सुन बात गवार नार
तू थी ग्वाले की छोरी
मैंने ही बना दिया तुझको
थानेदार की गोरी
मैंने ही बना दिया तुझको
थानेदार की गोरी
काम करे ना॰॰॰
बलम कीसी का होवे थानेदार
हो ओ थानेदार
हो ओ थानेदार
काम करे ना॰॰॰
बलम कीसी का होवे थानेदार
आठ पहर जो सजग भरे
और राखे हाथ कटार
आठ पहर जो सजग भरे
और राखे हाथ कटार
कब पिये वो जल का प्याला
जुल्म कर डाला
सितम कर डाला होए
दिल्ली वाले
ओय दिल्ली वाले साब
गजब कर डाला रे
दिल्ली वाले साब
दिल्ली वाले साब

थानेदार की बीवी होना बड़े भाग की बात
थानेदार की बीवी होना बड़े भाग की बात
सौ सौ करे सलाम पड़ोसन
तुझको दिन और रात
सौ सौ करे सलाम पड़ोसन
तुझको दिन और रात
ये सावन का मस्त महिना
ये रिम झिम बरसात
हो ओ बरसात
हो ओ बरसात
ये सावन का मस्त महिना
ये रिम झिम बरसात
किसे चाहिये पास पड़ोसन
जब हो बालम साथ
किसे चाहिये पास पड़ोसन
जब हो बालम साथ
जब प्यार ने होश संभाला
जुल्म कर डाला
सितम कर डाला होए
दिल्ली वाले
ओय दिल्ली वाले साब
गजब कर डाला रे
दिल्ली वाले साब
दिल्ली वाले साब


This article is written by Arunkumar Deshmukh, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Blog Day : 3604 Post No. : 14382

Today’s song is from an obscure film from 1941 – ‘Amrit’. The film was produced by Navyug Chitrapat Ltd. It was directed by Master Vinayak. The music was by Dada Chandekar, who was a regular with Master Vinayak, for his Hindi and Marathi films. The cast of the film was Meenakshi Shirodkar, Vinayak, Master Vithal, Lalita Pawar, Baburao Pendharkar, Dada Salvi, Damuanna Malvankar, Vishnupant Jog etc. The cameraman was Pandurang Naik, one of the owners of Navyug, along with Baburao, PK Atre and Vinayak, of course.

Hindi film industry of Bombay was dominated by Gujarati and Marathi people. It was natural, considering that Bombay was located in Maharashtra and close to Gujarat. The Gujarati people had money, so they became producers, financiers, owners and distributors, never interfering with the making of films, but controlled the monetary part. Marathi people had talents in various categories like acting, music, direction, publicity etc. As the industry grew and got talents from every part of India, in due course the number of Marathi people diminished in the industry. During this period, the Marathi film industry was also very strong and the Marathi crowd of Hindi films shifted to Marathi industry.

Till independence, this situation was in place. The Marathi film makers like Master Vinayak, V Shantaram, Bhalji Pendharkar etc made films simultaneously in Marathi and Hindi, from the earliest time of the film making in India. This trend, however, almost stopped completely, after the polarisation in 1947, except for few bilingual films made later, like ‘Chhatrapati Shivaji’ in 1952 and ‘Mahatma’ in 1953 which came in Marathi and Hindi. ‘Mahatma’ was even made in English.

Master Vinayak Karnataki (19-1-1906 to 19-8-1947) was born in Kolhapur. Many of his cousins and family members were already in film line. His half brothers Bhal ji and Baburao Pendharkar, maternal cousin V Shantaram and his brother V Avadhoot (cinematographer) were in films. His own brother Vasudev also became a cameraman. Master Vinayak was working as a teacher in a school, but Bhalji convinced him to join films. Initially Vinayak was with Prabhat, working under Shantaram and learning many things. He started his own company, Hans Pictures, in partnership with Baburao Pendharkar and cameraman Pandurang Naik. Their first film was ‘Chhaaya’ (1936). Almost all films made by Master Vinayak till 1947 were bilingual in Marathi and Hindi, sometimes with different titles, like ‘Ardhaangi’ in Marathi became ‘Ghar Ki Rani’ (1940) in Hindi etc.

While Shantaram stressed on technical aspects of film making successfully, Vinayak was keen on strong story. Therefore he used the works of top class writers in Marathi like VS Khandekar, PK Atre, Mama Varerkar etc. [Auth Note: VS Khandekar later won the Sahitya Academi Award, the Jnanapeeth award, Padma Bhushan award and many more honours like D Litt etc. The Government issued a postage stamp in his honour, after his death.] ‘Chhaaya’ won many awards and was commercially successful. Next came ‘Dharamveer’ (1937) and ‘Premveer’ (also 1937). The heroine in ‘Premveer’ was Ashalata – wife of music director Anil Biswas). Then came ‘Jwaala’ in 1938, with Chandramohan in both versions – Marathi and Hindi. He learnt to speak excellent Marathi for this film. Later he did three more Marathi films. Unfortunately, ‘Jwaala’ was a resounding flop – not because of any reason other than Master Vinayak meddling with the story too much, according to VS Khandekar (this appears to be a chronic ailment of film line !).

Master Vinayak fell back on comedy and made ‘Brahmachari’ in 1938 and ‘Brandi Ki Botal’ in 1939. Both were successful, but the loss due to ‘Jwaala’ was too big. Even one more comedy – ‘Ghar Ki Rani’ (1940) could not salvage the damage. Hans Pictures was dissolved to form another company Navyug Chitrapat, with PK Atre as a partner. Navyug was the first film company to offer 100 rs. shares directly to public. (Bombay Talkies had shares with only the directors, initially). The first film was ‘Lapandav’ (1940). Though it was successful, PK Atre left the company along with its heroine Vanmala – his consort, and established his own company Atre Pictures.

After another comedy, Navyug made ‘Amrit’ in 1941. In 1942, Navyug made the film ‘Pahili Mangalagaur’, in which Lata Mangeshkar made her debut as an actress and singer. She sang her first ever film song with Snehprabha Pradhan, under the baton of Dada Chandekar. There was a kissing scene of Snehprabha and Shahu Modak in this film. During the making of this film, Master Vinayak left Navyug and started his own company Prafull Pictures. He made several Hindi and Marathi films including ‘Badi Maa’ (1945). He died on 19-8-1947, just 4 days after Independence.

The music director of ‘Amrit’ was Dada Chandekar, a regular of Master Vinayak. His real name was Shankar Vishnu Chandekar. He was born on 19-3-1897 at Kolhapur. His father used to do ‘keertan‘ in temples. His younger brother Narhari used to call him as Dada (Bade Bhaiya – elder brother), and subsequently everyone started to call him Dada only. Later his real name was not known to anyone. He was an excellent harmonium player.

He joined Kirloskar Drama Company, where he used to do female roles, as per system in those days. Once Deenanath Mangeshkar’s Harmonium player was absent. Dada was called and then he worked in Deenanath’s Balwant Natak Mandali  for next 20 years. Later he joined Dhamman Khan, MD as his assistant. In 1935 he gave some songs in film ‘Kaliya Mardan’, when Dhamman Khan left midway.

In 1937 Dada Chandekar joined Hans Pictures. He composed the background music for ‘Jwaala’. Pleased by his work, Master Vinayak gave him his first independent film- ‘Bramhachari’ in 1938. All the songs became hits and were popular. Particularly the song by Meenakshi, “Yamuna Bich Khelun Khel, Kanhaiya”. The song was performed on screen by Meenakshi wearing a swimming costume, a very revolutionary idea in that era. The song became popular all over India. People repeatedly saw the film for this song and Meenakshi in swimming dress ! However, Master Vinayak did not get any money from this film, as he had to sell the film, while still in production, at a mesum- mainly because of the new heroine. Actually, it was successful due to her only.

Dada continued with Master Vinayak till 1947. Then he left Hindi films. Till 1964, he gave music to dramas and Marathi films. He also worked in All India Radio, Poona for some time. He died on 27-1-1976. In all, he gave music to 13 Hindi and 25 Marathi films. some of his Hindi films are, ‘Bramhachari’, ‘Brandy Ki Botal’, ‘Jwaala’, ‘Ghar Ki Rani’, ‘Amrit’, ‘Ladaai Ke Baad’, ‘Din Raat’, ‘Main Tera Hoon’, ‘Moti’ and ‘Phool Aur Kaante’.

One of the actors in the film was Damuanna Malvankar (1893 to 1975); incidentally the film shooting was done in his home town Malwan only. He was one of the most famous and popular comedian in Marathi films. He used his natural squint in his comedy. He did about 100 films in all, which also include Hindi films like ‘Andheri Duniya’, ‘Bramhachari’, ‘Brandy Ki Botal’, ‘Sangam’, ‘Ghar Ki Rani’, ‘Mera Haq’, ‘Mera Ladka’, ‘Badi Maa’, ‘Jeevan Yatra’, ‘Subhadra’, ‘Main Tera Hoon’etc. His daughter Bharati (Marathi film actress) is the wife of Lata’s brother Hridaynath Mangeshkar. Baburao Patel of Film India was a great fan of Damuanna Malvankar and wrote very lovingly about him in his magazine.

Then there was actor Vishnupant Jog, who paired with Damuanna in 29 comedy films.

I have not seen this film. Here is the film synopsis from ‘Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema’,

A complicated plot about class differences in a coastal Konkan village. It introduced a typical Khandekar character, the idealistic but dogmatic patriarch who becomes a victim of his own beliefs.

Here it is Bappa (Salvi), who monopolises the village palm trees from which toddy is made. He believes in fairness, not mercy. The story of his urban son Vilas (Master Vithal), his daughter Lata (Meenakshi) and her friend Sadanand (Master Vinayak) is interspersed with that of a drunken shoemaker Krishna (Baburao Pendharkar) and his wife Seeta (Lalita Pawar). Vilas, who covets the shoemaker’s wife Seeta, procures a new hut for them. He then starts having problems with his father and all the parallel stories converge when Vilas accidentally kills Seeta’s daughter.

Bappa, using his political influence, gets her innocent husband arrested instead and Seeta exploiting Vilas’s desire for her, retaliates by making him virtually her slave. Bappa eventually faces up to his moral responsibility in a tale that also warns against the Demon Drink.

The song being presented today, is sung by Meenakshi Shirodkar, Vishnupant Jog and chorus. This is an old style song. The film makes its debut on the blog.

[Author’s Note: Acknowledgements and thanks – The above write up refers to and has adapted material from Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema, Marathi Chitrapat Sangeetkar Kosh, Listener’s Bulletin, IMDB, MuVyz, HFGK, Wikipedia, and my own notes.]


Song – Jaago Jawaano, Jaago Jawaano, Navyug Aaya Re (Amrit) (1941) Singer – Vishnupant Jog, Meenakshi Shirodkar, Lyrics – Pt Indra, Music – Dada Chandekar
Chorus

Lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)

jaago. . .
jaago. . .
jaago jawaano
jaago jawaano
navyug aaya re
navyug aaya re
ey hey. . .

aaya re
aaya re
aaya re
jaago jawaano
jaago jawaano
navyug aaya re
navyug aaya re
ey hey. . .

nav jeevan laaya re
nav jeevan laaya re
laaya re
laaya re
laaya re
jaago jawaano
jaago jawaano
navyug aaya re
navyug aaya re

na koi nanga
na koi bhookha
na koi ooncha neecha
ik paani se
ik khaad se
sab booton ko seencha
amrit baagh lagaaya re
amrit baagh lagaaya re
jaago jawaano
jaago jawaano
navyug aaya re
navyug aaya re

teri daulat hai tu
teri taaqat hai tu
teri himmat hai tu
teri kismat hai tu
tere haathon mein honi jhoome
haan tere haathon mein honi jhoome
tere paanv ko manzil choome
tere paanv ko manzil choome
teri aankhon mein hardam savera
teri aankhon mein hardam savera
savera
savera
savera
savera
savera
savera
tu to suraj se chamki kaaya re
tu to suraj se chamki kaaya

jaago jawaano
jaago jawaano
navyug aaya re
navyug aaya re

———————————————————
Hindi script lyrics (Provided by Sudhir)
———————————————————
जागो॰ ॰ ॰
जागो॰ ॰ ॰
जागो जवानो
जागो जवानो
नवयुग आया रे
नवयुग आया रे
ए हे॰ ॰ ॰

आया रे
आया रे
आया रे
जागो जवानो
जागो जवानो
नवयुग आया रे
नवयुग आया रे
ए हे॰ ॰ ॰

नव जीवन लाया रे
नव जीवन लाया रे
लाया रे
लाया रे
लाया रे
जागो जवानो
जागो जवानो
नवयुग आया रे
नवयुग आया रे

ना कोई नंगा
ना कोई भूखा
ना कोई ऊंचा नीचा
इक पानी से
इक खाद से
सब बूटों को सींचा
अमृत बाग लगाया रे
अमृत बाग लगाया रे
जागो जवानो
जागो जवानो
नवयुग आया रे
नवयुग आया रे

तेरी दौलत है तू
तेरी ताक़त है तू
तेरी हिम्मत है तू
तेरी किस्मत है तू
तेरे हाथों में होनी झूमे
हाँ तेरे हाथों में होनी झूमे
तेरे पाँव को मंज़िल चूमे
तेरे पाँव को मंज़िल चूमे
तेरी आँखों में हरदम सवेरा
तेरी आँखों में हरदम सवेरा
सवेरा
सवेरा
सवेरा
सवेरा
सवेरा
सवेरा
तू तो सूरज से चमकी काया रे
तू तो सूरज से चमकी काया रे

जागो जवानो
जागो जवानो
नवयुग आया रे
नवयुग आया रे


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Today is a special day for Atulites and each one of us on our Whatsapp Group knows that it is Blog’s 9th anniversary. The Blog’s anniversary is the mother of all other celebrations connected with it. Otherwise how would it be possible to celebrate century songs, artists’ centuries, artists’ birth anniversaries, the remembrance days, other special occasions etc without the existence of the Blog?
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Who was the first female music director in Hindi film Industry? The answer to this question has changed thrice during the last few years.

It was believed that Saraswati Devi (real name: Khorshed Minocher-Homji) was the first female music director who composed songs for ‘Jawaani Ki Hawa’ (1935), produced under the banner of Bombay Talkies. Subsequently, it was established that Jaddanbai, who composed the songs for ‘Talaash-e-Haq’ (1935) was the first female music director, her film having been released earlier than ‘Jawaani Ki Hawa’. It will be interesting to know as to which of the songs from these two films were recorded first on the respective film’s sound track.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sudhir, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a regular contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

= = = = = = = = = = =
The Voice of Mukesh #69
– – – – – – – – – – – – – –

The film industry has seen many stars, who, by logical analysis, should not have been. Let me mention the names of four male singers, who have become legends now – Saigal Sb, Rafi Sb, Mukesh, and Kishore Kumar. Besides all four of them being singers who have rendered songs that have become timeless in their essence and popularity, there is one more common thread that runs through their lives. None of these four had any recognized formal training in classical music. And yet, their voice, their renditions, the emotional alchemy contained therein – has an element of something that can only be attributed to providence.
Read more on this topic…


This article is written by Sadanand Kamath, a fellow enthusiast of Hindi movie music and a contributor to this blog. This article is meant to be posted in atulsongaday.me. If this article appears in sites like lyricstrans.com and ibollywoodsongs.com etc then it is piracy of the copyright content of atulsongaday.me and is a punishable offence under the existing laws.

Meena Kumari’s life was other people’s destination. For own self, it was a road leading nowhere….no point of arrival.

These words of Meena Kumari, ​ quoted in the book ‘Meena Kumari the Poet – A Life Beyond Cinema’ (2014),  sum up her short life, so well.

Today is the 43rd death anniversary of Mahajabeen Bano, better known as Meena Kumari (August 1, 1932 – March 31, 1972).  Although she had done roles in diverse genres, she was known as the ‘tragedy queen’ of Hindi films. Her personal life was no less a tragedy than the roles she had played in most of her films.  It is said that as a new born child, she was abadoned and put in an orphanage, albiet for few hours, as her parent could not afford to take care of her due to their poor financial condition. A change of mind of her parents brought her back to their residence. But the very thought of she being an ‘unwanted’ child must have lingered in Meena Kumari’s mind later on.  Most of her childhood was  spent in the film studios as she became the earning member of the family by working in the films as child actor.  Her youth was spent in depicting onscreen, the sufferings, sorrows and tragedies that are associated with most womenfolk in India.  After the marriage, her husband saw in her more an actress for his films than a wife.  With this background, one does not need a psychologist to analyse as to why she excelled in her tragic roles. One of her tragedy roles that most often lingers in my mind is  that of Chhoti Bahu in ‘Sahib Bibi Aur Ghulam’ (1962) which, in a way, was a reminiscence of her own life.
Read more on this topic…


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This blog discusses Bollywood songs of yesteryears. Every song has a brief description, followed by a video link, and complete lyrics of the song.

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